Pages Navigation Menu

ON-LINE MAGAZINE & WEB SITE - SCROLL DOWN FOR NEWS

NFR FINALS – DAY 4 – 12-11-17

Posted by on Dec 11, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NFR FINALS – DAY 4

Courtesy PRCA
Dec. 11, 2017

Benton wins $33,564 in bull riding

LAS VEGAS – Trey Benton III continues to be one of the hottest competitors at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER.

On Sunday, Dec. 10, he made it count in a way no other cowboy has.

The bull rider from Rock Island, Texas, was one of just three to ride to the whistle, doing it to the tune of 87.5 points on Andrews Rodeo’s Mo Money at the Thomas & Mack Center.

And because fewer than six riders placed, the three bull riders split the ground money, with all of it counting toward the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings.

Benton cashed in for $33,564, the most money anyone has won at a Finals rodeo where it all counted toward the standings.

He’s also leading the bull riding average with 350 points on four head. He’s the only rider to cover all four bulls, so far.

“I’m going to stick with the system I’ve had since it’s working well – I don’t want to change anything,” Benton said. “… It’s just keeping my mindset right, I’ve seen harder days than this. The past three years (at the WNFR), I partied too hard and this year I didn’t – I’m working out and eating right and not listening to outside opinions.”

Sunday was the 29th time in the history of the National Finals Rodeo that just three riders have covered.

Joining Benton in riding to the whistle were Joe Frost (83 points) and Ty Wallace (80.5 points).

Unlike in years past, Benton was healthy heading into this Finals, and it’s making a difference.

“I just kept believing in myself when there was so much doubt,” Benton said. “There’s a reason you’re here, and it sucks when you get high expectations for yourself and they don’t come out as planned.”

Three-time defending world champion and current world leader Sage Kimzey sits atop the standings with $291,576. Garrett Smith is second ($253,797) and Benton, who started the Finals in sixth, is up to third with $209,670.

It was his second win of the Finals. He placed fourth in the second round and third in the third round. His $89,115 won at the WNFR through four rounds has him in front for the RAM Top Gun Award, given to the competitor who wins the most money in one event.

He knows he has a chance to do more.

“It’s good, and I’ve got to finish my job – but I’m not getting excited yet because it’s only the fourth round,” Benton said.

 

Brown/Long tie Egusquiza/Koontz to climb team roping standings

Luke Brown and Jake Long are on a roll.

The team ropers tied Dustin Egusquiza and Kory Koontz with a time of 4.1 seconds to split the first-place win.

Brown entered the team roping header standings in fourth, while Long was fifth in the heeler standings.

Brown has shot up to second place, Long third, in their respective events.

“I feel like I’m on a spaceship right now,” Long said. “I’m feeling a lot better. I had a rough start. If we can make six more good runs, we’ll win a lot more money and we’ll have a good week.”

Brown trails team roping heading leader Kaleb Driggers by about $5,400. Team roping heeling leader Junior Nogueira leads the world standings by about $3,300.

Egusquiza is making his first WNFR appearance. Sunday marked his first WNFR win.

“I’m incredibly excited right now,” said Egusquiza, 22. To be here, to split the round with (Brown and Long), these guys are legends and my partner (Koontz) is one of the greatest legends of all time.”

The 4.1-second time was Egusquiza and Koontz’s best time of the Finals.

“Our game plan really didn’t change much, we just executed what we’d been wanting a lot better tonight,” said Koontz, adding that Egusquiza made a horse change.

Brown and Long are looking to keep climbing.

“It’s outstanding,” Brown said. “It’s a whole ton of money.”

 

Ryder Wright scores 89 points to win saddle bronc riding

At 19 years old, Ryder Wright shows no fear when he steps into the Thomas & Mack. He hides it well.

Wright scored 89 points on Stace Smith Pro Rodeos’ Pony Man to win Round 4 of the saddle bronc riding.

Wright won the first four rounds of the WNFR as a rookie last year. This was his first win of this WNFR, giving him $72,615 at the Finals.

“I thought I would be calmer this year, but I was shaking bad in the first round,” Wright said. “The atmosphere and crowd are not anything you’ll get over. You wouldn’t think it would be as different as it is, I’ve been here 13 years watching my dad (Cody) and it’s crazy how different it is to ride here.”

Wright has climbed from eighth in the world standings to start the WNFR to fourth. He’s hoping the win kickstarts the rest of his Finals.

“It definitely helps and gets your motor rolling when you’re winning,” the Utah cowboy said. “I just need to win the next six and let the cards fall where they may.”

A night after winning Round 3, Jacobs Crawley continues to lead in the world standings with $220,158.

 

Breuer notches first WNFR victory

In his third trip to the WNFR, Ty Breuer finally got his first round victory. He made it a memorable one, too.

Breuer won the bareback riding competition by tying the Round 4 record, scoring 90.5 points on Brookman Rodeo’s Risky Business.

Breuer also qualified for the WNFR in 2013 and 2016. But this was his first victory. His previous best was a tie for third last season.

“It means the world,” Breuer said. “My wife and I just had a little girl. It’s just been fun being here.”

Breuer had never been on Risky Business before. So, he called up someone who had to do a little research. It helped.

“I had heard about that horse a couple times this year and got to see it once,” said the 27-year-old from North Dakota. “I saw (Devan) Reilly get on him in the Pendleton (Ore., Round-Up) short round and I called him about it. He said, ‘It’s going to be fun and just let him roll.'”

Breuer did just that, tying him with Will Lowe for the Round 4 record, set in 2004.

“That’s just icing on the cake,” Breuer said. “My whole goal was to, ever since I got here, just to win a round. That’s just icing on the cake and just keep riding.”

In 2016, while on his way to winning the WNFR average and world title, Tim O’Connell placed in eight of the 10 rounds, missing out only in Rounds 6 and 9. Following a re-ride, O’Connell placed fifth and leads the world standings with $271,570, a lead of more than $100,000.

 

Struxness capitalizes with draw to win steer wrestling

When steer wrestler J.D. Struxness saw he’d drawn the same steer for Round 4 that Tyler Waguespack won with in Round 1, he knew he’d had have a good chance to at least place.

Struxness then went out and won the fourth round in 3.6 seconds.

“There’s a little bit of pressure there because they’ve done good with him and you don’t want to be the one who stubs his toe and doesn’t do good on him,” said Struxness, 23. It’s also a relief because you know they have been fast on that steer, so you know it can be done if you go make a good run.”

Last year at the WNFR – his first – Struxness won Rounds 4, 5 and 10, split the win in Round 3 and placed in six rounds.

“I’m riding a good horse, Peso,” Struxness said. “I rode him here last year, and he’s 14 years old. I just bought him last year and he works great out here. I had a good hazer over there, Jacob Shofner, and he does a good job keeping them where they need to be.”

Struxness is sitting in seventh place in the world standings with $120,203. He entered the WNFR in 13th place.

“In this building, it’s the same game plan every night,” he said. “You have to hit that start and make the best run you can with whatever steer you have. It’s a relief (to win a round) because everybody is waiting to bust that ice and win that round, so to be able to do it in the fourth round feels good, and hopefully this will set me up the rest of the week.”

World-standings leader Ty Erickson tied for fourth and remains atop the standings with $202,767.

 

Martin wins first WNFR tie-down roping buckle

In just his fourth round at the WNFR, Cooper Martin won his first career Finals go-round buckle.

Martin won the tie-down roping competition in 7.6 seconds.

He tied for fifth for his first Finals check in Round 3, then came back to win Sunday.

“I can’t even describe what it feels like to win,” said Martin, 20. “Just even riding in the grand entry is incredible. I have been watching these guys rope since I was 7 years old, and to be with them out here roping is just phenomenal. I’ve been roping all fall to try and get ready for this.”

Martin’s winnings (he’s won $56,961 at the WNFR) has him in sixth place in the world standings with $142,400. He opened the Finals in 14th place.

He’s been able to push aside his nerves of the bright lights of Las Vegas.

“I thought I would be more nervous than I have been, but once I got in the building I seemed to relax a little bit because I know I got here for a reason and this has been a blast,” he said.

 

Tuf Cooper is in first place in the world with $205,945.

 

Moore notches fifth buckle

Barrel racer Amberleigh Moore didn’t have the easiest ride. But she didn’t need to, either.

Moore, with one foot out of its stirrup, won Round 4 in 13.56 seconds. She’s in second place in the world standings with $198,922.

“I knew there had been a lot of girls having trouble on the ground, so I came into my first barrel and I went in and sat her (my horse, Paige) and asked her to sit really hard and she did,” Moore said. “Somehow, I managed to blow my inside stirrup, so going across to two I’m fishing for it and I can’t find it, and then I’m going to three and I still can’t find it. I just said, ‘Oh well, sit hard on the third and don’t come off.'”

Her fifth buckle won at the WNFR came on a significant day.

“Today is my daughter’s 26th birthday, so I guess Paige gave her a happy birthday present,” Moore said. “I will give this buckle to her.”

Tiany Schuster, who finished the regular season first, still leads all barrel racers with $260,378.

 

Brazile holding onto all-around title

Trevor Brazile has earned $313,837 over the course of the 2017 season to maintain the lead for the all-around cowboy race.

Brazile has won $70,077 in tie-down roping at the Finals to expand his lead.

 

Fourth Performance Results, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017

Bareback riding: 1. Ty Breuer, 90.5 points on Brookman Rodeo’s Risky Business, $26,231; 2. Wyatt Denny, 87, $20,731; 3. Orin Larsen, 86, $15,654; 4. Bill Tutor, 85, $11,000; 5. Tim O’Connell, 84.5, $6,769; 6. (tie) Caleb Bennett and Richmond Champion, 84, $2,115 each; 8. (tie) Jake Vold, Steven Dent and Mason Clements, 83.5 each; 11. (tie) J.R. Vezain and Jake Brown, 81.5 each; 13. (tie) Clayton Biglow and R.C. Landingham, 80 each; 15. Tanner Aus, 77. Average standings: 1. Tim O’Connell, 348 points on four head; 2. Jake Vold, 345; 3. Richmond Champion, 342; 4. Caleb Bennett, 338; 5. Ty Breuer, 332.5; 6. R.C. Landingham, 331. World standings: 1. Tim O’Connell; $271,570; 2. Tanner Aus, $170,138; 3. Jake Vold, $167,372; 4. Richmond Champion, $157,524; 5. Orin Larsen, $149,855; 6. Wyatt Denny, $140,084; 7. Clayton Biglow, $138,153; 8. Caleb Bennett, $131,908; 9. J.R. Vezain, $130,081; 10. Ty Breuer, $125,337; 11. Jake Brown, $119,982; 12. Bill Tutor, $117,039; 13. Steven Dent, $109,998; 14. Mason Clements, $109,441; 15. R.C. Landingham, $106,031.

 

Steer wrestling: 1. J.D. Struxness, 3.6 seconds, $26,231; 2. Chason Floyd, 3.8, $20,731; 3. Dakota Eldridge, 3.9, $15,654; 4. (tie) Ty Erickson and Jon Ragatz, 4.1, $8,885 each; 6. Rowdy Parrott, 4.2, $4,231; 7. (tie) Tanner Milan, Nick Guy and Kyle Irwin, 4.4 each; 10. Tyler Pearson, 4.9; 11. Ryle Smith, 5.6; 12. Olin Hannum, 7.1; 13. Scott Guenthner, 7.3; 14. Baylor Roche, 15.8; 15. Tyler Waguespack, NT. Average standings: 1. Kyle Irwin, 16.7 seconds on four head; 2. Tyler Pearson, 16.8; 3. Jon Ragatz, 17.1; 4. Ty Erickson, 17.8; 5. Rowdy Parrott, 19.2; 6. Tanner Milan, 19.4. World standings: 1. Ty Erickson, $202,767; 2. Tyler Pearson, $177,034; 3. Tyler Waguespack, $153,290; 4. Kyle Irwin, $129,242; 5. Olin Hannum, $120,951; 6. Tanner Milan, $120,304; 7. J.D. Struxness, $120,203; 8. Baylor Roche, $118,224; 9. Jon Ragatz, $117,082; 10. Scott Guenthner, $117,032; 11. Chason Floyd, $109,453; 12. Dakota Eldridge, $106,634; 13. Ryle Smith, $103,463; 14. Nick Guy, $99,737; 15. Rowdy Parrott, $99,550.

 

Team roping: 1. (tie) Luke Brown/Jake Long, Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 4.1 seconds, $23,481 each; 3. Clay Smith/Paul Eaves, 4.3, $15,654; 4. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 4.4, $11,000; 5. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 4.5, $6,769; 6. Jr. Dees/Tyler McKnight, 5.2, $4,231; 7. Coleman Proctor/Billie Jack Saebens, 5.3; 8. Riley Minor/Brady Minor,7.2; 9. Clay Tryan/Jade Corkill, 8.8; 10. Kaleb Driggers/Junior Nogueira, Cody Snow/Wesley Thorp, Dustin Bird/Russell Cardoza, Tom Richards/Jeremy Buhler, Garrett Rogers/Jake Minor, Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, NT. Average standings: 1. Clay Smith/Paul Eaves, 18.4 seconds on four head; 2. Jr. Dees/Tyler McKnight, 22.9; 3. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 23.7; 4. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 25.5; 5. Riley Minor/Brady Minor, 31.0; 6. Luke Brown/Jake Long, 12.8 on three. World standings: (headers) 1. Kaleb Driggers, $183,535; 2. Luke Brown, $178,092; 3. Clay Smith, $176,825; 4. Erich Rogers, $163,596; 5. Jr. Dees, $134,656; 6. Dustin Egusquiza, $121,918; 7. Dustin Bird, $114,519; 8. Charly Crawford, $113,821; 9. Riley Minor, $110,818; 10. Chad Masters, $110,739; 11. Coleman Proctor, $108,033; 12. Garrett Rogers, $98,940; 13. Tom Richards, $91,415; 14. Clay Tryan, $91,383; 15. Cody Snow, $89,236. (heelers) 1. Junior Nogueira, $184,265; 2. Paul Eaves, $180,942; 3. Jake Long, $169,563; 4. Cory Petska, $163,596; 5. Russell Cardoza, $136,004; 6. Tyler McKnight, $135,066; 7. Billie Jack Saebens, $120,930; 8. Kory Koontz, $119,133; 9. Joseph Harrison, $118,063; 10. Travis Graves, $117,649; 11. Brady Minor, $110,818; 12. Jake Minor, $98,940; 13. Jade Corkill, $91,383; 14. Wesley Thorp, $90,836; 15. Jeremy Buhler, $78,006.

 

Saddle bronc riding: 1. Ryder Wright, 89 points on Stace Smith Pro Rodeos’ Pony Man, $26,231; 2. Brody Cress, 86, $20,731; 3. (tie) Hardy Braden and Heith DeMoss, 85.5, $13,327 each; 5. Audy Reed, 85, $6,769; 6. Sterling Crawley, 81.5, $4,231; 7. Jake Wright, 80.5; 8. Layton Green, 80; 9. CoBurn Bradshaw, 77; 10. Jacobs Crawley, 75.5; 11. Zeke Thurston, 72.5; 12. Taos Muncy, 62.5; 13. Cody DeMoss, Clay Elliott and Jesse Wright, NS. Average standings: 1. CoBurn Bradshaw, 337.5 points on four head; 2. Brody Cress, 330.5; 3. Sterling Crawley, 327.5; 4. Audy Reed, 325; 5. Jake Wright, 321.5; 6. Taos Muncy, 295.5. World standings: 1. Jacobs Crawley, $220,158; 2. CoBurn Bradshaw, $186,577; 3. Zeke Thurston, $184,122; 4. Ryder Wright, $171,977; 5. Hardy Braden, $157,831; 6. Brody Cress, $152,049; 7. Cody DeMoss, $151,657; 8. Sterling Crawley, $127,953; 9. Heith DeMoss, $121,107; 10. Layton Green, $120,613; 11. Taos Muncy, $116,171; 12. Jake Wright, $107,527; 13. Audy Reed, $104,687; 14. Clay Elliott, $99,332; 15. Jesse Wright, $86,630.

 

Tie-down roping: 1. Cooper Martin, 7.6 seconds, $26,231; 2. Marty Yates, 7.7 seconds, $20,731; 3. Shane Hanchey, 7.8, $15,654; 4. (tie) Randall Carlisle and Timber Moore, 8.2, $8,885 each; 6. J.C. Malone, 8.9, $4,231; 7. Cory Solomon, 9.0; 8. (tie) Trevor Brazile and Marcos Costa, 9.4 each; 10. Tuf Cooper, 9.5; 11. Tyson Durfey, 12.5; 12. Cade Swor, 20.3; 13. Matt Shiozawa, 25.2; 14. Caleb Smidt and Ryan Jarrett, NT. Average standings: 1. Trevor Brazile, 32.0 seconds on four head; 2. Marcos Costa, 33.4; 3. Cooper Martin, 33.9; 4. Tuf Cooper, 35.8; 5. Timber Moore, 36.0; 6. Shane Hanchey, 36.9. World standings: 1. Tuf Cooper, $205,945; 2. Trevor Brazile, $171,510; 3. Marcos Costa, $165,748; 4. Caleb Smidt, $156,425; 5. Shane Hanchey, $154,383; 6. Cooper Martin, $142,400; 7. Cade Swor, $132,691; 8. Ryan Jarrett, $132,286; 9. Timber Moore, $131,077; 10. Marty Yates, $127,904; 11. Tyson Durfey, $124,192; 12. Matt Shiozawa, $114,363; 13. J.C. Malone, $107,299; 14. Cory Solomon, $106,210; 15. Randall Carlisle, $104,451.

 

Barrel racing: 1. Amberleigh Moore, 13.56 seconds, $26,231; 2. Ivy Conrado, 13.58, $20,731; 3. Taci Bettis, 13.59, $15,654; 4. Hailey Kinsel, 13.63, $11,000; 5. Kathy Grimes, 13.73, $6,769; 6. Lisa Lockhart, 13.76, $4,231; 7. Nellie Miller, 13.84; 8. Tillar Murray, 13.85; 9. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, 13.87; 10. Tiany Schuster, 14.34; 11. Kassie Mowry, 15.41; 12. Kellie Collier, 16.12; 13. Kimmie Wall, 18.69; 14. Stevi Hillman, 24.59; 15. Sydni Blanchard, 25.40. Average standings: 1. Hailey Kinsel, 54.08 seconds on four runs; 2. Nellie Miller, 54.88; 3. Ivy Conrado, 54.96; 4. Kathy Grimes, 55.18; 5. Lisa Lockhart, 55.37; 6. Tiany Schuster, 56.71. World standings: 1. Tiany Schuster, $260,378; 2. Amberleigh Moore, $198,922; 3. Stevi Hillman, $195,952; 4. Nellie Miller, $184,537; 5. Hailey Kinsel, $177,245; 6. Kassie Mowry, $166,624; 7. Kathy Grimes, $139,555; 8. Ivy Conrado, $124,142; 9. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, $123,660; 10. Taci Bettis, $122,677; 11. Lisa Lockhart, $114,916; 12. Sydni Blanchard, $108,131; 13. Tillar Murray, $102,789; 14. Kellie Collier, $97,569; 15. Kimmie Wall, $86,294.

 

Bull riding: 1. Trey Benton III, 87.5 points on Andrews Rodeo’s Mo Money, $33,564; 2. Joe Frost, 83, $28,064; 3. Ty Wallace, 80.5, $22,987; 4. Sage Kimzey, Garrett Smith, Tim Bingham, Cole Melancon, Jordan Spears, Dustin Bowen, Jordan Hansen, Roscoe Jarboe, Trevor Reiste, Guthrie Murray, Brennon Eldred and Boudreaux Campbell, NS. Average standings: 1. Trey Benton III, 350 points on four head; 2. Sage Kimzey, 257 on three; 3. Joe Frost, 253.5; 4. Garrett Smith, 172.5 on two; 5. Cole Melancon, 170; 6. Ty Wallace, 167. World standings: 1. Sage Kimzey, $291,576; 2. Garrett Smith, $253,797; 3. Trey Benton III, $209,670; 4. Ty Wallace, $203,814; 5. Joe Frost, $183,989; 6. Jordan Spears, $141,423; 7. Cole Melancon, $144,081; 8. Roscoe Jarboe, $133,586; 9. Tim Bingham, $129,515; 10. Jordan Hansen, $109,429; 11. Trevor Reiste, $107,121; 12. Dustin Bowen, $104,668; 13. Brennon Eldred, $102,991; 14. Boudreaux Campbell, $102,294; 15. Guthrie Murray, $97,288.

 

All-around world standings: 1. Trevor Brazile, $313,837; 2. Tuf Cooper, $245,522; 3. Junior Nogueira, $185,987; 4. Caleb Smidt, $166,221; 5. Erich Rogers, $158,649; 6. Ryle Smith, $150,876; 7. Russell Cardoza, $149,026; 8. Dakota Eldridge, $129,854; 9. Marty Yates, $120,014.

Read More

☛ NFR Finals – Day 3 12-10-17

Posted by on Dec 10, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NFR FINALS – DAY 3 RESULTS

Courtesy PRCA
Dec. 12, 2017

O’Connell ties arena record in bareback riding with 91.5 points

LAS VEGAS – Ahead of Saturday’s Round 3 draw for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER, there was plenty of hope among rodeo fans that bareback riding defending World Champion Tim O’Connell would be matched with reigning Bareback Horse of the Year C5 Rodeo’s Virgil.
O’Connell himself prayed for a decent draw.
Everyone got what they wanted, and O’Connell made it count.
On a night when the bareback riding stock was as impressive as the riders aboard them, the reigning world champion tied the Thomas & Mack Center arena record by riding Virgil for 91.5 points on Saturday, Dec. 9, to cash in for $26,231.
“I was actually really relieved to be honest with you,” said O’Connell, who has placed in each of the first three rounds. “We were sitting at dinner and it had been like an hour after they drew and it’s the E-pen (Eliminator Pen Round). You’re just sitting there and you’re anticipating the draw sheet to come out, you’re wondering, and you’ve got things running through your head. I remember I was just sitting there and I grabbed my cross and my wedding band that’s around my neck. I just prayed to God to put me at ease and give me what I needed. He did exactly that. He gave me the world champion bucking horse.”
O’Connell tied Justin McDaniel (2007), Bobby Mote (twice in 2008) and Will Lowe (2007) for the arena record.
O’Connell entered the WNFR with the largest lead of any cowboy in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings. His win Saturday put him in first place in the aggregate scores in the race for the average title.
O’Connell tied for third in each of the first two rounds before winning Round 3. He wanted to be consistent at the Finals, and so far, so good.
“I want to be consistent every time I nod my head,” said O’Connell. “I want the fans to know I’m the world champion. I’ve worked really, really hard to be the best in the world. I feel like the second one (title) will prove it.”
O’Connell leads the world standings with $264,800. Tanner Aus is second with $170,138.

Kinsel shatters arena barrel racing record

Immediately after watching the arena record get broken, barrel racer Hailey Kinsel posted a blistering time of 13.11 seconds to set the Thomas & Mack arena record.
After two barrels, Kinsel knew something special might be happening.
“(My horse) Sister was a little different than normal tonight,” Kinsel said. “She felt a little bit more focused than ever. I felt like she was going to do something good. I mean, I didn’t know it was going to be that good. She smoked the first barrel and then she smoked the second, and I sat up and rode my third good, so I can take a little credit there, but I let her work and I don’t know what else to say. This is one night I sure won’t forget.”
Right before Kinsel’s run, she watched Kassie Mowery finish in 13.36 to break the previous arena record of 13.37.
“I can’t downplay what Kassie did,” Kinsel said. “That was a smoking run. We know from record books that it was an awesome run. … I mean, Ivy Conrado ran a 13.59 and any other night that might win the round. So, smoking runs by everybody. Hats off to the ground crew. They help us out a lot.”

Bull riders Melancon, Kimzey tie with 91.5 points

In Cole Melancon’s first trip to the WNFR he has his first round win. And he tied three-time defending World Champion Sage Kimzey to do it.
Melancon scored 91.5 points on Smith, Harper & Morgan’s Hot and Ready, while Kimzey scored 91.5 on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s Nose Bender to split the first-place winnings in Round 3.
“This is my first time here and my first win, and to ride one last night calmed my nerves a bit and then to get a 91.5 is awesome and something I’ll never forget,” Melancon said. “This is the biggest stage in rodeo, and to be a 91.5 at the Super Bowl is a great feeling.”
Kimzey continues to sit atop the world standings. He tied for second on Friday before returning to tie for the win on Saturday. Kimzey has $291,575 in earnings for 2017.
“Oh, man, I’m blessed, and I started this year putting the work in and it’s nice to see that hard work paying off,” said Kimzey, who notched his first score of at least 90 points at the WNFR. “I work for everything I get, and this year is a prime example of that. I went to the most rodeos, besides Boudreaux Campbell, and got on 170 bulls and rode 65 percent of them and put on 50,000 miles (on the road) and had 50 airline tickets.”
Kimzey was excited by breaking the 90-point threshold.
“This was my first time being 90 here, and the few opportunities I have had I let slip past me and this is pretty special for sure,” he said.
Tying with Kimzey was perfectly fine for Melancon, who sits seventh in the world.
“Sage is known as one of the greatest bull riders going, and I see myself as one of the greatest ones too, to be here,” Melancon said. “But to split it with Sage, it’s a great feeling to be able to do it at my first NFR and be in the 90s.”

Irwin posts top steer wrestling time of 2017 WNFR

Steer wrestler Kyle Irwin posted the fastest steer wrestling time of this year’s WNFR after stopping the clock in 3.4 seconds in Round 3 on Saturday.
It also gave him the second most money won at the WNFR in steer wrestling with $49,558.
“I’m going to say it was the horse (Scooter) I was riding and the hazer (Tyler Pearson),” Irwin said. “That horse, Tyler (Pearson) and I are co-owners of him, and he was the (2017) horse of the year and he makes my job so much easier because I know he’s going to do his job. We knew that steer tonight would be OK, but I had to get a good start and get my feet on the ground fast, and Scooter let me do that, and it all came together.”
Scooter wasn’t just a good horse for Irwin. He was the horse for the top four steer wrestlers of the night, helping Ty Erickson take second, Pearson third and Tyler Waguespack fourth.
“Scooter gets stronger with the second and third who ride him,” Irwin said. “I was first out on him, and that just tells you how good he is. It’s good to have those other guys riding him. It’s fun. We compete against each other, and it’s cool to see Scooter handle the pressure over and over again.”
The win has Irwin in ninth place in the world standings with $129,242.
Erickson continues to lead with $193,883.

Brown and Long heating up in team roping

A night after team ropers Luke Brown and Jake Long got on the board with a fifth-place finish, they came right back with a win in 3.9 seconds.
The win has them finding their timing.
“We’ve roped so much and we’ve practiced for this,” Brown said. “There’s one other team I know that practiced just as hard as we did, and honestly, I think we did everything we needed to do before we came here and we’re going to stick to what we do.”
Brown was able to hook the steer early and turn him for Long, setting them up for the win.
“Well, anytime you see (Luke) get it on one that fast, you know the ball’s in your court and you don’t ever want to miss that shot, because it’s a layup to win first,” Long said.
The win gives header Brown $154,611 for the 2017 season and heeler Long $146,082, good for fourth place in the world standings for each of them.
Kaleb Driggers and Junior Nogueira lead the world standings, with Driggers atop the headers with $183,535, and Nogueira leading heelers with $184,265.
Brown and Long are planning on continuing to do what’s working for them and hope things work out when the 10th round ends.
“Luke is really solid, and one thing he told me was, if we make nine good runs like we’ve practiced, we’ll win plenty of money and get out of here good,” Long said.

Former world champ scores 87.5 to win saddle bronc riding

The 2015 saddle bronc riding World Champion Jacobs Crawley had yet to score through two rounds at the WNFR.
Then came Saturday night.
Crawley notched 87.5 points on Sutton Rodeos’ South Point to win Round 3 and $26,231.
“It’s been another great year as far as the regular season is concerned, so you hope to get hot and stay hot, and I caught a spark tonight,” said Crawley, tops in the world standings.
The winning money gives Crawley $220,158 for the 2017 season. CoBurn Bradshaw is second with $186,577.
Crawley won the saddle bronc riding title in 2015, but the first two rounds of 2017 had been a struggle. That’s not the case anymore.
“It means I got the monkey off my back and getting a nice check with a lot of opportunities is where I would like to be,” he said. “Obviously, I would have liked to have done better last night, but I’m happy to be in this position.”
He’s not planning on doing anything differently as he continues to push for his second world title.
“… If you think about changing the plan based on a round win, I don’t think it’s a good idea,” said the 29-year-old Texas cowboy. “I’m happy to get it and I’m ready for seven more.”

Moore notches first round win of 2017 WNFR

Tie-down roper Timber Moore is no stranger to the WNFR after making this his sixth trip to the Finals in Las Vegas.
But last year Moore failed to place in any round.
On Saturday, he rectified that with a 7.1-second time and a first-place check worth $26,231.
“I came in second in the standings at the NFR last year and thought I had a good chance to win the world and nothing went my way and I had all kinds of trouble,” Moore said. “This win feels really good to get some money, especially after the year I had last year at the NFR. This is a big confidence boost. The run was very good and I had a really good calf and I had a really good start.”
The victory has Moore up to ninth place in the world standings.
Still leading the way is Tuf Cooper, who tied for fifth in Round 3, with $205,945. Cooper’s brother-in-law, Trevor Brazile, is in second with $171,510 after placing third on Saturday.

Brazile leading all-around, RAM Top Gun standings

Trevor Brazile moved into first place in the RAM Top Gun Award race after taking third in tie-down roping.
The finish gave Brazile $70,077 at the WNFR in the race for the most money won at the Finals.
It also gave him $313,837 in the standings for all-around cowboy, where he leads Tuf Cooper, who has $245,521.

Third Performance Results, Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017

 

Bareback riding: 1. Tim O’Connell, 91.5 points on C5 Rodeo’s Virgil (tied arena record), $26,231; 2. Richmond Champion, 89.5, $20,731; 3. Jake Vold, 87, $15,654; 4. Caleb Bennett, 86, $11,000; 5. R.C. Landingham, 84, $6,769; 6. Steven Dent, 83, $4,230; 7. Tanner Aus, 81.5; 8. Ty Breuer, 78.5; 9. J.R. Vezain, 78; 10. Orin Larsen, 73; 11. Wyatt Denny, 72.5; 12. Bill Tutor, 71; 13. Clayton Biglow, Jake Brown, Mason Clements, NS. Average standings: 1. Tim O’Connell, 263.5 points on three head; 2. Jake Vold, 261.5; 3. Richmond Champion, 258; 4. Caleb Bennett, 254; 5. R.C. Landingham 251; 6. Tanner Aus, 248.5. World standings: 1. Tim O’Connell, $264,800; 2. Tanner Aus, $170,138; 3. Jake Vold, $167,372; 4. Richmond Champion, $155,408; 5. Clayton Biglow, $138,153; 6. Orin Larsen, $134,202; 7. J.R. Vezain, $130,081; 8. Caleb Bennett, $129,793; 9. Jake Brown, $119,982; 10. Wyatt Denny, $119,353; 11. Steven Dent, $109,998; 12. Mason Clements, $109,441; 13. Bill Tutor, $106,039; 14. R.C. Landingham, $106,031; 15. Ty Breuer, $99,106.
Steer wrestling: 1. Kyle Irwin, 3.4 seconds, $26,230; 2. Ty Erickson, 3.7, $20,731; 3. Tyler Pearson, 4.0, $15,654; 4. (tie) Tyler Waguespack and Baylor Roche, 4.1, $8,885 each; 6. Rowdy Parrott, 4.3, $4,231; 7. Scott Guenthner, 4.5; 8. Jon Ragatz, 4.6; 9. Tanner Milan, 4.9; 10. (tie) Dakota Eldridge and Nick Guy, 5.0 each; 12. Ryle Smith, 5.1; 13. J.D. Struxness, 9.6; 14. Olin Hannum and Chason Floyd, NT. Average standings: 1. (tie) Tyler Pearson and Tyler Waguespack, 11.9 seconds on three head;3. Kyle Irwin, 12.3; 4. Jon Ragatz, 13.0; 5. Scott Guenthner, 13.3; 6. Ty Erickson, 13.7. World standings: 1. Ty Erickson, $193,883; 2. Tyler Pearson, $177,034; 3. Tyler Waguespack, $153,290; 4. Kyle Irwin, $129,242; 5. Olin Hannum, $120,951; 6. Tanner Milan, $120,304; 7. Baylor Roche, $118,224; 8. Scott Guenthner, $117,032; 9. Jon Ragatz, $108,198; 10. Ryle Smith, $103,463; 11. Nick Guy, $99,737; 12. Rowdy Parrott, $95,319; 13. J.D. Struxness, $93,973; 14. Dakota Eldridge, $90,981; 15. Chason Floyd, $88,723.
Team roping: 1. Luke Brown/Jake Long, 3.9 seconds, $26,231 each; 2. Jr. Dees/Tyler McKnight, 4.1, $20,731; 3. Kaleb Driggers/Junior Nogueira, 4.2, $13,327; 3. Garrett Rogers/Jake Minor, 4.2, $13,327; 5. Clay Smith/Paul Eaves, 4.9, $6,769; 6. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 9.1, $4,231; 7. Coleman Proctor/Billie Jack Saebens, 9.4; 8. Riley Minor/Brady Minor, 9.5; 9. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 9.6; 10. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 10.3; 11. Cody Snow/Wesley Thorp, Dustin Bird/Russell Cardoza, Clay Tryan/Jade Corkill, Tom Richards/Jeremy Buhler, Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, NT. Average standings: 1. Clay Smith/Paul Eaves, 14.1 seconds on three head; 2. Jr. Dees/Tyler McKnight, 17.7; 3. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 19.2; 4. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 21.1; 5. Riley Minor/Brady Minor, 23.8; 6. Kaleb Driggers/ Junior Nogueira, 30.50. World standings: (headers) 1. Kaleb Driggers, $183,535; 2. Clay Smith, $161,171; 3. Erich Rogers, $156,827; 4. Luke Brown, $154,611; 5. Jr. Dees, $130,425; 6. Dustin Bird, $114,519; 7. Charly Crawford, $113,821; 8. Riley Minor, $110,818; 9. Coleman Proctor, $108,033; 10. Chad Masters, $99,739; 11. Garrett Rogers, $98,940; 12. Dustin Egusquiza, $98,437; 13. Tom Richards, $91,415; 14. Clay Tryan, $91,383; 15. Cody Snow, $89,236. (heelers) 1. Junior Nogueira, $184,265; 2. Paul Eaves, $165,289, 3. Cory Petska, $156,827; 4. Jake Long, $146,082; 5. Russell Cardoza, $136,004; 6. Tyler McKnight, $130,835; 7. Billie Jack Saebens, $120,930; 8. Joseph Harrison, $118,063; 9. Brady Minor, $110,818; 10. Travis Graves, $106,649; 11. Jake Minor, $98,940; 12. Kory Koontz, $95,652; 13. Jade Corkill, $91,383; 14. Wesley Thorp, $90,836; 15. Jeremy Buhler, $78,006.
Saddle bronc riding: 1. Jacobs Crawley, 87.5 points on Sutton Rodeos’ South Point, $26,231; 2. Ryder Wright, 87, $20,731; 3. Taos Muncy, 85.5, $15,654; 4. (tie) CoBurn Bradshaw, Hardy Braden, Heith DeMoss and Audy Reed, 84, $5,500 each; 8. Layton Green, 83.5; 9. Sterling Crawley, 83; 10. Brody Cress, 82.5; 11. Clay Elliott, 82; 12. (tie) Zeke Thurston and Jake Wright, 79.5 each; 14. Jesse Wright, 78.5; 15. Cody DeMoss, NS. Average standings: 1. CoBurn Bradshaw, 260.5 points on three head; 2. Sterling Crawley, 246; 3. Brody Cress, 244.5; 4. Jake Wright, 241; 5. Audy Reed, 240; 6. Taos Muncy, 233. World standings: 1.Jacobs Crawley, $220,158; 2. CoBurn Bradshaw, $186,577; 3. Zeke Thurston, $184,122; 4. Cody DeMoss, $151,657; 5. Ryder Wright, $145,746; 6. Hardy Braden, $144,504; 7. Brody Cress, $131,319; 8. Sterling Crawley, $123,723; 9. Layton Green, $120,613; 10. Taos Muncy, $116,171; 11. Heith DeMoss, $107,780; 12. Jake Wright, $107,527; 13. Clay Elliott, $99,332; 14. Audy Reed, $97,918; 15. Jesse Wright, $86,630.
Tie-down roping: 1. Timber Moore, 7.1 seconds, $26,231; 2. Cooper Martin, 7.2, $20,731; 3. Trevor Brazile, 7.3, $15,654; 4. Matt Shiozawa, 7.4, $11,000; 5. (tie) Tuf Cooper and Cade Swor, 7.9, $5,500 each; 7. Marcos Costa, 8.0; 8. Tyson Durfey, 8.2; 9. J.C. Malone, 8.7; 10. Marty Yates, 9.4; 11. Cory Solomon, 9.7; 12. Randall Carlisle, 10.1; 13. Shane Hanchey, 10.5; 14. Ryan Jarrett, 19.2; 15. Caleb Smidt, NT. Average standings: 1. Trevor Brazile, 22.60 seconds on three head; 2. Cade Swor, 23.70; 3. Marcos Costa, 24.00; 4. Tyson Durfey, 26.00; 5. (tie) Tuf Cooper and Cooper Martin, 26.30 each. World standings: 1. Tuf Cooper, $205,945; 2. Trevor Brazile, $171,510; 3. Marcos Costa, $165,748; 4. Caleb Smidt, $156,425; 5. Shane Hanchey, $138,729; 6. Cade Swor, $132,691; 7. Ryan Jarrett, $132,286; 8. Tyson Durfey, $124,192; 9. Timber Moore, $122,193; 10. Cooper Martin, $116,169; 11. Matt Shiozawa, $114,363; 12. Marty Yates, $107,173; 13. Cory Solomon, $106,210; 14. J.C. Malone, $103,068; 15. Randall Carlisle, $95,566.
Barrel racing: 1. Hailey Kinsel, 13.11 seconds (new arena record), $26,231; 2. Kassie Mowry, 13.36, $20,731; 3. Amberleigh Moore, 13.57, $15,654; 4. Ivy Conrado, 13.59, $11,000; 5. Nellie Miller, 13.66, $6,769; 6. Lisa Lockhart, 13.67, $4,231; 7. Taci Bettis, 13.68; 8. Kathy Grimes, 13.70; 9. Stevi Hillman, 13.84; 10. Tiany Schuster, 14.20; 11. Kellie Collier, 14.58; 12. Tillar Murray, 18.76; 13. Sydni Blanchard, 18.90; 14. Kimmie Wall, 18.95; 15. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, 19.18. Average standings: 1.Hailey Kinsel, 40.45 seconds on three runs; 2. Nellie Miller, 41.04; 3. Ivy Conrado, 41.38; 4. Kathy Grimes, 41.45; 5. Lisa Lockhart, 41.61. 6. Tiany Schuster, 42.37. World standings: 1. Tiany Schuster, $260,378; 2. Stevi Hillman, $195,952; 3. Nellie Miller, $184,537; 4. Amberleigh Moore, $172,691; 5. Kassie Mowry, $166,624; 6. Hailey Kinsel, $166,245; 7. Kathy Grimes, $132,785; 8. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, $123,660; 9. Lisa Lockhart, $110,685; 10. Sydni Blanchard, $108,131; 11. Taci Bettis, $107,023; 12. Ivy Conrado, $103,412; 13. Tillar Murray, $102,789; 14. Kellie Collier, $97,569; 15. Kimmie Wall, $86,294.
Bull riding: 1. (tie) Sage Kimzey on Rafter H Rodeo’s Nose Bender and Cole Melancon on Smith, Harper & Morgan’s Hot and Ready, 91.5 points, $26,231 each; 3. Trey Benton III, 87, $18,404; 4. Ty Wallace, 86.5, $13,750; 5. Garrett Smith, Joe Frost, Tim Bingham, Jordan Spears, Dustin Bowen, Jordan Hansen, Roscoe Jarboe, Trevor Reiste, Guthrie Murray, Brennon Eldred, Boudreaux Campbell, NS. Average standings: 1. Trey Benton III, 262.5 on three head; 2. Sage Kimzey, 257; 3. Garrett Smith, 172.5 on two head; 4. Joe Frost, 170.5; 5. Cole Melancon, 170; 6. Roscoe Jarboe, 87 on one head. World standings: 1. Sage Kimzey, $291,575; 2. Garrett Smith, $253,797; 3. Ty Wallace, $180,827; 4. Trey Benton III, $176,106; 5. Joe Frost, $155,925; 6. Jordan Spears, $141,423; 7. Cole Melancon, $144,081; 8. Roscoe Jarboe, $133,586; 9. Tim Bingham, $129,515; 10. Jordan Hansen, $109,429; 11. Trevor Reiste, $107,121; 12. Dustin Bowen, $104,668; 13. Brennon Eldred, $102,991; 14. Boudreaux Campbell, $102,294; 15. Guthrie Murray, $97,288.
All-around world standings: 1.Trevor Brazile, $313,837; 2. Tuf Cooper, $245,522; 3. Junior Nogueira, $185,987; 4. Caleb Smidt, $166,221; 5. Erich Rogers, $151,880; 6. Ryle Smith, $150,876; 7. Russell Cardoza, $149,026; 8. Dakota Eldridge, $114,200; 9. Josh Peek, $105,470.
Read More

☛ NFR Finals – Day 2 12-9-17

Posted by on Dec 9, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NFR FINALS – DAY 2

Courtesy of PRCA
Dec. 9, 3017

Bradshaw closes gap in saddle bronc riding

LAS VEGAS – It’s only Day 2 of the 10-day Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER.
Saddle bronc rider CoBurn Bradshaw may have already found his groove.
A night after placing second in the saddle bronc riding, Bradshaw scored 89.5 points on Calgary Stampede’s Tiger Warrior to win Round 2 at the WNFR on Friday, Dec. 9, at the Thomas & Mack Center. The score tied for the second most points in Round 2 history.
Bradshaw was good for 87 points in the first round on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Big Tex.
“The saddle is feeling good,” said Bradshaw, 23. “I was nervous coming in since it’s a new saddle and I had been on 15 horses with it, and they were little. So, I took my leathers up and was nervous they would be too tight. Last night’s horse (Big Tex) I had been on before and I knew Tiger Warrior was a good horse and my leathers were feeling good. I was nervous about Tiger Warrior because he is big and strong, and I was questioning my saddle, but now my confidence is up.”
Bradshaw also won Round 2 in 2015.
“I don’t know, I just have good luck in it and I guess it’s turning into my round – I’ve been nervous every year in the first round,” he said. “Last year, I had new leathers, too, and I threw my old ones on after the third round and did better.”
Also rising for Bradshaw after two nights were his season earnings. The Utah cowboy has earned $56,962 – including his $10,000 check for qualifying for the WNFR – in two rounds, putting him in the lead for the RAM Top Gun Award.
He’s still sitting in third place in the saddle bronc riding competition, but instead of being behind by more than $61,000, he’s behind leader Jacobs Crawley by about $12,000.
“I hope to be first place every night from now on,” Bradshaw said. “I’ve got a lot of ground to make up.”

Smith rides for 87 points to win bull riding competition

Once upon a time, Garrett Smith was at the WNFR in an accomplice role.
Smith, at the ripe old age of 19, hazed for his brother, Wyatt, at the 2014 Finals.
On Friday, Smith won Round 2 of the bull riding competition with 87 points on Rafter G Rodeo’s J Lazy.
“It means a lot and helps your confidence going into the next round; and going into the week it makes everything better,” said Garrett Smith, now 22 years old.
Smith can operate at either end of the arena, but for him, there’s only one end he’s interested in at the moment, and it’s showing with his second-place position in the world standings.
“That’s always been my dream since I was little, to be a bull rider, but when my brother asked me to haze it was cool,” he said. “I bulldog quite a bit, but I’m having too much fun riding bulls while I’m young to go for the Linderman Award.”
Smith’s win gives him $253,797. He trails three-time, defending World Champion Sage Kimzey by less than $12,000.
Smith isn’t planning on changing anything to close the gap further.
“You’ve got to keep doing what you are doing, and if you keep doing that it should go good,” he said.

Brazile wins tie-down roping title, extends all-around lead

Trevor Brazile was back to his old ways Friday night, winning his record 67th career go-round by taking the Round 2 tie-down roping victory in 7.4 seconds.
“It is just cool every time you win a round here,” said the 41-year-old Texas cowboy. “It just puts you in the (record) book and lets you be a part of the rich history of our sport, and it’s a lot of the reason we do what we do.”
With the win, Brazile increased his PRCA record in career go-rounds won overall, including the National Finals Steer Roping and Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, to 67. Tie-down roper Cody Ohl (55) and saddle bronc rider Billy Etbauer (51) are second and third, respectively.
Brazile has won 23 career PRCA gold buckles (all-around 2002-04, 2006-15; tie-down roping 2007, 2009-10; team roping 2010; steer roping 2006-07, 2011, 2013-15).
The win also added to Brazile’s lead in the race for the all-around cowboy gold buckle, as he built his total winnings for 2017 up to $298,183. He leads brother-in-law Tuf Cooper by $58,161.
“I know it’s a race, but I also know it’s not a sprint either,” he said. “So, I’m just roping, and you can start worrying about it (the all-around standings) when you get close to the end, but until then, there’s nothing you can do.”

Amberleigh Moore posts Round 2 record

Amberleigh Moore, the barrel racer who holds the NFR earnings record won Round 2 in a round record time of 13.54 seconds on CP Dark Moon (Paige).
“I took a deep breath before I came up the alleyway because last night took a little bit of wind out of my sail,” Moore said. “I’m very happy for tonight.”
Moore bested the previous record (set by Sherry Cervi in 2013) by .12 seconds.
“Being top of the ground (second out) definitely was an advantage, I feel,” Moore said. “Tonight, Paige readjusted how she ran and adapted to the ground and got it done.”
Moore made an equipment change ahead of her ride.
“I had a new saddle,” Moore said. “I’ve had it for about two months and a couple times I felt a little bit uncomfortable in it, and last night was the final, ‘Go back to the saddle you’ve ridden in for the past year.’ I think it helped – at least I felt more confident in it.”

Aus, Champion share bareback riding title

Entering the WNFR, Tanner Aus had the largest deficit of any cowboy sitting in second place. He trailed defending world champion Tim O’Connell by $65,259.

After missing out on the money in the first round while O’Connell took home more than $13,000, Aus went back to his hotel and refocused.
On Friday night, Aus and Richmond Champion each scored 87.5 points to split the Round 2 victory.
“It’s nice to start off early,” said Aus, who rode Pickett Pro Rodeo’s Scarlet Fever. “I had kind of a slow night last night. You go back to the hotel and you think about your mistakes and try to rectify the situation, so I felt like I did an all right job doing that.”
Champion did his damage on a familiar horse, Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Fancy Free.
“Man, it was awesome,” Champion said. “It’s a horse that’s been around a long time – Fancy Free of Pete Carr’s – I think she might be older than I am. I knew I had a good one. I wasn’t sure she was going to be enough. Like I said, she’s an older horse, but she bucked like a colt today.”
While Aus and Champion each won $23,481, O’Connell placed again, bringing his 2017 WNFR earnings to $36,654.
Over the months leading up to the WNFR, Aus was contemplating what he needed to do to track down O’Connell.
“From the end of September to the beginning of December, those two months are pretty slow,” the Minnesota cowboy said. “Then the three days when you get to Vegas are the slowest. You try to keep your mind right and have a little fun. But here we are, second night down, and once she gets started it goes pretty fast.”
In his third trip to the Finals, this was Champion’s first time placing before the fourth round. Friday brought a different feeling.
“In the past two qualifications here, I’ve been a notorious slow starter,” an elated Champion said. “My goal this year was to get the ball rolling early. Last night didn’t go my way, but I kind of had a feeling tonight was going to be a better night, and I guess we’re right on track.”
 

Tanner Milan wins first career round win

With a little help from his family steer wrestler Tanner Milan nailed down his first career WNFR round win.
Milan won Round 2 in 3.5 seconds, tying for the fifth-fastest Round 2 time.
“This is incredible. This is just a heck of a feeling. This feels awesome,” Milan said. “Now, I have to just stay real aggressive on the start and run at the barrier every night and try and catch up as fast as I can.”
The win has Milan in fifth place in the world standings. His brother, Baillie, had a big hand in Friday’s win.
“I got a real, real good start and that little horse I’m riding (Maverick) is owned by Tom Lewis, and he gets across there so fast and he’s a real good, honest horse,” Milan said. “I had my brother, Baillie, hazing, and I have great support here from my family and friends. I couldn’t ask for a better way to have things go for me in Round 2.”
Tyler Pearson took second place in Round 2, bringing his NFR earnings after two nights to $51,462. Pearson now trails leader Ty Erickson by less than $12,000. Erickson’s lead going into the NFR had been more than $52,000.

Bird, Cardoza post 3.9-second round in team roping

When the first team ropers of the night shot out to a 4.1-second time, Dustin Bird and Russell Cardoza didn’t let it pressure them.
The team roping veterans topped it with a time of 3.9 to win Round 2, tying the round’s second quickest time, and cashing in for $26,231 apiece.
“After missing one last night, we weren’t going to just catch him, that’s for sure,” Bird said. “He was a good enough steer that allowed us to make a good run and win first.”
Bird and Cardoza are old hats at making the trip to Vegas. Bird is in his fifth WNFR competition, while Cardoza is in his sixth.
“Vegas is fun anytime you come, but if you’re in the rodeo it makes it that much better,” said Cardoza, who sits fourth place in the team roping heeler world standings.
Bird is fifth place among headers after scoring the first-place check.
“That’s the big thing, being back here in Vegas, but to actually go and do good is another thing, so it feels good,” Bird said.
Header Kaleb Driggers and teammate heeler Junior Nogueira did not place, but continue to lead the world standings in their respective events. Each lead by at least $11,000 over their nearest competitor.

Second Performance Results, Friday, Dec. 8, 2017

Bareback riding: 1. (tie) Tanner Aus on Pickett Pro Rodeo’s Scarlet Fever and Richmond Champion on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Fancy Free, 87.5 points, $23,481 each; 3. (tie) Tim O’Connell and Jake Vold, 87, $13,327 each; 5. Jake Brown, 86.5, $6,769; 6. Orin Larsen, 85, $4,231; 7. (tie) Clayton Biglow and Caleb Bennett, 84 each; 9. (tie) J.R. Vezain and R.C. Landingham, 83.5 each; 11. Mason Clements, 83; 12. Ty Breuer, 81.5; 13. Steven Dent, 78.5; 14. Bill Tutor, 78; 15. Wyatt Denny, 73.5. Average standings: 1. Jake Vold, 174.5 points on two head; 2. Tim O’Connell, 172; 3. Orin Larsen, 171.5; 4. Jake Brown, 169; 5. Richmond Champion, 168.5. World Standings: 1. Tim O’Connell, $238,567; 2. Tanner Aus, $170,138; 3. Jake Vold, $151,718; 4. Clayton Biglow, $138,153; 5. Richmond Champion, $134,678; 6. Orin Larsen, $134,202; 7. J.R. Vezain, $130,081; 8. Jake Brown, $119,982; 9. Wyatt Denny, $119,353; 10. Caleb Bennett, $118,793; 11. Mason Clements, $109,441; 12. Bill Tutor, $106,039; 13. Steven Dent, $105,767; 14. R.C. Landingham, $99,261; 15. Ty Breuer, $99,106.
Steer wrestling: 1. Tanner Milan, 3.5 seconds, $26,231; 2. Tyler Pearson  , 4.0, $20,731; 3. (tie) Kyle Irwin and Jon Ragatz, 4.1, $13,327 each; 5. Nick Guy, 4.2, $6,769; 6. Tyler Waguespack, 4.3, $4,231; 7. (tie) Ty Erickson and Scott Guenthner, 4.5 each; 9. (tie) Olin Hannum and Chason Floyd, 4.9 each; 11. Ryle Smith, 5.9; 12. Rowdy Parrott, 6.4; 13. Dakota Eldridge, 7.1; 14. J.D. Struxness, 13.8; 15. Baylor Roche, NT. Average standings: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 7.8 seconds on two head; 2. Tyler Pearson, 7.9; 3. Jon Ragatz, 8.4; 4. Scott Guenthner, 8.8; 5. Kyle Irwin, 8.9. World Standings: 1. Ty Erickson, $173,152; 2. Tyler Pearson, $161,380; 3. Tyler Waguespack, $144,405; 4. Olin Hannum, $120,951; 5. Tanner Milan, $120,304; 6. Scott Guenthner, $117,032; 7. Baylor Roche, $109,340; 8. Jon Ragatz, $108,198; 9. Ryle Smith, $103,463; 10. Kyle Irwin, $103,011; 11. Nick Guy, $99,737; 12. J.D. Struxness, $93,973; 13. Rowdy Parrott, $91,088; 14. Dakota Eldridge, $90,981; 15. Chason Floyd, $88,723.
Team roping: 1. Dustin Bird/Russell Cardoza, 3.9 seconds, $26,231 each; 2. Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 4.5, $20,731; 3. Clay Smith/Paul Eaves, 4.6, $15,654; 4. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 4.7, $11,000; 5. Luke Brown/Jake Long, 4.8, $6,769; 6. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 5.1, $4,231; 7. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 5.3; 8. Jr. Dees/Tyler McKnight, 9.3; 9. Riley Minor/Brady Minor, 9.4; 10. Kaleb Driggers/Junior Nogueira, 22.2; 11. Coleman Proctor/Billie Jack Saebens, Cody Snow/Wesley Thorp, Clay Tryan/Jade Corkill, Tom Richards/Jeremy Buhler and Garrett Rogers/Jake Minor, NT. Average standings: 1. Clay Smith/Paul Eaves, 9.2 seconds on two head; 2. Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 9.3; 3. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 10.1; 4. Chad Masters/Travis Graves,10.8; 5. Jr. Dees/Tyler McKnight, 13.6. World Standings: (headers) 1. Kaleb Driggers, $170,208; 2. Clay Smith, $154,402; 3. Erich Rogers, $152,596; 4. Luke Brown, $128,381; 5. Dustin Bird, $114,519; 6. Charly Crawford, $113,821; 7. Riley Minor, $110,818; 8. Jr. Dees, $109,694; 9. Coleman Proctor, $108,033; 10. Chad Masters, $99,739; 11. Dustin Egusquiza, $98,437; 12. Tom Richards, $91,415; 13. Clay Tryan, $91,383; 14. Cody Snow, $89,236; 15. Garrett Rogers, $85,614. (heelers) 1. Junior Nogueira, $170,938; 2. Paul Eaves, $158,519; 3. Cory Petska, $152,596; 4. Russell Cardoza, $136,004; 5. Billie Jack Saebens, $120,930; 6. Jake Long, $119,852; 7. Joseph Harrison, $118,063; 8. Brady Minor, $110,818; 9. Tyler McKnight, $110,105; 10. Travis Graves, $106,649; 11. Kory Koontz, $95,652; 12. Jade Corkill, $91,383; 13. Wesley Thorp, $90,836; 14. Jake Minor, $85,614; 15. Jeremy Buhler, $78,006.
Saddle bronc riding: 1. CoBurn Bradshaw, 89.5 points on Calgary Stampede’s Tiger Warrior, $26,231; 2. Sterling Crawley, 83, $20,731; 3. Brody Cress, 82.5, $15,654; 4. Cody DeMoss, 81.5, $11,000; 5. Audy Reed, 78, $6,769; 6. (tie) Jake Wright and Taos Muncy, 76.5, $2,115 each; 8. Jacobs Crawley, Zeke Thurston, Hardy Braden, Layton Green, Ryder Wright, Heith DeMoss, Clay Elliott, Jesse Wright, NS. Average standings: 1. CoBurn Bradshaw, 176.5 points on two head; 2. Cody DeMoss, 167; 3. Sterling Crawley, 163; 4. Brody Cress, 162; 5. Jake Wright, 161.5. World Standings: 1. Jacobs Crawley, $193,927; 2. Zeke Thurston, $184,122; 3. CoBurn Bradshaw, $181,077; 4. Cody DeMoss, $151,657; 5. Hardy Braden, $139,004; 6. Brody Cress, $131,319; 7. Ryder Wright, $125,015; 8. Sterling Crawley, $123,723; 9. Layton Green, $120,613; 10. Jake Wright, $107,527; 11. Heith DeMoss, $102,280; 12. Taos Muncy, $100,517; 13. Clay Elliott, $99,332; 14. Audy Reed, $92,418; 15. Jesse Wright, $86,630.
Tie-down roping: 1. Trevor Brazile, 7.4 seconds, $26,230; 2. Cade Swor, 7.7, $20,731; 3. Marcos Costa, 8.1, $15,654; 4. Cory Solomon, 8.4, $11,000; 5. Tyson Durfey, 8.8, $6,769; 6. Shane Hanchey, 9.0, $4,231; 7. Marty Yates, 9.2; 8. Tuf Cooper, 10.0; 9. Cooper Martin, 10.5; 10. Timber Moore, 10.9; 11. J.C. Malone, 13.9; 12. Matt Shiozawa, 14.1; 13. Ryan Jarrett, 18.6; 14. Caleb Smidt, 24.7; 15. Randall Carlisle, NT. Average standings: 1. Trevor Brazile, 15.30 seconds on two head; 2. Cade Swor, 15.80; 3. Marcos Costa, 16.0; 4. Tyson Durfey, 17.80; 5. Tuf Cooper, 18.40.: World Standings 1. Tuf Cooper, $200,445; 2. Marcos Costa, $165,748; 3. Caleb Smidt, $156,425; 4. Trevor Brazile, $155,856; 5. Shane Hanchey, $138,729; 6. Ryan Jarrett, $132,286; 7. Cade Swor, $127,191; 8. Tyson Durfey, $124,192; 9. Marty Yates, $107,173; 10. Cory Solomon, $106,210; 11. Matt Shiozawa, $103,363; 12. J.C. Malone, $103,068; 13. Timber Moore, $95,962; 14. Randall Carlisle, $95,566; 15. Cooper Martin, $95,438.
Barrel racing: 1. Amberleigh Moore, 13.54 seconds, $26,231; 2. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, 13.62, $20,731; 3. Hailey Kinsel, 13.65, $15,654; 4. Nellie Miller, 13.74, $11,000; 5. Sydni Blanchard, 13.80, $6,769; 6. Kellie Collier, 13.83, $4,231; 7. Taci Bettis, 13.87; 8. Ivy Conrado, 13.89; 9. (tie) Tillar Murray and Kathy Grimes, 13.90 each; 11. Lisa Lockhart, 13.96; 12. Tiany Schuster, 14.10; 13. Kimmie Wall, 19.07; 14. Kassie Mowry, 19.24; 15. Stevi Hillman, 23.67. Average standings: 1. Hailey Kinsel, 27.34 seconds on two runs; 2. Nellie Miller, 27.38; 3. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, 27.61, 4. Kathy Grimes, 27.75; 5. (tie) Tillar Murray and Ivy Conrado, 27.79 each. World Standings: 1. Tiany Schuster, $260,378; 2. Stevi Hillman, $195,952; 3. Nellie Miller, $177,768; 4. Amberleigh Moore, $157,037; 5. Kassie Mowry, $145,894; 6. Hailey Kinsel, $140,015; 7. Kathy Grimes, $132,785; 8. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, $123,660; 9. Sydni Blanchard, $108,131; 10. Taci Bettis, $107,023; 11. Lisa Lockhart, $106,454; 12. Tillar Murray, $102,789; 13. Kellie Collier, $97,569; 14. Ivy Conrado, $92,412; 15. Kimmie Wall, $86,294.
Bull riding: 1. Garrett Smith, 87 points on Rafter G Rodeo’s J Lazy, $26,230; 2. (tie) Sage Kimzey and Joe Frost, 86.5, $18,192 each; 4. Trey Benton III, 85.5, $11,000; 5. Jordan Hansen, 84.5, $6,769; 6. Cole Melancon, 78.5, $4,231; 7. Ty Wallace, Tim Bingham, Jordan Spears, Dustin Bowen, Roscoe Jarboe, Trevor Reiste, Guthrie Murray, Brennon Eldred and Boudreaux Campbell, NS. Average standings: 1. Trey Benton III, 175.5 points on two head; 2. Garrett Smith, 172.5; 3. Joe Frost, 170.5; 4. Sage Kimzey, 165.5; 5. Roscoe Jarboe, 87 points on one head. World Standings: 1. Sage Kimzey, $265,345; 2. Garrett Smith, $253,797; 3. Ty Wallace, $167,077; 4. Trey Benton III, $157,702; 5. Joe Frost, $155,925; 6. Jordan Spears, $141,423; 7. Roscoe Jarboe, $133,586; 8. Tim Bingham, $129,515; 9. Cole Melancon, $117,850; 10. Jordan Hansen, $109,429; 11. Trevor Reiste, $107,121; 12. Dustin Bowen, $104,668; 13. Brennon Eldred, $102,991; 14. Boudreaux Campbell, $102,294; 15. Guthrie Murray, $97,288.
All-around world standings: 1. Trevor Brazile, $298,183; 2. Tuf Cooper, $240,022; 3. Junior Nogueira, $172,660; 4. Caleb Smidt, $166,221; 5. Ryle Smith, $150,876; 6. Russell Cardoza, $149,026; 7. Erich Rogers, $147,649; 8. Dakota Eldridge, $114,200; 9. Josh Peek, $105,470.
Read More

☛ Weis facility burns in California 12-8-17

Posted by on Dec 8, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SCOTT AND MELISSA WEIS’ FACILITY IN OJAI, CALIF., BURNED TO THE GROUND IN CALIFORNIA FIRE

Facebook post from Melissa Weis
Dec. 8, 2017

While Scott and Melissa Weis were at the NCHA Futurity in Fort Worth, their Ojai, Calif., home and horse facility was being destroyed in the California fire. Following is Melissa’s post on my Facebook page that I think everyone should see.

“On  Monday night, Scott got a phone call warning him that a small brush fire was gaining ground toward the direction of our beautiful Ojai, Calif., home. He rushed to DFW, jumped on a plane and rented the only rental car with 4WD. Most roads were closed but he navigated his way up the mountain and pulled in our driveway to be greeted with these eerie images.

“No animals were on the property as many of you know, we have been on the road showing our horses in Texas. the fire is still not completely contained so there is no telling if the devastation is over.

“My heart breaks  for Scott as he sits there sifting through the ashes looking for anything that might have escaped being completely destroyed.

“To further expand on why this is especially sad – that barn was by no means fancy but it was hand built by Scott’s father. Every nail was pounded by him. Scott only put  his favorite horses in it and the hundreds of bridles, bits and spurs that trained countless winning cutting horses were all housed there.

“There probably aren’t many cutting horses here today that Scott Weis hadn’t trained or showed a mother of, a grandmother of, or father of. He has won a major event in the Will rogers Coliseum every decade, NCHA Rider Hall of Fame, only Californian to be Equistat Rider of the Year in the Aged Events and in weekend earnings, LTE of $4 million dollars. And to have to go home, in the middle of the Futurity, to sift through ashes of all those precious memories makes me sick!”

I couldn’t reproduce the photos she posted, but if you want to see them, go to my Facebook page.

In other news from California, dozens of Thoroughbred race  horses had to be turned loose and died in the California wildfire. It’s unfathomable to think about this. The Thoroughbred facility had 500 horses and not enough time to load them all into trailers so they had to turn them loose.

Read More

☛ National Finals Rodeo – Day 1 – 12-8-17

Posted by on Dec 8, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NATIONAL FINALS RODEO – DAY 1

Courtesy PRCA
Dec. 8, 2017

Bull rider Benton takes home healthy haul

LAS VEGAS – Entering the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER, Trey Benton III was feeling healthy.

After Round 1 of the WNFR, Benton was feeling fantastic.

The bull rider from Rock Island, Texas, scored 90 points on Big Stone Rodeo Inc’s Mortimer to win the first round on Thursday, Dec. 7, at the Thomas & Mack Center.

“I’ve always been broken up here,” Benton said, “so knowing I’ve got a chance … I have never been healthy here, but the tribulations make a man.”

Benton picked up right where he left off at the end of the 2017 regular season. Benton won back-to-back nights in Sioux Falls, S.D., Sept. 29-30, both Wrangler Champions Challenge presented by Justin Boots events.

He was 91 points on Sept. 29 and he closed the season with 88 points Sept. 30. He was right back at it in Las Vegas on Thursday.

“I’ve got to make a statement for nine more rounds and do what I’ve done all year and stick to the system I had intended – to do whatever it takes to stay on and nothing else matters,” Benton said. “I need to take care of myself here (in Vegas). I hadn’t had good experiences here before, and I want to make sure I do it right this time.”

Benton did it right in Round 1. The win climbed him two places, earning him $26,231, and moved him up to fourth in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings. He’s earned $146,702 on the season.

Setting the bar with the first 90 of the rodeo in the first round shows that Benton is ready to roll.

“I honestly didn’t know it would be a 90, I got an A-plus for the day,” Benton said. “I just nodded and hoped for the best; it’s hard to tell the fans that, but you get a drift of things after a while. I’ve done this my whole life.”

Defending champ Waguespack back at it

A year ago, steer wrestler Tyler Waguespack won $213,218 to not only capture the RAM Top Gun Award for winning the most money at the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, but he also claimed his first world title.

Waguespack picked up right where he left off from last year, winning Round 1 after posting a 3.5-second time – his second fastest at the WNFR, and tied for the fourth fastest time in the history of the first round.

“Coming into it, I always try and treat it just like another rodeo and that’s pretty hard with the stage that it’s on,” the defending champion said. “I don’t know if the hype gets to me or I just get excited, but whatever I’m doing sure seems to be working. I thought if I could start it off with a bang in the first round, it will relax me for the rest of the time and I’m glad I got that accomplished.”

Waguespack entered the 2017 WNFR in fourth place. The first-round win moved him up to third with $140,175, with Ty Erickson still holding the lead with $173,152.

Over the 2016-17 WNFRs, Waguespack has placed in nine of the last 11 WNFR rounds.

Waguespack was planning to ride Cadillac – the 2014 and 2016 PRCA/AQHA Horse of the Year – in Vegas, but had to switch to Scooter when Cadillac was injured before the WNFR. The transition was seamless.

“I got off one horse of the year and got on another and Scooter was awesome,” the Gonzales, La., cowboy said. “I was able to ride Scooter several times throughout the year and have success on him.”

 

WNFR rookie tops saddle bronc riding

It didn’t take long for saddle bronc rider Hardy Braden to enjoy his first trip to the WNFR.

The 28-year-old cowboy from Welch, Okla., scored 87.5 points on Cervi Championship Rodeo’s HATitude Alpha Dog to win his debut.

Braden summed it up succinctly.

“I don’t think it gets any better than that,” he said. “What tops that? That is how you want to start out the Finals and I’m super excited – I can’t even tell you how excited I am.”

Braden entered the Finals in seventh place in the world standings. The victory pushed him up two spots to fifth.

Braden got plenty of advice in the weeks and months leading up to his trip to Las Vegas. He listened to it all, but also made sure not to change much.

“A lot of people asked me if I was nervous and this and that, and I told them I’ll treat it like any rodeo and everyone said, ‘Good luck,'” Braden said. “I did the same routine as any rodeo, and I didn’t get nervous or think about it too much.”

The win gives Braden $139,004 for the season and gives him plenty of confidence with nine more nights to go.

“I can relax and say, ‘Alright, it’s begun,’ and now enjoy the moment,” Braden said. “I’ll hang with my bronc rider friends, then talk to my dad and try to win some money at the casinos.”

 

Team roping leaders hold serve in Round 1

Team roping header Kaleb Driggers and team roping heeler Junior Nogueira maintained their status as the ones to beat, posting an impressive 4.1-second go to win Round 1.

Driggers and Nogueira tied for the second fastest time in the first round.

“It’s a blessing, honestly,” Driggers said. “When we started this week, we weren’t going for first. We were just going to try to go for our steers and make the best runs we can, and let it play out.”

Watching the other teams go before could affect the way Driggers and Nogueira would attack their steer. They changed that up for 2017.

“It’s hard not to get your adrenaline pumping when you’re watching the headers spin ’em fast,” Driggers said. “That’s one thing I had to do, tell myself to settle down, do my job and do the best I can.”

It helped that Driggers and Nogueira knew the steer.

“We know them a little bit, we’ve roped them before,” said Brazilian cowboy Nogueira, the reigning all-around world champion. “We helped to break them in. We know which ones were running faster and which ones were running slower. We had a pretty good steer tonight.”

Driggers leads all headers with $170,208, while Nogueira leads heelers with $170,938.

After the duo each finished in second place in 2016 in their respective events, the two are flying high after Round 1.

“There are a lot of guys that didn’t make it that rope just as good as we do and are sitting at home,” Driggers said. “So, we just try to take it all in stride, you know? It’s a blessing to be here and we’re very grateful.”

 

Vold tops bareback riding

Jake Vold opened the WNFR in eighth place, nearly $100,000 behind leader Tim O’Connell in the bareback riding standings.

Vold knows he needs a great WNFR if he has any hope of catching the defending world champion. He got off to a great start Thursday night.

Vold scored 87.5 points on Kesler Championship Rodeo’s Oakridge to win the bareback riding and take home $26,231. The win leapfrogged Vold from eighth to third.

“It’s a good confidence builder here,” he said. “There are a lot of horses here and going at that kind of money, I find quite exciting. It keeps your blood flowing. I need to win a lot of money to have a chance at a world title. To get a win right off the bat is definitely key. Hopefully a guy can keep it rolling and see what happens after 10 days.”

Last season, Vold won three consecutive rounds, placed in seven rounds and finished second in the world standings. So, the Ponoka, Alberta, cowboy – in his third trip to the WNFR – is finding himself at home in Las Vegas.

“The atmosphere here is so unbelievable and the people, everything, the bright lights, just being in Vegas, going at the money every night keeps you pretty excited,” said Vold, 30. “When you’ve got a chance to go at that every night for 10 nights in a row it’s a game changer.”

His 87.5 points tied for the fourth most in Round 1.

 

New experience for veteran Jarrett in tie-down roping

Ryan Jarrett has plenty of experience at the WNFR.

He’s qualified 10 times in tie-down roping, once in steer wrestling and won a world title in all-around in 2005, the same year he won the Finals tie-down roping average.

But on Thursday night, the 33-year-old Georgia cowboy accomplished something he’d never done before – winning Round 1 at the WNFR.

Jarrett did that in 7.5 seconds to take home first place, four-tenths of a second faster than anyone else on the first day of the 2017 edition of the WNFR.

“This is a good feeling,” said Jarrett, who will turn 34 on Dec. 28. “I’ve never won the first round, so this is exciting. Getting started off like this means a lot. Winning Round 1 is like no other (for your confidence) and winning rounds doesn’t get old.”

The victory moved Jarrett from eighth to fifth in the world standings with $132,286 on the year.

Jarrett had plenty of confidence in his horse.

“I was riding a young horse, he is just 7 years old, his name is Snoopy,” Jarrett said. “He’s never been here, but I rode him toward the end of the (regular) season and I had a lot of confidence on him and I chose to bring him here. I wanted to be against the barrier and I knew he would do his job. You get confidence in him, but to bring him to this level, you have to have a different kind of confidence in him, and he came through.”

 

Miller notches victory in return

Before Thursday night, Nellie Miller hadn’t competed in the barrel racing at the Thomas & Mack Center since 2010.

Miller made a triumphant return to the WNFR, winning Round 1 in 13.64 seconds.

“This round win is a tremendous start to the week and it gives you a lot of confidence in that arena,” said Miller, sitting in third place in the world standings. “It is what we came here to do. Everything worked out. I didn’t win any rounds at the 2010 NFR, so this is new for me and I am just so excited.”

Miller was riding Rafter W Minnie Reba “Sister,” who won AQHA Horse of the Year and the WPRA Horse with the Most Heart award, voted on by the Top 15 Barrel Racers in 2015.

Miller immediately pointed to Sister as a reason for the win.

“My run was amazing,” she said. “Sister is so confident in what she’s doing. She hunts the barrels and she always turns, no matter what. She just went in there and looked for those barrels.”

 

Brazile pads all-around lead

Trevor Brazile continues to lead the way in search of his 14th all-around gold buckle.

After the first round at the WNFR, Brazile had won $271,952, giving him a $31,930 lead over his brother-in-law, Tuf Cooper.

Brazile added to his lead over Cooper by tying for second place in the tie-down roping and winning a check for $18,192.

First Performance Results, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017

 

Bareback riding: 1. Jake Vold, 87.5 points on Kesler Championship Rodeo’s Oakridge, $26,231; 2. Orin Larsen, 86.5, $20,731; 3. (tie) Tim O’Connell and Mason Clements, 85, $13,327 each; 5. J.R. Vezain, 84.5, $6,769; 6. (tie) Caleb Bennett and Steven Dent, 84, $2,115 each; 8. R.C. Landingham, 83.5; 9. Jake Brown, 82.5; 10. Ty Breuer 82; 11. Richmond Champion, 81; 12. Bill Tutor, 80.0; 13. Tanner Aus, 79.5; 14. Wyatt Denny, 78.5; 15. Clayton Biglow, 75.0. World Standings: 1. Tim O’Connell, $225,243; 2. Tanner Aus, $146,657; 3. Jake Vold, 138,391; 4. Clayton Biglow, $138,153; 5. J.R. Vezain, $130,081; 6. Orin Larsen, $129,971; 7. Wyatt Denny, $119,353; 8. Caleb Bennett, 118,793; 9. Jake Brown, $113,212; 10. Richmond Champion, $111,196; 11. Mason Clements, $109,441; 12. Bill Tutor, $106,039; 13. Steven Dent, $105,767; 14. R.C. Landingham, $99,261; 15. Ty Breuer, $99,106.

 

Steer wrestling: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 3.5 seconds, $26,231; 2. Tyler Pearson, 3.9, $20,731; 3. (tie) Scott Guenthner, Jon Ragatz, J.D. Struxness, Rowdy Parrott and Chason Floyd, 4.3, $7,531 each; 8. Dakota Eldridge, 4.5; 9. (tie) Olin Hannum and Kyle Irwin, 4.8 each; 11. Ty Erickson, 5.5; 12. Nick Guy, 6.5; 13. Tanner Milan, 6.6; 14. Ryle Smith and Baylor Roche, NT. World Standings: Ty Erickson, $173,152; 2. Tyler Pearson, $140,649; 3. Tyler Waguespack, $140,175; 4. Olin Hannum, $120,951; 5. Scott Guenthner, $117,032; 6. Baylor Roche, $109,340; 7. Ryle Smith, $103,463; 8. Jon Ragatz, $94,871; 9. Tanner Milan, $94,073; 10. J.D. Struxness, $93,973; 11. Nick Guy, $92,968; 12. Rowdy Parrott, $91,088; 13. Dakota Eldridge, $90,981; 14. Kyle Irwin, $89,684; 15. Chason Floyd, $88,723.

 

Team roping: 1. Kaleb Driggers/Junior Nogueira, 4.1 seconds, $26,231 each; 2. Jr. Dees/Tyler McKnight, 4.3, $20,731; 3. Clay Smith/Paul Eaves, 4.6, $15,654; 4. (tie) Erich Rogers/Cory Petska and Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 4.8, $8,885 each; 6. Riley Minor/Brady Minor, 4.9, $4,231; 7. Coleman Proctor/Billie Jack Saebens, 5.2; 8. Cody Snow/Wesley Thorp, 5.5; 9. Clay Tryan/ Jade Corkill, 5.6; 10. Chad Masters/ Travis Graves, 5.7; 11. Tom Richards/Jeremy Buhler, 9.3; 12. Luke Brown/Jake Long, Dustin Bird/Russell Cardoza, Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz and Garrett Rogers/Jake Minor, NT. World Standings: (headers) 1. Kaleb Driggers, $170,208; 2. Erich Rogers, $152,596; 3. Clay Smith, $138,748; 4. Luke Brown, $121,611; 5. Riley Minor, $110,818; 6. Jr. Dees, $109,694; 7. Coleman Proctor, $108,033; 8. Chad Masters, $95,509; 9. Charly Crawford, $93,090; 10. Tom Richards, $91,415; 11. Clay Tryan, $91,383; 12. Cody Snow, $89,236; 13. Dustin Bird, $88,288; 14. Dustin Egusquiza, $87,437; 15. Garrett Rogers, $85,614. (Heelers) 1. Junior Nogueira, $170,938; 2. Cory Petska, $152,596; 3. Paul Eaves, $142,866; 4. Billie Jack Saebens, $120,930; 5. Jake Long, $113,082; 6. Brady Minor, $110,818; 7. Tyler McKnight, $110,105; 8. Russell Cardoza, $109,774; 9. Travis Graves, $102,418; 10. Joseph Harrison, $97,332; 11. Jade Corkill, $91,383; 12. Wesley Thorp, $90,836; 13. Jake Minor, $85,614; 14. Kory Koontz, $84,652; 15. Jeremy Buhler, $78,006.

 

Saddle bronc riding: 1. Hardy Braden, 87.5 points on Cervi Championship Rodeo’s Hatitude Alpha Dog, $26,231; 2. CoBurn Bradshaw, 87, $20,731; 3. Ryder Wright, 86.5, $15,654; 4. Cody DeMoss, 85.5, $11,000; 5. (tie) Zeke Thurston, Jake Wright and Heath DeMoss, 85, $3,667 each; 8. Jacobs Crawley, 81; 9. Sterling Crawley, 80; 10. Brody Cress, 79.5; 11. (tie) Layton Green and Clay Elliott, 79 each; 13. Audy Reed, 78; 14. Taos Muncy, 71; 15. Jesse Wright, NS. World Standings: 1. Jacobs Crawley, $193,927; 2. Zeke Thurston, $184,122; 3. CoBurn Bradshaw, $154,846; 4. Cody DeMoss, $140,657; 5. Hardy Braden, $139,004; 6. Ryder Wright, $125,015; 7. Layton Green, $120,613; 8. Brody Cress, $115,665; 9. Jake Wright, $105,411; 10. Sterling Crawley, $102,992; 11. Heith DeMoss, $102,280; 12. Clay Elliott, $99,332; 13. Taos Muncy, $98,402; 14. Jesse Wright, $86,630; 15. Audy Reed, $85,649.

 

Tie-down roping: 1. Ryan Jarrett, 7.5 seconds, $26,231; 2. Trevor Brazile, 7.9, $18,192; 3. Marcos Costa, 7.9, $18,192; 4. Cade Swor, 8.1, $11,000; 5. J.C. Malone, 8.2, $6,769; 6. Caleb Smidt, 8.3, $4,231; 7. Tuf Cooper, 8.4; 8. Cooper Martin, 8.6; 9. Tyson Durfey, 9.0; 10. Shane Hanchey, 9.6; 11. Timber Moore, 9.8; 12. Matt Shiozawa, 10.7; 13. Cory Solomon, 11.9; 14. Randall Carlisle, 18.4; 15. Marty Yates, 19.7  . World Standings: 1. Tuf Cooper, $200,444; 2. Caleb Smidt, $156,425; 3. Marcos Costa, $150,094; 4. Shane Hanchey, $134,498; 5. Ryan Jarrett, $132,286; 6. Trevor Brazile, $129,626; 7. Tyson Durfey, $117,423; 8. Marty Yates, $107,173; 9. Cade Swor, $106,460; 10. Matt Shiozawa, $103,363; 11. J.C. Malone, $103,068; 12. Timber Moore, $95,962; 13. Randall Carlisle, $95,566; 14. Cooper Martin, $95,438; 15. Cory Solomon, $95,210.

 

Barrel racing: 1. Nellie Miller, 13.64 seconds, $26,230; 2. Kassie Mowry, 13.68, $20,730; 3. Hailey Kinsel, 13.69, $15,654; 4. Kathy Grimes, 13.85, $11,000; 5. Tillar Murray, 13.89, $6,769; 6. Ivy Conrado, 13.90, $4,230; 7. Lisa Lockhart, 13.98; 8. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, 13.99; 9. Tiany Schuster, 14.07; 10. Kellie Collier, 14.13; 11. Kimmie Wall, 14.14; 12. Sydni Blanchard, 14.18; 13. Stevi Hillman, 18.68; 14. Amberleigh Moore, 18.95; 15. Taci Bettis, NT. World Standings: 1. Tiany Schuster, $260,378; 2. Stevi Hillman, $195,952; 3. Nellie Miller, $166,768; 4. Kassie Mowry, $145,894; 5. Kathy Grimes, $132,785; 6. Amberleigh Moore, $130,806; 7. Hailey Kinsel, $124,361; 8. Taci Bettis, $107,023; 9. Lisa Lockhart, $106,454; 10. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, $102,930; 11. Tillar Murray, $102,789; 12. Sydni Blanchard, $101,362; 13. Kellie Collier, $93,338; 14. Ivy Conrado, $92,412; 15. Kimmie Wall, $86,294.

 

Bull riding: 1. Trey Benton III, 90 points on Big Stone Rodeo’s Mortimer, $26,231; 2. Roscoe Jarboe, 87, $20,731; 3. (tie) Garrett Smith and Tim Bingham, 85.5, $13,327 each; 5. Joe Frost, 84.0, $6,769; 6. Boudreaux Campbell, 82.5, $4,231; 7. Sage Kimzey, 79.0; 8. Ty Wallace, Cole Melancon, Jordan Spears, Dustin Bowen, Jordan Hansen, Trevor Reiste, Guthrie Murray and Brennon Eldred, NS. World Standings: 1. Sage Kimzey, $247,152; 2. Garrett Smith, $227,566; 3. Ty Wallace, $167,077; 4. Trey Benton III, $146,702; 5. Jordan Spears, $141,423; 6. Joe Frost, $137,732; 7. Roscoe Jarboe, $133,586; 8. Tim Bingham, $129,515; 9. Cole Melancon, $113,619; 10. Trevor Reiste, $107,121; 11. Dustin Bowen, $104,668; 12. Brennon Eldred, $102,991; 13. Jordan Hansen, $102,660; 14. Boudreaux Campbell, $102,294; 15. Guthrie Murray, $97,288.

Read More

☛ American Horse Council addresses ELD Mandate 12-4-17

Posted by on Dec 4, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

American Horse Council Efforts to Address ELD Mandate

Press Release from American Horse Council
Dec. 4, 2017
Over the past months the American Horse Council (AHC) has reached out to the equine community to determine the potential impact of the upcoming Electronic Logging Device mandate. Based on the information received, the AHC, in collaboration with the rest of the animal agriculture community, has requested that the Department of Transportation (DOT) grant a one-year enforcement delay followed by a waiver and limited exemptions from compliance with the December 18, 2017 implementation date for the Final Rule on Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) and Hours of Service (HOS). Additionally, we requested that the DOT address the significant problems with the mandate that will occur if the compliance deadline is not extended. The welfare, safety, and health of the animals in transit, together with the safety of other drivers on the road, are top priorities for the equine industry and its enthusiasts.The livestock sector has consistently been one of the safest of the commercial hauling sectors. The Large Truck Crash Causation Study, conducted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Institute, showed that of 1,123 accidents involving trucks hauling cargo, only five involved the transportation of livestock. Similarly, the report titled Trucks Involved in Fatal Accidents Fact-book 2005, conducted by the Transportation Research Institute, shows that livestock transporters accounted for just 0.7 percent of fatal accidents. The ELD mandate itself, which is the subject of this petition, does nothing to improve that record of safety over paper logs.While this figure is not irrelevant, and any safety improvements should be considered, the trajectory of this rule’s implementation has left much to be desired.  Despite its being issued nearly two years ago, awareness of this rule among livestock haulers and the equine industry is nearly non-existent. For instance, FMCSA’s recent change to include livestock in its interpretation of the 150-air mile exemption for agricultural commodities, a change that the industry strongly supports and appreciates, has raised many additional questions from livestock haulers who are unsure about the mechanics of the new exemption and even if it means they are exempt from the ELD mandate altogether. More time is needed to reach out to the horse industry, and ensure that industry outreach can address ELD compliance and ELD impact.

Many horse operations and competitions are in rural areas, routinely requiring long, and repeated, trips. These animals, when loaded onto trailers, are vulnerable to changes in temperature, humidity, and precipitation. Horse haulers are accustomed to managing these changing conditions through planning, log books and notations in those books. These planning techniques have adapted and evolved over decades as technology has improved. Unfortunately, the quick transition to ELDs does not allow for the natural trial and error process to adequately meet the needs of the horse industry.

The equine industry and the millions of horse fans who attend equine events rely on safe and effective methods of transportation from every corner of the United States. Domestic transit of our competition and breeding animals is critical to the business continuity of our industry and largely relies on the use of large commercial haulers. These individuals have expressed their concern with the implications of this rule in regards to the negative impacts to standards in welfare, biosecurity and cost.

We are disappointed that the FMCSA did not feel the need to reach out to the larger livestock industry stakeholders prior to finalizing this rule, but specifically for not reaching out to the equine industry considering the constant and repeated travel inherent to the competitive, coast to coast nature of our industry. While horse haulers are able to provide more accommodating shipping conditions compared to other livestock sectors, the issues we have with immediate implementation of the rule mirror those of the larger animal agriculture community.

The American Horse Council will continue to petition for an enforcement delay, to be followed by a waiver and/or limited exemptions from compliance with the final rule on ELDs, and specifically the expected Hours of Service (HOS). Additionally we will continue to take advantage of any opportunity to collaborate with FMCSA and the DOT during this delay to better meet the needs of the animal agriculture community on future regulatory efforts.

Please contact Cliff Williamson at the American Horse Council with questions or comments at 202-296-4031 or at cwilliamson@horsecouncil.org .

Read More

☛ House to take up Farm Bureau- supported tax bill 12-3-17

Posted by on Dec 3, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

HOUSE POISED TO TAKE UP FARM BUREAU-SUPPORTED TAX BILL

Press release from Farm Bureau Federation
Dec. 3, 2017

The lower individual tax rates and the new business tax rate contained in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1), set for a House vote on Thursday, hold the potential to reduce income taxes for farmers and ranchers, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation.

The measure would also preserve many critical tax provisions farmers and ranchers need to manage tight margins and unpredictable income.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act would expand and increase expensing limits for Sec. 179 small business expensing and allow for unlimited immediate expensing. In addition, the bill would let farmers and ranchers continue to deduct customary business expenses including, but not limited to, feed, seed and other inputs. The deduction for state and local taxes is another tool that would continue to be available under the bill.

“A tax system that is fair to small business must allow for the deduction of all legitimate business expenses,” AFBF President Zippy Duvall wrote in a letter to House members in support of the measure.

Cash accounting and like-kind exchanges for buildings and land would continue under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, though not permanently, as farmers had hoped. These provisions are critical to people who operate low-margin businesses with unpredictable income streams.

 

“We look forward to working with Congress to make expensing provisions permanent so that farmers and ranchers will have the certainty they need to manage their farm and ranch businesses,” Duvall said.

The bill’s provision to increase the estate tax exemption and permanently repeal the tax in 2024 was cheered by farm and ranch families.

“While we would prefer immediate repeal, the doubling of the estate tax exemption indexed for inflation with a continuation of the spousal transfer is a positive intermediate step that will ease the burden for the vast majority of farmers and ranchers,” Duvall wrote.

Read More

☛ DOT Federal Mandate on logging device temporarily waived 12-3-17

Posted by on Dec 3, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT TEMPORARILY WAIVES LOGGING DEVICE MANDATE FOR AGRICULTURE

 

Press Release from Department of Transportation
Dec. 3, 2017

The Department of Transportation has granted a 90-day waiver from the requirement that agricultural and livestock haulers install electronic logging devices in their vehicles. Over those 90 days the department plans to look closely at agriculture’s request for an exemption while developing additional guidance for agricultural haulers.

Most farmers and ranchers should be exempt from the ELD mandate because they can claim covered farm vehicle status, but drivers who haul livestock, live fish and insects are likely to fall under the requirements.

In September, the American Farm Bureau Federation and seven livestock organizations petitioned DOT for a waiver and exemption from the Dec. 18 ELD implementation deadline. In their request, the groups explained their two biggest concerns about the requirement: livestock haulers’ readiness to comply and the effect on the transported animals’ well-being.

Drivers who have to use ELDs would be limited to current hours of service rules, which restrict a driver to only 14 “on duty” hours, with no more than 11 active driving hours. Once a driver hits those maximum hour allotments, he must stop and rest for 10 consecutive hours, which would be problematic when transporting livestock and other live animals.

In their petition, the groups pointed out livestock haulers’ strong commitment to ensuring the safety of both the animals they’re transporting and the drivers they share the road with.  In addition, livestock haulers often receive specialized training beyond that required for their counterparts driving conventional commercial motor vehicles. The pork industry’s Transport Quality Assurance Program and the beef industry’s Master Cattle Transporter program provide detailed instruction on proper animal handling and transportation methods.

“As reflected in the [Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s] data, the emphasis these programs place on animal welfare benefits driver safety as it encourages livestock haulers to slow down, be more aware of their surroundings and road conditions, and avoid rough-road situations that could result in animal injury,” the groups noted.

Another major roadblock to implementation for livestock haulers is their lack of awareness of the rule. Because the livestock hauling industry is small compared to the overall trucking industry, it isn’t strongly engaged by DOT’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. As a result, livestock drivers who are aware of the program have had difficulty researching the ELD marketplace and identifying cost-effective solutions that are compatible with livestock hauling and current agricultural hours of service exemptions.

In their petition, the groups also asked DOT to address the incompatibilities between the FMCSA’s hours of service rules and the structure and realities of the U.S. livestock sector.

“For many drivers, there is concern that there are those, with no understanding of or concern for animal welfare or livestock hauling, who will arbitrarily penalize them for choosing the proper care of animals over stopping in excessive heat or cold because of an arbitrary HOS cutoff,” the groups said.

Read More

☛ Federal Mandate to affect Horse Show industry in big way 12-1-17

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

A NEW FEDERAL MANDATE TO AFFECT HORSE SHOW INDUSTRY IN BIG WAY

THE EFFECT OF THIS NEW LAW COULD MEAN THE END TO HORSE AND CATTLE EVENTS

Dec. 1, 2017

Even though most of us didn’t have any advance notice or knowledge that a mandate requiring an electronic logging device (ELD) be in your truck, would be hitting the horse and cattle transportation industry today, almost everyone who hauled horses to the NCHA Cutting Futurity in Fort Worth, Texas, or the NRHA Reining Futurity in Oklahoma City, Okla., had no advance warning.

According to an article from “Protect The Harvest,” The United States Congress enacted a bill called “Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century” that was introduced by President Obama in 2012. A part of the bill included a provision requiring the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Act (FMCSA) to develop a rule mandating the use of electronic logging devices on commercial vehicles.

Although most horse show participants wouldn’t think that a horse or cattle trailer was a commercial vehicle, horses are livestock and are specifically listed in the transportation bill language. Also families that show cattle, pigs and other livestock to stock shows and 4-H events, and travel long distances to show their animals will be impacted as well. In fact, any other type of activity or hobby that requires a large vehicle and trailer and where there is the potential to win money in competitions is included in this mandate.

There are some exemptions but you will have to look long and hard to find them. No longer will a “Not For Hire” sign on you rig protect you if it is determined that your truck and trailer fit into the commercial category or are being used for commercial purposes. Nor will it protect you if you are driving a vehicle and trailer that requires a commercial license.

This law mandates how long you can drive and how long your breaks need to be.  This means that those hauling horses will be required to stop their trip once a 14-hour threshold is reached and cannot resume travel until the mandatory 10-hour rest period has passed, If the threshold is breached, the ELD makes a record of it and you can be fined. If you haul horses owned by others, your truck and trailer are considered commercial vehicles.  If you have won money competing with your horse or a client’s horse, the Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration (FMCSA)  would consider money won at a horse show or event, a profit. They also consider hauling to an event with the intent or hopes of winning some money as pursuing a profit, which classifieds your truck and trailer as commercial. If you have sponsors (a sticker on your truck or trailer), those sponsorships qualify as “furtherance of a commercial enterprise,” putting them in the commercial category.

This new mandate was obviously created by someone who knew nothing about horses or cattle. What if you were in the middle of a snow storm in the midwest and had to stop on the road for 10 hours. You would arrive at your destination with a load of dead horses or cattle, worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Or if you were driving through South Texas in mid-July during those over 100-degree days and your time was up at 10 am  and you had to park it for 10 hours. Your horses or cattle could easily die of the heat in a crowded trailer, with no water to drink. Add to that the liability concerns as animal abuse is now a felony!

 

There are many other mandates and mountains to climb in this new law and only those who know about this horrible mandate can protest this government overreach. Protect The Harvest as well as Lucas Oil, who add money to many  major horse events, have evidently known about this upcoming mandate and have been working hard to bring these issues to light by making trips to Washington D.C. to meet with lawmakers.

You can also help by letting others know about this government overreach and get your local clubs involved too. Everyone should contact their Congressional Representative and let them know your concerns.

How The ELD Mandate Will Impact The Horse Industry

 

Read More

☛ Alice Walton sells her Millsap, Texas, ranch 11-30-17

Posted by on Nov 30, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

ALICE WALTON SELLS HER 1,460 ACRE RANCH WEST OF FORT WORTH

STILL FOR SALE IS 4,416-ACRE PROPERTY NEAR POSSUM KINGDOM LAKE

Nov. 30, 2017
According to an article written by Max Baker in the Fort Worth Star Telegram, Alice Walton has sold her 1,460-acre cutting horse ranch after having it on the market for two years. The article says the ranch sold for a reduction in the $16.5 million original price to a West Texas group called the Three Amigos Investment Group Kermit, Texas, in late September.

According to Tony Underwood, a representative for the group, he could not divulge what they paid for the ranch but according to the Fort Worth Star Telegram article, court records show they didn’t finance the purchase. He said they will run cattle and other livestock on the property. The company has plans for the cutting horse facility, but said those plans are not finalized.

The ranch, located about 45 minutes west of Fort Worth near Millsap, included three-quarters of a mile of Brazos River frontage, as well as a 4,000-square-foot home and a 24-stall main show barn.

The 4,416-acre property she also owns is still for sale. It was originally advertised for $28.7 million; however, it is now on the market for $22.1 million.

Alice, the daughter of Sam Walton, the late founder of Wal-Mart, remains the wealthiest person in Texas, with an estimated net worth of $38.2 billion, according to the ranking by Forbes released last  month. She is currently listed as No. 13 on the list of richest Americans.

Alice was very active in the cutting horse industry, both riding and breeding cutting horses; however, due to her health issues, she was unable to spend time in the indoor horse arenas where most of the large money purses were offered. Therefore she decided to devote more of her time on the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., which she created. Its popularity precipitated her decision to sell the ranches. She also still has a  home in Fort Worth.

Read More