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☛ A cheaper way to talk 8-18-17

Posted by on Aug 18, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

A CHEAPER WAY TO TALK!

 

ALL CELL PHONES ARE NOT THE SAME

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
August 18, 2017

As a businessman, the most important tools of my primary trade are: 1) my vehicle, 2) my computer and 3) my cell phone. The same goes for horse owners and trainers. Over time cell phone communication has evolved from objects that looked like bricks to the phones we use today, which are easily placed in our shirt pockets.

However, along with evolution also evolved the costs of these mobile devices as well as the cost for their service capability with a cell carrier’s ever-increasing costs. Cell phone bills have graduated over time to eliminate cost-per-minute values, roaming charges, including connection fees and opting instead for monthly charges comprised of packages or bundled costs.

Today, cell phones basically are either Android or Apple I-phones. These phones come in different sizes – from small to large – and have enough functions and storage to be considered a handheld computer that can talk. As the old adage goes, “There’s an app for that.”

Then there are the basic models that only allow texting and talking. However, the most advanced models can be used to type and send an email or a complete letter using the correct word processor app.

Whether your using the voice control to find directions to a local eating place or directions for an over-the-country trip, the modern cell phone will do it all.  However, along with modern advances also comes advances in pricing.  The cell phone industry has evolved into a comfortable multi-billion dollar industry.  Today, cell phones are used to talk on, take photographs and video, wake up to, remind us when to go to sleep, keep track of important meetings, conduct business with clients, count our steps, stay in touch with our families, contact emergency facilities in case we need them as well as ordering and purchasing items over the internet.

In fact, “do-it-all” cell phones have virtually replaced our land-line phones, our cameras, our video recorders and in some cases our computers. Technological engineering advances have produced cell phones with state-of-the-art video recording devices and photographic documentation that rivals the best-known cameras. Essentially, cell phones have become indispensable in our daily lives.

THE TECHNOLOGY:

Today, there are four main cell phone carriers operating in the United States: Verizon Wireless, AT&T Communications, Sprint and T-Mobile. The first three companies are American owned with T-Mobile being owned by Deutsche Telekom.

However, the leading cell phone systems in use today are: Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), a channel-access method used by various radio communications technologies.  CDMA is an example of multiple access, where several transmitters can send information simultaneously over a single communication channel. This allows several users to share a band of frequencies (bandwidth). To permit this without undue interference between the users, CDMA employs spread-spectrum technology and a special coding scheme, where each transmitter is assigned a code.  CDMA is used as the access method in many mobile phone standards.  IS95 also called “CDMAONE”, and its 3G evolution CDMA2000 are often referred to as CDMA, which is also used to control the speed of data transmission. Verizon Wireless and Sprint use the CDMA cell-phone technology.

Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) is the second technology in use today by cell phone carriers in the United States.  GSM is a digital mobile telephony system that is widely used in Europe and other parts of the world. GSM uses a variation of time division multiple access (TDMA) and is the most widely used of the three digital wireless telephony technologies (TDMA), (GSM), and (CDMA). AT&T and T-Mobile utilize this technology.

In my research I determined that unless you purchase an unlocked version of your favorite phone it will not work on a dual basis, e.g., each specific carrier has the cell phone manufacturer engineers design a phone that works on either the (CDMA) of (GSM) system.

However, unlocked cell phones are generally designed to work on either system which negates having to purchase a new cell phone when you change a carrier for better pricing or reception requirements. A cell phone that I’ve used and is designed to work on either cellular concept, from inception, is Motorola. In fact the cell phone provider advertises their unlocked phones will work on AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile. I Interviewed representatives from AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile and determined there were two specific reasons major carries sold cell phones locked and specific to their carrier brand.

1) It provides the carrier with a market base that’s hard to get rid of unless the owner of the cell phone decides to take an enormous loss in trading in or selling their existing cell phone, which guarantees the carrier recurring revenue and 2) the carrier maintains control of the cell phone and its owner if the phone is financed by the carrier for a specific amount of time. Essentially, you’re being punished for moving your service. The main drawback to some cell phone users is: Unlocked cell phones require a cash purchase versus purchasing a cell phone from a major carrier using the locked-and financed-basis, which is essentially signing a contract with the carrier until the phone is paid off.

Recently, I ran into an issue with my cell carrier whom I’ve been with since cell phones were invented and marketed.  After a long debate, I decided to shop my existing phone on the open carrier market. To my surprise, my phone would only work on AT&T and perhaps T-Mobile and Straight Talk Wireless which is sold at Walmart.  I also learned my existing cell phone I purchased on December 4, 2016 for $769 from AT&T was only worth $375 in August 2017.

After counseling with several cell phone retailers and wholesalers, I learned the cell phone is one of the fastest depreciating electronic devices you can purchase.  My (I-Phone 7) 128 GB (gigabyte) phone actually depreciated $53 per month to date. Therefore, in order to leave my carrier I would take a huge loss on my cell phone and perhaps the coverages at T-Mobile and Straight Talk which is exclusive to Walmart and utilizes the TracFone System that wouldn’t provide me with adequate coverage since I’m a national and international traveler.

ON THE HUNT FOR A CHEAPER ALTERNATIVE

So off to Walmart I went in search of a cheaper alternative.  Upon arrival I was enlightened by the vast array of cell phones carried by this marketing giant.

In the electronics department was a vast assortment of cell phones, represented by a myriad of cell phone carriers.  One item in particular brought my attention.  Walmart has joined forces with Verizon in their pre-paid division. A pre-paid phone is one whereby the monthly bill is paid in advance using either a pre-paid card or a direct withdrawal from your bank account.

I needed some phones and services to experiment with so I purchased an I-Phone 5S 16 GB on the Walmart-Verizon Network and an LG Model on the Straight Talk Network. The curious nature of this affair is that I learned the Walmart Straight Talk System buys air time from all of the major carriers and sells it to the consumer at a reduced cost, along with matching phones.

A number of newer unlocked phones, such as the Moto G (4th Gen) are universal and; therefore, compatible with all major U.S. carriers in addition to most overseas carriers. You can choose almost any carrier or plan and all you need is a SIM card. Common U.S. carriers include: Verizon, Sprint, AT&T, T-Mobile, Cricket Wireless, AT&T Go-Phone and TracFone

THE EXPERIMENT BEGINS

After arriving home, I began the process of installing each phone’s SIM (Subscriber Identity Module)  card and charging the phone. Once the phone was completely charged I followed the activation directions and acquired my telephone numbers. The I-Phone 5S cost me $49.95 and the LG Model cost $79.00.  Afterwards, I carried both cell phones in addition to my $769 I-Phone on the AT&T Network.

For the record, the I-Phone 5S was on the Verizon-Walmart circuit or the (CDMA) system and the LG was on the AT&T-Walmart System or the (GSM).  For three weeks now I’ve been carrying the phones to compare how well they functioned against each other. The following is the outcome of the cell phone trials.

1) The Verizon Walmart I-Phone 5S functioned flawlessly.  If my AT&T I-Phone 7 had one bar of coverage, my I-Phone 5S had three (3) to four (4) bars. The camera is excellent in this little phone. The video worked excellent. Reception was outstanding with no dead zones and data speeds were lighting fast.  If I kept this phone it would cost me $40 per month for a 3 + 1 GB of data, exclusively at Walmart.  In some cases this phone had service when the AT&T I-Phone didn’t.  All of the individuals I spoke with on this phone said the sound was excellent.

2) The Walmart LG Straight Talk phone functioned flawlessly.  It’s comparable to the AT&T I-Phone 7, except when the former didn’t have coverage the LG did.  This little phone’s camera and video functioned flawlessly and there were no dead zones during testing.  If I kept this phone my cell bill would be $45 per month for unlimited talk, text and data.

FINAL ANALYSIS

In the end, if you’re not looking for the latest cell phone, there are cheaper alternatives out there besides the ones mentioned in this article. If you’re like me and you use your cell phone for your business, one of these models may suit you perfectly. That way, if you break it or lose it, you won’t be out a month’s mortgage payment on your house.

Along with this analysis, I also performed an analysis of my insurance for my phone through AT&T.  I was very unhappy to discover the replacement cost would be a $225 out-of-pocket deductible expense.  For that amount I can buy 5 I-Phone 5S’s from Walmart.  As with all I-Phones, this little model comes with fully functioning I-Cloud storage.  The same picture storage is available for either phone free of charge from Google Photos.

In my final analysis, I learned that cell coverage is predicated on cell-tower availability. I also learned the main cause of malfunctions with cell carriers is horrible customer service.

So if you’re in the horse business and you constantly are in need of a replaced, broken or wore-out phone, there are cheaper alternatives out there that function fine.

Since then I have returned to Walmart and purchased their Verizon-Walmart I-Phone 32 GB SE to use as a spare phone until I can sell my AT&T I-Phone 7.  Porting your existing cell number is easy – except if your phone is locked due to owing the carrier money.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle”

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis

Managing Member

 

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☛ QHN parent company selling 11 newspapers-8-15-17

Posted by on Aug 15, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

QUARTER HORSE NEWS PARENT COMPANY SELLING 11 PAPERS TO GATEHOUSE MEDIA

 

QUARTER HORSE NEWS NOT LISTED AS SELLING

Press release from Morris Communications
Aug. 15, 2017

In a press release dated Aug. 9, 2017, Morris Communications, the parent company of Quarter Horse News, announced they were selling 11 of its daily and non-daily newspaper holdings including its Lubbock, Texas-based commercial printing operation (West Texas Printing) and other related publications to GateHouse Media, Inc. The sale is expected to be finalized on Oct. 2, 2017. The company will focus on lifestyle and niche publications, broadband operations, property development and new business. Quarter Horse News is not listed as a publication they will be selling.

The daily newspapers they are offerings theFlorida Times-Union in Jacksonville, Fla.; the St.Augustine (Fla.) Record; The Savanah (Ga.) Morning News; TheAugusta (Ga.) Chronicle; The Athens (Ga.) Banner-Herald; Lubbock (Texas) Avalanche-Journal; Amarillo (Texas Globe-News; the Topeka (Kan.) Capital Journal; Log Cabin Democrat (Conway, Ark.); Juneau (Alaska) Empire Peninsula Clarion (Kenai, Alaska) and Homer (Alaska) News.

William S. “Billy” Morris III,Chairman of Morris Communications, will remain as publisher of the Augusta Chronicle and will oversee editorial-page policy for the three Morris newspapers in Georgia.

Morris said, “Every newspaper company in America is battling trends and redirected advertising dollars necessary for newspapers to be part of a large newspaper group to build and maintain the necessary resources to compete.”

William S.Morris IV, president and CEO of Morris Communications said, “As the company transitions to the third generation of leadership, we are enthusiastic about our plans to diversify our business holdings with print and digital communications, broadband and real estate development.

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 8-15-17

Posted by on Aug 15, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
Aug. 15, 2017

Reeves finds success in Lovington

LOVINGTON, N.M. – Matt Reeves is no stranger to winning the Lea County Fair & PRCA Rodeo.
The veteran steer wrestler most recently won it in 2009 when he split the title with Lee Graves.
He was victorious again Aug. 12 when he won the crown outright with a 7.9-second time in the two-head average.
“I had to come home and regroup because we were having trouble getting them lined out,” Reeves said. “A guy named Quinn Campbell – I talked to him about going to the Northwest (as his hazer) – and he came over (Aug. 8) and by the end of practice things were going good.”
With Campbell hazing for him, Reeves placed third in the first round with a 4.1-second time and earned $1,250 in Lawton, Okla., early last week.
Things went even better for Reeves in Lovington. The Cross Plains, Texas, cowboy placed third in the first round with a 3.8-second run and followed that up with a 4.1-second effort in the second round to clinch the average. Reeves made both of his runs on Aug. 10.
“Quinn served two more of them up at Lovington,” Reeves said. “I got three looks – all the same (at Lawton and Lovington), and I don’t remember the last time that happened for me. I had one that was running too far and I blew the barrier out and was 3.8 and my second one I was aggressive and made a good run (at 4.1 seconds). Having a guy on my team like Quinn was good because he gave me consistent looks.”
When Reeves departed Jake McClure Arena in Lovington, he earned $3,666. That visit to the pay window was key for Reeves. He was 14th in the Aug. 9 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings with $53,688, and now has he’s moved up to 13th with $58,604.
“It feels really good to win this rodeo again,” Reeves said.
This season, Reeves has been using a new full-time horse, 9-year-old Roy.
“I rode him some here and there last year, and at Jackson (Miss., in February) I just decided I was going to ride him and win on him,” Reeves said. “I finished second there and he has gotten better and better and better. I’ve been happy with how he has done.”
Reeves is a six-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2007, 2009-2010, 2012-13, 2016). A year ago, he tied his career-best season, placing second in the world standings – something he also did in 2013.
With the end of the 2017 season looming, Reeves has a simple plan to get back to Las Vegas for the seventh time.
“Win baby, and keep it going,” Reeves said. “You have to keep running them.”
Although Reeves is 39, he has no plans of leaving the rodeo arena any time soon.
“I still like getting in the pickup (truck),” he said. “When I don’t want to get in the pickup anymore I will do something else. It pays the bills and I enjoy it. I love rodeo.”
Other winners at the $212,147 rodeo were bareback rider Orin Larsen (90 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Scarlets Web), team ropers Jake Orman/Will Woodfin (10.0 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Heith DeMoss (84.5 points on Big Rafter Rodeo’s Who Knows), tie-down roper Cory Solomon (16.3 seconds on two head), barrel racer Taci Bettis (17.28 seconds), steer roper Rocky Patterson (33.2 seconds on three head) and bull rider Koby Radley (87 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Half Nuts).
  • Evans takes over steer roping lead: Steer roper Jason Evans is the new leader atop the Aug. 14 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings with $67,798. He has a $1,613 lead over last week’s leader Chet Herren, and a $2,337 edge over Vin Fisher, who is third in the standings.
  • Sherwood/Woodard win un Missoula: Matt Sherwood/Walt Woodard won the Missoula (Mont.) Stampede Aug. 12 with a 3.6-second time, which tied them for the third-fastest run of the season with Jake Orman/Tyler Domingue. Sherwood and Woodard, who have won two world championships in their careers with different partners, earned $2,641 for their performance. Sherwood moved up to 17th in the latest header world standings and Woodard is 23rd in the heeler standings.
  • Jarrett moves up: Tie-down roper Ryan Jarrett won $7,402 this past week, highlighted by winning two rodeos. He’s 12th in the latest world standings with $68,125. Jarrett moved from 17th to 12th thanks to winning the Sand & Sage Roundup in Lamar, Colo., for $1,486, and winning the Dick Stull Memorial Rodeo in Sterling, Colo., for $1,404; he also picked up $4,038 at the Lea County Fair & PRCA Rodeo in Lovington, N.M., and $474 at the Yuma (Colo.) County Fair & Rodeo.

2. Will Smith scores Sikeston victory

SIKESTON, Mo. – Saddle bronc rider Will Smith was psyched to win the Sikeston (Mo.) Jaycee Bootheel Rodeo, as he nailed an 85.5-point ride on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s Spade on Aug. 12, good for a $4,385 boost for both the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings as well as the RAM Great Lakes Circuit Standings.
“I’d been on that horse four or five times and I used to be scared of him because he bucked me off harder than most,” Smith said, adding that he finally made a successful ride on Spade a couple of years ago at the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo.
“I got more confidence on him this time,” the 28-year-old cowboy said. “That horse is scary in the chute – sometimes he’ll rear at the post, but then he just jumps and kicks down the pen and he’s the one you want to have. I was telling my travel partner, Hardy Braden, that I’d take some Spade, and he called the next day and said, ‘you got him,’ and I was excited.”
Before winning Sikeston, the South Carolina-native-turned-Missouri cowboy was 10th in the Great Lakes Circuit with $3,670 – not too far behind the current leader, Wade Sundell’s $8,659. Now, he’s No. 2 and only $3,986 away from the top.
“I’ve been coming here since 2009, and had never won it and it’s exciting – my friend, Ty Atchison, always wore the buckle from it,” Smith said.
Smith was 50th in the world standings prior to winning Sikeston thanks to picking up $8,960 for placing second in the average at the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo in Denver on Jan. 22; then $2,285 for placing second at the Heart of the North Rodeo in Spooner, Wis., on July 8. Now he’s sitting at 41st.
Sikeston marks Smith’s second win of the 2017 season, having split the win with Ross Griffin at the 41st Annual Isanti (Minn.) Firefighters Rodeo on July 8.
“The Fourth went all right – I got $5,000, and that’s good for me,” Smith said.
The 2017 season has been a difficult one outside of the arena for Smith as his grandfather fell ill and then passed away recently. Smith had taken some time off from rodeoing to spend time with his grandpa and family. The Sikeston rodeo was his first time competing since then.
“I’m going to get my circuit count in and get set up for next year so I can get to those big indoor rodeos,” Smith said, adding that he’s aiming for a shot at the San Antonio rodeo.
“I’m going to circuit bust and just stay here in the Great Lakes and try to beat that old boy (Wade) Sundell in the circuit,” Smith said.
Other winners at the $157,152 rodeo were all-around cowboy Ryle Smith ($3,465 in tie-down roping and steer wrestling), bareback rider Clayton Biglow (87 points on Pickett Rodeo’s First Place), steer wrestler Sean Mulligan (8.9 seconds on two head), team ropers Jacob Dragenhart/Zack Mabry (10.7 seconds on two head), tie-down ropers Cade Swor and Cimarron Boardman (16.4 seconds on two head each), barrel racer Lacinda Rose (16.27 seconds), and bull rider Clayton Foltyn (87 points on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s News Flash).

3. Foss is boss at Hermiston

HERMISTON, Ore. – Bareback rider Austin Foss impressed in front of his fellow Oregonians, as the 25-year-old managed to take advantage of his one and only ride at the Farm-City Pro Rodeo.
Foss, on top of Calgary Stampede’s Special Delivery, scored a sterling 89 points, notching the Redmond, Ore., native a win and a bounty of $5,534.
“It’s great to be close to home and be able to get on that good of a horse,” Foss said. “It’s more of a confidence booster, especially in a guy’s backyard.”
Foss outlasted fellow bareback riders such as Orin Larsen and Kaycee Feild en route to his first win at the Farm-City Pro Rodeo. Having drawn a quality bucking horse like Special Delivery, Foss had an idea he would have a chance to score some points in the one-go format.
“(Special Delivery) was pretty good,” Foss said. “I’ve been on that horse about two or three different times, and I’ve always done really good on him. He’s definitely one to have if the right guy gets him.”
The 2012 Bareback Riding Rookie of the Year, Foss is eyeing his fourth career Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER qualification. Having trekked to Las Vegas three times in the past four years, Foss, currently ranked 19th in the WEATHER GUARD™ PRCA World Standings, fully understands the ramifications of bringing home more than $5,500 at this time of the year.
“It’s really important,” he said. “Everybody is making that final push. We’ve only got 50-something days left, and everything is an opportunity for a guy to capitalize on. So, you got to really take advantage.
“When you can draw that good and put together a good ride, it’s all a blessing. I’m really happy.”
With his focus on the Thomas & Mack Center, Foss is committed to ensuring that his December plans include a road trip to Sin City.
“That’s everything. That’s the ultimate goal every year,” he said. “You don’t want what you’re doing to be in vain, so to say. You want to make the NFR every year, and really try as long as you can.
“It’s not over yet. There’s still a lot of rodeoing to go, so anything can happen.”
Other winners at the $194,425 rodeo were all-around cowboyClayton Hass ($1,760 in steer wrestling and team roping), steer wrestler Chason Floyd (7.5 seconds on two head), team ropers Hayes Smith/Justin Davis (9.6 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Jake Wright (88.5 points on Calgary Stampede’s Weekend Departure), tie-down roper Tyler Milligan (16.7 seconds on two head), barrel racer Kimmie Wall (17.20 seconds) and bull rider Toby Collins (87 points on Kesler Rodeo’s Goosebumps).
Wright set an arena record at the Farm-City Rodeo in Hermiston, Ore., with his 88.5-point ride on Calgary Stampede’s Weekend Departure.

4. Two-time world champion Garrison passes away 

HERMISTON, Ore. – Junior James Garrison, who won a pair of PRCA tie-down world championships in 1966 and 1970, passed away Aug. 12. He was 79.
Garrison, who was a native of Marlow, Okla., qualified for the National Finals Rodeo 10 times (1964-71, 1975 and 1977). He was the NFR average winner in 1968 and placed second in the average in 1966 and 1977.
Garrison edged ProRodeo Hall of Famer Dean Oliver by $96 for the 1966 world championship. Oliver broke ropes on his last two calves and Garrison helped his own cause by winning Round 7 with a 10.8-second time. Garrison finished the season with $24,304.
“I was lucky…awful lucky, Dean’s the greatest,” Garrison said after he won the ’66 title.
In 1970, Garrison earned $24,311 to earn his 1970 gold buckle.
“If you’re doing something you really like, then you’re always on vacation,” Garrison said. “If you’re on vacation, you don’t want it to end,” Garrison said in a March 22, 1995, issue of the ProRodeo Sports News.
In 1967, Garrison tied a calf in 7.5 seconds in Evergreen, Colo., which was the record for several years.
When Garrison was 17, he was driving a bread truck and didn’t know the slightest thing about rodeo.
Garrison’s high school girlfriend invited him to family get-togethers where they would hold goat ropings. Inspired to prove his friends wrong, Garrison began roping goats.
“I guess it was the laughing (by his friends) that started it all,” Garrison said in 1977 PRCA media guide. “I said I’d show them and learn.”
Learning to rope proved to be a wise decision for Garrison. By age 26, he qualified for his first NFR.
After his rodeo career, Garrison trained and sold roping horses and Thoroughbreds.
Garrison is survived by two daughters, Jeana and Jamie Kay.

5. Stock contractor Art Alsbaugh passes away

HERMISTON, Ore. – Art Alsbaugh, longtime PRCA stock contractor and husband of Linda Alsbaugh, 2015 PRCA Secretary of the Year, passed away Aug. 13 in Pueblo, Colo., of cancer. He was 76.
Alsbaugh was the son of ProRodeo Hall of Fame stock contractor Walt Alsbaugh. Walt was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1990 and passed away in September of 1992 at age 73.
Art and Linda were married 49 years. Art and his dad owned Alsbaugh Rodeo from 1972-94, and he and Linda started Cross Triangle Rodeo, which they owned from 1973-94. They sold them both in 1994.
The last rodeo Art and Linda worked together was the Alamosa (Colo.) Round-Up June 22-23. He was a judge at that rodeo. Art bought his Rodeo Cowboys Association card in 1965, then in 1972 went into partnership with his father. He completed in calf roping and steer wrestling.
Art worked as a pickup man, timed-event chute boss, flank man, judge and stock contractor in the rodeo world.
Art and Linda were the 2012 recipients of the Donita Barnes Lifetime Achievement Award. Information about a celebration of Art’s life is pending and will be posted on www.prorodeo.com when it is confirmed. Cards for Linda may be mailed to 14107 County Road 6 South, Alamosa CO 81101.
6. News & Notes from the rodeo trail
ProRodeoLive.com will be broadcasting the Gooding (Idaho) ProRodeo at 8 p.m. (MT) Aug. 17-19 The Wrangler NFR National Anthem Contest sign-up form is now available at www.nfrsocialarena.com/national_anthem.The final day to submit entries is Aug. 25. This year, there is only one open category, available to all age groups … The Steamboat Springs (Colo.) ProRodeo Series concluded Aug. 12. The champions of the 2017 summer series were all-around cowboy Cole Dorenkamp, bareback rider Ben Hall, saddle bronc rider Tyler Turco, bull rider Brett Custer, permit bull rider Cordell Curtis, tie-down roper Cy Eames, steer wrestler Beau Clark, team roping header Clayton Van Aken, team roping heeler Cullen Teller and barrel racer Stacey Smallwood.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “He loved rodeo and I know he would want to be remembered for his infectious smile, and loud, booming voice.”
– Lee Ann Alsbaugh-LeSueuer told the ProRodeo Sports News about her father Art Alsbaugh.

7. Next Up

Aug. 14           Wyoming State Fair & Rodeo, Douglas, Wyo.
Aug. 14           Dacotah Stampede, Aberdeen, S.D., begins
Aug. 15           Lynden (Wash.) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 15           Caldwell (Idaho) Night Rodeo begins
Aug. 15           Canby (Ore.) Rodeo begins
Aug. 16           Juneau County Fair Pro Rodeo, Mauston, Wis.
Aug. 16           Inter-State Rodeo, Coffeyville, Kan., begins
Aug. 16           Jasper (Alberta) Heritage Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           McCone County Fair PRCA Rodeo, Circle, Mont., begins
Aug. 17           Yellowstone River Roundup, Billings, Mont., begins
Aug. 17           Cassia County Fair & Rodeo, Burley, Idaho, begins
Aug. 17           Gooding (Idaho) ProRodeo begins
Aug. 17           Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo, Kalispell, Mont., begins
Aug. 17           Moses Lake (Wash.) Round-Up begins
Aug. 17           5J Exposete, Sete Lagoas, Brazil, begins
Aug. 18           Brown County Fair ProRodeo, De Pere, Wis., begins
Aug. 18           Eureka (Kan.) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Imboden (Alberta) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Seward County PRCA Rodeo, Liberal, Kan., begins
Aug. 18           Annual World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo begins, Payson, Ariz.
Aug. 18           Tehachapi (Calif.) Mountain PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Cranbook (British Columbia) ProRodeo begins
Aug. 18           North Texas State Fair & Rodeo, Denton, Texas, begins
Aug. 18           Norco (Calif.) Mounted Posse Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Pincher Creek (Alberta) ProRodeo begins
Aug. 19           Badlands Circuit Finals Steer Roping, Deadwood, S.D., begins
Aug. 19           Painted Pony Championship Rodeo, Lake Luzerne, N.Y., begins
Aug. 19           Mesquite (Texas) ProRodeo Series begins
Aug. 19           Cowtown Rodeo, Woodstown Pilesgrove, N.J., begins
Aug. 19           Fallon County Fair & Rodeo, Baker, Mont., begins
Aug. 20           Days of ’76 Stand Alone Steer Roping begins, Deadwood, S.D.

8. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Aug. 14, 2017
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$173, 702
BB:
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$174,658
SW:
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$141,452
TR-1:
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$112, 808
TR-2:
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$112,808
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$157,869
TD:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$153,931
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Texas
$209,973
SR:
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$67,798


9. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Aug. 14, 2017
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$173,702
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
129,299
3
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
123,735
4
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
123,349
5
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
109,601
6
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
102,395
7
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
92,263
8
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
86,183
9
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
75,058
10
Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
73,789
11
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
68,368
12
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
57,562
13
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
55,929
14
Curtis Cassidy, Canada
53,175
15
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
47,564
16
Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb.
46,112
17
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
45,900
18
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
44,966
19
Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta
38,583
20
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
36,812
Bareback Riding
1
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$174,659
2
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
120,211
3
Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev.
101,845
4
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
92,075
5
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
88,391
6
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
88,078
7
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
87,644
8
Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas
81,327
9
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
77,854
10
R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif.
76,524
11
Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta
73,831
12
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France,
72,178
13
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
68,171
14
Justin Miller, Billings, Mont.
66,153
15
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
66,115
16
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
62,313
17
Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah
61,800
18
Tanner Phipps, Dalton, Ga.
57,523
19
Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore.
56,575
20
Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho
52,402
Steer Wrestling
1
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$141,452
2
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
99,769
3
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
96,849
4
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
87,831
5
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
84,484
6
Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah
80,199
7
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
78,807
8
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
72,652
9
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
69,317
10
Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis.
66,976
11
Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis.
60,272
12
J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn.
60,245
13
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
58,604
14
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
55,935
15
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
54,348
16
Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark.
54,151
17
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
53,211
18
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
53,120
19
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
52,243
20
Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev.
52,058
Team Roping (header)
1
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$112,808
2
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
107,739
3
Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas
86,528
4
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
80,310
5
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
77,554
6
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
74,538
7
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
71,993
8
Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore.
70,549
9
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,248
10
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
65,573
11
Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont.
65,479
12
Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz.
62,475
13
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
62,230
14
Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta
60,423
15
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
51,446
16
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
49,618
17
Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz.
48,943
18
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
48,482
19
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
47,659
20
Nelson Wyatt, Clanton, Ala.
47,203
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$112,808
2
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
107,739
3
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
91,512
4
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
85,299
5
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
77,999
6
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
77,358
7
Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas
77,238
8
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
75,534
9
Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,549
10
Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,248
11
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
69,814
12
Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta
60,422
13
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
60,003
14
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
59,445
15
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
56,350
16
Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev.
51,446
17
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
46,736
18
John Robertson, Polson, Mont.
42,872
19
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
40,932
20
Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont.
40,914
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$157,869
2
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
141,395
3
Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.
102,493
4
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
101,362
5
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
84,186
6
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
83,613
7
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
80,450
8
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
73,282
9
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
71,768
10
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
68,477
11
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
67,726
12
Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.
67,402
13
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
67,009
14
Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah
65,766
15
Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas
62,820
16
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
51,716
17
Cody Wright, Milford, Utah
49,017
18
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
48,656
19
Tyrell J. Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont.
48,367
20
Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah
48,208
Tie-down Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$153,931
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
118,251
3
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
100,203
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
90,749
5
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
85,297
6
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
82,134
7
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
79,673
8
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
77,319
9
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
77,226
10
J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah
72,161
11
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
69,120
12
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
68,125
13
Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla.
66,679
14
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
66,203
15
Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas
64,937
16
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
64,906
17
Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas
64,867
18
Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas
64,540
19
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
61,937
20
Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas
57,289
Steer Roping
1
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$67,798
2
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
66,185
3
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
65,461
4
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
60,505
5
John Bland, Turkey, Texas
44,998
6
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
44,526
7
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
38,777
8
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
37,818
9
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
37,730
10
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
37,095
11
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
36,029
12
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
35,786
13
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
35,187
14
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
32,064
15
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
31,325
16
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
29,755
17
J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla.
29,497
18
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
28,495
19
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
26,163
20
Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M.
21,084
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$209,973
2
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
165,647
3
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
123,618
4
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
94,766
5
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
94,380
6
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
90,847
7
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
83,923
8
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
81,340
9
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
80,883
10
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
78,975
11
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
78,867
12
Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta
74,293
13
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
72,841
14
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
71,716
15
Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas
69,009
16
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
63,490
17
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
60,170
18
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
59,824
19
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
57,671
20
Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash.
57,631
*2017 Barrel Racing (Aug. 14, 2017)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas
$244,742
2
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
157,476
3
Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas
115,201
4
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
113,505
5
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
111,309
6
Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash.
104,027
7
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
94,279
8
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
87,867
9
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
80,514
10
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
80,306
11
Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas
79,110
12
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
70,954
13
Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas
69,042
14
Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas
58,551
15
Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo.
58,284
16
Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M.
56,621
17
Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark.
55,594
18
Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas
54,317
19
Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas
51,714
20
Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas
49,530
10. 2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings
     Unofficial through Aug. 14, 2017
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$58,153
2
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
40,596
3
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
31,170
4
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
26,855
5
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
22,440
6
Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla.
20,609
7
Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas
20,167
8
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
19,279
9
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
18,503
10
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
18,231
11
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
16,992
12
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
16,567
13
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
16,287
14
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
16,269
15
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
15,204
16
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
14,142
17
Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas
13,433
18
Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah
12,820
19
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
12,079
20
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
11,734
Read More

☛ PRCA Rodeo News 8-7-17

Posted by on Aug 7, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
Aug. 7, 2017

Shade Etbauer powers through Dodge City

DODGE, CITY, Kan. – For the Etbauers there’s a bright light budding underneath the cover of the family tree.
Saddle bronc rider Shade Etbauer managed to stay hot on the rodeo trail, as his 170-point two-head score netted the 23-year-old $4,926 in winnings. Settling into his groove as the rodeo progressed, Etbauer narrowly edged away from second-place bronc riders Wade Sundell and Jacobs Crawley by a single point. For the young Oklahoman, walking away from the Dodge City Roundup as champion was special.
“I’m just really excited to be able to win,” Etbauer said. “This is a rodeo I’ve always tried to win. My dad won it, and my uncles always did really good at it. I’m just glad to check it off the list.”
The 41st running of the Dodge City Roundup provided Etbauer a chance to digest the raucous southwestern Kansas atmosphere.
“It was awesome,” Etbauer said. “The crowd was amazing. Making it back to the short round and being there with all of the top guys in the world – and being able to compete against them – gets your adrenaline going.”
The Aug. 6 final performance in Dodge City was comprised of a total of 34 qualifiers to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER. Undeterred by the star power in the field, Etbauer channeled the energy in Dodge City Roundup Rodeo Arena into a pair of solid rides.
“The horse I got on in the first round was really nice,” he said. “Just a real nice horse from Harry Vold, got lucky enough and made it back to the short round.
“Then I got on Medicine Woman of Frontier Rodeo, and that was the first time I’ve ever been on her and she’s been Horse of the Year I don’t know how many times. Just to be able to get on that caliber of horse is amazing. It’s really fun to be able to compete on her and do good.”
Knowing the reputation that a horse like Medicine Woman brings, Etbauer did all he could to remain calm and collected with the four-time PRCA Saddle Bronc Horse of the Year drawn in the final round.
“The horse was really strong,” Etbauer explained. “I knew I just had to keep gassing her and keep going at it. I was just trying to do my best and it worked out for me.”
Ranked 25th in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings as of August 7, Etbauer is confident this win can compound good fortune down the final stretch of his first PRCA season.
“It helps me out a lot,” Etbauer said. “I’m trying to win Rookie of the Year, and I’m hopefully trying to get to the Finals. But just to be able to go there and win that rodeo and that much money helps me out a lot.
“It makes me want to keep pushing on.”
Other winners at the $329,794 rodeo were all-around cowboy Josh Peek ($3,529 in tie-down roping and steer wrestling), bareback rider Tilden Hooper (173 points on two head), steer wrestler Tom Lewis (12.2 seconds on three head), team ropers Colby Lovell/James Arnold (15.5 seconds on three head), tie-down roper Timber Moore (28.2 seconds on three head), barrel racer Sidney Forrest (52.32 seconds on three runs), steer roper Vin Fisher Jr. (36.7 seconds on three head) and bull rider Shane Proctor (168.5 points on two head).

2. Edgewood (Iowa) Pro Rodeo Days is all about community

EDGEWOOD, Iowa – As a proud sponsor of the PRCA, AGCO® Corporation through its brands Hesston® and Massey Ferguson, recognize that PRCA-sanctioned rodeos contribute significant support for local, regional and national charities and organizations. These charitable efforts by rodeo committees are making a positive impact on members of the various communities. Hesston and Massey Ferguson, through its Sowing Good Deeds initiative, wants to raise awareness of these many local efforts and reward one PRCA committee each year whose impact goes above and beyond.
One applicant for the Sowing Good Deeds initiative is the Edgewood (Iowa) ProRodeo Days.
The rodeo just celebrated its 30th anniversary this past June, and has been a driving force for success in the community of 864 people. Edgewood is in the northeast corner of the state, 60 miles from Waterloo, Cedar Rapids and Dubuque.
The inception of the Edgewood Rodeo Days can be traced to when Gerald Perrinjaquet brought the idea to the attention of the members of the chamber board in 1987. The idea was a hit, and the chamber started to plan the first rodeo. It was held at the Edgewood Feed Mill’s grain elevator. Back then, it wasn’t an occasion that would bring in thousands of people. After two years of having the rodeo at the feed mill, it was then held at the town football field. And the next year, once again, at the feed mill. In 1992, Day Welterlen donated the current grounds to the city of Edgewood and the event has been at the same location ever since.
All profits – which range between $15,000 and $30,000 – from the Edgewood Pro Rodeo Days Celebration are put back into Edgewood.
Over the past 30 years, profits from the rodeo have gone to improving the local school, purchasing land for an industrial park, matching funds for grants, funding for youth groups, funding for fire and ambulance services, financial assistance for Eagle Scout projects and much more.
The Edgewood Chamber of Commerce directs rodeo profits to the summer reading program, economic development initiatives like fixing up downtown buildings, and creating a revolving loan fund for start-up businesses. In Edgewood, investments have been made in the local golf course, track/football field and childcare center.
“The rodeo is the focal point that drives the other projects,” said Elise Bergan, the Edgewood Chamber of Commerce secretary, and the only paid staff member on the Edgewood Pro Rodeo Days committee. “While the rodeo is going on, we’re booking things for next year and taking notes for improvements.”
            Three Hills Rodeo has been the stock contractor for the Edgewood Pro Rodeo Days for two-plus decades, and during the three-day rodeo more than 10,000 people attend.
The backbone of the Edgewood Pro Rodeo Days Celebration are the more than 500 volunteers who put on the event.
“The volunteers are vital to the success of this rodeo and they do a wonderful job, and Three Hills Rodeo has been working with us probably the last 25 years and they help us have a great show and showcase the athletes of the PRCA,” Bergan said. “We bring rodeo to Iowa. We have a Western identity and cowboy spirit we are pretty proud of.”
The 2018 Edgewood Pro Rodeo Days are set for June 21-23. On June 24, there will be a firemen’s breakfast, followed by a demolition derby.
To submit an application for the Sowing Good Deeds initiative, visit http://www.hesston.com/sowinggooddeeds/index.html.

3. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com will be broadcasting the Omak (Wash.) Stampede at 7 p.m. (PT), Aug. 10-12, and at 2 p.m., Aug. 13 … Dale Gilbert, the son of Diamond G Rodeos’ owner Steve Gilbert, passed away Aug. 2 in St. George, Utah. He was 55. Gilbert was born June 1, 1962. He is survived by wife, Pattiand son, PRCA pickup man Keith (Aimee) Gilbert; daughter, Brandy Gilbert, and grandchildren, Kailey and Kaden Thomas “Tom” Kiplinger, a PRCA Gold Card member, passed away July 29 in McCook, Neb. He was 88. Kiplinger was born on Dec. 24, 1928, in McCook. He graduated from McCook High School in 1946, and graduated from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colo., in 1950 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Animal Science. Kiplinger was a member of the Colorado State University-Fort Collins rodeo team in the late 1940s … For the past 121 years, Cheyenne, Wyo., has hosted a true celebration of Western heritage during Frontier Days. The 2017 rodeo took place July 22-30. Rodeo attendance was 94,267, compared to 93,238 in 2016. The final rodeo on Championship Sunday, July 30, had 12,419 fans … The final numbers are still being tallied, but the July 19-22 Eagle (Colo.) County Fair & Rodeo outperformed projections and recorded sellout crowds. “We sold out Saturday (July 22) at 6:15 p.m. That was the first time ever. I think we had a good 150 people in line who didn’t get in and I felt bad for them,” Fair Manager Tanya Dahlseid told the Vail Daily. Overall, the rodeo recorded $130,478 in ticket sales and $94,500 in sponsorships. Dahlseid said 275 PRCA members competed in this year’s four nights of action … On Aug. 5, dozens of participants took part in the fifth annual Exceptional Rodeo hosted by Eagle Mount of Great Falls (Mont.) and Special Olympics Montana. Those in attendance learned how to ride bulls, rope steers and barrel race. Volunteers included staff from Eagle Mount, Special Olympics and the Great Falls Voyagers. Rodeo personnel helping with the event included stock contractor Ike Sankey, rodeo announcer Jeff Marn, rodeo clown Donnie Landis, and rodeo royalty from around Central Montana … The North Texas Fair and Rodeo in Denton announced the concert lineup for the 89th annual fair and rodeo. The fair runs Aug. 18- 26, with the rodeo taking place from Aug. 18-20. This year’s biggest acts are a mix of veterans and rising stars in the country music world. The Josh Abbott Band plays at 9:30 p.m. (CT) Aug. 18. Veteran country music star Travis Tritt plays at 9:30 p.m. Aug. 19. Cody Johnson plays at 9:30 p.m. on Aug. 24, and Ryan Bingham plays at 9:30 p.m. on Aug. 25. For reservations, visit the fair and rodeo’s website, www.ntfair.com/. Patrons can print out their tickets and bring them to the gate. The North Texas Fairgrounds are located at 2217 N. Carroll Blvd … The Inter-State Fair and Rodeo takes place Aug. 16-19 in Coffeyville, Kan. The first night of the rodeo will honor veterans. Anyone who wishes to bring pictures of a veteran they know can bring them for the ceremony. Pictures that are submitted will be put on a big screen on the first night of the rodeo … Award-winning performer Tomás Garcilazo will be a part of the 74th annual Moses Lake Roundup (Aug. 17-19) for the first time in his career. Garcilazo was PRCA Dress Act of the Year in 2007 and 2012-13.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “This is a great deal and something you don’t ever think will happen to you. To see my accomplishments in the Hall with guys like Leo Camarillo, Tom Ferguson and Joe Alexander is really cool.”
– Team roper/tie-down roper/steer roper Mike Beers told the ProRodeo Sports News after being inducted in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame Aug. 5 in Colorado Springs, Colo.

4. Next Up

Aug. 7             All American ProRodeo, West Friendship, Md., begins
Aug. 7             Larimer County Fair & Rodeo, Loveland, Colo., continues
Aug. 8             Lea County Fair & PRCA Xtreme Bulls, Division 1, Lovington, N.M.
Aug. 8             Howard County Fair, West Friendship, Md.
Aug. 8             Field of Dreams Stampede, La Crete, Alberta, continues
Aug. 8             Yuma (Colo.) County Fair & Rodeo begins
Aug. 8             Jerome (Idaho) County Fair and Rodeo begins
Aug. 9             Missoula (Mont.) Stampede Xtreme Bulls Division 2
Aug. 9             Crossett (Ark.) Riding Club 68th annual PRCA Rodeo
Aug. 9             Farm-City ProRodeo, Hermiston, Ore., begins
Aug. 9             Lawton (Okla.) Rangers Rodeo begins
Aug. 9             Lea County Fair & PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 9             Sikeston (Mo.) Jaycee Bootheel Rodeo begins
Aug. 10           Lyon County Fair PRCA Rodeo, Marshall, Minn., begins
Aug. 10           Dick Stull Memorial Rodeo, Sterling, Colo., begins
Aug. 10           Bozeman (Mont.) Stampede begins
Aug. 10           Cache County Fair and Rodeo, Logan, Utah, begins
Aug. 10           Missoula (Mont.) Stampede begins
Aug. 10           Omak (Wash.) Stampede begins
Aug. 11           3rd annual Ridin’ and Riggin’ Days, Craig, Colo., begins
Aug. 11           Lincoln County Fair Rodeo, Afton, Wyo., begins
Aug. 11           Cascade (Mont.) ProRodeo begins
Aug. 11           Summit County Fair & Rodeo, Coalville, Utah, begins
Aug. 11           NE Arkansas ProRodeo, Jonesboro, Ark., begins
Aug. 11           Sand & Sage Roundup, Lamar, Colo., begins
Aug. 11           Ralph Morgan Semi-Annual Rodeo, Lauderdale, Miss.
Aug. 11           Linn County Fair & Rodeo, Mound City, Kan., begins
Aug. 11           Catfish Stampede, Onida, S.D., begins
Aug. 11           Steamboat Springs (Colo.) ProRodeo Series begins
Aug. 11           Steamboat Springs (Colo.) ProRodeo Series, permit section (BR), begins
Aug. 11           Dawson Creek Stampede, British Columbia, begins
Aug. 12           Dawson County Fair & Rodeo, Glendive, Mont., begins
Aug. 12           Painted Pony Championship Rodeo, Lake Luzerne, N.Y.
Aug. 12           Mesquite (Texas) ProRodeo Series
Aug. 12           Cowtown Rodeo, Woodstown Pilesgrove, N.J.
Aug. 12           Kimball (Neb.) Banner Rodeo begins
Aug. 12           Sioux Falls (S.D.) Empire Fair Rodeo begins
Aug. 12           Ventura (Calif.) County Fair Rodeo begins
Aug. 13           Wyoming State Fair & Rodeo, Douglas, Wyo., begins

5. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Aug. 7, 2017
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$164,822
BB:
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$170,087
SW:
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$138,163
TR-1:
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$107,643
TR-2:
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$107,643
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$150,575
TD:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$145,829
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Texas
$187,555
SR:
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
$62,365


6. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Aug. 7, 2017
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$164,822
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
125,091
3
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
119,349
4
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
114,717
5
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
106,344
6
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
97,749
7
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
87,577
8
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
84,153
9
Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
71,909
10
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
71,711
11
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
66,811
12
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
54,226
13
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
53,399
14
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
46,279
15
Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb.
45,980
16
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
45,469
17
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
44,146
18
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
40,291
19
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
36,812
20
Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta
32,682
Bareback Riding
1
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$170,087
2
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
111,742
3
Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev.
101,475
4
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
86,186
5
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
85,581
6
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
84,029
7
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
79,470
8
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
77,854
9
R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif.
76,524
10
Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas
71,826
11
Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta
69,596
12
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France
66,369
13
Justin Miller, Billings, Mont.
65,934
14
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
63,710
15
Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah
58,939
16
Tanner Phipps, Dalton, Ga.
57,242
17
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
56,469
18
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
53,414
19
Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore.
51,502
20
Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho
50,625
Steer Wrestling
1
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$138,163
2
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
98,912
3
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
91,495
4
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
85,261
5
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
80,099
6
Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah
76,973
7
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
72,752
8
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
72,652
9
Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis.
66,900
10
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
64,412
11
Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis.
59,258
12
J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn.
55,700
13
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
54,864
14
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
53,688
15
Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark.
51,867
16
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
51,464
17
Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev.
51,024
18
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
50,664
19
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
50,291
20
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
49,663
Team Roping (header)
1
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$107,643
2
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
106,196
3
Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas
86,528
4
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
80,310
5
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
76,926
6
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
73,189
7
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
70,858
8
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,248
9
Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore.
66,009
10
Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont.
63,393
11
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
62,527
12
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
61,602
13
Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta
59,696
14
Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz.
58,588
15
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
46,300
16
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
46,271
17
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
46,026
18
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
45,532
19
Nelson Wyatt, Clanton, Ala.
42,843
20
Cory Kidd V, Statesville, N.C.
41,176
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$107,643
2
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
106,196
3
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
89,426
4
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
85,299
5
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
77,999
6
Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas
77,254
7
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
76,730
8
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
74,184
9
Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,248
10
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
66,768
11
Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
66,009
12
Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta
59,696
13
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
58,817
14
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
57,820
15
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
54,223
16
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
46,736
17
Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev.
46,026
18
John Robertson, Polson, Mont.
40,709
19
Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont.
39,916
20
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
36,573
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$150,575
2
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
137,306
3
Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.
101,911
4
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
88,548
5
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
79,722
6
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
76,690
7
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
75,948
8
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
71,456
9
Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah
65,766
10
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
65,330
11
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
65,185
12
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
64,346
13
Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.
62,805
14
Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas
61,765
15
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
61,759
16
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
49,628
17
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
48,410
18
Tyrell J. Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont.
48,367
19
Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah
48,208
20
Cody Wright, Milford, Utah
47,058
Tie-down Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$145,829
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
114,043
3
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
96,114
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
89,970
5
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
80,797
6
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
78,221
7
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
75,636
8
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
71,548
9
J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah
70,716
10
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
68,077
11
Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla.
63,459
12
Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas
63,359
13
Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas
62,227
14
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
61,988
15
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
61,937
16
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
60,291
17
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
58,112
18
Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas
57,384
19
Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla.
55,851
20
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
55,391
Steer Roping
1
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
$62,365
2
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
61,281
3
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
61,000
4
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
60,505
5
John Bland, Turkey, Texas
44,998
6
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
44,526
7
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
38,777
8
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
37,818
9
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
36,615
10
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
35,135
11
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
34,600
12
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
33,267
13
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
33,230
14
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
28,398
15
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
27,716
16
J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla.
26,292
17
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
26,135
18
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
25,803
19
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
25,170
20
Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M.
20,429
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$187,555
2
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
157,908
3
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
121,484
4
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
94,766
5
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
94,380
6
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
82,914
7
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
82,757
8
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
78,867
9
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
76,574
10
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
75,101
11
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
71,849
12
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
69,553
13
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
67,600
14
Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas
67,016
15
Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta
64,054
16
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
62,558
17
Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash.
57,631
18
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
56,964
19
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
55,624
20
Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas
54,502
*2017 Barrel Racing (Aug. 7, 2017)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas
$233,978
2
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
156,141
3
Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas
115,201
4
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
113,505
5
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
106,872
6
Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash.
100,556
7
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
94,279
8
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
76,565
9
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
75,301
10
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
74,858
11
Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas
73,957
12
Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas
69,042
13
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
66,042
14
Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo.
53,916
15
Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas
53,170
16
Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M.
53,098
17
Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas
52,877
18
Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark.
51,629
19
Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas
49,468
20
Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas
47,439
7. 2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings
     Unofficial through Aug. 7, 2017
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$46,572
2
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
40,596
3
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
31,170
4
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
26,235
5
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
21,086
6
Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas
20,167
7
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
19,279
8
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
18,503
9
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
16,567
10
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
16,287
11
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
16,269
12
Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla.
16,059
13
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
15,204
14
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
13,796
15
Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas
13,433
16
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
12,079
17
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
11,734
18
Markus Mariluch, Daingerfield, Texas
11,531
19
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
10,861
20
Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas
10,590
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☛ Metallic Cat big winner at NCHA Summer Spectacular 8-7-17

Posted by on Aug 7, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AUSTIN SHEPARD RIDES SIR LONG LEGS LAST TO WIN CHAMPIONSHIP OF THE NCHA SUMMER SPECTACULAR DERBY 

 

PAULA WOOD TAKES NON PRO AND METALLIC CAT IS LEADING SIRE OF BOTH OPEN AND NON-PRO

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Aug. 7, 2017

As the last cutter to show in the NCHA Summer Spectacular Open Derby finals, Austin Shepard, Summerdale, Ala., rode Sir Long Legs, the only offspring of High Brow Cat in the finals, out of Lil Lena Long Legs, to a whopping 229 to take the Open Championship.  The pair earned an estimated check of $41,097 for owner Lew Hall, Lakeland, Fla., at the finals held Sunday, Aug. 7.

The Non Pro finals was won by Paula Wood, Stephenville, Texas, riding Suen Too Be Black (BoonToo Suen x Chinas Blue Boon), owned by her husband Kobie. The pair scored a 219.5 for an estimated $18,545 paycheck.

However, the big story of this year’s event was the complete domination Metallic Cat as the leading sire of finalists – even though neither the Open nor Non-Pro champions were sired by High Brow Cat. Metallic Cat sired nine (9) Open finalists, winning 41 percent of the Open purse – $165,348 to be exact – or 46 percent of the Open purse of $359,205. Only one other sire had more than one finalist and that was Spots Hot with two (2.)

In fact, in the Open, of the first 10 horses that placed, five, or 50 percent of those horses were sired by Metallic Cat.

Other stallions represented in the Open finals included Spots Hot with two finalists, and Highbrow Cat, Hickorys Indian Pep,Dual Smart Rey, Dual Rey, OneTIme Pepto, Woody Be Tuff, Smooth As A Cat, Hydrive Cat, High Brow CD and Bet Hesa Cat, each siring one.

In the Non-Pro competition, Metallic Cat had six finalists earning $61,521 of the $186,472 total purse, or 33 percent. Two other sires had more than one finalist and they included Dual Rey with 4 earning $34,670 and Smooth As A Cat with 3 earning $18,186. Other sires represented in the Non-Pro finals included High Brow CD, Dual Smart Rey, Hydrive Cat,  Thomas E Hughes, WR This Cats Smart, CD Royal and Jazarell Cat.

Of the top 10 Non-Pro horses that showed, four were sired by Metallic Cat.

Altogether, Metallic Cat had 15 finalists in the Open and Non-Pro, taking home $226,869, or 42 percent of the total purse of $545,677 paid out in the two finals.

The leading money-earning rider was Matt Miller, who finished as Reserve Champion in the Open riding Metallic Smart Cat for $36,227 and sixth on Lou Lou Louise, earning $23,388 – for a total of $59,615. Second was Shepard, with his $41,097 for the championship riding Sir Long Legs and Tap This, finishing in a tie for 12th, taking home an additional $12,073 for a total of $53,170.

NCHA Summer spec Open results

Non-Pro Derby results

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☛ New Congress to introduce new SAFE Act, banning horse slaughter 8-7-17

Posted by on Aug 6, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NEW CONGRESS TO INTRODUCE NEW SAFE ACT TO BAN HORSE SLAUGHTER IN 2017

Aug. 6, 2017

The NEW Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act, which would prevent the horse slaughter industry from establishing operations in the United States and prohibit the export of American horses for slaughter abroad, was introduced in the Senate on Aug. 2, 2017. These House’s version of the bill was introduced earlier this year.

The bill already has bipartisan support; however, it’s vital that past co-sponsors sign on again. Also new members of the House and Senate need to be educated about the issue of horse slaughter and the importance of finally banning horse slaughter once and for all.

The fight to ban horse slaughter through a federal bill is now a decade old and each year that passes without a ban sees more than 100,000 American horses shipped over our borders to be butchered for human consumption.

Advocates are asking that you email your U.S. Representatives and Senators, urging them to cosponsor and support the SAFE Act.

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☛ AQHA Terminates Incentive Fund 8-7-17

Posted by on Aug 6, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AQHA TERMINATES INCENTIVE FUND PROGRAM

Published by AQHA
Aug. 6, 2017

As a means to conclude the program, the American Quarter Horse Association Incentive Fund   will not accept foal nominations past 2018 and, effective immediately, will no longer accept stallion nominations.

“The AQHA Incentive Fund was a landmark program for the equine industry, having paid out more than $80 million in its lifetime,” said AQHA Chief Show Officer Pete Kyle. “The fund was so successful that it became a model for many others. However, multiple factors in the past decade contributed to the Incentive Fund’s decline.”

Ultimately, a lack of participation led the AQHA Executive Committee, at its July 2017 meeting, to approve the incentive program’s termination. The conclusion of the program will allow time and resources to move to the research and development of new potential incentive programs for competitors and breeders.

With no new stallion nominations coming in, the Incentive Fund should conclude in a few years.

“For owners and nominators wondering when the last payout will be made, we are looking closely at the financial reports for the Incentive Fund and will make a decision about that very soon,” said AQHA Treasurer and Chief Operating Officer Trent Taylor. “Preliminary examination indicates it will likely pay through the 2020 show season.”

Depending on the breeding and foaling year, stallion and foal nominators can apply for a nomination refund as follows:

  • Stallion nominators for 2017 breeding season – option of refund or nominator may opt to remain in the Incentive Fund as it winds down
  • 2017 foal nominators – option of refund if the nominator is still the recorded owner of the foal or the nominator may opt to remain in the Incentive Fund as it winds down
  • Nomination payments for stallions or foals made prior to 2017 are non-refundable, as such payments have already been allocated/distributed for payout years

Refunds must be applied for by September 30, 2017.

As stated above, 2018 foals may be nominated but only if the sire was nominated for the 2017 breeding season and such stallion nominator does not request a refund.

“To anyone who has ever nominated a foal or stallion, owned or shown an Incentive Fund horse, thank you for supporting the program,” Kyle said. “It was your support that made this the greatest incentive fund program in the equine industry.”

For questions regarding the Incentive Fund and its termination, read the AQHA Incentive Fund Q&A and Incentive Fund timeline.

To request a refund, contact Brianna Charles at 806-378-4535 or bcharles@aqha.org.

AQHA News and information is a service of the American Quarter Horse Association. For more news and information, follow @AQHAnews on Twitter and visit www.aqha.com/news.

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☛ PRCA Rodeo Hall of Fame inducts 2017 class 8-6-17

Posted by on Aug 6, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRO RODEO HALL OF FAME INDUCTS 2017 CLASS

Courtesy PRCA
Aug. 6, 2017

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Stars converged at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame Saturday as a new class was enshrined into the prestigious Hall.

Randy Corley, a 12-time PRCA Announcer of the Year, joined five world champions to headline the 12-member 2017 induction class.

Corley, along with gold buckle winners including the late Buck Rutherford (all-around, 1954), Enoch Walker (saddle bronc riding, 1960), Tommy Puryear (steer wrestling, 1974), Mike Beers (team roping, 1984) and Cody Custer (bull riding, 1992), were enshrined with rodeo notable Bob Ragsdale, a 22-time National Finals Rodeo qualifier in three events.

Also inducted into the Hall were four-time bareback horse of the year, Christensen Bros.’ Smith & Velvet, and the committee for the Ogden (Utah) Pioneer Days.

For the first time in the history of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, barrel racers from the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) were amongst the class of inductees. Their inaugural class was comprised of Wanda Harper Bush, Charmayne James and a joint PRCA/WPRA equine inductee – Star Plaudit “Red.”

Corley’s résumé is ProRodeo Hall of Fame worthy. He has been selected PRCA Announcer of the Year 12 times (1984, 1990-96, 1998, 2003, 2011 and 2015). He also has been an announcer at the National Finals Rodeo 16 times (1985-86, 1992, 1994-96, 2007-2016).

“It was the worst night of sleep I had (Friday night) in 45 years,” Corley said. “I just think it was nerves. There are 259 people in the Hall and that’s not a huge number for a Hall that opened in 1979. I’m in a pretty select group and I’m so honored. My whole thing is cowboys are the stars. When they are nodding their head, you’ve already told everyone who they are.

“That’s what I strive for, and have forever, and to be a good person to everybody, inside the arena and outside the arena. Those are the deals that I think make you a better announcer because then you’re true, and true is the best way to announce.”

Puryear qualified for the NFR nine times, eight of which were consecutive, from 1971-78, and then again in 1983. The Texas bulldogger also won the gold buckle in 1974 and the NFR average title in 1976.

“This day is something that you never plan for when you’re out rodeoing. I’ve been ready for this to happen so I can stop thinking about it – it’s something you think about every day since the call that you’re in the Hall of Fame,” Puryear said. “One of the main reasons I’m here today is because of the people I had around me who supported and helped me. So many friends and family contributed to this. I never owned my own horse – I always traveled with horsemen and stayed in a positive rig. We’d go to 120 rodeos a year, and we loved every second of it.”

Puryear first joined the PRCA in 1970, and now, 47 years later, he’s recognized as one of the best steer wrestlers in PRCA history.

“Leon (Bauerle) and I rode up to Colorado Springs together – we didn’t fly, we drove up in the truck from Texas together just like we used to,” Puryear said. “It was one for the road and to relive the old times, and we still get along really well. Leon was always easy to travel with, as long as you agreed with him. But a great deal of the credit for me being here is due to Leon and his horses.”

Rutherford was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame more than half a century after he was topping the world standings across four events – bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling and bull riding.

The Oklahoma cowboy was in the Top 5 of the world standings 11 times between 1949-57, and was the 1954 all-around world champion and the first cowboy to ever win more than $40,000 in a single year (approximately $362,235 in 2017 dollars, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics).

“It’s quite an honor, and he’s a part of history,” said Claudine Rutherford, Buck’s sister-in-law. “He could do anything.”

Becky Raetzsch, Rutherford’s daughter, also was thrilled about the honor bestowed on her father.

“It’s exciting, and it gives us a chance to learn more about the history of him,” she said. “It really is quite an honor. I have his grandchildren here, all of his great-grandchildren are here, so it’s really exciting for all of them.”

Although he never won an individual event championship, he placed second in the bareback riding standings the same year he won the all-around title.

Rutherford twice finished third in the bull riding world standings (1951 and 1954).

His rodeo earnings fell flat after a bad spill slipped a disk in his back in November 1958. He then retired from rodeo and resumed ranching in his hometown until his death at 58 years old on April 28, 1988.

Walker, who won both the 1960 saddle bronc riding world championship and NFR average title, took to the skies in his ascent to ProRodeo fame – qualifying for 10 NFRs during his 20-year tenure with the Rodeo Cowboys Association.

“It’s a pretty cool deal and pretty humbling to be around the guys who are world champs. I knew a lot of them like Cody Custer and Mike Beers, and you look up to a lot of those guys. My father would have been humbled to be with them,” said Jack Walker, one of Enoch’s sons.

In 1960, the 28-year-old Walker had been knocking on the door of a gold buckle for years, placing third in 1957, second in 1958 and third again in 1959.

Walker entered the 1960 season with a plan for earning the gold buckle that literally took flight. He teamed up with Paul Templeton, who flew him from one rodeo to the next when his rodeo road trips got too hectic.

Walker arrived at the NFR in Dallas, Texas, leading the pack with $20,832 earned that season by placing 126 times at 56 rodeos and winning 21 rodeos throughout 1960, including Salinas, Calif., and Fort Worth, Texas.

He rode all 10 horses at the NFR in Dallas, placing on five of them – winning the NFR and the world title.

“I think it would have been great if he could have been here,” Jack Walker said. “It would have meant everything to him because of the caliber of people in the (ProRodeo) Hall of Fame; he would have thought it was really cool. These guys were all top of the world in their day, and I was on the bottom looking up, so it’s humbling for me to be here, but it would have been special for him to have seen it.”

Beers, a heeler, won his world championship while roping with header Dee Pickett, who was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2003. Beers qualified for the NFR 23 times in team roping (1980-95, 1997-98, 2000-03, 2007). He also qualified for the NFR in tie-down roping in 1981, 1983 and 1985 and for the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping in 1992.

“I’m going into rodeo immortality and 50 years from now, they are still going to remember my name,” Beers said. “That’s something you never think about when you’re a kid growing up rodeoing. You want to win a championship or make the Finals, but it is never a thought of being in the Hall of Fame. There’s three things I guess in my career I really remember. One was winning the world championship with Dee Pickett, the second one was making the Finals with my son, Brandon, in 2007, and now being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. This is the icing on the cake.”

Custer’s eight trips to the NFR and 1992 bull riding world championship win landed him in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

“I found out that my permanent position will be next to John Quintana, and that’s a big deal because he was my hero as a kid,” Custer said. “It’s one of those deals where I’ve looked at the stuff here (at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame) and to see it next to a guy like that and then Ronnie Rossen and Charlie Sampson, it’s a cool deal. I took a picture of it, and I’ll send it to his (Quintana’s) son. I never met John as an adult, but I knew him as a kid and he made me feel like I belonged. I remember how he made me feel as a kid, and I try do that for kids now.”

Custer first joined the PRCA in 1985 and went on to qualify for the NFR from 1987-92, and again in 1998-99. He remained an active competitor through 2002.

“The people that have come here to be with me – everyone has a piece of this and it’s not just mine,” Custer said. “Corey Navarre is here too, I rodeoed with him and if it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t have gone to the NFR in 1999 because I had wanted to go home.

“I told everyone here with me that this is theirs too – everyone from my mom and dad to the guys I rodeoed with, it’s an awesome thing. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, everything I accomplished in the arena was because of my hard work and some talent. Being inducted is just a gift in my book.”

Ragsdale, for most of his adult life, has served the sport of rodeo as a competitor and as an ambassador. On Saturday, the cowboy they call “Rags” added “Hall of Famer” to his one-of-a-kind résumé.

“It’s been a whirlwind,” Ragsdale said. “It’s just been a great experience. Kind of the last of the big events probably, for me. I’m not rodeoing anymore, so I’m reminiscing like we used to in the old days.”

Ragsdale, a 22-time NFR qualifier in steer wrestling, team roping and tie-down roping, recognized he will forever be cemented into history among the legends of the sport he holds so dear.

“Going through the Hall, that’s what’s amazing,” he said. “I know so many of them, and I can remember stories, and when I see someone, a story will pop up in my head or some event that happened. It’s neat. Even though they’re gone, I relive that in my mind.”

Ragsdale became the first and only left-handed roper to qualify for the NFR for 15 consecutive years from 1961-75. He also served as both the Vice President and President of the Rodeo Cowboys Association in the early ’70s, and is credited as the one to propose the association include “Professional” to the organization’s formal title.

Smith & Velvet was the definition of a late bloomer.

The horse, which was honored as the PRCA’s top bareback horse four times (1977, as Mr. Smith, and then 1979-80 and 1982, as Smith & Velvet), didn’t become an award-winning bucker until he was into his 20s.

This is Bobby Christensen’s third horse to be inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. Christensen also has saddle bronc horses Miss Klamath (1998) and War Paint (2011) in the Hall, but Smith & Velvet is his first bareback horse to be enshrined.

“Early on, I never would’ve believed that he’d be in the Hall of Fame, but after he won horse of the year a few times I was thinking it would happen. It’s been 34 years since the horse died – I think the best way to describe this is late in coming, but well-deserved.

“When Smith & Velvet was in his prime, everybody wanted to see him and everybody wanted him at their rodeo. I could go to a committee and say, ‘Hey, I have the bareback horse of the year if you want to hire me to bring stock to your rodeo.’ That worked a lot of places.

“Smith & Velvet knew what he was doing, and liked what he was doing. He was even-tempered, and I rode him in his early years. But I wouldn’t have wanted to ride him in his later years, that’s for sure.”

Smith & Velvet died in 1983 in a tragic car accident that killed many of Christensen’s prized NFR horses. He says the horse was the pride and joy of his rodeo company.

The Ogden (Utah) Pioneer Days celebrated its 83rd year of existence July 20-24.

The event has come a long way since its inception in 1934, when Ogden City Mayor Harman W. Peery organized a Western festival to boost the spirits of the locals and entice tourists to visit the city.

“We just got done with this year’s rodeo, and it really settled in with the community and the rodeo and the committee,” said Dave Halverson, the rodeo’s director. “We have had honors and people have shed tears of joy. People have been outstanding, and we are humbly honored to be recognized.”

The Ogden Pioneer Days is more than just a rodeo, it’s an event. It includes concerts, parades, farmer’s markets, and, of course, the rodeo at historic Ogden Pioneer Stadium.

“When you look at the community of Ogden – this is one of the biggest awards this city will receive, and so on behalf of the committee and the city, we’re honored and delighted to be so recognized,” said Alan Hall, chairman of the Ogden Pioneer Foundation. “We appreciate the (ProRodeo) Hall of Fame and the committee for the selection and all those who make this organization world class.”

Bush was multi-talented, becoming the most decorated cowgirl in the history of the WPRA (formerly the Girls Rodeo Association).

When the GRA first formed in 1948, Bush was one of the first to sign-up. All totaled, she won 32 world titles – nine all-around (1952, 1957-58, 1962-65, 1968-69), two barrel racing (1952-53), two cutting (1966, 1969), one flag race (1969), 11 calf roping (1951-56, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1966-67) and seven ribbon roping titles (1951, 1953-54, 1956-59). She finished as reserve world champion in barrel racing three separate times.

While Bush’s barrel racing world titles came before the NFR began, she qualified seven times (1959-60, 1962-65, and 1974) for the NFR during her career.

“I’m honored to accept this honor for my mom, a famous legend, an icon, and my very best friend,” said Shanna Bush, Wanda’s daughter, who qualified for the NFR in 1984. “For my dear uncle, A.C. Harper, who said my mom was a world champion sister. How deserving to be the first woman inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. History is made today, and she did it by being just Wanda.”

Bush was inducted posthumously, having passed away Dec. 29, 2015.

“She was one to shy away from publicity, interviews and pictures,” Shanna said. “Material things just didn’t mean much to mom. She taught many movie stars, singers, governors, vice presidents and their kids to ride, or they bought horses from us. But no one ever knew when they came or went from our ranch, that’s just how our family was. She was a really appreciative person always content with just what she had.”

James may have had to wait 22 years to join her legendary horse, Scamper, in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, but was ecstatic to be a part of this historic class.

“I finally get to join him (Scamper), and that’s emotional,” said James, who now makes her home in Boerne, Texas. “Today is really a big deal, not only for me, my family, but I think for all the barrel racers of the WPRA. I couldn’t be more proud and humbled to be one of the first inductees as one of the barrel racers.”

James, who grew up in Clayton, N.M., the home of the very first barrel racing National Finals Rodeo in 1959, won the first of 10 consecutive world titles at the youthful age of 14 in 1984.

James was the first WPRA member to wear the coveted No. 1 back number in 1987, and became the first barrel racer to cross the $1 million mark in career earnings. In addition to the 10 consecutive world titles (1984-1993), James and Scamper won the NFR average title six times (1984, 1986-87, 1989-90 and 1993). In 1996, Scamper became the first and only barrel horse (until 2017) to be inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

James would add a cherry on top of her illustrious career, returning to the top of the sport aboard Cruiser (Cruisin on Six) in 2002, winning her 11th world title and seventh NFR average title.

“My mom traveled a million miles with me and my whole family sacrificed, so this induction is not just about me, but also your family and friends,” James said. “The horses along the way, I couldn’t have been here without the great horses. Obviously, Scamper was a godsend. This is just like icing on the cake getting up here today and accepting this honor.”

Star Plaudit “Red” holds a very unique record in the world of professional rodeo, one that is not likely to ever be duplicated. The bay gelding won two world championships in the sport in a single year and contributed to a third, at the age of 12.

In 1962, Red, as he was affectionately known, carried his owner Sherry (Combs) Johnson to the GRA world title in the barrel racing. The horse also helped close family friend Tom Nesmith to the RCA world title in the steer wrestling, as well as the RCA all-around championship.

Johnson credits the steer wrestling with teaching Red how to run hard through the pattern.

“He (Red) was such a special, special horse,” Johnson said. “He was a really good bulldogging horse. We went to Denver, his first rodeo, and we won the go and I found out that day what run meant. He always ran his hardest. He was the best horse. I never had a horse like him, and he had heart. I believe that a barrel racer better know her barrel horse better than her husband, and I think we do.”

Red passed away at the age of 22.

With the 2017 class, the ProRodeo Hall of Fame now has enshrined 259 people, 33 animals and 28 rodeo committees.

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☛ Peter J Cofrancesco III passes at age 45 – 8-5-17

Posted by on Aug 5, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AQHA HALL OF FAMER AND PAST PRESIDENT PETER J. CONFRANCESCO III DIES AT AGE 45

Aug. 5, 2017

Peter J. Confrancesco III passes at age 45

AQHA lost a staunch supporter with the death of Peter J Cofrancesco III, 45, Sparta, N.J.≤ when he passed away  after falling ill on Tuesday, Aug. 1. His death came only days after a case displaying his memorabilia was unveiled July 26 at the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in Amarillo, Texas.  He had been inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame in March.

The son of another AQHA Icon, Peter Confrancesco Jr., Peter was raised with Quarter Horses and became the President of the (AJQHA) American Junior Quarter Horse Association on his way to becoming the President of the AQHA, an office he served from 2011-2012. In 2008, Peter was elected to the AQHA Executive Committee.

Peter and his family competed in 4-H with horses and purebred Hereford cattle, but switched their focus almost exclusively to horses as Peter moved into Amateur competition, showing halter horses. It was while competing at the All American Quarter Horse Congress that he met his wife Carmen and they were married in 1999. The couple have three children: Ireland, Peter IV and Emma.

When his father died in 2001, Peter and his siblings assumed leadership of The Grinnell Group of Companies, the family’s manufacturing, waste and recycling company. Peter also took his father’s place on the New Jersey Horse Racing Commission and, with his mother, developed a popular horse charity in Sussex County.

Peter was also influential in forming the World Conformation Horse Association, an AQHA alliance partner that holds an annual futurity, as well as classes at major shows including the AQHA World Championship Show.

Survivors include his wife, Carmen, their three children, all at home; his mother, Peggy Confrancesco; two brothers: Jason and Jarrod; a sister Darla and many friends and family.

Viewing will be held at Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church in Sparta Township on Monday, Aug. 7 from 2-8 p.m. The funeral mass will be at Our Lady of the Lake at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, immediately followed by interment in the St. Thomas of Aquin RC Cemetery, #53 Kennedy Ave., Ogdensburg, N.J.  In lieu of flowers, memorials in Peter’s memory may be made to Pope John Angel’s Fund, #18 Andover Rd., Sparta, NJ 07871.

An account has also been established as a college scholarship for Peter’s three children called the Peter J. Confrancesco III Scholarship Foundation. Contribution can be mailed in that name to 320 N. Church Rd., Sparta, NJ 06871.

Information for the above article came from the AQHA as well as other sources.

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 8-2-17

Posted by on Aug 2, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

 

Courtesy PRCA
Aug. 2, 2017

 

Cress wins hometown rodeo at Cheyenne Frontier Days

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – A hometown victory by claiming the Daddy of ’em All is how saddle bronc rider Brody Cress is continuing his winning streak.

Cress, 21, grew up just down the road from the Cheyenne Frontier Days rodeo, so the grandstands were packed with his family, friends, and thousands of rodeo fans from the Cowboy State.

“This rodeo is hard, and it has so much history, and it’s my hometown; so, it’s one I wanted more than anything,” Cress said. “I love riding in front of my family and friends, and it’s awesome to do good for them.”

His hot streak for just the month of July alone has added up to more than many saddle bronc riders win all year. Cress kicked off his winning streak during Cowboy Christmas and is showing no signs of slowing down as he’s collected weekly paychecks totaling:
* $3,418 at Greeley, Colo., on July 3
* $4,367 at Belle Fourche, S.D., on July 4
* $2,487 at Estes Park, Colo., on July 10
* $3,341 in Casper, Wyo., on July 15
* $6,930 in Salinas, Calif. on July 23

Cress followed all of that up by raking in a grand total of $14,241 by going for 256 points on three head at Cheyenne Frontier Days.

A month ago, Cress was sitting at 40th in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings, and he was at 17th prior to winning Cheyenne. Now, he’s moved up to 14th in the July 31 standings with $57,766.

Cress gained steam as Cheyenne Frontier Days progressed – he tied for fourth in the first round with an 83.5-point ride, then placed second in the second round with an 84 before nailing the win in the final round with an 88.5-point ride on Sankey Pro Rodeo & Robinson Bulls’ Black Box.

“I didn’t know it was going to happen – I tried not to get too pressured up or nervous and just have fun,” Cress said.

Cress has now burst the bubble and broken into the Top 15, but the race is on for the final two months of the 2017 season, and every cowboy is hitting the rodeo road hard.

“I have a lot of rodeoing left, and it’s close through the Top 30, so anything can happen,” Cress said. “I’ve won checks every weekend, but I’ve dang sure got to keep it up and keep going.”

Although he’s excited for his win, Cress isn’t letting his most-recent triumph alter his plans.

“It’s awesome to win it, but I’ve got to keep it up – there’s a lot of winning that has to happen to make the Finals – but, it keeps my confidence up,” Cress said. “I love getting on bucking horses and need to keep my head level.”

Cress hit the road immediately after Cheyenne to compete at the Wind River PRCA Roundup Rodeo in Riverton, Wyo. From there, he’s heading to Iowa’s Championship Rodeo in Sidney and the Dodge City (Kan.) Roundup Rodeo.

“There’s a lot of good rodeos coming up and a lot of good horses, so it’ll be a lot of fun,” Cress said.

Other winners at the $835,283 rodeo were all-around cowboy Trevor Brazile ($13,949 in team roping, steer roping and tie-down roping), bareback rider Tim O’Connell (254 points on three head), steer wrestler Baylor Roche (26.1 seconds on three head), team ropers Erich Rogers and Cory Petska, and Brandon Webb and Kollin VonAhn (28.4 seconds on three head each), tie-down roper Lane Livingston (38.0 seconds on three head), barrel racer Stevi Hillman (52.44 seconds on three runs), steer roper Brady Garten (51.6 seconds on three head) and bull rider Clayton Foltyn (255.5 points on three head).

  • Kormos ties Cheyenne record: Tie-down roper Scott Kormos won the first round at Cheyenne Frontier Days with a 9.9-second time. That time tied Kormos for the Cheyenne Frontier Days record. Kormos now shares the record with Chad Johnson (1997) and Cade Swor (2014). Kormos, who has qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo eight times (2004, 2006-2011, 2013), won $6,442 for his first-round victory.
  • Change in the standings: The only change atop the July 31 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings from a week ago is steer roper Chet Herren. The Pawhuska, Okla., cowboy is leading the standings with $60,524. Herren was third in the July 25 standings with $50,551. He moved past longtime season leader Scott Snedecor, who is now third with $59,933. Jason Evans remains second in the standings with $59,944.
  • Saddle bronc leaderboard shakeup: This past weekend, there were two changes atop the leaderboard in saddle bronc riding for the 2017 season. Clay Elliott took the top spot in the season leaderboard with a 92-point ride on Calgary Stampede’s Tiger Warrior to win the final round at the Hardgrass Bronc Match in Pollockville, Alberta, July 29. Layton Green finished second in the final round at the Hardgrass Bronc Match with a 91.5-point ride, which was the second-best saddle bronc score of the season.

 

 

2. Smith captures Deadwood title

DEADWOOD, S.D. – It has been an outstanding season for bull rider Garrett Smith.

All season, the Rexburg, Idaho, cowboy has seemingly been in the top two of the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings.

“This has been unbelievable season for me,” Smith said. “Everything seems to be clicking.”

His position in the standings – second – will not change after his stellar performance at the Deadwood Days of ’76 Rodeo (July 26-29).

Smith had an 87.5-point trip on Bar T Rodeo’s Cool Friend to capture the title in his inaugural appearance at the Deadwood Days of ’76 Rodeo.

Smith’s effort was a measure of revenge, as a year ago at Pleasant Grove, Utah, Cool Friend got the best of him.

“He bucked me off in like two seconds,” Smith said. “I really didn’t know what he was going to do this time. He kicked and spun and he was tough and it was one of those rides where you had to grit it out.”

Smith was rewarded for his ride with $4,385 in earnings. As of July 31, Smith was second in the world standings with $141,558.

“My traveling partners – Riker Carter and Steve Woolsey – wanted to go to Deadwood, so we went,” Smith said. “This feels great to win such a prestigious rodeo like Deadwood. Everything is old-school about this rodeo, and it’s really cool to be a part of it, and win. This was just awesome.”

Last week was strong for Smith. First, he earned $3,200 at the Cowboy Games & Rodeo in Salt Lake City, Utah, July 25. He followed that up by winning the Central Montana RAM Pro Rodeo in Lewistown July 27, collecting a $1,922 check. Smith also won the Medicine Hat (Alberta) Stampede and earned $2,500.

A year ago, Smith made his debut at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER. He won $77,269 and finished fifth in the world standings with $171,698.

“This year has been the most fun I’ve ever had rodeoing, and the gold buckle is the goal,” Smith said. “Last year helped me a bunch in terms of experience and I’m going to keep going to as many rodeos as I can and keep my momentum.”

Other winners at the $223,489 rodeo were all-around cowboy Paul David Tierney ($4,695 in tie-down roping and team roping), bareback rider Shane O’Connell (86.5 points on Brookman Rodeo’s Risky Business), steer wrestlers Cody Cabral and Kyle Whitaker (7.9 seconds on two head each), team ropers Kelsey Parchman/Chase Tryan (9.7 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Chet Johnson (86.5 points on Dakota Rodeo’s Bridal Shower), tie-down roper Josh Peek (17.3 seconds on two head), barrel racer Taci Bettis (17.89 seconds) and steer roper Jess Tierney (33.9 seconds on three head).

 

3. Cannon takes part in Heroes and Horses program

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Bareback rider Clint Cannon, a five-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2009-2011, 2013, 2015) recently took part in a 10-day journey as part of the Heroes and Horses program.

Micah Fink, a good friend of Cannon, is the executive director and founder of the Heroes and Horses program. The non-profit program was created by Fink in 2013.

“My buddies who are (Navy) SEALs asked me to come be a part of this with my horsemanship and rodeo experience,” Cannon said.

Fink has spent 10 years on Navy SEAL Teams, both active duty and reserves. He conducted operations involving land and undersea mobility platforms in USPACOM, USCENTCOM and a National Tasking deployment, which earned him numerous awards – including the Bronze Star.

The Heroes and Horses’ three-phase reintegration program, which is offered to qualifying veterans at no cost, utilizes the remote wilderness of Montana, in addition to the horse/human connection, to challenge and inspire personal growth in veterans suffering from mental and physical scars.

This innovative program utilizes expedition-style horse pack trips to teach self-reliance, teamwork and perseverance. Led by experienced instructors, many of whom are combat veterans and program graduates themselves, these veterans and their pack animals travel into the wilderness on epic, life-changing journeys of self-discovery.

Heroes and Horses inspires veterans to move beyond the difficulties experienced from years of war, toward a life of restoration and hope. This unique experience challenges these individuals, invokes change, and helps them to develop innovative ways to approach and solve problems. By challenging what challenges them, veterans can make peace with their past and replace devastating memories with positive ones.

“When you come home from combat, combat doesn’t make you sick – it’s not a disease,” Fink said in a One Eighty Out YouTube video. “It’s a set of experiences that are real intense. The culture changes you. The war changes you. You can’t help but be changed.”

Cannon took part in Phase 2 (application phase) of the Heroes and Horses program from July 20-29.

“We packed 10 days back in the mountains and ran a string of mules,” Cannon said. “We probably covered 130 miles and we stayed in the mountains for 10 days in the Beartooth Wilderness by Yellowstone National Park. We took these eight combat veterans back in the mountains for 10 days, and it was a tough 10 days. These guys broke down and they were wanting to fight and they were crying. We really got to see their true emotions and hear their stories.”

In Phase 3, participants can take the skills they have acquired through the completion of Phases 1 and 2 of the program, and work with either a wilderness outfitter as a hand, learning horsemanship, or working cattle on a ranch in Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho or Utah.

Cannon acknowledged the 10-day experience was beneficial to him as well.

“I was helping those guys, and they were helping me,” Cannon said. “I’m in the same transition. This is my last year of rodeo, I’m done after this year. A lot of stuff these (combat veterans) suffer from is the same thing rodeo cowboys suffer from. When you do something for 16 years and then you quit cold turkey and have to jump into regular life, it’s dramatic on you, and I’ve been experiencing that.

“These combat veterans who were on our trip have been in the military like 18 years, and that’s all they know. This Horses and Heroes program teaches them that they can’t be a soldier in the civilian world; you have to find your niche. From day one to day 10, I saw a complete change in those guys.”

Cannon said he’s trying to get some of these combat veterans work with rodeo stock contractors as part of their Phase 3.

“I would like to see these guys working at stock contractors’ ranches and feeding and going to rodeos,” Cannon said. “Any stock contractor interested in doing this, I would love to talk to them.”

 

4. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

WranglerNetwork.com will livestream the Dodge City (Kan.) Rodeo Roundup at 8 p.m. (CT), Aug. 5-6 … The Idaho Rodeo Hall of Fame inducted 15 more members on July 29 in front of a full crowd at the Canyon Crest Event Center in Twin Falls. The inductees were Harry ChartersKatherine PopeJack Pope, “Bingo,” Lisa DavisJohn DavisHarry HamiltonDean OliverSue Ellen SmithLarry SmithBev StoneGary Stoneand Johnny Urrutia. Twelve of the inductees are from Idaho, and three are from Oregon. Charters, Katherine Pope, Jake Pope and “Bingo” were all inducted posthumously. It was the fifth annual induction ceremony. The induction was preceded by a July 28 introduction and fundraiser. The Hall of Fame Association teamed up with Saint Luke’s to host a dinner fundraiser for cancer at Canyon Crest … PRCA saddle bronc rider and country up-and-comer Chancey Williams debuted the music video for his new song “Rodeo Cold Beer” exclusively for readers of The Boot on July 28. The video can be seen at this link, www.theboot.com/chancey-williams-rodeo-cold-beer-music-video/. Written by Williams and Trent Willmon – who is famous for his work with Brad Paisley, Little Big Town and more country hitmakers – “Rodeo Cold Beer” is packed with inspiration from Williams’ experiences as saddle bronc rider. “Rodeo Cold Beer” is also the title track of Chancey Williams and the Younger Brothers Band’s sophomore album, released in May … Rodeo fans attending the Dick Stull Memorial PRCA Rodeo Aug. 10-11 in Sterling, Colo., during the Logan County Fair this year will have a special treat. The fair board’s rodeo committee has booked Justin Rumford, one of the top rodeo clowns in the business, to lighten the mood during this year’s rodeo. In 2016, Rumford was named PRCA Clown of the Year for the fifth-consecutive time (2012-16) … On July 28, 6-year-old Hatti Ewert, courtesy of Children’s Western Wishes, was crowned rodeo princess for the night at the Deadwood (S.D.) Days of ’76 Rodeo in Deadwood. Hatti struggles with a rare disease called Myasenthia Gravis, which attacks her muscles and makes life a little difficult.

 

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“It was amazing to win Deadwood. This was like a hometown rodeo for me and I’m absolutely loving going down the road right now.”

– Bareback rider Shane O’Connell of Rapid City, S.D., told the ProRodeo Sports News after winning the Deadwood (S.D.) Days of ’76 Rodeo July 29.

 

 

5. Next Up

July 31            Wind River PRCA Rodeo Roundup, Riverton, Wyo., begins

July 31            Jayhawker Roundup Rodeo, Hill City, Kan., begins

Aug. 1             Dodge City (Kan.) Roundup Xtreme Bulls Division 2

Aug. 1             Northeast Montana Fair & Rodeo, Glasgow, Mont., begins

Aug. 1             High Prairie Elks ProRodeo, High Prairie, Alberta, begins

Aug. 1             Iowa’s Championship Rodeo, Sidney, Iowa, begins

Aug. 2             Garfield County Fair Extreme Bulls Division 2, Rifle, Colo.

Aug. 2             Gerry (N.Y.) Volunteer Firemen’s Rodeo begins

Aug. 2             Big Sky Rodeo ProRodeo Roundup, Great Falls, Mont., begins

Aug. 2             Dodge City (Kan.) Roundup Rodeo begins

Aug. 3               Douglas County Fair and Rodeo Xtreme Bulls Division 2, Castle Rock, Colo.

Aug. 3             Garfield County Fair & PRCA Rodeo, Rifle, Colo.

Aug. 3             Richland County Fair & Rodeo, Sidney, Mont., begins

Aug. 3             Wild Bill Hickok Rodeo, Abilene, Kan., begins

Aug. 3             Carson (Iowa) Community Rodeo begins

Aug. 3             XIT Rodeo & Reunion, Dalhart, Texas, begins

Aug. 3             War Bonnet Roundup Rodeo, Idaho Falls, Idaho, begins

Aug. 3             Kansas’ Biggest Rodeo, Phillipsburg, Kan., begins

Aug. 3             Deep South PRCA Rodeo, Winnsboro, La., begins

Aug. 4             Kootenai River Stampede, Libby, Mont.

Aug. 4             Mountain Valley Stampede, Heber City, Utah, begins

Aug. 4             Bonner County Rodeo, Sandpoint, Idaho, begins

Aug. 4             Steamboat Springs (Colo.) ProRodeo Series begins

Aug. 4             Steamboat Springs (Colo.) ProRodeo Series, permit section (BR), begins

Aug. 4             Douglas County Fair and Rodeo, Castle Rock, Colo., begins

Aug. 4             Santa Barbara (Calif.) Old Spanish Days Stock Horse Show & Rodeo, begins

Aug. 4             Strathmore (Alberta) Stampede begins

Aug. 5             Kootenai River Stampede, Libby, Mont.

Aug. 5             Mesquite (Texas) ProRodeo Series

Aug. 5             Sonoma County Fair Wine Country Rodeo, Santa Rosa, Calif.

Aug. 5             Home On The Range Champions Ride Xtreme Bulls Division 2, Sentinel Butte, N.D.

Aug. 5             Cowtown Rodeo, Woodstown Pilesgrove, N.J.

Aug. 5             Ashley (N.D.) Rodeo begins

Aug. 5             North Peace Stampede, Grimshaw, Alberta, begins

Aug. 6             Larimer County Fair & Rodeo, Loveland, Colo., begins

Aug. 7             All American ProRodeo, West Friendship, Md., begins

 

8. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through July 31, 2017

 

AA: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $163,025
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $165,544
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $134,222
TR-1: Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. $107,643
TR-2: Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil $110,343
SB: Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $144,236
TD: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $143,959
BR: Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Texas $182,290
SR: Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. $60,524

 

 

6. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through July 31, 2017

All-around
1 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $163,025
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 124,333
3 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 116,840
4 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 107,420
5 Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. 96,452
6 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 94,220
7 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 84,952
8 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 83,109
9 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 67,808
10 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 65,203
11 Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah 62,462
12 Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah 51,162
13 Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla. 46,472
14 Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb. 44,348
15 Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif. 44,154
16 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 42,302
17 Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta 40,964
18 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 35,794
19 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 34,694
20 Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta 31,826
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $165,544
2 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 106,683
3 Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev. 99,760
4 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 85,496
5 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 78,963
6 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 78,001
7 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 77,854
8 Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. 77,740
9 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 76,524
10 Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta 69,596
11 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 69,562
12 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 66,106
13 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 60,592
14 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 59,857
15 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 57,872
16 Tanner Phipps, Dalton, Ga. 52,678
17 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 51,502
18 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 49,750
19 Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. 49,705
20 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 48,619
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $134,222
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 94,490
3 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 84,858
4 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 77,932
5 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 77,589
6 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 74,617
7 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 72,448
8 Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta 70,702
9 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 65,079
10 Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta 63,626
11 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 54,765
12 J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn. 54,707
13 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 53,688
14 Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev. 51,024
15 Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La. 49,884
16 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 49,789
17 Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala. 49,663
18 Will Lummus, West Point, Miss. 49,284
19 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 49,192
20 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 48,877
Team Roping (header)
1 Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. $107,643
2 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. 100,613
3 Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas 82,115
4 Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla. 80,310
5 Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla. 72,740
6 Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. 70,657
7 Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D. 69,610
8 Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 67,308
9 Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore. 64,835
10 Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta 61,342
11 Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore. 60,986
12 Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. 59,324
13 Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz. 58,588
14 Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont. 55,464
15 Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas 42,778
16 Cory Kidd V, Statesville, N.C. 41,176
17 Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn. 40,924
18 Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz. 40,866
19 Nelson Wyatt, Clanton, Ala. 40,632
20 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 39,763
Team Roping (heeler)
1 Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil $110,343
2 Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. 100,613
3 Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo. 85,299
4 Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. 81,497
5 Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas 77,254
6 Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan. 73,586
7 Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. 72,740
8 Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas 71,653
9 Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 67,308
10 Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla. 65,227
11 Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 64,835
12 Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta 61,342
13 Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas 55,498
14 Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan. 54,298
15 Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. 49,615
16 Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif. 45,850
17 John Robertson, Polson, Mont. 40,356
18 Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev. 39,222
19 Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont. 39,030
20 Cody Pearson, Tucson, Ariz. 35,572
Saddle Bronc Riding
1 Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $144,236
2 Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta 126,676
3 Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La. 96,580
4 Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta 87,145
5 CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah 77,396
6 Jake Wright, Milford, Utah 74,881
7 Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla. 70,917
8 Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah 65,766
9 Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M. 65,222
10 Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas 64,734
11 Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La. 62,805
12 Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta 62,796
13 Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas 60,016
14 Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo. 57,766
15 Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah 56,026
16 Tyrell J. Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont. 48,367
17 Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah 48,208
18 Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb. 45,455
19 Cody Wright, Milford, Utah 42,554
20 Jake Watson, Hudsons Hope, British Columbia 41,386
Tie-down Roping
1 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $143,959
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 113,285
3 Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La. 94,110
4 Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas 89,516
5 Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas 80,194
6 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 76,250
7 Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan. 74,226
8 J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah 67,160
9 Randall Carlisle, Athens, La. 66,773
10 Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas 65,338
11 Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla. 63,341
12 Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas 61,338
13 Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan. 61,314
14 Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho 60,354
15 Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas 57,183
16 Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla. 56,603
17 Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla. 55,851
18 Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas 55,428
19 Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas 53,707
20 Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas 52,747
Steer Roping
1 Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. $60,524
2 Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas 59,944
3 Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas 59,933
4 Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas 57,190
5 John Bland, Turkey, Texas 44,268
6 J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas 43,932
7 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 37,759
8 Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. 36,615
9 Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas 36,611
10 Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo. 35,135
11 Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas 34,084
12 Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas 32,219
13 Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. 31,906
14 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 27,716
15 Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D. 25,803
16 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 25,350
17 Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas 25,170
18 Shay Good, Midland, Texas 24,629
19 J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla. 22,117
20 Reo Lohse, Kaycee, Wyo. 18,625
Bull Riding
1 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $182,290
2 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 141,558
3 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. 121,484
4 Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah 94,766
5 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 89,102
6 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 82,757
7 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 79,640
8 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 76,574
9 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 75,637
10 Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif. 70,592
11 Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas 67,016
12 Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas 66,949
13 Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla. 65,580
14 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 63,826
15 Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta 59,158
16 Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 56,964
17 Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas 54,502
18 Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah 52,306
19 Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash. 50,647
20 Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas 50,610

 

*2017 Barrel Racing (July 31, 2017)

Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.

1 Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas $230,659
2 Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas 154,142
3 Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas 115,201
4 Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif. 112,501
5 Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore. 106,744
6 Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash. 99,805
7 Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas 94,279
8 Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas 74,566
9 Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas 73,957
10 Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas 72,309
11 Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D. 67,897
12 Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas 67,227
13 Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas 65,157
14 Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo. 52,625
15 Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas 51,859
16 Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas 51,722
17 Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark. 51,629
18 Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M. 51,334
19 Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas 49,468
20 Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas 45,873

 

 

 

10. 2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings

     Unofficial through July 31, 2017

 

1 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $46,500
2 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. 40,563
3 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 31,053
4 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 26,235
5 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 21,086
6 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 20,076
7 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 19,364
8 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 16,204
9 Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla. 16,059
10 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 15,204
11 Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas 14,880
12 Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas 13,796
13 Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas 13,433
14 Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla. 12,037
15 Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla. 11,961
16 Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas 11,889
17 Markus Mariluch, Daingerfield, Texas 11,556
18 Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas 10,909
19 Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas 10,692
20 Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas 10,651

 

 

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