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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 4-3-17

Posted by on Apr 3, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
April 3, 2017

WPRA history on display at ProRodeo Hall of Fame

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – In anticipation of the 2017 ProRodeo Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on Aug. 5, the ProRodeo Hall of Fame and the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association opened a historical exhibit March 31.

This exhibit is housed in the 101 Gallery of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, and will remain open until September. Visitors can learn the history of the WPRA from when 38 women met in a hotel room in San Angelo, Texas, in 1948 to start the Girls Rodeo Association (GRA) through the historic 2017 ProRodeo Hall of Fame inductions, which will include barrel racers for the first time ever.

In addition, there is a display showing the fashion and clothing trends through the years, a look back at the 1988 and 2002 Olympic Command Performance Rodeos held during the Olympic Games in Calgary and Salt Lake City, respectively, and a horsepower section honoring the horses that have been awarded with honors such as AQHA Horse of the Year, Horse With the Most Heart and the Rising Star Award.

“I am thrilled with the new partnership between the ProRodeo Hall of Fame and the WPRA,” said Kent Sturman, Director of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. “Not only will we now honor the women who excel in the sport of barrel racing, but with this exhibit, we can educate our guests and fans about the history of the WPRA and promote this important segment of the sport of professional rodeo. These outstanding women have been instrumental in advancing this event, and they deserve to be celebrated.”

As announced March 28, the two individuals and one equine partner which will be honored in the inaugural WPRA Hall of Fame class include Wanda Harper Bush, Charmayne James and a joint PRCA/WPRA equine inductee, Star Plaudit “Red.”

They will be joined by the PRCA inductees, which include Buck Rutherford (All-Around), Enoch Walker (Saddle Bronc), Cody Custer (Bull Riding), Tommy Puryear (Steer Wrestling), Mike Beers (Team Roping), Randy Corley (Contract Personnel), Bob Ragsdale (Notable), Smith & Velvet (Livestock) and Ogden Pioneer Days Rodeo (Committee).

The ProRodeo Hall of Fame, which is a popular Colorado Springs attraction for rodeo fans and tourists alike, has already inducted 250 people, 27 rodeo committees and 31 animals.

The 2017 ProRodeo Hall of Fame Induction festivities are scheduled for Aug. 3-5, and the actual ceremony will take place at 10 a.m. MT on Aug. 5.

The Hall of Fame is currently open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday. Starting May 1 through Aug. 31, it will be open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. More information can be found at www.prorodeohalloffame.com.

RNCFR turns 30

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Thursday is the start of the 30th annual RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Kissimmee, Fla. The rodeo takes place Thursday through Sunday at the Silver Spurs Arena.

The inaugural Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo was held in March of 1987 in Pocatello, Idaho, but the story began more than a decade before then.

In 1974, saddle bronc riding representative Larry Jordan hatched the idea to create a circuit system to benefit the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and all of its weekend cowboys – those dedicated rodeo contestants who also had a job and maybe a family, but not the desire or capability to travel year-round in an effort to reach the National Finals Rodeo.

The first year the circuit system was in place there were 14 different circuits. The map was shuffled into 12 circuits the following year.

All of Oklahoma was the Oil Circuit. Now it’s part of the Prairie Circuit, along with Kansas and Nebraska. Three of the circuits – California, Montana and Texas – are comprised of one state, while the First Frontier Circuit in the Northeast includes 13 states.

In 1987, Dodge came in as a sponsor for each of the 12 Circuit Finals Rodeos, as well as the Dodge National Circuit Finals, which was renamed the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo in 2012.

As for the location, Pocatello was the original home of the rodeo largely thanks to stock contractor Reg Kessler suggesting the location. The rodeo was held in Pocatello for 24 years before moving to Oklahoma City, Okla., for 2011-13 and then a single year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., before moving to its home through 2024 – Kissimmee, Fla. The following cowboys won the first National Circuit Finals Rodeo:

* Saddle bronc riding average – Bud Monroe, 159 points on two head, $1,171

* Saddle bronc riding Wrangler round – (tie) Clay Jawers and Bud Monroe, 80, $2,049 each

* Bareback riding average – Todd Little, 160 points on two, $1,206

* Bareback riding Wrangler round – (tie) Steve Carter and Todd Little, 87, $2,111 each

* Bull riding average – Johnny Shea, 157 points on two, $1,234

* Bull riding Wrangler round – (tie) Brett Todd and Tuff Hedeman, 80, $2,159 each

* Calf roping average – D.R. Daniel, 21.8 seconds on two, $1,119

* Calf roping Wrangler round – D.R. Daniel, 9.7, $2,238

* Steer wrestling average – Darrell Sewell, 10.7 seconds on two, $1,114

* Steer wrestling Wrangler round – John Thompson, 4.0, $2,228

* Team roping average – Barry Johnson/Dee Pickett, 14.4 seconds on two, $636

* Team roping Wrangler round – Jake Barnes/Clay O’Brien Cooper, 6.2, $1,272

* Barrel racing average – Suzanne Fausett, 31.12 seconds on two, $974

* Barrel racing Wrangler round – Charmayne James, 15.30, $1,948

Lerwill takes bicycle riding journey

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Since the age of 3, Troy “Wild Child” Lerwill has been riding a bicycle – and he has never stopped.

At the age of 50, Lerwill, a three-time barrelman at the National Finals Rodeo (2006-08), embarked on a 1,400-mile bicycle ride from Covington, La. to Key West, Fla.

“I love to ride,” said Lerwill, who has been a PRCA member since 1997. “I owned a bike store for 23 years and I just sold it two years ago. I’m an avid cyclist and I wanted to do this. After I finished working the Fort Worth (Texas) Stock Show & Rodeo, I spent a couple of weeks getting my stuff ready for the ride and I took off. The coolest part about the ride was all the people I met along the way.”

Lerwill’s journey began on Feb. 18 and concluded March 25. He was picked up by some friends who brought him back to Covington, La., where his truck and trailer were.

“I had about six weeks off after I finished Fort Worth, so I had time to make this ride,” said Lerwill, who was the opening act at the NFR in 2001 and 2003. “Now, I have some rodeos that are starting up down here in (Louisiana).”

Although Lerwill is no stranger to bike rides, this 1,400-mile trek was new to him.

“I never done something this long and just by myself,” he said. “I’ve ridden across the state of Utah and I rode from Wyoming back to Utah, and from Utah over into Nevada, but nothing this long.”

Not only did Lerwill brave the elements on his touring bicycle – he also was living in the elements each night.

“I just took my tent and my hammock,” Lerwill said. “If the weather permitted, I stayed in the hammock and if it didn’t I stayed in my tent. Then, it took me three days to get through the congested area from St. Petersburg (Fla.) all the way to Naples, and there were no campgrounds, so I had to stay in three hotels. I didn’t want to do that, but I didn’t have much of a choice. I slept under two or three bridges and I tried my best to stay in state parks and campgrounds.”

According to Lerwill, he averaged about 55 miles a day for six days a week, and then he would have one day of rest.

“I’m always trying to grow and learn and experience new things, and this was something I wanted to do,” Lerwill said. “Mentally and physically this was very challenging. I was on the bike between five to seven hours a day. Your body needs to conform to all the new things that are happening that it’s not used to. I prepared well, and it turned out great. I cooked my own meals and I pretty much lived on fruits and vegetables the entire time. I did have half a dozen pieces of Key Lime pie when I was in Key West.”

Lerwill acknowledged this type of bicycle trip will likely not be his last.

“It was very gratifying to complete this journey, and I’m probably going to do some more long-distance adventures,” he said. “I think this is just the beginning. I would like to ride from Vancouver, British Columbia, down to Tijuana (Mexico). The soonest I could do that ride would be 2019, but I’m probably going to do another ride after Fort Worth next year, I just don’t know if I’m going to go back through Florida.”

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeo Live will broadcast live from the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo April 6-9 in Kissimmee, Fla., at the Silver Spurs Arena. The performances are 11 a.m. (ET) April 6; 7:30 p.m. April 7; 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. April 8; and 2:30 p.m. on April 9.

The following PRCA Executive Council members were recently elected (or re-elected) and will serve two-year terms beginning April 1. The newly-elected members were Caleb Bennett (bareback riding event representative), Jerome Schneeberger (tie-down roping representative), Manny Equsquiza (team roping event representative) and Tim Bridwell on the stock contractor executive council. The re-elected members are Cody Whitney (bull riding event representative), Duane Reichert (arena pickup men/labor/specialty act), Eva Chadwick (timer/secretary representative), Mike Mathis (contract personnel representative at large), David Petty (Rodeo committee executive council $10,000-$20,000), Larry McConnell (rodeo committee executive council $20,000-$50,000), Keith Marrington and David Morehead (stock contractor executive council) and Dean Oliver (general membership to the competition committee representative).

Steer wrestler Tater Decker, who qualified for the National Finals Rodeo in 1959 and ’61, passed away March 31, from natural causes, in his home in Talihina, Okla. He was 92. Decker finished 13th in the 1959 world standings and eighth in 1961.

The South Dakota premiere of the documentary film, “Floating Horses: The Life of Casey Tibbs” is scheduled to take place April 26, from 7-10 p.m. (MT) at the Elks Theatre in Rapid City, S.D. Tickets are available at www.blackhillsfilmfestival.org.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“When I went to my first rodeos, the (ProRodeo) Hall of Fame was nowhere near my way of thinking. It never even entered my mind.””

– Announcer Randy Corley said March 31 when he was told he was being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame with the 2017 class Aug. 5.

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through April 3, 2017

AA: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford,Texas $55,636
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $74,985
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $46,209
SB: Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $57,546
TD: Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $50,404
BR: Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $54,009
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX   $42,405

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through April 3, 2017

All-around
1 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $55,636
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 50,328
3 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 49,271
4 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 43,929
5 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 29,368
6 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 27,706
7 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,482
8 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 23,877
9 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 19,627
10 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 19,369
11 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
12 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 14,205
13 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 13,883
14 McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla. 12,187
15 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
16 Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla. 10,580
17 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 9,555
18 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 9,298
Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta 8,517
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
2 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 54,836
3 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 43,300
4 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 39,857
5 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
6 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 36,692
7 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 35,718
8 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 29,250
9 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
10 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 25,150
11 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 24,105
12 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 24,092
13 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 20,227
14 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 17,635
15 Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. 16,902
16 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 16,861
17 Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta 16,748
18 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 14,792
19 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 14,420
20 Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. 14,329
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $74,985
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 51,523
3 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 34,063
4 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 32,664
5 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 30,285
6 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 26,770
7 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 26,642
8 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 22,608
9 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 20,902
10 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 20,590
11 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 20,153
12 Shane Frey, Duncan, Okla. 18,347
13 Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii 18,296
14 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 18,244
15 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 18,109
16 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 18,098
17 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 17,974
18 Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
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☛ ProRodeo Hall of Fame 3-29-17

Posted by on Mar 29, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

ProRodeo Hall of Fame announces 2017 class

Press release from PRCA
March 29, 2017

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Randy Corley, an 11-time PRCA Announcer of the Year, joins five world champions to headline the 12-member 2017 induction class for the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, which was announced Tuesday.

Corley, along with gold buckle winners including the late Buck Rutherford (all-around, 1954), Enoch Walker (saddle bronc riding, 1960), Tommy Puryear (steer wrestling, 1974), Mike Beers (team roping, 1984) and Cody Custer (bull riding, 1992), will be enshrined with rodeo notable Bob Ragsdale, a 22-time National Finals Rodeo qualifier in three events.

Also, voted in by the selection committee were four-time bareback horse of the year, Christensen Bros.’ Smith & Velvet, and the committee for the Ogden (Utah) Pioneer Days.

For the first time in the history of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, barrel racers from the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) will be amongst the class of inductees. Their inaugural class will be Wanda Harper Bush, Charmayne James and a joint PRCA/WPRA equine inductee – Star Plaudit “Red.” The class will be inducted Aug. 5 at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colo.

“It’s something that’s pretty awesome beyond anything I can say,” Corley said. “Right now, I’m kind of in shock. This is quite an honor, and I do not take this lightly – I can tell you that. Nothing can be any better than reaching this pinnacle, other than taking care of every rodeo that I will continue to do. They are all the reasons I’m in the Hall of Fame.”

Corley has been selected PRCA Announcer of the Year 11 times (1984, 1990-96, 1998, 2003 and 2011). He has also been an announcer at the National Finals Rodeo 15 times (1985-86, 1992, 1994-96, 2007-08, 2010-16).

Puryear qualified for the NFR nine times, eight of which were consecutive, from 1971-78, and then in 1983. The Texas bulldogger also won the gold buckle in 1974 and the NFR average title in 1976.

“It’s really got me kind of speechless, and I’m normally not totally speechless,” Puryear said. “I can’t believe it – I know several of those people (the other 2017 inductees), and knew them well. I even knew the bucking horse well, too, and it’s kind of a coincidence Ogden is there because it’s one of my favorite rodeos – it’s set up well and fit me well.”

Puryear first joined the PRCA in 1970, and now, 47 years later, he’s being recognized as one of the best steer wrestlers in PRCA history.

“Most of those guys down there (in the Hall of Fame) were my heroes – people I’d read about,” Puryear said. “The first rodeo I went to, I was too bashful to even say hi to them – it was unbelievable being around them.”

Rutherford was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame more than half a century after he was topping the world standings across four events – bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling and bull riding.

The Oklahoma cowboy was in the Top 5 for the world standings 11 times between 1949-57, and was the 1954 all-around world champion and the first cowboy to ever win more than $40,000 in a single year (approximately $362,235 in 2017 dollars according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics).

Although he never won an individual event championship, he placed second in the bareback riding standings the same year he won the all-around title.

Rutherford twice finished third in the bull riding world standings (1951 and 1954).

Shortly after the 1952 season closed, Rutherford was in a serious car wreck and suffered a life-threatening skull fracture and was unconscious for 15 days. After several months of hospitalization, Rutherford recovered and returned to rodeo to win the all-around title.

His rodeo earnings fell flat after a bad spill slipped a disk in his back in November 1958. He then retired from rodeo and resumed ranching in his hometown until his death at 58 years old on April 28, 1988.

Walker, who won both the 1960 saddle bronc riding world championship and NFR average title, took to the skies in his ascent to ProRodeo fame – qualifying for 10 NFRs during his 20-year tenure with the Rodeo Cowboys Association.

In 1960, the 28-year-old cowboy had been knocking on the door of a gold buckle for years, placing third in 1957, second in 1958 and third again in 1959.

Walker entered the 1960 season with a plan for earning the gold buckle that literally took flight. He teamed up with Paul Templeton, who flew him from one rodeo to the next when his rodeo road trips got too hectic.

Walker arrived at the NFR in Dallas, Texas, leading the pack with $20,832 earned that season by placing 126 times at 56 rodeos and winning 21 rodeos throughout 1960, including Salinas, Calif., and Fort Worth, Texas.

He rode all 10 horses at the NFR in Dallas, placing on five of them – winning the NFR and the world title.

Beers, a heeler, won his world championship while roping with header Dee Pickett, who was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2003. Beers qualified for the NFR 23 times in team roping (1980-95, 1997-98, 2000-03, 2007).

“This is like winning the world,” Beers said. “You hear about all these guys like Larry Mahan, Ty Murray, Dee Pickett, Leo Camarillo, Clay O’Brien Cooper and Jake Barnes, and to be put in a category with those guys is a great honor.”

Custer’s eight trips to the NFR and 1992 bull riding world championship win landed him in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

“It wasn’t a call I wasn’t waiting on or expecting – it’s one of those deals I thought about it, but you don’t sit on your hands and wait,” Custer said. “I was overwhelmed and a bit emotional, and didn’t have much to say.”

Custer first joined the PRCA in 1985 and went on to qualify for the NFR from 1987-92, and again in 1998-99. He remained an active competitor through 2002.

“I was just a kid from Arizona who had big dreams to do something in rodeo,” Custer said. “Fortunately for me, I had a Cinderella-type career, and in the middle of it you take it for granted – this kind of recognition means a lot to me – as much or more than winning the world title.”

For most of his adult life, Robert (Bob) Reuel Ragsdale has served the sport of rodeo as a competitor and as an ambassador. On Tuesday, the cowboy they call “Rags” added “Hall of Famer” to his one-of-a-kind résumé.

“Well, it really hasn’t sunk in yet,” Ragsdale said with a laugh. “But it’s something anybody that’s ever rodeoed dreams about. You never think that it could really happen.”

Ragsdale, a 22-time NFR qualifier in steer wrestling, team roping and tie-down roping, recognized he will forever be cemented into history among the legends of the sport he holds so dear.

“To be able to be there with all the world’s champions – I’ve done a lot of different things in the PRCA and RCA – but to be nominated and go into the Hall is unbelievable,” he said.

Ragsdale became the first and only left-handed roper to qualify for the NFR for 15 consecutive years from 1961-75. He also served as both the Vice President and President of the Rodeo Cowboys Association in the early ’70s, and is credited as the one to propose the association include “Professional” to the organization’s formal title.

Bareback horse Smith & Velvet was the definition of a late bloomer.

The horse, which was honored as the PRCA’s top bareback horse four times (1977, as Mr. Smith, and then 1979-80 and 1982, as Smith & Velvet), didn’t become an award-winning bucker until he was into his 20s.

“When I first started bucking him, he would be good for five or six seconds, and then he would spin and stop,” said Bobby Christensen, owner of Smith & Velvet. “A lot of people told me to get rid of him, but instead I turned him out for a few years. I entered him in Oakdale, Calif., and he bucked off World Champion Jack Ward. From then on, I knew I had a good horse, and he took off from there.”

Smith & Velvet died in 1983 in a tragic car accident that killed many of Christensen’s prized NFR horses.

He says the horse was the pride and joy of his rodeo company.

“He went to 25-30 rodeos per year, and was the bread and butter of our company for many years,” Christensen said.

The Ogden (Utah) Pioneer Days will celebrate its 83rd year of existence in 2017.

The event has come a long way since its inception in 1934, when Ogden City Mayor Harman W. Peery organized a Western festival to boost the spirits of the locals and entice tourists to visit the city.

“This rodeo was started right after the Great Depression because the community needed it,” said Dave Halverson, the rodeo’s director. “We’ve been in the Top 5 of the best large outdoor rodeo category several times in the past 10 years, and the fans here grab onto that.”

The Ogden Pioneer Days is more than just a rodeo, it’s an event. It includes concerts, parades, farmer’s markets, and, of course, the rodeo at historic Ogden Pioneer Stadium.

“We’re the largest celebration in the state of Utah,” Halverson said. “I know our whole committee and the community will be very excited about being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

“You just do what you do, and you hope that someday you get that call. But we don’t do this for notoriety, we do it for the community and the state of Utah.”

This year’s Ogden Pioneer Days will take place July 20-24.

On the WPRA side, Bush was multi-talented, becoming the most decorated cowgirl in the history of the WPRA (formerly the Girls Rodeo Association).

When the GRA first formed in 1948, Bush was one of the first to sign-up. All totaled, she won 32 world titles – nine all-around (1952, 1957-58, 1962-65, 1968-69), two barrel racing (1952-53), two cutting (1966, 1969), one flag race (1969), 11 calf roping (1951-56, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1966-67) and seven ribbon roping titles (1951, 1953-54, 1956-59). She finished as reserve world champion in the barrel racing three separate times.

While Bush’s barrel racing world titles came before the NFR began, she qualified seven times (1959-60, 1962-65, and 1974) for the NFR during her career.

“That is awesome and really great. We are really proud she will be honored in this way,” said Shanna Bush, Wanda’s daughter, who qualified for the NFR in 1984. “She would be very honored and humbled. She would be very glad to be a part of the Cowboys Association (PRCA) because she always worked for that to be the case. She always wanted them to get along and to better themselves by being associated with each other. This is a very special honor.”

Bush will be inducted posthumously, having passed away Dec. 29, 2015.

Although she had to wait 22 years to join her legendary horse Scamper in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, James is ecstatic to be a part of this historic class.

“I am thrilled to be going in as part of the inaugural class and what this represents for all barrel racers,” said James, who now makes her home in Boerne, Texas. “To be going in with Wanda is very exciting. Wanda was such a pioneer for our sport. Throughout my entire career her presence and forging through on issues with barrel racing was there and evident, and why we are where we are today.

“Scamper has just been waiting for me and I was fine with that as he really deserved the honor. This news made my entire day.”

James, who grew up in Clayton, N.M., the home of the very first barrel racing National Finals Rodeo in 1959, won the first of 10 consecutive world titles at the youthful age of 14 in 1984.

James was the first WPRA member to wear the coveted No. 1 back number in 1987, and became the first barrel racer to cross the $1 million record in career earnings. In addition to the 10 consecutive world titles (1984-1993), James and Scamper won the NFR average title six times (1984, 1986-87, 1989-90 and 1993). In 1996, Scamper became the first and only barrel horse (until 2017) to be inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

James would add a cherry on top of her illustrious career returning to the top of the sport aboard Cruiser (Cruisin on Six) in 2002, winning her 11th world title and seventh NFR average title.

Bringing symbolism to this new chapter in the history of the PRCA and WPRA is best summed up with the induction the horse known as Star Plaudit “Red.”

Star Plaudit holds a very unique record in the world of professional rodeo, one that is not likely to ever be duplicated. The bay gelding won two world championships in the sport in a single year and contributed to a third, at the age of 12.

In 1962, Red, as he was affectionately known, carried his owner Sherry (Combs) Johnson to the GRA world title in the barrel racing. The horse also helped close family friend Tom Nesmith to the RCA world title in the steer wrestling, as well as the RCA all-around championship.

Johnson credits the steer wrestling with teaching Red how to run hard through the pattern.

“Lord, that is a blessing and a dream come true for him and I,” Johnson said of Red being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. “He was a horse of a lifetime, and what he accomplished will never be done again. I had the pleasure of riding him and he had such a big heart. This is just such a wonderful honor.”

Red passed away at the age of 22.

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 3-27-17

Posted by on Mar 27, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
March 27, 2017

 Aus-ome effort captures first Austin title

AUSTIN, Texas – Tanner Aus had come painfully close to his first Rodeo Austin win a few years back. On Saturday night, he made sure that he’d be collecting the coveted branding iron that goes to each champion.

The 26-year-old bareback rider scored the win in the final round with an 89-point trip on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Hollywood Hills. He earned $9,400 for that ride, as well as the branding iron, which he was most excited about.

“One year, they told me I had split the win and they had me in the arena with the branding iron, but it turned out I was a point off the win,” Aus said with a smile. “That makes this win even sweeter, because I think about this rodeo all the time.

“This is the cap to the winter season, and Austin is a rodeo that has always seemed to treat me well. I’ve been second here twice, and to finally come out of here with a ‘W’ is great. I got my hands on one of those branding irons, and that’s awesome.”

Aus also won the first round with an 86.5-point ride on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s What Happens, which brought his total winnings in Austin to $12,562.

He admitted the large payday for winning Austin was in the back of his mind.

“When you’re focused on the task at hand, you don’t really think about the money as much, but you know it’s there,” he said.

Aus was third in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings entering the weekend, and he moved to second in the standings with $54,836 after his Austin performance.

“I haven’t been paying much attention to the standings, because it’s always a grind this time of year,” he said. “We get on a lot of horses down here in Texas during the winter, and I’m very thankful for the position I’m currently in.

“I drew really well – I got on three Beutler horses. I just snuck into the finals in the eighth and last spot. But I knew I had drawn a horse that would test me and that was good enough to win the short round.”

The Granite Falls, Minn., native has been to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER the past two years, finishing sixth and fifth in the world in 2015 and 2016.

He’s been on quite a hot streak the past several months, which included winning three rounds at the 2016 WNFR.

“It’s been a blessing, and I’m very thankful,” Aus said. “It’s mostly attributed to the time I’m not rodeoing – when I’m at home and in the gym. There’s a lot of stuff that goes on behind the scenes that people don’t see that leads to being successful in the arena.”

Other winners at the $516,154 rodeo were steer wrestler Tommy Cook (3.9 seconds), team ropers Garrett Rogers/Jake Minor (4.0 seconds), saddle bronc rider Zeke Thurston (89 points on Andrews Rodeo’s Fire Lane), tie-down roper Marty Yates (8.5 seconds), barrel racer Tammy Fischer (15.41 seconds) and bull rider Tyler Taylor (there were no qualified rides in the finals, and Taylor won by having the best two-head score of any cowboy).

  • Steer wrestler Jacob Talley stopped the clock in 3.2 seconds in the semifinals at Rodeo Austin (Texas) to tie the arena record. Talley now shares the record with Levi Wisness (2007), Matt Reeves (2009) and Casey Martin (2014).
  • There was some movement atop the March 27 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings. Tuf Cooper overtook Caleb Smidt for the lead in the all-around standings, saddle bronc rider Jacobs Crawley slipped past CoBurn Bradshaw to take the standings lead and tie-down roper Marty Yates jumped ahead of Smidt for the lead in the tie-down roping standings.

ProRodeo Hall of Famer Mahan receives honor

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – ProRodeo Hall of Fame cowboy Larry Mahan added another honor to his ever-impressive resume.

The eight-time world champion was selected as the Outstanding American awardee from the state of Oregon by the Oregon chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Mahan, who wrestled in high school in Oregon in Redmond and Salem, will be recognized at the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Oregon Chapter’s 23rd annual Honors Banquet, April 22, at the Embassy Suites Portland Washington Square in Tigard, Ore.

“I really feel that wrestling made a great contribution to my rodeoing career, because it is a one-on-one sport,” Mahan said. “It’s one of those sports like rodeo where if you make a mistake you can’t blame it on anybody else but yourself. You have to look in the mirror and start working harder or you’re not going to achieve your goals.”

Dr. Dale Burt Johnston, a board member for the Oregon Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, praised the selection of Mahan.

“Larry is absolutely worthy of receiving this honor,” Johnston said. “He is one of the greatest of all-time in the sport of rodeo and because he has a wrestling tie I think it makes him a good qualified candidate for the Outstanding American award.”

Mahan was enshrined in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1979. He was born Nov. 21, 1943, in Salem, Ore., and went on to a legendary rodeo career, winning eight world championships (all-around, 1966-70, 1973; bull riding, 1965, 1967). He was named the Legend of ProRodeo in 2010.

Mahan isn’t the only cowboy to be inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Oregon Chapter.

Most recently, in 2015, steer wrestler Trevor Knowles of Mount Vernon, Ore., a 13-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, was given the Outstanding American award by the Oregon Chapter.

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeo Live will broadcast live from the High Desert Stampede March 31-April 1 in Redmond, Ore., 7 p.m. (PT) each night.

A third member of a Texas college rodeo team has died from injuries suffered in a traffic accident while driving to a competition. The Wichita Falls Times Record News reports that 20-year-old Jakob Plummer of Petrolia, Texas, died March 26, as a result of injuries he suffered in the March 18 wreck that killed two other members of the Vernon (Texas) College rodeo team. The team was traveling to Brownwood for a National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association rodeo. Yancie McCuistion, 19, of Sugar City, Colo., died at the scene near Haskell, north of Abilene, Texas. Vinita Trevino, 19, of Petrolia, died a day later. Another teammate was injured. Authorities say McCuistion was the driver of a pickup that drove through a stop sign and was struck by a motor home

The Gerry (N.Y.) Rodeo Committee has been selected by the PRCA to host a free PRCA Championship Rodeo Camp on April 29, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The camp is free to anyone ages 8 and up, both male and female. Its purpose is to promote the sport of rodeo through education and recruitment of young people who may become the next generation of rodeo stars. The event will provide a fun rodeo-related experience through both classroom and arena participation with instruction by professional rodeo cowboys. Pre-registration is required and forms are available at the PRCA website www.prorodeo.com/prorodeo/rodeo/youth-rodeo or by visiting the Gerry Rodeo website www.gerryrodeo.org. The registration needs to be completed by April 22, but early registration is encouraged as spaces are limited. Call 716.985.4215 or 716.969.4488 if there are problems with the registration. Additional information is available by email at jjutten@prorodeo.com or by calling Julie Jutten at 719.528.4729. The 73rd annual Gerry Rodeo is set for four performances, Aug. 2-5.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Hey, I’ll take the win – it was a tough pen in the finals. This is one of the biggest rodeos of the year, and to win here is a blessing. I’m really starting to believe in myself, and think that I could be a world champion one day.””

– Bull rider Tyler Taylor talking about winning Rodeo Austin thanks to his two-head score before the final round, in which there were no qualified rides.

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through March 27, 2017

AA: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford,Texas $53,062
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $74,985
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $46,209
SB: Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $55,968
TD: Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $50,404
BR: Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $54,009
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX   $41,752

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through March 27, 2017

All-around
1 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $53,062
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 50,328
3 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 44,618
4 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 41,852
5 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 27,562
6 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 26,572
7 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,232
8 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 23,877
9 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 19,627
10 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 17,612
11 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
12 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 14,205
13 McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla. 12,187
14 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 12,086
15 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
16 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 9,555
17 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 9,298
18 Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta 8,517
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
2 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 54,836
3 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 42,716
4 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
5 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 36,745
6 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 36,692
7 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 35,718
8 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
9 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 28,439
10 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 25,150
11 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 24,105
12 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 24,092
13 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 17,635
14 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 17,351
15 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 16,861
16 Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta 16,748
17 Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. 15,661
18 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 14,792
19 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 14,420
20 Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. 14,329
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $74,985
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 49,280
3 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 34,063
4 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 30,199
5 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 29,272
6 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 26,770
7 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 25,785
8 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 22,608
9 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 20,902
10 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 20,153
11 Shane Frey, Duncan, Okla. 18,133
12 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 17,974
13 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 17,676
14 Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii 16,447
15 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 16,116
16 Tommy Cook, Waller, Texas 16,007
17 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 15,904
18 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 15,535
19 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 15,409
20 Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta 14,441
Team Roping (header)
1 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
2 Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas 39,368
3 Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. 39,365
4 Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. 36,378
5 Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. 31,761
6 Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore. 31,608
7 Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, Okla. 24,076
8 Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M. 22,166
9 Travis Tryan, Billings, Mont. 21,335
10 Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla. 19,494
11 Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz. 19,239
12 Kelsey Parchman, Cumberland City, Tenn. 19,136
13 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 16,068
14 Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont. 14,779
15 Blake Teixeira, Tres Pinos, Calif. 14,628
16 John Alley, Adams, Tenn. 13,446
17 Cody Tew, Belgrade, Mont. 13,055
18 Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla. 12,936
19 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 12,345
20 Brady Tryan, Huntley, Mont. 11,943
Team Roping (heeler)
1 Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. $46,209
2 Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan. 39,368
3 Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil 36,378
4 Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas 35,580
5 Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 31,608
6 Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. 29,407
7 Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas 28,633
8 Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont. 23,587
9 John Robertson, Polson, Mont. 21,882
10 Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. 19,494
11 Kinney Harrell, Marshall, Texas 19,136
12 Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. 17,723
13 Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo. 17,540
14 B.J. Dugger, Three Rivers, Texas 15,861
15 Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas 15,856
16 Travis Woodard, Stockton, Calif. 13,974
17 Clark Adcock, Smithville, Tenn. 13,446
18 York Gill, Stephenville, Texas 13,023
19 Trace Porter, Leesville, La. 12,779
20 Matt Zancanella, Aurora, S.D. 12,578
Saddle Bronc Riding
1 Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $55,968
2 CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah 55,940
3 Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta 46,039
4 Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas 39,832
5 Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla. 36,277
6 Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta 27,265
7 Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La. 26,206
8 Curtis Garton, Kaitaia, New Zealand 22,267
9 Jake Wright, Milford, Utah 22,065
10 Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas 21,860
11 Nat Stratton, Goodwell. Okla. 18,552
12 Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah 17,735
13 Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah 17,593
14 Cody Wright, Milford, Utah 17,133
15 Tyrell J Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont. 17,084
16 Tyler Corrington, Hastings, Minn. 16,846
17 Shade Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 16,515
18 Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah 16,125
19 Cooper DeWitt, Rio Rico, Ariz. 15,571
20 Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D. 14,466
Tie-down Roping
1 Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $50,404
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 42,584
3 J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah 42,285
4 Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas 37,840
5 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 35,204
6 Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla. 34,788
7 Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La. 32,360
8 Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla. 31,835
9 Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas 27,995
10 Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas 24,032
11 Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan. 21,428
12 Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas 21,148
13 Tim Pharr, Resaca, Ga. 20,160
14 Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas 17,941
15 Randall Carlisle, Athens, La. 17,771
16 Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas 17,089
17 Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas 16,904
18 Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho 16,657
19 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 15,851
20 Michael Otero, Krum, Texas 15,382
Steer Roping
1 Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas $41,752
2 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 26,683
3 Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas 25,469
4 Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. 22,482
5 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 20,168
6 Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas 19,905
7 John Bland, Turkey, Texas 18,330
8 Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas 17,321
9 Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas 16,416
10 Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. 16,323
11 Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas 12,572
12 Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo. 11,340
13 Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. 10,306
14 Shay Good, Midland, Texas 10,285
15 Roger Branch, Wellston, Okla. 9,773
16 J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas 8,914
17 Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas 8,810
18 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 8,287
19 Brodie Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla. 7,790
20 Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D. 7,714
Bull Riding
1 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $54,009
2 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 49,314
3 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 45,090
4 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. 44,669
5 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 39,950
6 Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah 37,054
7 Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas 34,770
8 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 32,182
9 Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M. 31,047
10 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 27,815
11 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 27,789
12 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 26,129
13 Scottie Knapp, Albuquerque, N.M. 25,872
14 Jeff Askey, Athens, Texas 23,944
15 Dalan Duncan, Ballard, Utah 22,440
16 Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta 21,479
17 Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas 20,921
18 Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla. 20,653
19 Dave Mason, Burnet, Texas 19,749
20 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 19,588

*2017 Barrel Racing (March 27, 2017)

Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.

 

1 Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas $89,487
2 Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash. 80,297
3 Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas 73,501
4 Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore. 58,705
5 Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas 40,135
6 Taylor Langdon, Aubrey, Texas 36,112
7 Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif. 30,829
8 Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas 28,525
9 Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas 26,439
10 Sammi Bessert, Grand Junction, Colo. 23,614
11 Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark. 23,177
12 Jordan Moore, Mauston, Wis. 22,843
13 Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo. 22,660
14 Fallon Taylor, Collinsville, Texas 21,375
15 Cayla Small, Bokchito, Okla. 21,252
16 Brooke Rix, Skidmore, Texas 21,197
17 Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas 20,421
18 Carmel Wright, Roy, Mont. 20,119
19 Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas 20,052
20 Sabra O’Quinn, Ocala, Fla. 19,189
2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings

     Unofficial through March 27, 2017

 

1 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $25,884
2 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. 22,263
3 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 20,680
4 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 20,453
5 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 15,995
6 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 14,134
7 Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas 11,892
8 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 10,332
9 Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas 10,313
10 Jeffrey Ramagos, Zachary, La. 9,281
11 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 8,146
12 Clayton Foltyn, Winnie, Texas 7,580
13 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 7,402
14 Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas 7,078
15 Ednei Caminhas, Denton, Texas 6,639
16 Tanner Bothwell, Rapid City, S.D. 6,561
17 Christopher Byrd, Compton, Calif. 6,486
18 Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas 6,357
19 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 6,338
20 Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta 6,266
Read More

☛ PRCA Rodeo News 3-21-17

Posted by on Mar 21, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
March 21, 2017

Rodeo world remembers Harry Vold

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The Duke of the Chutes was remembered in grand fashion Monday.

A standing-room only crowd paid tribute to ProRodeo Hall of Fame stock contractor Harry Vold during an emotional memorial service at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame’s courtyard. The memorial service was emceed by veteran ProRodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus.

Vold passed away March 13 at the age of 93 in his sleep at his home in Avondale, Colo.

“This was a great tribute to what a good person he was and that he was a great friend to other people,” said Kirsten Vold, Harry’s daughter, who will continue to run her father’s rodeo company. “This was wonderful. I also think how great it is that all these people get to see each other who normally don’t get to see each other for many years.”

Harry Vold is one of only two stock contractors to provide animals for every National Finals Rodeo, which has been held annually since 1959.

Vold, while operating the Harry Vold Rodeo Company, was chosen PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year 11 times (1982, 1987-96), which is tied for the most selections with Stace Smith ProRodeos.

Jerry Nelson, who runs Frontier Rodeo Company and has been selected PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year the past two years, took a moment Monday to talk about Vold.

“I think we’re all going to miss him,” Nelson said. “We’re going to miss his point of view and miss his tips and just miss talking to him. I loved calling him on the phone and saying, ‘Hey, Harry, what do you think about this? Or what do you think about that?’ I wouldn’t be in the rodeo business if it wasn’t for him selling me those mares like he did years ago; I would call him all the time and talk to him. I’m going to miss him, and there will not be another Harry Vold.”

Jake Vold wins Montgomery with a 90.5

MONTGOMERY, Ala, – Jake Vold nailed the fourth-best bareback ride of the 2017 season and won the Southeastern Livestock Exposition in Montgomery, Ala., with his 90.5-point ride on Frontier Rodeo’s Short Night.

“I try to win every rodeo, but I’ve got a lot of ground to make up now that everything counts, so I need to keep winning,” Vold said. “It’s going to take quite a bit of money this year – every win is key.”

Vold was No. 27 in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings prior to his $4,893 win on Saturday night. He moved up to 17th in the March 20 world standings.

“It feels good, but it’s early in the season you know, so I’m picking away where I can,” Vold said. “But any time you win a rodeo, it’s a good feeling.”

Competition was stiff, but Vold set the bar high with his 90.5 ride, leaving Kaycee Feild in second with an 89.5 and Caleb Bennett in third with an 88.

“They had some rank horses and I drew a good one and just ended up being lucky tonight, I guess,” Vold said.

Vold placed second in the 2016 world standings and tied for second in the average at the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER. He kicked off the new year with an early split-win and an 86.5-point ride at the Dixie National Rodeo in Jackson, Miss., in early February.

Since then, Vold’s been cooling off from his win in the South by taking some time off at his home in Alberta, Canada.

“I come down and rodeo here and there – can’t rodeo 365 days a year – I’m just getting started” Vold said. “We got a little buffalo set up there, and some cows, just ranching around up there and keeping myself busy.”

Up next, the 30-year-old bronc rider is heading to Rodeo Austin (Texas) which is underway until March 25.

“I’m just going to keep doing what I do, enter the big ones and get on the good ones,” Vold said.

Other winners at the $102,018 rodeo were all-around cowboy Nelson Wyatt ($2,038 in tie-down roping and team roping), steer wrestler Matthew Mosseau (3.3 seconds), team ropers Keven Daniel/Justin Yost (4.5 seconds), saddle bronc riders Audy Reed on Frontier Rodeo’s Medicine Woman, Clay Elliott on Frontier Rodeo’s Cross Fire, and Zeke Thurston on Frontier Rodeo’s Popsicle (87.5 points each), tie-down ropers Tyler Milligan and Shane Hanchey (7.8 seconds each), barrel racer Carlee Pierce (15.84 seconds), and bull riders Dustin Bowen on Frontier Rodeo’s Highway Man and Kolby Radley on Frontier Rodeo’s Footloose (89 points each).

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

Longtime Casper (Wyo.) College rodeo coach Tom Parker passed away March 15 of cancer. He was 69. Memorial services for Parker will be held at 1:30 p.m., March 28, 2017, at Highland Park Community Church in the Sanctuary in Casper. Parker was in charge of the Thunderbirds men’s and women’s rodeo teams for more than 25 years. During his time at Casper College, Parker led three women’s teams to the season-ending College National Finals Rodeo. In recent years, however, it was the men’s team that garnered national attention as the red-vested T-Birds won three Central Rocky Mountain Region titles (2011-12, 2015) and qualified for the CNFR at the Casper Events Center five of the past six years.

Juanita (Nita) Mary Humphrey Clark of Redmond, Ore., joined her beloved husband, Gene Clark in Heaven on March 12, 2017. She was 89. On the rodeo circuit, she served as a timer for Beutler Brothers and Beutler & Son. After Gene retired from the PRCA, they produced kids’ rodeos where she was business manager of the Gene Clark Junior Rodeo Association.

The PRCA continues to receive a jolt in mainstream media, thanks to journalist John Branch. The renowned New York Times writer wrote a story for his newspaper on rodeo and the Wright family. The six-page piece ran in The New York Times on March 15, 2015, on PRCA’s world championship saddle bronc riding family. That story was selected for the 2016 Best American Sports Writing anthology and Branch has plans on extending the story on the Wrights into a book. In a Facebook post March 15, Branch said the following: “With luck, the book (still untitled) will be out in a year,” Branch said. “Proud to know the Wrights, an incredible family with a timeless story.” Branch joined The New York Times in 2005 as a sports reporter. He won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2013 for “Snow Fall,” a story about a deadly avalanche in Washington State.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Tom wanted to make sure his kids became good citizens and good contestants. That’s what he strived for. He’ll leave a lasting impression on a lot of kids.”

– University of Wyoming rodeo coach George Howard on Casper College rodeo coach Tom Parker, who passed away March 15. 

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through March 20, 2017

AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville,Texas $50,328
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $66,874
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $46,209
SB: CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah $55,940
TD: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $42,584
BR: Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $48,865
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX   $41,752

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through March 20, 2017

All-around
1 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $50,328
2 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 50,177
3 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 41,852
4 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 40,868
5 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 27,562
6 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 26,572
7 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,232
8 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 23,877
9 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 18,642
10 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 17,521
11 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
12 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 13,557
13 McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla. 12,187
14 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 12,086
15 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
16 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 9,555
17 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 9,298
18 Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta 8,517
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
2 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 42,716
3 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 42,274
4 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
5 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 34,554
6 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 30,469
7 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
8 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 25,150
9 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 24,092
10 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 23,452
11 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 23,380
12 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 19,992
13 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 17,635
14 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 17,351
15 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 16,861
16 Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. 15,661
17 Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta 14,918
18 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 14,792
19 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 14,420
20 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 13,535
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $66,874
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 49,280
3 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 29,272
4 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 26,770
5 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 26,449
6 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 25,785
7 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 22,957
8 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 20,902
9 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 20,153
10 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 19,482
11 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 17,676
12 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 17,581
13 Shane Frey, Duncan, Okla. 17,220
14 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 16,116
15 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 15,904
16 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 15,535
17 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 15,409
18 Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta 14,441
19 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 14,172
20 Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb. 14,105
Team Roping (header)
1 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
2 Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas 39,368
3 Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. 36,378
4 Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. 31,505
5 Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. 25,766
6
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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 3-19-17

Posted by on Mar 19, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
March 19, 2017

Harry Vold, Jan. 29, 1924 – March 13, 2017

The rodeo world lost its “Duke of the Chutes.”

ProRodeo Hall of Fame stock contractor Harry Vold passed away March 13. He was 93.

The legendary Vold passed away in his sleep at his home in Avondale, Colo.

“My dad enjoyed rodeo more than anyone I know,” said Kirsten Vold, Harry’s daughter. “The PRCA meant a lot to him. He dedicated his life to the sport of rodeo and he believed in everything those four letters (PRCA) stood for. He passed away in his sleep like every good cowboy should.”

A memorial service will take place at 1 p.m. (MT) March 20 at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colo., 101 Pro Rodeo Drive.

Vold, while operating the Harry Vold Rodeo Company, was chosen PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year 11 times (1982, 1987-96), which is tied for the most selections with Stace Smith ProRodeos.

Vold is one of only two stock contractors to provide animals for every National Finals Rodeo, which has been held annually since 1959.

“He’s made a lot of friends and done a lot of things in rodeo,” Kirsten said. “I would say he had no regrets with how he spent his life because there’s nothing he would have rather have done than spend it in a rodeo arena on the back of a black horse, and he got to do that for many, many years.”

Vold was born Jan. 29, 1924, in Edmonton, Alberta. Vold tried his hand at bareback and saddle bronc riding, but he never had any ambition to be a full-time rodeo cowboy.

His interest was in the horse business and auctioneering, then in rodeo. His early exposure to stock contracting came with some of the greatest names in the business – Leo Cremer, Lynn Beutler and Harry Knight.

Vold’s breeding program, primarily with bucking horses, has led to seven animals being voted top bucking stock of the year – two of which have been repeat winners. Over the years, Vold stock has appeared at every major rodeo in the United States, and several in Canada.

“My philosophy is to put on the very best quality rodeo with top stock and top cowboys –  wholesome family entertainment,” Harry once said.

Vold was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1994 and was named Legend of ProRodeo in 2009.

“I would hope people would remember that he was a true, loyal and honest friend,” said Kirsten, who will continue to run her father’s rodeo company.

Frost heats up in Florida

ARCADIA, Fla. – Joe Frost traveled 2,285 miles to compete at the Arcadia All-Fla Championship Rodeo, and it was worth the long flight.

The 24-year-old Randlett, Utah, bull rider covered Frontier Rodeo’s Back Down for 86 points to win the title and earn a check for $4,258.

“I try to never think about the expenses or traveling, because that’s just part of the job we do,” Frost said. “In my mind, it doesn’t matter if I’m rodeoing in my back yard or getting on a plane for four hours – I make it just about bull riding and not stress about money, because that doesn’t do you any good.”

He didn’t need to stress about his performance in Arcadia. In fact, the ride he made on Back Down not only led to a big check, but also a bit of revenge.

“I got bucked off that bull in Spanish Fork (Utah) last year, and he bucked my brother Josh off at a college rodeo,” Frost said. “So, that was a good one to have again and get him rode – I got some revenge for the family.

“He’s a bull who’s better out of the right-hand delivery, and he’s really fast and a guy has to be moving and hustling or he’ll get ahead of you in a hurry. Winning this makes me feel better that I wasted a chance at $4-5,000 the first time I saw that bull.”

This was Frost’s second trip to Arcadia, as he earned a sixth-place check at the rodeo last year.

“I really like that rodeo – they have a good crowd and (eight-time World Champion) Donnie Gay is helping announce, and he always adds a little flavor to it,” Frost said. “It’s exciting when you make a good ride with him rambling in the background.”

Surprisingly, this is Frost’s first victory of the 2017 season. Still, he entered the weekend sixth in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings on the strength of plenty of second- and third-place finishes.

“It’s about consistency and being able to ride every different kind of bull you face,” he said. “I’d rather be second at three rodeos than first at one and buck off at the other two. The name of the game is winning as much money as you can, but it’s nice to get a win now and then.”

Frost, who has qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER the past three years, missed three months of action last April through June with a blood clot. He’s finished in the top six of the world each of the past three seasons, and is now hoping to have a season full of health.

“I’d like to think the sky is the limit, but I’ve never been able to go a full year, and have always had injuries,” he said. “But my goal is to be the world champion, and to stay fresh and go to as many rodeos as I can.”

Other winners at the $100,266 rodeo were all-around cowboy Nelson Wyatt ($2,759 in tie-down roping and team roping), bareback rider Orin Larsen (87 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Times Up), steer wrestler Kyle Irwin (4.2 seconds), team ropers Nelson Wyatt/Brad Culpepper (5.5 seconds), saddle bronc rider Clay Elliott (87.5 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Memphis King), tie-down roper Zeb Chapman (9.8 seconds) and barrel racer Taylor Carver (17.31 seconds).

  • Steer wrestler Damian Padilla put himself atop the PRCA season leader board with his 2.9-second winning run at the Parada del Sol rodeo in Scottsdale, Ariz. (March 101-2). The steer wrestling world record – with a barrier – is 2.4 seconds shared by four men. Padilla did establish a new Parada del Sol rodeo record, shattering the time of 3.5 seconds shared by Rodney Towe, (1978); Les Shepperson (2009) and Dean Gorsuch (2010)
  • .The biggest movement in the season leaderboard came in steer roping. Bryce Davis stopped the clock at 8.4 seconds in the fourth round of the M.M. Fisher Jr. Memorial Steer Roping (March 11-12) in Andrews, Texas, which was the second fastest time recorded in 2017. Trevor Brazile had an 8.5-second time in the fourth round at the same event, leaving him No. 3 on the leaderboard. Brazile also won the first round at the M.M. Fisher Jr. Memorial Steer Roping with a 9.1-second run, which is tied for fifth-best this season with Rocky Patterson’s 9.1-second time in Bellville, Texas on Oct. 15 at the Austin County Fair & Rodeo.

Mize captures his inaugural Xtreme Bulls Division 1 win

FORT MOHAVE, Ariz. – Fear obviously wasn’t a factor for rookie Tristan Mize Saturday night.

Competing against a talented field, Mize came out a champion with a score of 173 points in the two-head average at the Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event.

It was Mize’s first career Xtreme Bulls win, in only his second attempt.

“This feels really good,” said Mize, 20. “There were a lot of very good riders here (March 11), and this is my biggest win so far in my PRCA career. I get nervous now and then, and if you don’t get nervous, I don’t think you’re human, but I was able to relax and do what I needed to do.”

Mize was especially happy about the $10,381 he earned for his performance.

“That money will help me out a lot,” Mize said. “This is a big win for me and gives me a good confidence boost.”

Mize, of Bryan, Texas, set the stage for his victory with an 85-point ride on Bar T Rodeo’s Starfish.

“That was a nice bull, and it felt great to get one rode in the long round,” Mize said.

Mize’s ride left him in a tie for second place with Kurtis Turner, and just one point behind Jeffrey Ramagos, who registered his 86-point score on Championship Pro Rodeo’s Glory.

In the finals, things clicked again for Mize as he had an 88-point trip on Honeycutt Rodeo’s Bragging Rights.

Mize just edged reigning PRCA/Resistol Rookie of the Year Roscoe Jarboe by 1.5 points to win the average.

Jarboe qualified for the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER, finishing ninth in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings.

He won the short round in Fort Mohave with a 90.5-point ride on Bar T Rodeo’s Broken Arrow. That tied him for the third-highest scored bull ride this season with Brennon Eldred’s 90.5-point ride on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Muley Madness in Tucson, Ariz.

“I just wanted to stay calm and have fun and get my job done,” Mize said. “I had never seen that bull (Bragging Rights) before, and I didn’t know much about him, but he ended up being really good. He went around to the left and kicked real hard and bucked good. When I made the whistle, I was pretty excited because I knew I was going to get a decent score.”

Although Mize is only a rookie, he’s not lacking any confidence.

“I don’t think there’s any reason of doing anything unless you’re the best at it,” he said. “I ride bulls because I love doing this, and I want to be the best. I love the thrill and the rush of riding bulls, and being able to ride something that weighs that much more than you do, and that moves so fast.”

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com will be broadcasting the Southeastern Livestock Exposition from Montgomery, Ala., March 16-18. The rodeo begins at 7 p.m. (CT) March 16 and March 17, and there are two performances March 18, at 2 and 7 p.m.

The Reno (Nev.) Rodeo Foundation is warning the public about scammers using its name to ask for donations. Clara Andriola, executive director of the Reno Rodeo Foundation, spoke to the PRCA media department about the issue March 9. “It’s come to our attention that there may be scammers using the Reno Rodeo Foundation name to fraudulently solicit donations,” Andriola said. “We want the community to know that the Foundation does not, and will not, make calls asking for donations. We do appreciate donations, and the money that’s donated goes to the kids in our community, but to be secure about making a donation we use a secure website, or they can contact me by phone or email.” The secure website address is www.renorodeofoundation.org. To get in touch with Andriola by phone, call 775.322.9875 or contact her via email at info@renorodeofoundation.org .

This past weekend’s Arcadia All-Fla Championship Rodeo was the last in its historic facility, as construction is underway for a new $7 million, 7,796-seat covered arena. This is the third time the 89-year-old Arcadia rodeo has moved since it began. “We have outgrown our current location,” said Don Hall, president of the Arcadia Rodeo Committee. “It’s a good problem to have.” The new arena can fit about 1,600 more spectators than the current one and will have two barns with 100 stalls. The long-term plan is to expand to 300 stalls, Hall said. In addition to more seating, the individual seats will be twice as wide. Before, seats were nine inches wide, and the new bleachers will allow for 18 inches of space per person.

A pair of Fort Hays (Kan.) State University (FHSU) students have been awarded scholarships courtesy of the Phillipsburg Rodeo Association. Kaitlyn Dinges, Ness City, Kan., and Wyatt Livingston, Oxford, Neb., are recipients of $500 scholarships towards their education at Fort Hays State … Officials are deciding whether to replace the nearly century-old rodeo arena grandstands at the Roundup Grounds Sports Complex in Belle Fourche, S.D., and how to pay for such a project. Mayor Gloria Landphere says work began on a master plan for the complex earlier this year. She says initial talks should focus on the financial aspects of the $1.2 million projected cost of replacing the grandstands at the city-owned complex. Landphere told the city council during a meeting last month that officials need to talk about replacing the bleachers because of the insurance liability, the Black Hills Pioneer reported. “We’re going to have to address some type of a plan because of the age of these (grandstands),” Landphere said. Council members discussed the possibility of using the city’s hospitality tax to fund the project.

Councilwoman Jessica Carmichael noted that other projects also need attention within the complex. The complex consists of soccer and baseball fields that require repair and maintenance, in addition to the rodeo arena. The mayor said she would put together a list of projects on the plan to discuss at a later meeting. The 98th annual Black Hills Roundup will take place in Belle Fourche, S.D., June 30-July 4.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Harry just had a way with people. He was spectacular to be around. He was humble, and great to talk to, and he was a unique man. It’s a big loss to our rodeo industry”

– Seven-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier Josh Peek on his good friend Harry Vold who passed away Monday.

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through March 13, 2017

AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville,Texas $50,328
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $64,453
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $46,209
SB: CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah $55,545
TD: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $42,584
BR: Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $48,865
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX   $41,752

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through March 13, 2017

All-around
1 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $50,328
2 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 50,177
3 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 41,852
4 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 40,868
5 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 27,562
6 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 26,572
7 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,232
8 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 23,711
9 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 17,011
10 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
11 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 14,458
12 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 14,286
13 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 13,348
14 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
15 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 9,555
16 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 9,298
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
2 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 42,274
3 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 40,720
4 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
5 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 34,554
6 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
7 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 28,186
8 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 25,150
9 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 23,452
10 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 22,891
11 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 22,377
12 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 19,992
13 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 17,635
14 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 17,351
15 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 16,861
16 Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. 14,843
17 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 13,535
18 Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho 13,111
19 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 12,952
20 Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. 12,649
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $64,453
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 48,707
3 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 29,272
4 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 26,770
5 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 26,449
6 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 25,785
7 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 22,957
8 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 20,902
9 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 20,153
10 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 19,482
11 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 17,676
12 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 17,476
13 Shane Frey, Duncan, Okla. 17,220
14 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 15,904
15 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 15,167
16 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 14,761
17 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 14,567
18 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 14,172
19
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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 3-8-17

Posted by on Mar 8, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

 

Press release from PRCA
March 8, 2017

 

Larsen wins second consecutive Champions Challenge

GRAND ISLAND, Neb. – Bareback rider Orin Larsen is two-for-two after winning his second consecutive Wrangler Champions Challenge presented by Justin Boots event.

“It’s neat to win two of them back-to-back, and definitely a rewarding feeling for me,” Larsen said, following his Grand Island, Neb., victory. “I hope to do it for the next six or so Champions Challenges. It’s a great opportunity to win more money and get to the Finals.”

The 25-year-old Canadian member of Team Coors covered J Bar J’s Blessed Assurance with 87 points, a nearly identical performance to his winning 86-point ride at the Rapid City, S.D., Champions Challenge on Feb. 1.

“It (Blessed Assurance) was a wild little horse – circled around and came to the right and was pretty exotic,” Larsen said. “Just a fun horse to get on.”

Competition was tight and the stock was rank, so Larsen had to bring his A-game to come out on top.

“It was a great group of guys and a great group of horses – it was phenomenal bareback riding,” Larsen said. “The stock was all awesome, you could win on any of them, I thought.”

Larsen wasn’t exaggerating, as the Top 5 bareback rides were all 84 points or better and the second-place score was a mere point-and-a-half behind him.

“I try not to be surprised about a win – we are all expected to win and ride at our best, and everyone rode outstanding,” Larsen said. “It’s a relief, but I feel like it wasn’t unexpected.

“It’s always a huge confidence boost to get a win under your belt. It’s like a hometown win, really – me and my fiancée bought a place and have been living in Gering (Neb.) for almost exactly a year.”

Larsen’s hitting the road for more rodeos, with Arcadia, Fla., Montgomery, Ala., and Austin, Texas, next on his list.

“I’m going to keep picking away and hopefully earn enough to make it back to Vegas,” Larsen said. “I haven’t had very good winter runs, so I was hoping for this. It will help going into the spring and the rest of the year.”

Larsen was No. 3 in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings in 2016, and is confident this year will go just as well.

“That’s what I’m banking on, nod for 90 or go down swinging,” Larsen said.

Other winners at the $92,800 rodeo were Team B&W Trailer Hitches steer wrestler Dakota Eldridge (4.1 seconds), Team Coors team ropers Dustin Bird/Russell Cardoza (4.8 seconds), Team PRCA saddle bronc rider Jake Wright (88.5 points on Brookman Rodeo’s Drinking Again), Team Experience Kissimmee tie-down roper Tuf Cooper (7.3 seconds), Team Justin Boots barrel racer Tiany Schuster (13.76 seconds) and Team RAM bull rider Cole Melancon (88 points on Summit Pro Rodeo’s Red Image).

This was Melancon’s second-consecutive WCC victory as well.

  • Jake Wright’s 88.5-point ride on Brookman Rodeo’s Drinking Again is tied for the third-highest scored saddle bronc ride of the season. Shorty Garrett also had an 88.5-point ride on Sutton Rodeos’ Snake Stomper Nov. 5.

Hadley Barrett: Sept. 18 1929 – March 2, 2017

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association lost a legend March 2.

Announcer Hadley Barrett, who was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1999, passed away in the early morning hours of March 2 due to heart failure while at University Hospital in Denver, Colo. He was 87.

“I’m having a hard time dealing with this because he was not only my dad, but my best friend,” said Trent Barrett, Hadley’s son.

The last rodeo Barrett announced was the San Antonio (Texas) Stock Show & Rodeo, and his final day of announcing was Feb. 25.

A memorial service was held for Barrett Monday at the Budweiser Events Center, in Loveland, Colo.

Veteran announcer Wayne Brooks, who has worked with Barrett for years, was trying to come to grips with his passing.

“I’ve talked to everybody in the last two or three hours (on March 2), and the consensus is that he was supposed to be bulletproof,” Brooks said. “Because that’s not only the way everybody depicted him, but that’s the way he came across. Regardless of age, the numbers don’t count, he was just an ironman. We all know (passing away) is going to happen to us someday, but it doesn’t seem possible that’s happening now with him. It’s unreal for sure.”

Brooks worked with Barrett some, most recently at San Antonio, and was scheduled to work with him at Rodeo Austin (Texas) March 11-25.

“The level with which everybody around him held him was unbelievable, even to this day, whether it’s fans, committees, cowboys, stock contractors, the list goes on and on,” Brooks said.

“Not just because of his tenure, but because of the kind of man he was. To not have that piece of the puzzle in these locations is going to be very odd, very strange, very different. The thing that created his longevity in our game is after a rodeo performance when you went and listened to him, you felt like he was your friend.”

Barrett was born Sept. 18, 1929, in North Platte, Neb. The ranch-raised Nebraskan started his career as a contestant and formed his own dance band, but found his place in rodeo history behind the microphone.

A PRCA member since 1965, Barrett has announced all the big rodeos, and a great number of the smaller, ones across the country. He has been the voice of the Sidney (Iowa) Championship Rodeo since 1983; worked the Buffalo Bill Rodeo (North Platte, Neb.) for more than 30 years; the Greeley (Colo.) Stampede for more than 20 years; and worked for more than a decade at Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days.

Barrett was named PRCA Announcer of the Year in 1983, 1985, 1989 and 2002. He worked five National Finals Rodeos (1968, 1976, 1979, 1983 and 2008) and the 1967 National Finals Steer Roping, as well as called the action at the Canadian Finals Rodeo seven times.

He has worked as an NFR television announcer since 1980. He was among the first to announce while on horseback, and had always been credited with an honest approach to arena accidents and mishaps.

Barrett’s legacy is his willingness to share his talent and experience with others. He is known for taking rookie announcers under his wing and sharing hard-earned information.

“He had that capacity just to get up and love every day he was in touch with the rodeo business,” Brooks said. “It’s that passion that kept him going. He loved the game as much as he loved his family. He was an amazing man.”

Ratliff suffers season-ending injury

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Bareback rider Winn Ratliff is out of competition for the remainder of the 2017 season after suffering a severe injury during the Matagorda County Fair & Rodeo in Bay City, Texas, March 2.

“I’ll be out six months – this is a season-ending injury for me,” Ratliff said. “It’s frustrating I can’t compete, but there’s always another door open. Once I heal up, I’m going to get back at it again.”

The sacrum – the large triangular bone at the base of the spine that connects the pelvis together – was shattered, and Ratliff’s pubic symphysis was displaced.

“Basically, the horse fell over on top of him,” said Justin Sportsmedicine Director Rick Foster. “It takes a lot to break that – a 1,200-pound horse on a 150-pound guy can do that.”

“It was one of those freak accidents,” Ratliff said. “On the video, it looked like he lost his back footing and the fence scared him since his head was down while bucking – he fell back, and that pressure landed on my back and hips.”

There was no doubt in Ratliff’s mind that it was a major injury.

“I felt a pop and it scared me – I knew something wasn’t right,” Ratliff said, adding that he was unable to walk out of the arena. “It was one of those bad deals. The doctor said it’s broken completely – from top to bottom – the break goes from Zone 1 to Zone 2 and Zone 3 of the sacrum. It was a lot of pressure on my hips; something had to give.”

Ratliff is scheduled to undergo surgery March 7 to have a plate and screw put in, and to find out if his left joint is injured and if there’s any internal damage, as well.

“We discussed some options, and he feels this is the best option,” Foster said. “As far as I know, he was trying to put weight on it.”

Ratliff can stand up, but walking is difficult. It will be 12 weeks before Ratliff can put any weight on his hips, and then he’ll enter 12 weeks of therapy.

Ratliff’s injury is similar to the one suffered by barrel racer Mary Walker in 2011, Foster said. Walker bounced back from her surgery and won her first world title in 2012 at the age of 53 – Ratliff is currently 27 years old.

“I’m very fortunate and glad I’m not paralyzed,” Ratliff said. “It has crossed my mind, that I could have not been able to walk again, but thankfully God laid his hands on me and I have a chance to walk.”

Ratliff was ranked sixth in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings as of March 6.

“God has a plan for everything – we might not understand, but he is always in control, and if we follow his will, he won’t lead us astray,” Ratliff said. “It’s not like I’ll never compete again, it’s just a jam in the road. Every tragedy has something good come out of it, just have faith and believe and not be a Debby Downer.”

CPRA Welcomes New President

AIRDRIE, Alberta – Terry Cooke was named as the new president of the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association Feb. 28, and takes on the role immediately. Cooke was elected to the position by acclamation, according to the CPRA.

A long time CPRA rodeo official, committee member and CPRA Board member with a strong business background, Cooke brings a wealth of expertise to the position.

From his late teens, Cooke enjoyed involvement in the sport of rodeo.

“I rode bareback horses and bulls initially, but I wasn’t that good,” he said.

Cooke turned his attention to other areas of the industry. He worked for amateur stock contractors (Rudy Ostrem among them) and from the mid-1980s on, he judged rodeos and volunteered with the Dawson Creek (British Columbia) Stampede as a committee member.

In 1994, Cooke was invited (by then CPRA Rodeo Administrator Keith Hyland) to attend a professional rodeo judging clinic. The British Columbia native hasn’t looked back. For much of the year, he travels across Western Canada and into the U.S. officiating at professional rodeos.

As far as his involvement with the CPRA, Cooke is excited about the new position.

“I want to make this organization one that people are proud to be a part of … where contestants want to be members,” Cooke said.

Cooke went on to say that helping the Association become more stable financially is another goal, as is greater transparency within the organization. He’s excited to be part of the board structure once again, and noted that current board members have been welcoming.

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com will be broadcasting the Avi River Stampede from Fort Mohave, Ariz., March 10-12. The rodeo begins at 7:30 p.m. (MT) March 10, and at 2 p.m. March 11-12.

The Texas State Senate was scheduled to present a Senate Resolution to attending committee members of the ABC Pro Rodeo Monday. The resolution is being presented to honor the work, dedication and longevity of the ABC Pro Rodeo and its support of the Lubbock (Texas) Boys and Girls Clubs, and will be read on the Senate floor of the state capital in Austin. Dates for the 75th Annual ABC Pro Rodeo are March 30 through April 1. There will be four total performances.

In addition to the rodeo action, there will be plenty of music entertainment during Rodeo Austin (Texas) March 11-25. The music schedule at the Travis County Exposition Center includes Dwight Yoakam, March 11; Cole Swindell, March 14; Randy Rogers Band, March 17; Chase Bryant, March 18; Kenny Rogers, March 19; and Josh Turner, March 21. Cost of tickets range from $20-$175. For more information and a complete list of performers, visit www.rodeoaustin.com.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Nobody ever needs to try to be that because you are never going to be what he was. He loved rodeo. He was one-of-a-kind, Hadley Barrett.”

– Fellow announcer Randy Corley on his father-in-law, legendary Hadley                          Barrett.

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through March 6, 2017

AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville,Texas $50,328
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $53,814
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $64,453
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $44,853
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $44,853
SB: CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah $54,665
TD: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $42,584
BR: Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $48,865
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX   $39,526

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through March 6, 2017

All-around
1 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $50,328
2 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 50,177
3 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 41,852
4 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 40,868
5 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 27,562
6 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 26,572
7 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,232
8 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 23,711
9 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 17,011
10 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
11 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 14,458
12 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 14,286
13 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 13,348
14 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
15 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 9,555
16 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 9,298
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $53,814
2 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 42,274
3 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 40,720
4 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
5 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 33,960
6 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
7 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 28,186
8 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 24,073
9 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 23,452
10 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 21,608
11 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 21,116
12 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 19,992
13 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 17,351
14 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 16,861
15 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 13,680
16 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 13,535
17 Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho 13,111
18 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 12,952
19 Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. 12,163
20 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 12,020
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $64,453
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 48,707
3 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 29,272
4 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 26,770
5 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 26,449
6 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 25,785
7 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 22,957
8 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 20,902
9 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 20,153
10 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 18,673
11 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 17,470
12 Shane Frey, Duncan, Okla. 17,220
13 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 16,669
14 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 15,167
15 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 14,702
16 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 14,593
17 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 14,172
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