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☛ When barrel racing turns into a lawsuit 10-16-17

Posted by on Oct 16, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE LAWSUITS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

 

 

WHEN BARREL RACING TURNS INTO A LAWSUIT

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Oct. 16, 2017

 

Today, barrel horses bring a lot of money – and that’s because they can win a lot of money. It doesn’t matter if the rider is a boy or a girl, a man or a woman, 10 years old or 60 years old, a newcomer or a professional. However, the important thing is how old the horse is, how well trained it is and most important of all, how sound it is – which means, “How long will he or she last by staying sound?”

 

A court case in Madisonville County, Texas, began on May 22, 2016, in which Savannah Robertson, Los Osmos, Calif., purchased a barrel horse named Crown N Diamonds, a.k.a. “Rosie” and “Cinderella,” from Hope B. Martin, Huntsville, Texas, through her agent/broker Michelle Alley, Madisonville, Texas, a professional in the barrel racing industry. Prior to the purchase, Robertson was told that Cinderella was a sound barrel-racing performance horse, even though the May 13, 2016 contract for the $10,000 sale stated the horse was being sold “as is.”

 

The purchase soon turned into a legal battle with the agent Michelle Alley being the Plaintiff filing a lawsuit against the defendants Hope B. Martin, the owner, and Savannah Robertson, the buyer. The reason was that approximately three days after Robertson took possession of the horse, on May 22, 2016, Cinderella experienced a “patella lockup” or an upper fixation of the left hindquarter stifle ligament. The first patella lockup occurred in the round pen and the second patella lockup occurred while Robertson was riding the mare, causing the horse and rider to go to the ground.

 

Thereafter, the horse was brought to a California veterinarian who identified the locking patella or upper-fixation condition and referred the horse to the Alamo Pintado Equine Medical Center, Los Olivos, Calif. Upon evaluation, the veterinary clinic also identified this abnormality and treated the horse for the patella lockup condition.

 

What is a patella lockup?

 Horse-Jumping stifle. … A locking stifle (in vet words, an upward fixation of the patella or UFP, a common problem in horses that is often unrecognized and often misdiagnosed as general hind leg lameness or overlooked altogether. The stifle joint in a horse’s hind leg corresponds anatomically to the knee joint in the human leg. However, instead of appearing halfway down the limb like the human knee, the horse’s stifle doesn’t even look like a joint because it is hidden within the structure of the horse’s upper hind leg. If you put your hand on the front of the horse’s hind leg where it ties into the flank, you can feel the patella, a small bone that is the anatomic equal of the human kneecap. The patella sits just above the stifle joint where the horse’s femur (upper leg bone that ties into the hip) and the tibia (long bone above the hock) meet.

 

The medial patellar ligament has the important function of hooking over a notch in the end of the femur when the horse is standing still. This stabilizes the stifle and allows the standing or snoozing horse to bear weight on the hind leg without muscular effort. Normally, the ligament slides out of the notch when the horse swings its leg forward as it begins to walk. If the ligament gets hung up and doesn’t slip into an unlocked position, the hind leg can’t be flexed forward and the horse has to drag the stiffened limb forward for a few steps before the ligament releases. This is commonly known as a locking or sticking stifle. While veterinarians term the condition “upward fixation of the patella,” old-time horsemen have a simpler descriptive phrase: “That horse is stifled.” They might add, “Back him up a few steps to get it to release,” and this trick often works. The following image depicts a horse with a locked stifle. The situation becomes problematic for the horse and rider when the stifle inadvertently locks while the equestrian team is in full performance mode. A locked stifle in the performance arena or while under saddle in generally utility riding can cause serious injury to the rider and horse or in the worst case scenario – death or permanent paralysis, if the horse goes down.


 

It wasn’t long before a demand letter from Savannah Robertson’s attorney, Robert Wagstaff, McMahon, Surovik, Suttle PC of Abilene, Texas was forwarded to the seller Hope B. Martin and her agent Michelle Alley on Sept. 30, 2016 stating damages and violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, especially – Section 17.46 of the Texas Business Commerce Code. More specifically, “Deceptive Trade Practices.” Unlawful – (a) False, misleading, or deceptive acts or practices in the conduct of any trade or commerce are hereby declared unlawful and are subject to action by the consumer protection division under 17.47, 17.58, 17.60 and 17.61 of this code.

 

However, upon receipt of the demand letter for payment of damages, court documents indicate the agent Michelle Alley hired attorney David Hammitt of Madisonville, Texas, to represent her in this matter by filing a lawsuit in her behalf against the buyer Savannah Robertson and the seller Hope B. Martin. Alley, the agent, had sued the buyer, Savannah Robertson, for breach of contract for desiring a rescission of the sale contract and a refund of funds. Thereafter, Robertson’s attorney countersued Alley, alleging violations of the Deceptive Trade Practices Act (DPTA) as previously stated, along with a realignment of Plaintiff and Defendants. More specifically, aligning Savannah Robertson as the Plaintiff and the agent Michelle Alley and the seller Hope B. Martin as the Defendants.

 

Further, Robertson’s lawsuit states the cause of action is “preexisting but undisclosed medical condition of the horse prior to the sale, that disqualifies Crown N Diamonds (Cinderella) as useful for the purpose identified by Robertson, i.e. a barrel-racing performance horse.” Therefore, disqualifying Crown N Diamonds (Cinderella) as a performance prospect for Robertson.

 

The lawsuit also stated that if these preexisting conditions would have been known prior to sale, it would have greatly affected Robertson’s opinion and she would have not bought the horse. The lawsuit further states this non-disclosure of disqualifying preexisting medical conditions was used to induce Robertson to buy the horse.

Link to the lawsuit>>

 

Then comes a strange twist:

 

Afterwards, Robertson’s attorney issued a series of subpoenas in this matter and the results are revealing and alarming to say the least. First, it was disclosed that while under the care, ownership and control of Michelle Gilbert of Bryan, Texas, the horse did in fact exhibit a series of medical treatments, (i.e.) locking patella, blistering the soft tissue surrounding the stifle ligament, hock injections, stifle injections, neck injections, colic treatment and treatment for a lameness of the right front hoof and proof of preexisting medical conditions. The treatments had been performed by Dr. Cameron Stoudt of the Texas Equine Hospital, Bryan, Texas who is also a contributor to “Barrel Horse News.”,

Medical Records

 

Other evidence contributing to a preexisting medical condition for the horse is included on the Facebook social media page of Gilbert where Gilbert openly admits the horse suffered from a locking patella as well as other injuries during training. A review of Stoudt’s medical records indicate after the last medical treatment, the owner (Gilbert) was selling the horse. A recovered advertisement by Gilbert states the horse is being sold as a “broodmare-sound-only horse, but may be runable in the future.”

 

Court documents report that the horse was sold by Gilbert to Hope B. Martin for $4,500, as a broodmare-sound-only mare. In Martin’s deposition, she states she was made aware of the preexisting medical conditions for the horse but “thought it was no big deal.” A scrutiny of the deposition transcripts didn’t reveal a challenge to Martin’s statement by Robertson’s attorney as to her veterinary knowledge that is sufficient for Martin to make such a medical evaluation of soundness.

 

Subpoenaed medical records also indicate Martin, by referral of Cameron Stoudt DVM, had the horse evaluated and treated at Texas A&M Medical University for the right front hoof injury and the records indicate the horse was also suffering from a degenerating navicular bone. For the record, Dr. Stoudt injected the horse’s right front navicular bursa on March 18, 2015. Also, for the record, court documents indicate none of these pre-existing medical conditions and treatments for the horse were ever conveyed to Savannah Robertson prior to the sale of the horse by Hope B. Martin and her agent Michelle Alley.

 

Another curious impact to this lawsuit indicates there are four individuals involved with this horse: Michelle Gilbert, Hope B. Martin, Michelle Alley and Cameron Stoudt DVM. It should be noted that Dr. Cameron Stoudt is the veterinarian of record for all three owners: Michelle Gilbert, Hope B. Martin and Savannah Robertson. It should also be noted that Dr. Stoudt treated the horse for Michelle Gilbert and Hope B. Martin as well as being the veterinarian of record who conducted the pre-purchase exams for Martin and Robertson. Dr. Stout passed the horse as sound on each pre-purchase veterinary exam.

 

When the depositions and other documents were scrutinized, it was learned that the agent Michelle Alley and the owner, Hope B. Martin, were advertising the horse as “Sound and Sane,” without mentioning any preexisting medical conditions and that the horse was in training with Michelle Alley to make her a “super star.” However, while under deposition scrutiny, each one denied having any alleged videos in their possession riding, exhibiting or showing the horse due to the fact that each of their cell phones had either been lost or collapsed prior to the depositions, which required replacement phones and a total loss of data.

 

But it was determined in Michelle Alley’s deposition that she is a “professional horsewoman” who makes a living training and exhibiting barrel horses as well as boarding, brokering, buying and selling horses. Another curiosity is in Alley’s lawsuit, where her attorney refers to Alley in this matter as a “consumer” rather than an “agent or broker” for the sale of Crown and Diamonds (Cinderella). For clarification, a “consumer” is one who buys a product. An Agent is one who represents an individual in the sale of a product or sells it in their behalf. Further scrutiny revealed professionals in the business are held to a higher standard than an individual just selling a personal horse.

 

On Sept. 11, 2017, an agreed-to “Order of Dismissal with Prejudice of Certain Claims” was filed jointly by the attorneys for Alley and Robertson, which essentially states Alley is dismissing her claims against Hope Martin and Savannah Robertson “with prejudice,” and Savannah Robertson dismissed her claim against Alley “with prejudice,” which essentially means the action can’t be filed in this court or any other court after dismissal.

 

However Robertson’s claim against Hope B. Martin remains intact and the lawsuit has been realigned as Savannah Robertson (as Plaintiff) vs Hope B. Martin (as Defendant).

 

 

Is the Seller a professional?

As Equine Legal Solutions explains: “Is the seller someone who sells horses as part of their business, such as a trainer or breeder, or are they an individual horse owner who sells a horse only occasionally?  If the seller is a professional, the sale may be subject to the Uniform Commercial Code, which provides that a “warranty of merchantability” is implied in every sale by a “merchant.”  In laymen’s terms, this means when a breeder or trainer sells a riding horse, there is an implied term that the horse is sound enough to be used as a riding horse. No warranties are implied in sales by individuals. The implied warranty of merchantability can be overcome by a specific statement in the sale contract disclaiming this warranty. Note, however, that contract statements such as “As Is,” “no warranties,” or “seller disclaims all warranties” are insufficient to successfully disclaim the warranty of merchantability – the word “merchantability” must be specifically mentioned in the contract disclaimer.

Click for Alley Perf Horses>>

5-Down the Alley PerformanceHorsesClick >>

 

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☛ Tommy Manion case covered by FW Star Telegram 10-13-17

Posted by on Oct 13, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

MANION BB GUN SHOOTING OF HORSE COVERED BY FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM

Fort Worth, Texas
Oct. 13, 2017

Friday the 13th only happened twice this year, and today was Tommy Manion’s unlucky day! Not only the NCHA, Allaboutcutting.com and Quarterhorsenews.com have covered the fact that he shot his stallion with a BB gun at an NCHA-approved show and when he was suspended by the NCHA for not following their new Zero Animal Abuse policy, he sued the NCHA. But now he has  announced he has dropped all charges and accepts his penalty. The prestigious Fort Worth Star Telegram and Senior Editor Max Baker have now gotten involved, not only covering the story but publishing the video!

Click on the following link for the article and video:

http://www.star-telegram.com/news/state/texas/-article178681691.html

 

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☛ Tommy Manion settles with NCHA 10-13-17

Posted by on Oct 13, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

TOMMY MANION SETTLES LAWSUIT WITH NCHA

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Oct. 13, 2017

Due to the fact that I’m in the middle of a move, yesterday I was dreading to go to the Fort Worth Court House to attend the Tommy Manion vs NCHA lawsuit; however, Manion evidently came to his senses and realized he was in the wrong – apologizing to the NCHA in an open letter posted on the NCHA website  to the members, following a meeting with his lawyer and the NCHA on Wednesday, Oct. 11.

The case involved him shooting an unruly stallion that he brought to a cutting in Whitesboro, Texas, that he repeatedly shot in the hip with a BB gun concealed under a jacket on his arm. However, a cell-phone video taken of the entire event was sent to the NCHA and circulated among NCHA members. When they sanctioned him for animal abuse and the non-compliance with the association’s recently implemented Zero Animal Abuse policy, Manion filed a lawsuit against the NCHA.

However, it didn’t take long for him to drop the lawsuit and apologize in an open letter to NCHA officials and members that was  published on the NCHA website, realizing the evidence was overwhelming that he had violated the newly created Zero Tolerance Animal Abuse Policy of the NCHA. Besides, that the more than likely “unwinable” lawsuit was becoming very costly.

But Manion didn’t get completely off the hook for his apology, as the the settlement included the following terms of the settlement:

1.    Suspension of NCHA membership for six months beginning August 9, 2017

2.    NCHA Membership Probation for one year thereafter

3.    Fine payable to NCHA to $10,000.00

4.    Letter to the NCHA membership (which was included in yesterday’s post)

The NCHA announced they are pleased with the settlement and remains committed to its Zero Tolerance policy.

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☛ Tommy Manion apologizes – court hearing cancelled 10-12-17

Posted by on Oct 12, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE LAWSUITS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TOMMY MANION APOLOGIZES – COURT HEARING CANCELLED

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Oct. 12, 2017

In a one-page letter, entitled Exhibit A, to the NCHA, Tommy Manion, who had been suspended from the association for horse abuse, for shooting his unruly horse with a BB gun at a Whitesboro, Texas, NCHA-approved show, apologized. Manion said he was sorry that the method he subsequently used for  correcting his unruly horse caused such a controversy.

“I deeply regret that this event took place,” said Manion. “I’m committed to the NCHA and will endeavor to continue to conduct myself in a professional manner for the remainder of my career. We are pleased that this matter is resolved. and look forward to putting it behind us.”

Manion continued, “I join with the Association in continuing to take a strong stance against animal abuse and in protecting the animals we all love so dearly. I appreciate the NCHA’s continued commitment to completely eliminate abuse in our industry,”

As a result, the hearing scheduled for Friday, Oct. 13, at the Tom Vandergriff Civil Courts Building courthouse in Fort Worth, Texas, was cancelled.To date, the NCHA has not answered Manion’s apology on their website.

tommy manion apology

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 10-12-17

Posted by on Oct 12, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
Oct. 12, 2017

Kyle Whitaker captures ninth Linderman award

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Twenty years ago, Kyle Whitaker won his first Linderman Award, a decoration bestowed upon select cowboys that win at least $1,000 in a minimum of three events, where two of three must include one roughstock and timed event.
Following in the footsteps of his father, Chip, a four-time recipient of the Linderman Award, Whitaker understands the magnitude of its legacy, as he now accepts his ninth career victory of the multi-event achievement.
“It’s something I’ve wanted to win ever since I was a little kid going to rodeos with my dad,” Whitaker said. “I always grew up knowing about it. That probably makes it more special to me than most of the guys that go. A lot of people don’t really know about it. I know the history of the award and respect it a lot.”
The Linderman Award, named after ProRodeo Hall of Fame cowboy Bill Linderman, is intended to recognize cowboys capable and willing to perform at both ends of the arena. In total, Linderman’s career ended with six world championships to his name, including two in the all-around (1950, 1953) and saddle bronc riding (1945, 1950) as well as claiming world titles in bareback riding (1943) and steer wrestling (1950).
Given the rigors of rodeo, even the spryest of cowboys are challenged to work multiple events. At the age of 41, Whitaker says it’s a matter of simply giving what he has.
He earned the majority of his money – $51,233 – in steer wrestling, while also collecting $9,666 in tie-down roping and $3,740 in saddle bronc riding.
“A lot of it is I just keep doing it,” Whitaker said. “I don’t get rusty. I just keep going. I haven’t taken a lot of time off to where I may lose some of my edge. Just stay in shape, and you have to keep the will to win at both ends.”
Despite his veteran age and the try on his body, Whitaker still has plans to rodeo this winter. Whenever the end to his career arises, and however it may finish, Whitaker will have no qualms with the time he’s spent in the sport he’s known for all his years.
“It’s something I’ve always dreamed of,” Whitaker said. “I remember when I won it the first time, nobody else had qualified and nobody had won it the year before. I thought well, I’d win it 10 times easy. And then here, to win it the ninth time 20 years later, it’s like man, that’s a lot of hard work and it takes a lot of perseverance to stick with it that long.
“It means a heck of a lot more now than it did when I was a 21-year-old kid.”

2. Morman wins Badlands Circuit Finals Rodeo

MINOT, N.D. – Steer wrestler Cameron Morman keeps getting better. By winning the RAM Badlands Circuit Finals Rodeo on Oct. 8, this 24-year-old bulldogger is off to a solid start in the 2018 season as he seeks his first qualification for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER.
Morman was off to a running start by winning the first round of the RBCFR with a 4.2-second run.
“I just backed into the box and got the start I wanted,” Morman said.
By placing fourth in the second round with a 4.4, he went on to win the average with 18.3 seconds on four head – good for a grand total of $5,451. This win also means Morman’s set for his second appearance at the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Kissimmee, Fla., April 5-8.
“You can win a lot of money there; and this counts toward next year’s world standings and that’s a good jump on next year,” Morman said. “I was there (the RNCFR) in 2015 and it would be good to get back. There’s a lot of money up for grabs there and it’s a big opportunity.”
Morman’s win at the RBCFR was worth nearly as much as his entire season earnings in 2016, when he was 171st with $5,853. Previously, the bulldogger from Glen Ullin, N.D., was 122nd in 2015 with $8,433, and was 136th in 2014 with $7,738.
Morman took the bull by the horns in 2017, finishing the regular season 34th with $45,159 and was ranked second in the Badlands Circuit standings with $11,166. His massive improvement in the 2017 season was thanks in part to winning four rodeos: the PRCA Championship Rodeo in Bismarck, N.D., on Feb. 4; the Bell County PRCA Rodeo in Belton, Texas, on Feb. 11; the Northeast Montana Fair & Rodeo in Glasgow, Mont., on Aug. 2; and the Cattlemen Days Rodeo in Ashland, Mo., on Aug. 26.
“A win is a win, it’s always good and there’s no such thing as a bad win,” Morman said, adding that he’s aiming for the 2018 WNFR. “This past year is the first I went and rodeoed all year, I used to just go to circuit rodeos.”
Morman got a taste of Las Vegas while in Minot, N.D., by riding a WNFR horse along with Chason Floyd and Jake Rinehart, who are ranked first and third in the Badlands Circuit. The trio all rode Rinehart’s 12-year-old buckskin gelding, Rio. Rinehart is a three-time competitor at the WNFR (2007, 2009 and 2011), and Rio was with him in Las Vegas.
“He’s super calm, easy to score on and has a great pattern,” Morman said. “He’s everything you want in a bulldogging horse.”
In addition to using the same horse, the three bulldoggers all had the same hazer – Billy Boldon.
“He did a great job,” Morman said.
Morman was already planning to hit the rodeo road hard for the 2018 season, so winning the RBCFR gave him a good jump start to the new season.
“I leave Tuesday for the All American Finals in Waco, Texas, and hopefully I can keep the ball rolling,” Morman said.
Other winners at the $193,576 rodeo were bareback rider Ty Breuer (324 points on four head), team ropers Logan Olson/Matt Kasner (22.4 seconds on four head), saddle bronc rider JJ Elshere (321.5 points on four head), tie-down roper Paul David Tierney (36.9 seconds on four head), barrel racer Nikki Hansen (55.09 seconds on four runs) and bull rider Jeff Bertus (207 points on three head).

3. Vazquez dominates at Turquoise Circuit Finals

PRESCOTT VALLEY, Ariz. – Heading into the RAM Turquoise Circuit Finals Rodeo, bull rider Joseph Vazquez simply wanted to cover a bull and see where the momentum carried him. Vazquez not only found what he craved, but he’s still digesting the biggest win of his young rodeo career.
With a two-head score of 169.5 points, Vazquez was the only bull rider at the Turquoise Circuit Finals Rodeo to make two qualified rides. With two round wins and ground money included, Vazquez was the recipient of $8,882.
“It’s really exciting,” said Vazquez, 28. “It’s been three years coming. This third year it finally happened, so that’s really cool.”
No cowboy rode to the whistle in the first round of the Turquoise Circuit Finals, enabling Vazquez to take advantage of the opening. Drawing Honeycutt Rodeo’s Crop Hopper in the second round, Vazquez topped the bull for a weekend-best 88 points, followed by a clinching ride of 81.5 points atop Salt River Rodeo’s Rio’s Jagged Edge in the Oct. 7 final performance.
“I wanted to win some rounds,” Vazquez explained. “I wanted to stay on at least one bull. That first bull I got on, I lost my rope at right about seven seconds, and I was just fired up for the rest of the weekend. In round three, everybody fell off and I was the last guy out, and I told myself I was gonna ride him just because I’d already won it.
“I went two-for-three and that’s a pretty cool deal.”
More than doubling his circuit total for the 2017 season at the Turquoise Circuit Finals Rodeo, Vazquez says he’ll be able to put some money away for his daughter, Ellie, and provide some financial security for his family.
“What this money did was kind of give me a cushion and allow me to put some money back in case something were to happen to me,” he said. “If any emergency were to come up, I have some money put back and can make sure she’s well taken care of. On my side of the family, we’re all happy, happy, happy over here.”
Vazquez’s bull riding career began at 18 years old, and according to the Alamogordo, N.M., native, his game is mostly self-taught. Now, with admittance to next year’s RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo, April 5-8, Vazquez hopes to see how far his natural bull riding skills can take him in Kissimmee, Fla.
“Just qualifying for the circuit finals was a big deal for me,” he said. “You know how goals progress, you get somewhere and you look higher. I’m on a path.
“Pretty much the metaphor for rodeo, for me, is the metaphor for life. The more you give it, the more it will give you back.”
Other winners at the $179,087 rodeo were bareback rider Kyle Charley (237.5 points on three head), steer wrestler Jace Melvin (15.7 seconds on three head), team ropers Brady Payne/Junior Zambrano II (22.5 seconds on three head), saddle bronc rider Leon Fountain (237 points on three head), tie-down roper Seth Hall (28.7 seconds on three head), barrel racer Lori Todd (46.08 seconds on three runs), and steer roper Corey Ross (27.2 seconds on two head).

4. PRCA/Resistol Rookies of the Year crowned

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The 2017 PRCA/Resistol Rookies of the Year have been settled, with Nelson Wyatt leading the way as the all-around champion.
“It’s definitely an honor and I started out the year heading and to win all-around too is definitely a bonus,” Wyatt said. “It’s always been a goal of mine to win the Rookie of the Year. I set out this year with that as my main goal and to achieve that goal means a lot.”
All-around and team roping header
Nelson Wyatt
Clanton, Ala.
Bareback riding
Tanner Phipps
Dalton, Ga.
Steer wrestling
Jesse Brown
Baker City, Ore.
Team roping heeler
Cody Hogan
Athens, Texas
Saddle bronc riding
Shade Etbauer
Goodwell, Okla.
Tie-down roping
Tyler Milligan
Pawhuska, Okla.
Steer roping
Kelton McMillen
Paden, Okla.
Bull riding
Boudreaux Campbell
Crockett, Texas
For complete Rooke of the Year coverage, check out the Oct. 27 issue of the ProRodeo Sports News.

5. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com will broadcast the All American ProRodeo Finals Oct. 12-14, beginning at 7 p.m. (CT) each day … The PRCA has announced a partnership with 5050 Central, a company which specializes in electronic real-time digital raffle systems. The Canadian-based company has already worked with PRCA rodeos in the past, including the Ponoka (Alberta) Stampede, Reno (Nev.) Rodeo & Xtreme Bulls, Strathmore (Alberta) Stampede and Williams Lake (B.C.) Stampede. “We are pleased to partner with 5050 Central to bring the rodeo tradition of the 5050 raffle into the age of technology,” PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman said. “This company offers a streamlined way for our rodeo committees to conduct 5050 raffles, and allows those committees to generate revenue that goes back into the community and to various charitable organizations. No matter who wins the raffle, the big winner is the rodeo community.” Jason Little, VP of Business Development of Gaming Nation, said the following: “We know our raffle fundraising technology will be a great new asset to PRCA events – creating a new means of excitement for fans, while also acting as an incredible fundraising vehicle for the organizing committee and its partnered charity.” …Ernie Gipson, who qualified for the 1979 National Finals Steer Roping event and finished 10th in the final world standings, passed away Oct. 6 in John Day, Ore. He was 61. Gipson became a PRCA member in 1973. In 1979, at age 23, Gipson qualified for the NFSR in grand style. He finished tied for second at the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days, tying ProRodeo Hall of Famer Phil Lyne, thanks to winning more than $4,860. He also team roped and he credited his father and former PRCA competitor Tom Gipson as the biggest influence on his rodeo career … For much of this year, the staff of Pete Carr Pro Rodeo has been raising money for the Cowboys Who Care Foundation. Carr not only plans to continue his giving mission at every rodeo that features the firm, but he also will open the opportunity for everyone to help by selling the popular Pete Carr Pro Rodeo hats, made by Resistol, on the company’s website, www.PeteCarrProRodeo.com. “We are going to take the proceeds from those online hat sales through the end of the year and donate them to Cowboys Who Care,” said Carr, who also serves on the foundation’s board. “We believe in this organization, so I wanted to find as many avenues as possible to continue giving.”Cowboys Who Care was founded by comedian cowboy Bill Martin and his wife, Michele. “The hat means honor, bravery and kindness,” Martin said. “Our sole mission is financial support, smiles and free cowboy hats for boys and girls who have cancer and other life-threatening illnesses.”
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “Shane rides great. It was hard to get the win against him. He’s a good rider and a good guy.
– Bareback rider Ty Breuer told the Minot (N.D.) Daily News about edging Shane O’Connell by two points to win the RAM Badlands Circuit Finals Rodeo Oct. 8.

6. Next Up

Oct. 10            All American ProRodeo Finals, Waco, Texas, continues
Oct. 12            Austin Co. Fair & Rodeo, Bellville, Texas, begins
Oct. 12            Rusk County PRCA Rodeo, Henderson, Texas, begins
Oct. 12            Guadalupe County Fair & PRCA Rodeo, Seguin, Texas, begins
Oct. 13            ProRodeo Oklahoma, Chickasha, begins
Oct. 13            Indiantown (Fla.) Rodeo begins
Oct. 13            Grand National Rodeo, San Francisco, Calif., begins
Oct. 13            RAM California Circuit Finals Rodeo, Lancaster, Calif., begins
Oct. 14            Willowdale ProRodeo, Toughkenamon, Pa.

7. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Oct. 9, 2017
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$214,131
BB:
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$201,916
SW:
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$163,152
TR-1:
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$133,977
TR-2:
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$134,707
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$184,052
TD:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$190,445
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$237,152
SR:
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$84,156


8. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings
Unofficial through Oct. 9, 2017
 
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$214,131
2
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
180,487
3
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
151,990
4
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
140,876
5
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
136,430
6
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
128,764
7
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
112,795
8
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
105,470
9
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
104,200
10
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
97,022
11
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
89,284
12
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
89,029
13
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
78,241
14
Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
75,671
15
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
74,931
16
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
58,000
17
Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb.
56,733
18
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
56,048
19
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
55,618
20
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
54,641
Bareback Riding
1
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$201,916
2
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
136,657
3
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
128,153
4
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
113,312
5
Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev.
109,353
6
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
106,677
7
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
103,212
8
Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta
102,161
9
Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas
101,197
10
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
99,240
11
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
96,039
12
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
93,652
13
R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif.
89,261
14
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
89,106
15
Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah
86,114
16
Justin Miller, Billings, Mont.
83,495
17
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France
80,762
18
Jessy Davis, Power, Mont.
66,029
19
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
64,757
20
Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore.
62,612
Steer Wrestling
1
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$163,152
2
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
110,951
3
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
109,919
4
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
103,944
5
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
99,501
6
Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah
99,340
7
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
93,463
8
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
84,073
9
Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis.
82,968
10
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
80,981
11
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
79,684
12
Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis.
77,340
13
J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn.
76,442
14
Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La.
73,558
15
Chason Floyd, Buffalo, S.D.
71,192
16
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
71,105
17
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
70,545
18
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
68,915
19
Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark.
67,294
20
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
66,520
Team Roping (header)
1
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$133,977
2
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
133,633
3
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
113,094
4
Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas
111,551
5
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
98,033
6
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
96,587
7
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
85,448
8
Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz.
81,415
9
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
81,356
10
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
79,236
11
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
78,964
12
Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont.
78,288
13
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
77,437
14
Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore.
75,614
15
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
74,146
16
Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta
68,006
17
Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz.
61,983
18
Hayes Smith, Central Point, Ore.
61,949
19
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
59,915
20
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
57,576
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$134,707
2
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
133,633
3
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
117,212
4
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
110,930
5
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
103,022
6
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
99,774
7
Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
96,587
8
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
92,358
9
Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev.
81,356
10
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
81,050
11
Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas
79,374
12
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
78,387
13
Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
75,614
14
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
74,652
15
Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta
68,006
16
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
65,136
17
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
61,745
18
John Robertson, Polson, Mont.
52,238
19
Clint Summers, Lake City, Fla.
51,647
20
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
49,836
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$184,052
2
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
170,456
3
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
124,115
4
Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.
119,657
5
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
110,613
6
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
105,789
7
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
102,774
8
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
99,361
9
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
92,992
10
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
91,745
11
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
89,332
12
Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.
88,613
13
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
88,402
14
Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah
76,630
15
Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas
75,649
16
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
71,822
17
Cody Wright, Milford, Utah
69,693
18
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
66,258
19
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
61,398
20
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
54,401
Tie-down Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$190,445
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
142,194
3
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
124,498
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
121,902
5
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
107,423
6
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
101,433
7
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
97,173
8
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
96,056
9
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
93,363
10
J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah
86,299
11
Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas
85,962
12
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
85,566
13
Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas
85,460
14
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
85,438
15
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
85,210
16
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
78,317
17
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
77,288
18
Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas
76,926
19
Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas
73,367
20
Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas
70,016
Steer Roping
1
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$84,156
2
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
78,934
3
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
72,976
4
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
68,084
5
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
64,266
6
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
56,868
7
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
50,109
8
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
49,347
9
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
49,309
10
John Bland, Turkey, Texas
48,184
11
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
47,061
12
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
45,082
13
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
44,217
14
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
42,848
15
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
41,913
16
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
40,615
17
J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla.
39,780
18
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
32,565
19
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
32,545
20
Roger Branch, Wellston, Okla.
31,183
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$237,152
2
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
204,239
3
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
157,077
4
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
131,423
5
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
120,963
6
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
110,471
7
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
106,188
8
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
103,619
9
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
102,855
10
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
97,121
11
Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas
94,668
12
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
92,991
13
Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta
92,660
14
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
88,063
15
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
87,288
16
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
87,014
17
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
85,957
18
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
80,183
19
Chase Dougherty, Canby, Ore.
72,754
20
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
70,593
*2017 Barrel Racing (Oct. 9, 2017)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas
$250,378
2
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
185,952
3
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
130,537
4
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
120,806
5
Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas
115,163
6
Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash.
111,758
7
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
98,707
8
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
97,023
9
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
96,454
10
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
92,930
11
Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M.
91,362
12
Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas
86,020
13
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
83,338
14
Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo.
78,181
15
Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas
76,294
16
Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz.
74,363
17
Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas
72,876
18
Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas
72,692
19
Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas
68,759
20
Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark.
64,894

9. 2018 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Oct. 9, 2017
All-around
1
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
$11,531
Bareback Riding
1
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
$8,510
2
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
7,294
3
Kyle Charley, Lukachukai, Ariz.
6,520
4
Trenten Montero, Winnemucca, Nev.
4,999
5
Luke Creasy, Garland, Texas
4,347
6
Justin McDaniel, Parkfield, Calif.
3,832
7
Joe Gunderson, Gettysburg, S.D.
3,647
8
Shon Gibson, Taylor, Ariz.
3,260
9
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
2,507
10
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France,
1,696
Steer Wrestling
1
Cameron Morman, Glenullin, N.D.
$5,451
2
Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
4,822
3
Jace Melvin, Fort Pierre, S.D.
4,081
4
Beau Franzen, Sidney, Mont.
3,984
5
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
3,459
6
Dean McIntyre, Cloncurry, Australia
3,401
7
Trevor Duhon, Phoenix, Ariz.
2,948
8
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
2,726
9
Damian Padilla, Rio Rico, Ariz.
2,721
10
Jake Rinehart, Highmore, S.D.
2,516
Team Roping (header)
1
Logan Olson, Flandreau, S.D.
$8,177
2
Tanner Baldwin, Vail, Ariz.
5,895
3
Brady Payne, Gilbert, Ariz.
5,442
4
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
4,822
5
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
4,347
6
Michael Calmelat, Tucson, Ariz.
3,401
7
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
2,936
8
Jason Thorstenson, Rapid City, S.D.
2,935
9
Joshua Torres, Ocala, Fla.
2,574
10
Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
2,516
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb.
$8,177
2
Logan Medlin, Tatum, N.M.
5,895
3
Jade Nelson, Midland, S.D.
4,822
4
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
4,347
5
Lane Siggins, Coolidge, Ariz.
3,401
6
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
2,936
7
J.D. Gerard, Kennebec, S.D.
2,935
8
Wesley Johnson, Log Cabin, La.
2,634
9
Jonathan Torres, Ocala, Fla.
2,574
10
Paul Griemsman, Piedmont, S.D.
2,516
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
J.J. Elshere, Hereford, S.D.
$7,548
2
Leon Fountain, Socorro, N.M.
6,371
3
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
6,152
4
Troy Crowser, Whitewood, S.D.
5,870
5
Ty Manke, Hermosa, S.D.
5,032
6
Dylan Henson, Bloomfield, N.M.
3,735
7
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
3,272
8
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
2,391
9
Will Smith, Marshall, Mo.
2,132
10
Shorty Garrett, Eagle Butte, S.D.
2,097
Tie-down Roping
1
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
$6,709
2
Jess Woodward, Dupree, S.D.
5,032
3
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
4,988
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
4,661
5
Jerrad Hofstetter, Shallowater, Texas
3,401
6
Trey Young, Dupree, S.D.
3,145
7
Jesse Clark, Portales, N.M.
2,948
8
Cole Hatzenbuehler, Solen, N.D.
2,935
9
Clay Long, Springtown, Texas
2,551
10
Joseph Parsons, Marana, Ariz.
2,267
Steer Roping
1
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
8,713
2
Corey Ross, Liberty Hill, Texas
4,729
3
Leo Campbell, Amarillo, Texas
3,941
4
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
3,411
5
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
3,116
6
Shank Edwards, Tatum, N.M.
2,955
7
Mike Chase, McAlester, Okla.
2,509
8
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
2,128
9
Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M.
1,773
10
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
1,680
Bull Riding
1
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
$14,698
2
Joseph Vazquez, Alamogordo, N.M.
8,882
3
Jeff Bertus, Avon, S.D.
7,827
4
Preston Preece, Troy, Texas
6,119
5
Tate Smith, Litchville, N.D.
6,010
6
Taylor Miller, Faith, S.D.
3,844
7
Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M.
3,331
8
Clayton Foltyn, Winnie, Texas
2,893
9
Mickey Andrews, Weatherford, Okla.
2,867
10
Tyler Viers, Comstock, Neb.
2,656
Read More

☛ Ed Dufurrena in court again!

Posted by on Oct 10, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE LAWSUITS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

LIGHTNING STRIKES DUFURRENA TWICE

ALLEGATIONS OF FRAUD RESURFACE IN FILED COURT DOCUMENTS BY EUGENE AND JANIE VOGEL

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Oct. 10, 2017

Ed Dufurrena from his website.

Edward L. Dufurrena, the owner of Dufurrena Cutting Horses LLC, Gainesville, Texas, is headed back to court in yet another civil lawsuit.The latest lawsuit filed against Dufurrena is entitled Donald Eugene Vogel and Janie S. Vogel vs Edward L. Dufurrena (CV17-00588). The lawsuit was filed in The State of Texas, County of Cooke, 235th District Court on Oct. 2, 2017 at 11:58 a.m. by the Vogels’ attorney Lisa C. Bennett of Adams, Bennett, Duncan & Henley, located at 100 East Broadway, Gainesville, Texas. For the record, the Vogels are the Plaintiffs and Edward L. Dufurrena is the Defendant. The Vogels are senior citizens, who were 66 at the time of the agreement.

As you may remember in a previous article regarding Dufurrena, included a seven-day trial held in April of this year, in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, in Sherman, Texas, to determine who was guilty for a HERDA positive foal, sired by Auspicious Cat, that was born to Canadians Shawn, Lisa and Lauren Minshall’s mare. The eight-member jury’s determined that Edward and Shona Dufurrena, Gainesville, Texas, who headed up the Dos Cats Partners, the owners of Auspicious Cat, were 60 percent responsible for their foal being born with full-blown HERDA, the Minshalls were 30 percent responsible and David Hartman, DVM’s Hartman Equine Reproduction Center, P.A., the veterinarian that collected the semen and shipped it to the Minshalls, was 10 percent responsible.

The suit alleged advertising fraud. Dufurrena, the Defendant, willfully and knowingly advertised his stallion Auspicious Cat, as HERDA negative (HN) when court documents revealed the stallion carried the (HN) designation on his AQHA registration papers, meaning he carried the HERDA gene, which can result in a disease that make a horse lose their skin, leaving huge sores on their body, making them unridable and they usually have to be put down. This court case resulted in out-of-court settlements and assignments of responsibility by a jury trial which I covered in length.  Essentially, the Minshalls bred a mare to Auspicious Cat that produced a HERDA foal.

Click on link below for copy of HERDA trial>>

http://allaboutcutting.net/?p=10092

 

DOS CAT PARTNERS RECENT LAWSUIT
In the most recent lawsuit filed by the Vogels, I reviewed Legal documents that indicate the subject of the lawsuit is a Partnership named Dos Cat Partners (herein after referred to as the  “Partnership”.  The Partnership was formed by written agreement on March 29, 2011 by and between Donald Eugene and Janie Vogel and Edward L. Dufurrena.  The Vogel’s invested $105,000 in the Partnership for a 49 pecent share with 51 percent of the Partnership belonging to Ed Dufurrena, also the defendant in this case.

The purpose of the Partnership was operating a business for profit. The principal business of the Partnership is to promote cutting horses through training, showing, breeding and sales for profit. The partnership was, at all times mentioned in this petition, in operation.

Court documents state that at the beginning, the Partnership owned four horses: Auspicious Cat, Ozzum Man, Ozzum Cat and Whata Sneaky Cat, as well as three embryos: one from Miss Ella Ray sired by Auspicious Cat, one from Miss Ella Ray sired by Metallic Cat and one out of Hickory Wheel sired by Auspicious Cat. Presently the horses remaining in the Partnership are the stallion Auspicious Cat, Crezy Train and Stevie Rey Von, also a stallion.  Stevie is the embryo of Miss Ella Rey sired by Metallic Cat.

2-Stevie Rey Von

3-Auspicious Cat

The terms of the Partnership were as follows: (1) all expenses are shared proportionately by owners according to ownership interest of each partner; (2) all earnings from any source are shared proportionately according to the ownership interests of each partner and (3) Ed Dufurrena, the Defendant, was to manage the horses.

4-copy of new lawsuit

 

2-PARTNERSHIP HORSE VALUES
Stevie Rey Von, considered as a “very valuable horse,” is owned by the Partnership and is an embryo offspring of Miss Ella Rey sired by Metallic Cat as indicated in the Partnership Agreement. In December 2015, Stevie Rey Von, ridden by Dufurrena, won the NCHA Cutting Horse Futurity for 3-year-olds. The winnings were substantial, consisting of $341,570. According to court papers, Dufurrena, the Defendant, collected all of the winnings, never sharing with the Vogels for their 49 percent. However, the win made the horse a substantial asset for the Partnership.

As of June 10, 2017, Stevie Rey Von has a total lifetime NCHA earnings of $341,570. Stevie Rey Von is currently advertised by Dufurrena (Defendant), standing at stud for a breeding fee of $4,000 plus a $650 chute fee.  Auspicious Cat is the second most valuable horse owned by the Partnership and stands at stud for $3,650 per breeding.

FAILURE TO PAY
Filed court documents state, ”After the large winnings, Dufurrena, the Defendant, did not pay the Vogels (Plaintiffs) their proportionate share. The Vogels requested that they be paid according to the partnership agreement; however, Dufurrena responded to the Plaintiff’s) by sending them self-generated invoices. The Vogels examined the invoices containing expense,  questioning the expenses and requesting that the expenses be substantiated. Dufurrena never complied and to date, Dufurrena has not substantiated those questioned expenses.

INSPECT THE PARTNERSHIP RECORDS
The lawsuit went on to say that the Plaintiff’s have requested to see the records of the Partnership. Beginning, January 2016, the Vogels contacted Dufurrena, advising him that they wanted to see the bills. Again, Dufurrena failed to comply. Thereafter, week after week and continuing through 2017, the Vogels said they requested documentation from Dufurrena and he always had a reason for not complying. They state that To date, Dufurrena has not complied.  In the suit, the Vogels also demand they should be allowed to inspect all the records of the Partnership.

GROSS MISREPRESENTATION OF MATERIAL FACTS
A. Number of breedings: A number of breedings of Stevie Ray Von were misrepresented by Dufurrena to the Vogels. Dufurrena represented to the Vogels that Stevie Rey Von had 40 breeding’s in 2016 (foals would be born in 2017);however, the Vogels recently learned that Dufurrena had permitted at least 100 breedings to Stevie Rey Von during that period. (This information is not yet available from the AQHA; however, 40 breedings would be worth $160,000, while 100 breedings would be worth $400,000, a different of $240,000.) The Vogels said in the court documents that they anticipate that the same will be true for 2015 and 2017 for Stevie Rey Von, as well as for Auspicious Cat. AQHA does not release the number of breedings by a stallion in given year; however, they do release the number of foals registered from those breedings.
Click for number of foals registered in 2016>>

B. Condition of Auspicious Cat: Dufurrena represented to the Vogels that Auspicious Cat had no physical defects.  However, since then the Plaintiff’s have learned that the horse is a cryptorchid (only has one testicle), a genetic condition which is very serious for a breeding sire and also has the genetic condition HERDA H/N, meaning he carries the HERDA gene and could pass it on. Both of these conditions greatly affect the horse’s value.

C. Expenses and Income: The Vogels claim that Dufurrena has misrepresented the expenses of the Partnership. They claim that Dufurrena has claimed expenses for things that were not incurred, as well as expenses that were inflated. They also claim that Dufurrena has claimed expenses that were not authorized and expenses that were excessive.  The Vogels previously questioned the expenses and requested that the expenses be substantiated; however,  Dufurrena provided little or no substantiation documents for the expenses.

D. Horse Ownership Papers: Court documents state that Dufurrena did not title the Partnership horses in the name of the Partnership nor did he include the name of the Vogels on the ownership papers, with the exception or Auspicious Cat. Dufurrena titled Stevie Rey Von’s ownership papers originally in the name of his son  (who showed the horse and won money in major NCHA events) and then in his name only – never in the name of the partnership. He also titled Crezy Train’s ownership papers in the name of his son and never informed the Vogels of his actions.

E. Representation to the Public: Court papers also state that Dufurrena has misrepresented the ownership of the horses not only to the Vogels, but also the public – namely the National Cutting Horse Association. Unknown to the Vogels at the time, Dufurrena showed Stevie Rey Von at the 2015 National Cutting Horse Association Futurity and represented himself as the sole owner, which if proven, is a serious violation of the rules and regulations of the National Cutting Horse Association. Also, advertisements for the horse indicated that Ed Dufurrena was the sole owner.

F. Conversion.  If the foregoing facts above are proven to be true,Dufurrena has committed conversion against the Plaintiffs.  Dufurrena has sold Partnership property without the right to do so  and against the benefit of the Plaintiffs.  Dufurrena has sold Partnership property without paying the Vogels their proportionate share or without their permission, including but not limited to: Dufurrena has received money for breedings from Stevie Rey Von, and has not paid to the Partnership or Plaintiff’s proportionate share. Dufurrena has received prize winnings that he has not paid to the Partnership or paid to the Plaintiff’s proportionate share. Dufurrena has invoiced and been paid for expenses that have not been incurred or were not for the benefit of the Partnership property. Those amounts due the Vogels have reached hundreds of thousands of dollars.

G. Fraud.  The Vogels have hired an attorney to assist them in enforcing their rights under the Partnership Agreement.  According to court documents, Dufurrena provided some documentation to the Vogels, through his attorneys and as such, the Vogels have  discovered in the documents that Dufurrena has committed forgeries.  If such action by Dufurrena is true, that would  constitute fraud.

H. Breach of Fiduciary Duty of Loyalty.  Based on the foregoing facts, Dufurrena has breached the duty of loyalty owed to the Vogels under the law and under the terms of the Partnership. He has used Partnership property for his own personal gain and to the deprivation of the Plaintiffs. The Vogels  claim Dufurrena has billed expenses to them  wrongfully, including expenses that never existed, were improperly applied or grossly inflated. The Vogels also claim that Dufurrena improperly titled Partnership property in his own name.

I. Dissolution of Property.  The Vogels seek a dissolution of the Partnership, and demand an accounting from Dufurrena. The Plaintiffs are requesting to be paid all monies due to them from Dufurrena. The Plaintiffs also demand that a receiver be appointed for the sale of all Partnership property including, but not limited to, Stevie Rey Von.

J. Fraud.  Based on the foregoing facts set out above, if proven to be true, Dufurrena has committed fraud on the Vogels and according to the court documents, to date, he has continued the fraud against the Vogels.

Risk Assessment
At my request, the following Risk Assessment/Risk Analysis was performed by Richard E. “Rick” Dennis in this matter.  Rick is a former Professional Drug Enforcement Agent and a Law Enforcement Officer.  Since 1986, Rick has been involved in the private security industry as an entrepreneur and currently is the Managing Member of the Wind River Company LLC.

Rick’s company specializes in providing Private Security, Personal Protection, Security Consultation, as well as Employee Drug and Alcohol Testing, and Risk Management Services to the private sector including Risk Assessment and Risk Analysis. Rick has a total of 47 years experience in his fields of representation.

In addition to the above, Rick is the author of two books: THE AMERICAN HORSE INDUSTRY, Avoiding The Pitfalls as well as CROSS TRAINING 101, Reining, Cutting, Cowhorse, a freelance writer and contributing writer to allaboutcutting.com.

In Rick’s opinion, “If all of the allegations included in this petition are proven true, it may produce a domino effect for the Defendants.  It will not only produce a civil lawsuit, as it already has, but it may also invoke a litany of criminal investigations into this matter as well.  These crimes could include: 1) Fraud, 2) Forgery, 3) Theft, 4) Violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices act which pays out three times the damage award if proven true, 5) taking advantage of the elderly, and 6) mail fraud — to name a few. However; as in all cases, each individual is innocent until proven guilty. Therefore, only law enforcement authorities, after a careful review, will be able to determine if criminal actions are warranted in this matter.

However, the Vogels are not the only ones that may be impacted by Dufurrena’s  actions. Again if proven true, the American Quarter Horse Association may be impacted by the misrepresentation of ownership of a specific horse, as well as all of the data in their cumulative records. The National Cutting Horse Association may certainly be impacted by the improper disbursement of horse earnings as well asthe data in the horse and rider earnings that they keep and publish. For example, accompanying a disbursement of funds above $600, the NCHA is required by IRS law to disburse a 1099 to the winner.

If fraud in this matter is proven true, the NCHA earnings checks should have been disbursed to Dos Cat Partners, who in turn should have disbursed a proportionate share of the earnings to the Vogels, along with an appropriate 1099. In this case, the NCHA may have to amend previously filed State or Federal Tax returns which cost money and, in turn, may affect the Vogel’s tax filings in this matter – adding further damages to them by Dufurrena’s actions.

Then there are also rule violations (where warranted) to take into account for either/and/or the American Quarter Horse Association and the National Cutting Horse Association. Overall, this legal filing is going to produce a lot of paper slinging on both sides and a big headache for the AQHA and the NCHA.

Note: a First Amended Petition was filed in court today (Monday, Oct. 9), by the Vogel’s attorney at 3:04 p.m. correcting a statement in the original filed petition which states “Stevie Rey Von won the American Cutting Horse Association Futurity” with a correction stating “Stevie Rey Von won the National Cutting Horse Association 2015 Futurity.”

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☛ Just in case you’re interested 9-27–17

Posted by on Sep 27, 2017 in HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, TO THE EDITOR, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

 

JUST IN CASE YOU ARE INTERESTED!!

By Carol Harris
Sept. 27, 2017

The following letter was sent to me today by two Quarter Horse lovers, Betty Marshall and Liz Hickling.  For some reason it got me upset all over again.  A year and a half ago I was more or less asked not to write anymore “On The Fence” articles because it disturbed the halter horse people too much.  No telling who this will disturb, but the subject of people not knowing the difference between right and wrong still disturbs me a great deal.

 

Today I have only touched on one of my most disturbing subjects which includes the following:

 

We have allowed too many inhumane trainers to become judges who continually reward each other at the horse shows.  These trainer/judges have been permitted by our Association to totally ruin our once extremely popular sport by participating in conflicting jobs at horse shows and by refusing to listen to good advice and good criticism that has been given to them for years.

 

If our leadership and our members do not know the difference between right and wrong, they should try to remember that there is “NO RIGHT WAY TO DO SO MANY WRONG THINGS”.  That is exactly what they have been doing to our horses, our membership and our Association for countless years.   I predict we will never be what we once were because too many intelligent voices have tried to get the attention of those in command – – – and failed.  No one has even had the guts to try and make a wise improvement, they just close their ears and fail to remember that our multiple leveled classes are extremely boring and AQHA membership is still decreasing every day.

Carol Harris

Betty Marshall shared Liz Hickling‘s post — with Linda Byrdsonge and 29 others.
  • Some people are honest and brave enough to tell it like it is.

Liz Hickling

So they said – western pleasure horses are moving much better, more fwd movement etc etc.
I decided to watch the Farnham 2 yr WP Stakes at the APHA World Show. Holy crappola – same canted into the rail, crippled movement – nothing changed BUT — two horses were different.
JS Heaven Sent owned by Jan and Jay Williams, actually loped and came off the rail to pass the cripples. KUDOS to them for letting their horse move naturally and having the balls to do that at the World Show. Was a pleasure to watch.
Mark Gilmore had the only other horse that moved better than the rest of them.
Guess what – the best moving horse placed last out of 9 – what a frigging surprise. Mark was 4th in the Limited and I believe about the same in the open.
So I guess all the BS about the pleasure horses moving more naturally and freer is just that BULL SHIT. And the statement that the judges have to use what they see. Well tonight they saw a western pleasure horse moving naturally, not canted in, head not down to the knees. Even in the back up – the rider of JS Heaven Sent was the only rider who didn’t have to yard her lines up to her ears to get the horse to back up – all the others did. Did they reward that movement – HELL NO!!

Saves me from watching any more pleasure classes.

Just my opinion which along with a dollar will get you nothing.

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☛ From the Editor 9-26–17

Posted by on Sep 26, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz

Sept. 26, 2017

I always seem to pick the worst times to be away. The past few months have been crazy. But I have sold my horse facility and I and my animal menagerie of animals including Cougarand, a 31-year-old champagne stallion sired by Peppy San Badger, out of an own daughter of Doc Bar, and my little dog Billie, will be moving into my new home in Grandview, Texas, with my daughter.

After 37 years in one place, it was a huge move, as well as being rather heart-wrenching. My Mother and my husband, Bob, both died in that house and it had many memories of buying and selling hundreds of horses, as well as raising hundreds of babies, as well as a little bit of showing.

Its also stressful to decide what to take and what not to take. And the “what-nots” need to be more things than you ever dreamed of getting rid of. But a statement I heard during my move helped: “If you’re not going to be using it, get rid of it because your kids don’t want it.” Good advice and very true I’m sure!

It seemed my most valuable possessions were horse magazines and horse sale catalogs: the Quarter Horse Journal, The Cutting Horse Chatter and Quarter Hsorse News.  I had some of them back into the 1970s and I finally got the nerve to throw some of them away, most interestingly enough, the more recent ones.

I gave my Chatters to Gala Nettles, as she is doing some historical articles on the National Cutting Horse Association. I advertised that I would give away my Quarter Horse Journals, dating back into the 1970s and had one phone call – a woman who wondered if I had the November 1973 issue of the Quarter House Journal as there was an article about her horse in it, I did have it and sent it to her free of charge. That’’s the only call I got. I guess I should have charged for them and I’d have had more takers! That’s usually the case.

But I realized that the summer was about gone. My daughter and I took a trip to North Dakota for my 60th class reunion, which was a blast.  We have them every five years and I don’t miss them – but they miss Bob as he brought that Pennsylvania home brew that his friend Bobby George made, and he enjoyed them even more than I did and it was my reunion!  I’m sorry to say that Bobby George also passed away a couple of months ago.

Also, I had only spent a couple of weeks in the mountains of Colorado. so I dumped my furniture and boxes, as well as Cougarand, off with my daughter to care for and headed to Colorado for what was left of the summer. Only days later, he got cast in his stall. She got the help of one of her employees, they tipped him over and got him up. When he started chasing the help’s dog, they knew he was OK.

Today, the aspens are all turning red and yellow, the morning and evening clouds are lowering themselves into our valley, it is freezing some at night and there is snow on the mountains. In fact, as I speak, it is raining now after a gorgeous day. I Guess I better think about coming back to Texas for the winter!

I’m still planning on continuing my site: www.allaboutcutting.com to keep you updated on interesting things going on in the horse industry. I know some of you will love that – while others will hate it; however, guys and gals, that’s life and I’m going to enjoy it to the fullest!

I have to thank Rick Dennis for helping me keep up my site by writing many interesting articles and forwarding news to me. If you haven’t read the articles on cell phones – you need to. It will enlighten you about the item that EVERYONE has to have. The articles give valuable information on the cell phones themselves, as well as the carriers. Also, as a risk analyst, he has written several articles about the horse industry and kept me up to date.

Following are a couple of articles of interest in the horse world:

TOMMY MANION SUES NCHA FOR SUSPENSION AND FINE

The latest news in the cutting world, is that Tommy Manion has sued the NCHA for suspending him for two years, putting him on probation, fining him $15,000, and also giving him a five-year probationary period to be served after his suspension, for violating the NCHA’s Zero Tolerance Policy. At an NCHA cutting in July, Manion was videoed when he shot his stallion with a BB gun “to calm him down from his aggressive and anti-social actions.”

The stallion, Smooth Maximus is a full brother to Million Dollar sire Smooth As A Cat. He said he did it because the stallion was “kicking at people and horses, trying to bite people and horses, rearing up and trying to charge at other horses, Manion said he couldn’t approach the stallion safely, so he shot him with a BB gun.” The incident was all filmed on a cell phone and sent to the NCHA,

I reported how the NCHA Executive Committee, as well as Grievance Committee found that he was guilty of the association’s Zero Tolerance Policy.

However, the latest is that in his lawsuit, he is asking that the NCHA’s disciplinary action be voided and that he receive more than $1 million in monetary relief.He has also asked the judge to issue a temporary injunction to block the NCHA from enforcing the action while the civil case is pending.

The NCHA contends that it  has a right to suspend Manion or any other member for the association’s rule violations.

When I get back to Fort Worth (after a quick jaunt to Nebraska to attend a friend’s wedding, who was a former employee of mine at Quarter Horse News), I will make a mad dash to the Tarrant County Courthouse and get the court documents and publish them.

I usually don’t report hear-say; however I did hear that the SPCA checked out the situation and let Manion off the hook if he gelded the stallion, which he did. If they would have charged him, that would have been a felony and he could have faced a severe financial penalty as well as serve some time in jail.  Also, I heard the stallion was owned by a syndicate and that the syndicate members are upset and thinking of suing Manion as they didn’t know anything about the incident or the gelding the stallion. I’ll also check that out when I get home,

ANIMAL ABUSERS COULD HAVE TO REGISTER AS SEX OFFENDERS

On a side note about cruelty to animals, On Tucker Carlson’s TV show, he reported that several jurisdictions may soon consider motions to create registries for animal abuser the same way sex offenders are documented, He said Tennessee is currently the only state that has such a registry but such legislation has been passed in Cook County, Ill, which is home to Chicago. Also Massachusetts and Arizona are also considering legislation to create such lists.

Carlson said that “animals are helpless in the hands of humans and that it is up to us to treat them fairly, Your relationship with them is governed only by empathy and if you hurt an animal, it says a lot about how you treat people.”

That statement has been proven by the FBI, as I previously wrote an article about that.Those kids who torture and kill animals are more likely to do the same to people later in life.

To wrap this up, I had a telephone call from a Senior Editor of the Star Telegram who are covering the Manion incident and he told me it has morphed into an “animal abuse” article. He wanted to interview me about that; however, I had such poor phone coverage that I told him that would be impossible until I get home.

I should be home next week and if I can find my computer and printer, I will continue to try to give you more ”horsey” news!

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☛ Gaughan named ProRodeo Legend 9-26–17

Posted by on Sep 26, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

Gaughan named 2017 ProRodeo Legend

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – ProRodeo Hall of Famer Michael Gaughan, who was inducted as a rodeo notable in 2007, is the 2017 ProRodeo Legend who will be honored at the 10th annual Wrangler Gold Buckle Gala on Dec. 4 at the South Point Grand Ballroom in Las Vegas.
“This is a very, very nice honor to receive,” said Gaughan, 74.
The Gala, which benefits the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, begins at 6 p.m. (PT).
Gaughan played a key role in bringing the National Finals Rodeo to Las Vegas in 1985 and in 1988, thanks to the late Benny Binion, also a ProRodeo Hall of Famer, he became involved with Las Vegas Events and the Wrangler NFR Committee.
“Michael has always been a big supporter of the PRCA and professional rodeo,” said PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman. “Although we have had some tough negotiations throughout the years, Michael has always been a friend of our sport. He was a major factor in the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo moving to Las Vegas, and has provided us endless hospitality at the South Point over the years.”
Gaughan also is a long-time sponsor, first locally, and then nationally, of the NFR and the PRCA.
“I enjoy rodeo and cowboys,” said Gaughan, who has lived in Las Vegas since 1952. “I’ve only missed seven performances at the NFR since it has been in Las Vegas since 1985.”
In 2007, Gaughan became a national sponsor for the PRCA with his South Point Hotel and Casino. The South Point Hotel and Casino opened in December 2005, and was followed by the equestrian center in the spring of 2006.
The South Point also has hosted the PRCA National Convention since 2006. The South Point is also a sponsor/supporter of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame and its events and Gaughan is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Hall of Fame.
“The NFR has been great for the city, and the city has been great for the rodeo,” Gaughan said. “Having the NFR in Las Vegas has really changed the month of December in Las Vegas. December used to be a slow month here, and now December is always my best month every year. Hosting the PRCA National Convention is also very, very good for business. I went after the convention and people seem to like it here the best.”
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☛ News from the PRCA 9-25–17

Posted by on Sep 25, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NEWS FROM THE PRCA

Courtesy PRCA
Sept. 25, 2017

PRCA launching ProRodeoTV.com this month

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The PRCA is going digital, and in a big way.
This month, the PRCA is launching ProRodeoTV.com, a subscription-based product with multiple distribution channels that will livestream rodeos from around North America.
Subscribers will be able to not only follow along and watch rodeos live, but they’ll also have access to more than 50 years of PRCA rodeo archives.
ProRodeoTV will broadcast PRCA-sanctioned rodeos live from around North America, including more than 20 of the organization’s biggest rodeos in 2018.
Fans domestically will be able to watch the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER following a 12-hour delay after it has aired live. International subscribers will have live streaming access to the WNFR. The first event subscribers can stream live is the Wrangler Champions Challenge Finale in Sioux Falls, S.D., Sept. 29-30. The Sept. 29 rodeo will stream for free.
ProRodeoTV.com will be available via home computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones.
PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman, Chief Operating Officer Aaron Enget and Chief Marketing Officer Steve Rempelos met with multiple organizations and agencies to determine what the best path for ProRodeoTV.com would be.
They determined it would be best for the PRCA to operate its own platform, giving it complete ownership rights to the content.
ProRodeoTV.com will generate revenue for its membership, providing a chance to give back to the organization.
“This is not only an opportunity to put more rodeo content at the disposal of our fans, but also a way to bring more money into the PRCA, which benefits the hard-working members of our association,” Stressman said. “ProRodeoTV is the future, and the future is now.”
The PRCA has digitized old videos as far back as the 1959 National Finals Rodeo. That process has led to the accumulation of nearly 50 years’ worth of digital content that can be streamed on ProRodeoTV.
Every PRCA rodeo broadcast by CBS Sports Network during the 2017 season will be available on demand on ProRodeoTV.com.
Recent Wrangler National Finals Rodeos have streamed live internationally. The response has been surprising. Viewers from New Zealand, Australia and Brazil, not to mention Mexico and Canada, have followed along to see who would be crowned WNFR champion and who would take home gold buckles.
With kids and adults alike turning to their phones, tablets and computers to get their entertainment, ProRodeoTV.com is one more outlet with which to reach them. It’s also the best outlet to give them a chance to connect with the foremost authority on rodeo.
“We can effectively reach our fan base with unique, live programming in a way that’s never been done before,” Stressman said. “And that’s pretty cool.”
Go to ProRodeoTV.com for details.

2. Elliot Jacoby closes 2017 strong with win at Stephenville

STEPHENVILLE, Texas – With the conclusion of the 2017 PRCA season just around the bend, a few cowboys are still hoping to cut any available corners in order to qualify for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER.
As it pertains to bull rider Elliot Jacoby, while it may be too little too late, some is better than none.
Entering the weekend ranked 19th in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings, Jacoby managed to outwit Lancaster & Jones Pro Rodeo’s Bandit for 89.5 points, notching the win at the fabled Cowboy Capital Of The World Rodeo. Not only did the Fredericksburg, Texas, native add $2,959 to his season winnings, but he got some other goodies, as well. Jacoby was No. 20 in the Sept. 25 standings with $70,593.
“It’s pretty cool,” Jacoby said. “It’s pretty close to the house, not too far. It’s cool to get a rifle, and they give some pretty cool stuff to the winner.”
Jacoby has history with Bandit, a bull capable of providing enough oomph in the one-go format. In June of this year, Jacoby bested Bandit for 86.5 points at the Parker County (Texas) Sheriff’s Posse Xtreme Bulls event. Yet again, the 26-year-old triumphed over the intimidating bull.
“He was really good,” Jacoby said. “I’ve been on him a couple times this year, and actually, that was the best I’ve ever scored on him. I was really excited to have him, and I knew I would have a good shot at winning the rodeo or placing pretty high.”
Despite recording the victory, Jacoby couldn’t help but lament on likely missing out on the WNFR.
“It’s all good to win, but I wish I would have done a lot more earlier in the season to put me in the Top 15,” he said.
After qualifying for the WNFR in 2013 and 2014, Jacoby saw his name slotted at 34th and 53rd in 2015 and 2016, respectively. Before the weekend, Jacoby was about $14,000 short of the coveted 15th place in the world standings, a mountain likely too high to climb with the hourglass short on sand. Still, this win doesn’t have Jacoby hanging his head.
“It feels really good to be staying on heading into the new year,” he said. “Hopefully I can come back and keep it up, and this next year will go a lot better.”
Other winners at the $137,371 rodeo were all-around cowboy Tuf Cooper ($6,494 in tie-down roping and steer roping), bareback rider Jake Brown (88.5 points on Pickett Rodeo’s Shady Nights), steer wrestler Dirk Tavenner (3.4 seconds), team ropers Jake Orman/Will Woodfin (4.0 seconds), saddle bronc rider Heith DeMoss (88 points on Pickett Rodeo’s Watch The Night), tie-down roper Cooper (7.3 seconds) and barrel racer Kellie Collier (15.29 seconds).

3. Award nominees announced, voting starts Oct. 2

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. –  It’s common for rodeo athletes and fans to use the hashtag “attitude of gratitude.” Each year, that gratitude is expressed at the annual PRCA Awards Banquet at Las Vegas right before the start of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER. For the first time in ProRodeo history, rodeo music directors are included in the awards ceremony.
The final online ballot process will be open Oct. 2-16 for applicable voting PRCA members. Eligible voters will need to keep an eye on their email’s inbox for voting information on Oct. 2. If no email is received for voting, contact Brandy Sorenson in rodeo administration for more information.
The winners for each category will be announced at the PRCA Awards Banquet at the South Point in Las Vegas on Dec. 6.
The following men, women and committees are among the bunch of highly-skilled and enthusiastic nominees:
Lifetime achievement award
The Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes and honors those contract personnel members of the PRCA who have dedicated their lives to the rodeo industry through their commitment, work and contributions.
* Dan Hubbell
* James Svoboda
* Jim & Julie Sutton
* Mildred Klingemann
* Pete Burns (posthumously)
Announcer of Year
* Andy Stewart
* Bob Tallman
* Mike Mathis
* Randy Corley
* Wayne Brooks
 
Bullfighter of Year
* Brandon Loden
* Clay Heger
* Cody Webster
* Dusty Tuckness
* Nathan Jestes
 
Clown of the Year
* Cody Sosebee
* JJ Harrison
* John Harrison
* Justin Rumford
* Keith Isley
 
Comedy Act of the Year
* Bert Davis
* David Whitmoyer
* Gizmo McCracken
* Johnny Dudley
* Mark Swingler
 
Dress Act of the Year
* Bobby Kerr
* Madison MacDonald
* One Arm Bandit and Co. – John, Lynn and Amanda Payne
* Rider Kiesner
* Tomas Garcilazo
 
Secretary of the Year
* Amanda Corley-Sanders
* Brenda Crowder
* Haley Bridwell
* Linda Alsbaugh
* Sandy Gwatney
 
Stock Contracting Firm of the Year
* Cervi Championship Rodeo
* Frontier Rodeo
* Pete Carr Pro Rodeo
* Powder River Rodeo
* Stace Smith Pro Rodeos
 
Small Rodeo of the Year
* Claremore, Okla.
* Coulee City, Wash.
* Elizabeth, Colo.
* Huntsville, Texas
* Monte Vista, Colo.
 
Medium Rodeo of the Year
* Amarillo, Texas
* Coleman, Texas
* Deadwood, S.D.
* Eagle, Colo.
* Stephenville, Texas
 
Large Indoor Rodeo of the Year
* Denver, Colo.
* Fort Worth, Texas
* Nampa, Idaho
* San Angelo, Texas
* San Antonio, Texas
 
Large Outdoor Rodeo of the Year
* Caldwell, Idaho
* Cheyenne, Wyo.
* Dodge City, Kan.
* Ogden, Utah
* Pendleton, Ore.
 
Music Director of the Year
* Andrew (Drew) Taylor
* Brenda Winklepleck
* Jill Franzen Loden
* Josh (Hambone) Hilton
* Randy (Stretch) Mayer

4. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com will broadcast the American Royal Rodeo in Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 29-30, beginning at 7 p.m. (CT) Sept. 29 and at 2 p.m., and 7 p.m., Sept. 30 … Four cowboys broke the bubble this week and got into the Top 15 in the Sept. 25 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings – bareback rider Ty Breuer, steer wrestler Chason Floyd, steer roper Tuf Cooper and bull rider Tristan Mize … Las Vegas Events is seeking a production manager for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. The annual event, held each year at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, is scheduled for Dec. 7-16. The production manager will work closely with the current NFR General Manager, LVE, NFRC and the PRCA on all aspects of rodeo production. For the full details of the position, including all duties and responsibilities, visit www.nfrexperience.com/news/read/203. All letters of interest and résumés may be sent to the following: WNFR Production Manager, c/o Las Vegas Events, 770 E. Warm Springs Road, Suite 140, Las Vegas, NV 89119. Résumés can also be sent directly to WNFRProductionManager@LasVegasEvents.com. All résumés must be received by Sept. 29, 2017, by 11:59 p.m. PT … ProRodeo Hall of Fame steer wrestler Jack Roddy is going to be inducted into the San Jose (Calif.) Sports Hall of Fame Nov. 9 at the SAP Center in San Jose. Roddy, who was born in San Francisco, Calif., won the PRCA steer wrestling world championships in 1966 and 1968. The San Jose Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2017 Inductees is comprised of Roddy; Ken Caminiti, MLB All-Star, Gold Glove winner and 1996 National League MVP; Dwight Clark, San Francisco 49er wide receiver, Super Bowl champion; Mark Marquess, All-American player/gold medal and NCAA championship coach; Danielle Slaton, national champion soccer player, Olympic medalist. Each inductee will be recognized with a bronze plaque permanently installed on the concourse at the SAP Center in San Jose. Including the 2017 inductees, there will be 106 South Bay sports icons enshrined in the Hall of Fame. The annual induction is an event of the San Jose Sports Authority, San Jose Arena Authority, SAP Center Management/San Jose Sharks, and the City of San Jose. The event benefits Special Olympics Northern California and high school sports programs. “San Jose’s incredibly rich and diverse sports history makes the Hall of Fame selection process very difficult each year,” said Charlie Faas, Chairman of the San Jose Sports Authority Board of Directors in a press release.  “The Class of 2017 is a wonderful representation of the deep and meaningful impact athletes and coaches with South Bay connections have made in their respective sports, locally, nationally and internationally. We are excited to welcome these five remarkable individuals into the San Jose Sports Hall of Fame.” … Allen Lewis Jordan Sr., a PRCA Gold Card member from Anza, Calif., passed away Aug. 11 after a brief battle with cancer. Jordan Sr. is the father of Allan Jordan Jr.,a former PRCA competitor and current PRCA pro official. Jordan Jr. won the California Circuit year-end titles in 1978, 1981 and 1986. Jordan Sr. joined the Rodeo Cowboys Association, a precursor to the PRCA, in 1974, competing in steer wrestling for many years. He would earn several trips to the then Sierra Circuit Finals Rodeo. Jordan hauled a good team and mounted many top cowboys on his bulldogging horse, Bob, while providing hazing duties as well. Jordan Sr. is survived by his wife, Kathy; son, Allan Jordan Jr.; and granddaughters, Allie and Myriah. A celebration of life will be held at the Lions’ Club in Norco, Calif., Oct. 28 at noon (PT).
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “I’m just trying to go about things like we have all year, taking it one steer at a time. I want to get back in the box, make a game plan and see if it works. I’m not worried about the pressure..”
– Steer wrestler Chason Floyd, who is in the No. 15 spot in the Sept. 25 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings and leads No. 16 Josh Peek by $87, told the ProRodeo Sports News about his mindset for the last week of the season.

5. Next Up

Sept. 25           Amarillo (Texas) Tri-State Fair and Rodeo begins
Sept. 25           Amarillo (Texas) Tri-State Fair and Rodeo begins
Sept. 28           Comal County Fair & Rodeo, New Braunfels, Texas, begins
Sept. 29           Wrangler Champions Challenge presented by Justin Boots, Sioux Falls, S.D.
Sept. 29           American Royal Rodeo, Kansas City, Mo., begins
Sept. 29           Southern New Mexico State Fair, Las Cruces, N.M., begins
Sept. 29           Young Living PRCA Rodeo, Mona, Utah
Sept. 30           Rodeo de Expo Ganadera, Chihuahua, Mexico, begins
Sept. 30           Wrangler Champions Challenge presented by Justin Boots, Sioux Falls, S.D.
Sept. 30           Cowtown Rodeo, Woodstown Pilesgrove, N.J.
Oct. 1              Comal County Fair Rodeo Xtreme Bulls Division 2, New Braunfels, Texas

6. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Sept. 25, 2017
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$211,927
BB:
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$198,900
SW:
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$157,464
TR-1:
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
$133,633
TR-2:
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
$133,633
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$180,304
TD:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$188,258
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Texas
$234,136
SR:
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$84,156


7. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Sept. 25, 2017
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$211,927
2
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
174,045
3
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
151,990
4
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
139,658
5
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
136,430
6
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
128,764
7
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
112,795
8
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
105,470
9
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
104,200
10
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
97,022
11
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
89,284
12
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
89,029
13
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
78,241
14
Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
75,671
15
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
74,931
16
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
57,721
17
Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb.
56,733
18
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
55,931
19
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
55,111
20
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
54,641
Bareback Riding
1
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$198,900
2
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
135,149
3
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
123,281
4
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
112,094
5
Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev.
109,353
6
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
104,473
7
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
102,293
8
Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta
102,161
9
Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas
97,775
10
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
96,039
11
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
95,296
12
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
89,039
13
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
87,066
14
R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif.
86,245
15
Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah
83,895
16
Justin Miller, Billings, Mont.
81,366
17
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France
80,762
18
Jessy Davis, Power, Mont.
66,029
19
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
64,757
20
Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore.
62,612
Steer Wrestling
1
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$157,464
2
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
105,975
3
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
105,789
4
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
103,944
5
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
99,501
6
Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah
97,136
7
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
92,245
8
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
84,073
9
Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis.
82,968
10
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
80,053
11
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
79,684
12
Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis.
76,581
13
J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn.
74,934
14
Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La.
72,399
15
Chason Floyd, Buffalo, S.D.
71,192
16
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
71,105
17
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
67,529
18
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
66,601
19
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
66,520
20
Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark.
64,758
Team Roping (header)
1
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
$133,633
2
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
129,105
3
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
112,223
4
Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas
106,598
5
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
95,079
6
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
91,073
7
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
84,391
8
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
81,356
9
Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz.
80,985
10
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
78,964
11
Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont.
78,288
12
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
76,145
13
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
75,986
14
Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore.
75,614
15
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
74,146
16
Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta
65,338
17
Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz.
61,983
18
Hayes Smith, Central Point, Ore.
61,949
19
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
59,915
20
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
56,501
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
$133,633
2
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
129,835
3
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
117,212
4
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
103,970
5
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
99,774
6
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
98,069
7
Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
95,079
8
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
91,300
9
Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev.
81,356
10
Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas
79,374
11
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
78,387
12
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
77,960
13
Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
75,614
14
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
73,201
15
Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta
65,338
16
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
65,136
17
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
61,745
18
John Robertson, Polson, Mont.
52,238
19
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
49,836
20
Clint Summers, Lake City, Fla.
48,264
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$180,304
2
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
168,600
3
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
120,171
4
Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.
119,657
5
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
110,613
6
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
102,774
7
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
98,916
8
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
93,509
9
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
91,745
10
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
90,852
11
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
89,332
12
Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.
87,105
13
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
85,486
14
Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas
75,270
15
Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah
74,745
16
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
71,822
17
Cody Wright, Milford, Utah
65,952
18
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
64,322
19
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
60,203
20
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
54,401
Tie-down Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$188,258
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
142,194
3
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
120,554
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
119,466
5
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
102,771
6
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
97,489
7
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
97,173
8
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
92,112
9
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
92,010
10
J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah
86,299
11
Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas
85,962
12
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
85,579
13
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
84,814
14
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
83,457
15
Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas
83,256
16
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
77,055
17
Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas
76,356
18
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
75,004
19
Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas
73,367
20
Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla.
68,779
Steer Roping
1
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$84,156
2
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
78,934
3
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
72,976
4
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
68,084
5
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
64,266
6
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
56,868
7
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
50,109
8
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
49,347
9
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
49,309
10
John Bland, Turkey, Texas
48,184
11
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
47,061
12
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
45,082
13
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
44,217
14
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
42,848
15
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
41,913
16
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
40,615
17
J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla.
39,780
18
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
32,565
19
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
32,545
20
Roger Branch, Wellston, Okla.
31,183
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$234,136
2
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
201,192
3
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
152,263
4
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
130,495
5
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
120,935
6
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
106,188
7
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
102,855
8
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
102,534
9
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
100,658
10
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
97,121
11
Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas
94,128
12
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
92,991
13
Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta
92,660
14
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
87,288
15
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
83,601
16
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
82,314
17
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
81,708
18
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
78,921
19
Chase Dougherty, Canby, Ore.
70,965
20
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
70,593
*2017 Barrel Racing (Sept. 25, 2017)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas
$250,017
2
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
177,792
3
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
130,537
4
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
120,852
5
Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas
115,163
6
Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash.
111,758
7
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
97,779
8
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
93,438
9
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
93,222
10
Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M.
91,377
11
Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas
86,020
12
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
83,741
13
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
83,342
14
Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo.
77,491
15
Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas
73,820
16
Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz.
73,016
17
Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas
71,705
18
Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas
70,654
19
Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas
68,759
20
Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark.
62,607

8. 2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings

     Unofficial through Sept. 25, 2017
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$58,657
2
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
53,380
3
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
46,937
4
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
35,837
5
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
31,170
6
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
26,855
7
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
24,153
8
Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla.
22,865
9
Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas
22,353
10
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
22,257
11
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
19,858
12
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
19,279
13
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
18,231
14
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
17,522
15
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
16,992
16
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
16,269
17
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
15,578
18
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
14,142
19
Denton Fugate, Dixon, Mo.
14,138
20
Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas
13,433
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