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☛ Tragedy at the AQHA World Show 11-17 -17

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TRAGEDY AT THE AQHA WORLD SHOW

 

SHARIN HALL LOSES A YOUNG CONTENDER IN THE JUNIOR BARREL RACE

A news and opinion piece by Glory Ann Kurtz
Nov. 17, 2017

AQHA photo.

After winning the first go-round of the Junior Barrel Race at the AQHA World Show, barrel racer Sharin Hall, of Winning Edge Stables, Harrah, Okla., and her top barrel mare Dreaming Of Foose (Foose x Hawks Dream Glrl), nicknamed Cali, were giving it their all in the final go-round on Nov. 15. While turning the second barrel, the mare fell and broke her pelvis and lacerated an artery which caused internal bleeding so bad that she passed away before they could get her to a veterinarian.

According to a report from the AQHA, “The mare became acutely lame during her barrel racing run and was provided emergency medical care. It was quickly determined to be in the horse’s best interest to be transported to a referral hospital. She was loaded into a trailer following medication administration to ease the pain and help control inflammation, but passed away enroute,” said Dr.Dave Frisbie of Equine Sports Medicine.”

Sharin is originally from Sunbury, Ohio. She was born to love, train and ride  horses as her father, Jackson Hall, was an accomplished horseman and a barrel horse trainer. Her mother is also into horses.

Sharin is a well-known trainer and competitor in barrel racing circles, having won and placed at many major barrel racing events, including “The American. Cali, a 2013 mare, was the 2017 Summer Shootout 1D Champion, Reserve Champion at Parker Wood Memorial Slot Race. She was also the Ultimate Isabella Quarter Horse Slot Race and Futurity Champion.

WAS THIS MARE’S DEATH PREVENTABLE?

However, from all the responses on Facebook, many barrel racers felt the death of this great mare was preventable. According to her friend Lainie Whitmire, who is also an accomplished barrel racer, the ground was the culprit.

“Multiple horses slipped in the prelims,” said Lainie in a post on Facebook. “Some went completely down and were pulled up. Great horses were unable to keep their footing in order to compete. I feel like the officials should have prepared the arena better before the finals. JMO. It might not have changed the outcome. This is a horse I know very well, owned by a friend, so it’s personal to me”

This was a terrible thing that happened to this young mare but it could have just as easily killed the rider. As a result, many petitions to the AQHA were started on my Facebook page as well as others I am sure, that were signed (including one I started by accident when I just thought I was signing another one) and sent to Pete Kyle, AQHA Executive Director of Shows and Judges,  stating, “There need to be changes made to the ground at the World Show, as well as other AQHA-approved events.”

One, signed by Amanda Earles, said, “After multiple horses going down, having footing problems and even passing away at the AQHA World Show in the barrel racing event held in Oklahoma City, Okla., the third week of November 2017, there need to be changes made to the ground. AQHA needs to bring in people, such as John Jamison, to evaluate and properly prep and work the ground before and during there AQHA World Show and other AQHA-approved events (such as the show during the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo.)

“The petition is to make AQHA take responsibility for their mismanagement of the round conditions at their shows and to fix this problem and hire outside organizations and/or people that are skilled in this area. This needs to happen now!”

MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE:

When I was younger and was hauling my daughter to barrel races, I occasionally ran barrels myself, I had a scary experience at the John Justin Arena, located in the Will Rogers Complex in Fort Worth. As I rounded the third barrel, I heard my horse’s shoes hitting the cement under the dirt in the arena . Many of my friends watching said the gelding was leaving sparks as he rounded the barrel for home. Luckily, this was an older, seasoned barrel horse that was raised in Montana and he knew how to handle bad ground.

Since then, Will Rogers and the John Justin arena have done a lot to change the ground, storing different ground for different events, like the NCHA Futurity that’s going on now, with the ground being deeper in front of the chutes where they cut. There are individuals out there who specialize in ground preparation for different events. The All-American Quarter Horse Congress has had problems for years as they also try to run various events in the same arena on the same ground. However, the last time I was there, they had additional buildings where they could run the timed events on different ground from the halter, pleasure and reining horses.

But now is the time for show management of all sizes to make an assessment of the ground for their shows, especially if they have several different classes, including timed events. If they don’t, there could be some big lawsuits in the wings if someone gets hurt badly or even killed.

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☛ From the Editor 9-26–17

Posted by on Sep 26, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz

Sept. 26, 2017

I always seem to pick the worst times to be away. The past few months have been crazy. But I have sold my horse facility and I and my animal menagerie of animals including Cougarand, a 31-year-old champagne stallion sired by Peppy San Badger, out of an own daughter of Doc Bar, and my little dog Billie, will be moving into my new home in Grandview, Texas, with my daughter.

After 37 years in one place, it was a huge move, as well as being rather heart-wrenching. My Mother and my husband, Bob, both died in that house and it had many memories of buying and selling hundreds of horses, as well as raising hundreds of babies, as well as a little bit of showing.

Its also stressful to decide what to take and what not to take. And the “what-nots” need to be more things than you ever dreamed of getting rid of. But a statement I heard during my move helped: “If you’re not going to be using it, get rid of it because your kids don’t want it.” Good advice and very true I’m sure!

It seemed my most valuable possessions were horse magazines and horse sale catalogs: the Quarter Horse Journal, The Cutting Horse Chatter and Quarter Hsorse News.  I had some of them back into the 1970s and I finally got the nerve to throw some of them away, most interestingly enough, the more recent ones.

I gave my Chatters to Gala Nettles, as she is doing some historical articles on the National Cutting Horse Association. I advertised that I would give away my Quarter Horse Journals, dating back into the 1970s and had one phone call – a woman who wondered if I had the November 1973 issue of the Quarter House Journal as there was an article about her horse in it, I did have it and sent it to her free of charge. That’’s the only call I got. I guess I should have charged for them and I’d have had more takers! That’s usually the case.

But I realized that the summer was about gone. My daughter and I took a trip to North Dakota for my 60th class reunion, which was a blast.  We have them every five years and I don’t miss them – but they miss Bob as he brought that Pennsylvania home brew that his friend Bobby George made, and he enjoyed them even more than I did and it was my reunion!  I’m sorry to say that Bobby George also passed away a couple of months ago.

Also, I had only spent a couple of weeks in the mountains of Colorado. so I dumped my furniture and boxes, as well as Cougarand, off with my daughter to care for and headed to Colorado for what was left of the summer. Only days later, he got cast in his stall. She got the help of one of her employees, they tipped him over and got him up. When he started chasing the help’s dog, they knew he was OK.

Today, the aspens are all turning red and yellow, the morning and evening clouds are lowering themselves into our valley, it is freezing some at night and there is snow on the mountains. In fact, as I speak, it is raining now after a gorgeous day. I Guess I better think about coming back to Texas for the winter!

I’m still planning on continuing my site: www.allaboutcutting.com to keep you updated on interesting things going on in the horse industry. I know some of you will love that – while others will hate it; however, guys and gals, that’s life and I’m going to enjoy it to the fullest!

I have to thank Rick Dennis for helping me keep up my site by writing many interesting articles and forwarding news to me. If you haven’t read the articles on cell phones – you need to. It will enlighten you about the item that EVERYONE has to have. The articles give valuable information on the cell phones themselves, as well as the carriers. Also, as a risk analyst, he has written several articles about the horse industry and kept me up to date.

Following are a couple of articles of interest in the horse world:

TOMMY MANION SUES NCHA FOR SUSPENSION AND FINE

The latest news in the cutting world, is that Tommy Manion has sued the NCHA for suspending him for two years, putting him on probation, fining him $15,000, and also giving him a five-year probationary period to be served after his suspension, for violating the NCHA’s Zero Tolerance Policy. At an NCHA cutting in July, Manion was videoed when he shot his stallion with a BB gun “to calm him down from his aggressive and anti-social actions.”

The stallion, Smooth Maximus is a full brother to Million Dollar sire Smooth As A Cat. He said he did it because the stallion was “kicking at people and horses, trying to bite people and horses, rearing up and trying to charge at other horses, Manion said he couldn’t approach the stallion safely, so he shot him with a BB gun.” The incident was all filmed on a cell phone and sent to the NCHA,

I reported how the NCHA Executive Committee, as well as Grievance Committee found that he was guilty of the association’s Zero Tolerance Policy.

However, the latest is that in his lawsuit, he is asking that the NCHA’s disciplinary action be voided and that he receive more than $1 million in monetary relief.He has also asked the judge to issue a temporary injunction to block the NCHA from enforcing the action while the civil case is pending.

The NCHA contends that it  has a right to suspend Manion or any other member for the association’s rule violations.

When I get back to Fort Worth (after a quick jaunt to Nebraska to attend a friend’s wedding, who was a former employee of mine at Quarter Horse News), I will make a mad dash to the Tarrant County Courthouse and get the court documents and publish them.

I usually don’t report hear-say; however I did hear that the SPCA checked out the situation and let Manion off the hook if he gelded the stallion, which he did. If they would have charged him, that would have been a felony and he could have faced a severe financial penalty as well as serve some time in jail.  Also, I heard the stallion was owned by a syndicate and that the syndicate members are upset and thinking of suing Manion as they didn’t know anything about the incident or the gelding the stallion. I’ll also check that out when I get home,

ANIMAL ABUSERS COULD HAVE TO REGISTER AS SEX OFFENDERS

On a side note about cruelty to animals, On Tucker Carlson’s TV show, he reported that several jurisdictions may soon consider motions to create registries for animal abuser the same way sex offenders are documented, He said Tennessee is currently the only state that has such a registry but such legislation has been passed in Cook County, Ill, which is home to Chicago. Also Massachusetts and Arizona are also considering legislation to create such lists.

Carlson said that “animals are helpless in the hands of humans and that it is up to us to treat them fairly, Your relationship with them is governed only by empathy and if you hurt an animal, it says a lot about how you treat people.”

That statement has been proven by the FBI, as I previously wrote an article about that.Those kids who torture and kill animals are more likely to do the same to people later in life.

To wrap this up, I had a telephone call from a Senior Editor of the Star Telegram who are covering the Manion incident and he told me it has morphed into an “animal abuse” article. He wanted to interview me about that; however, I had such poor phone coverage that I told him that would be impossible until I get home.

I should be home next week and if I can find my computer and printer, I will continue to try to give you more ”horsey” news!

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☛ Tommy Manion on camera shooting stallion with BB pistol 7-20-17

Posted by on Jul 20, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 28 comments

TOMMY MANION CAUGHT ON CAMERA SHOOTING AN UNRULY STALLION WITH A BB PISTOL AT AN NCHA-SANCTIONED SHOW

 

BESIDES NCHA SANCTIONING, COULD HE AND/OR NCHA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS BE GUILTY OF STATE OR FEDERAL LAWS VIOLATIONS?

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 20, 2017

I have now heard from a credible witness, that they knew the well-known Non-Pro who was at an NCHA Cutting in Whitesboro, Texas, on Saturday, July 15, and shot a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol. Another witness had taken a video of the event and it was soon in the hands of the NCHA. The witness assured me that the Non-Pro  in question was NCHA Non-Pro Tommy Manion, who at one time had the pistol under a jacket draped over his hand and dropped it on the ground and bent over to pick it up – all of which is on the video.

After receiving and confirming the reported horse abuse by Manion, I reached out to Rick Dennis, a Threat Assessment/Risk Analyst who is also a former Drug Enforcement Agent, for clarification of penalties resulting from Manion’s actions – for Manion, those who witnessed the event and the NCHA. Essentially, Rick informed me there are two laws in play here, one Federal, the other state, as well as two NCHA rule infractions.

There is a little-known Federal Law entitled 18 USC 4 – Misprision Of A Felony, which specifically states:  “Whoever having knowledge of the actual commission of a felony cognizable by a court of the United States, conceals and does not as soon as possible make known the same to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.” Animal abuse is now a Federal Felony with hefty fines and prison sentences.

Click for Misprision Of A Felony>>

Also, the State of Texas Animal Cruelty Law, which rates animal abuse as a Felony, states those prosecuted could be punishable by two years in a state jail and/or a $10,000 fine.

Click for Texas Animal Cruelty laws>>

Therefore, since the NCHA has already been notified of the animal cruelty case, along with being supplied with a video of the act, Manion has placed the association in a precarious spot, as whoever doesn’t report this gross violation to law enforcement in accordance with the provisions set forth in the USC 4 Code -Misprision of a Felony – is in direct violation of the federal law and could be subjected to arrest and prosecution at a later date. This includes Russell McCord, who received the phone call, as well as the Executive Director and the entire Executive Committee who met last night after being informed of the incident and determined their association’s punishment for the offense – and possibly even the lawyer who was informed of the infraction and gave the Executive Committee advice, as well as show management.

Difference of penalties between NCHA and governmental agencies:

The other curious nature of Manion’s act is the two violations in the NCHA Rulebook pertaining to animal abuse and cruelty and how they differ from Federal and State laws.

More specifically, the NCHA Rulebook states “if show management or a judge at any NCHA-approved or sponsored event discovers inhumane treatment or abuse of a horse, they may immediately bar the responsible party and contestant’s horse from further competition in the event and the judge will give a score of zero. The Executive Director must be notified within seven (7) days of the closing date of the show involved and the complaint will be referred to the appropriate NCHA Committee for investigation and consideration. Note: the Federal law says “as soon as possible It must be made known to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States and (the person) is to be fined or  imprisoned for not more than three years.”

Click for NCHA Standing Rule 35>>

While the NCHA disciplines animal cruelty by offense with a fine ($1,000 to $10,000), probation and/or suspension, the State of Texas Animal Cruelty Laws say that the perpetrator could be punished by two years in a state jail and/or a $10,000 fine.

Also, the NCHA should make sure that the abused animal is made available as soon as possible to a licensed veterinarian for any damage that has been done, especially since the person who described the incident to me said the when the BBs hit the stallion, he crouched and his body shook in fear.

On May 15, 2015, Rick Dennis wrote an article addressing this very problem called “Horse Abuse Part IV.” There are many good and devoted trainers in this industry; however, unfortunately we do have our share of abusive Open and Non-Pro trainers that should be removed. Click here for a copy of this article.

What’s the  hurry?

Why did the NCHA Executive Committee jump on this animal abuse case so quickly. I feel it is because they just tried to strengthen their animal abuse penalties due to the fact that PETA might come down on them and the sport of cutting if they waited. A smart move!

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☛ From the Editor 7-20-17

Posted by on Jul 20, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 20, 2017

Yesterday I sent out a notice in “Latest News” that a “well-known horse owner shot a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol at an NCHA cutting in Whitesboro, Texas. An update to that information is that the show was held on Saturday, July 15, rather than July 8. Also, that well-known horse owner is a top non-pro. NCHA’s Director of Judges Russell McCord was called and told what was going on and he told the caller to do whatever it took to stop it and make the person shooting the horse leave, which he did.

A bystander did take a video of the shooting which is now in the hands of the NCHA, and I understand that they have initiated the process against the person that did the shooting, as it is definitely against’ the NCHA’s highly advertised zero tolerance “horse-cruelty” policy. Still no mention of that person’s name but I do know that that person is a Non-Pro and a large advertiser in the Cutting Horse Chatter, giving the NCHA some hard choices.

I was given the name of the perpetrator; however, that person who told me about the shooting was not at the show and heard the information from someone who was. I would like to hear it from anyone who was present at this cutting who knew who the shooter was. I will not reveal your name. Call me at 940-433-5232 or 940-393-1865 or e-mail me at glory.kurtz@gmail.com. Since the NCHA has taken action, If that person’s name is not revealed sooner, I’m sure the perpetrator’s name will show up eventually in the Chatter under “Suspensions,” or possibly (but hopefully not) under “Probations.”

NCHA SUMMER SPECTACULAR NEWS:

The second go-round of the Open Classic/Challenge was completed yesterday, with those 26 scoring a 435.0 and above, advancing to the finals. Jon Burgess, riding Littlemak (Starlights Gypsy x Just a Swinging), owned by Anderson Cattle Co., Victoria, Texas, topped the two go-rounds with a 440.5 total score.

Grant Setnicka, not only finished a close second by scoring a 440.0 riding Ichis My Choice (Cat Ichi x My Little Abra), owned by J Five Horse Ranch Mgmt, LLC, Weatherford, Texas, but was the only rider to qualify three horses for the Finals. Also tying for second with a total score of 440.0 was Ed Flynn, riding Play Miss Boonsmal (Peptoboonsmal x Play Miss) for Danny R. Jones of Canada. The Open Classic/Challenge Finals is scheduled for Saturday,July 22, following six sets of the NCHA Derby Amateur and UnlimitedAmateur first go-round.

The Non-Pro and Limited Non-Pro in the Classic/Challenge  go-round is being held today. Also, don’t forget that the Western Bloodstock Summer Spectacular Sale,with 145 consignments, will be held Saturday, July 22, in the Watt Arena, starting at 9 a.m.

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☛ Where have I been lately? HOT news! 7-18-17

Posted by on Jul 19, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 19, 2017

I have had several individuals question whether or not I am continuing with my website www.allaboutcutting.com, as lately my news has been rather scarce and for that I am sorry.

My answer is “Yes,” I am continuing with my website; however, lately I have had several distractions which have cut back on my time to write articles. These include the following:

1) I was in the process of selling my horse operation since my husband passed away 9 years ago and I am unable to physically and financially keep this facility going. I recently solved that problem as I have sold my Boyd facility and purchased a much smaller place in Grandview, Texas. I will be moving the end of August but in the meantime I have to pack over 30 years of possessions and memorabilia.

2) Many of you old timers may remember Lee Dale, who created the pedigrees for sale catalogs, including the NCHA sales. Some 20 years ago she had a stroke and has been paralyzed on one side of her body and bedridden in nursing facilities ever since. Over the years all of her relatives have passed away and just before her sister died, I  agreed to take on her medical power of attorney. However, lately, Lee has gone downhill and though she has been in a nursing home for years, during the last few weeks she has been in the Wise Regional Hospital in ICU and currently is in Hospice at Senior Care in Decatur. Her mind is still pretty good and she remembers all you old-time cutters and all the stories that go with them!!!

3) On July 4, fireworks were going off in the middle of the highway in front of my place. The one horse I have left, Cougarand, a 31-year-old champagne son of Peppy San Badger out of a daughter of Doc Bar, is used to highway noises and even fireworks, but one must have come into his pasture and probably even hit him, which in the dark sent him into a pipe fence covered with wire where he fell with a leg getting stuck under the sucker rod at the bottom of the wire. I found him there the next morning and got him up; however, he had obviously injured the hind leg that was under the fence and was lame.

Even though I haven’t had a need to call a vet for some time, I called three different vets in the area – only one called me back; however, he didn’t show up. After doctoring Cougarand myself for a couple of weeks, I remembered my old friend and miracle worker – an equine kinesiologist and chiropractor named Laird Burke. He came and looked at Cougar and couldn’t believe what good shape he was in at 31 years of age – but most of all, he was surprised he hadn’t died lying under that fence all night.

After working on him for about 20 minutes, he said, Turn him loose and he will be just fine tomorrow.”Today is tomorrow – and like Laird promised – Cougarand is just fine, walking normal! In fact, when Laird got done working on him, I took his halter off. He usually runs off when he discovers he is loose; however, this time he followed me until I got out the gate. I guess he thought I had fixed his pain!

Laird has been a friend of Bob and me for many years and has “fixed” many horses that have had accidents or in some way had disturbed their skeletal frame or muscles. We had a baby colt one time who missed the gate when the horses, including his mother, headed out to the pasture. The colt jumped the fence and landed on his back. When he got up, he could walk, but it was like a car with a bent frame – he would walk toward you but he looked like he was actually going another way. We took him to vets and they said there was nothing they could do. About 3 months later, Laird came and stayed with us and he suggested we put the colt in the barn while he worked on him several times over the following week. His magic worked and the colt was soon walking normal and remained that way as long as we owned him. I became a lifetime fan!

Bob and I  met Laird years ago when he was working with and helping horses performing at the All American Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, Ohio. He eventually came and stayed with us for several months when he suddenly found himself with a lot of business in Texas, and he and his lovely wife Brenda soon moved to North Texas and have been helping horses over the past few years all over the country at major shows and ranches.

So that’s are my story and I’m sticking to it. I’m sure that in the short term, I will not be posting as often as I did before for awhile as I have this huge move in front of me. I have lived here for 38 years and imagine the “stuff” I have accumulated. They include Quarter Horse Journals back to the 1970s – that I am trying to give away to someone who would like to study the history of the wonderful Quarter Horse.

THE LATEST NEWS:

The latest news came from an e-mail last night wondering if I would like to expose wrong doing at the highest level in the cutting industry. The person said, “There is a Red Hot current situation about a well-known horse owner shooting a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol at a horse show in Whitesboro, Texas, Saturday, July 8, with witnesses, one of which took a video.”  They felt someone needed to pursue this in order to hold the NCHA accountable with their highly advertised zero tolerance “horse-cruelty” policy.

The caller said Russell McCord from the NCHA was called and told what was going on. He told the caller to do whatever it took to stop it and make the person shooting the horse leave, which he did.

I’m looking for someone who was there and watched the incident so I can report more about it. If you know such a person who is willing to talk with me, my phone no. is 940-433-5232 or cell 940-393-1865. I need to know who the person calling is but I do not have to give their name in my article – however, I would like for them to confirm the name of the perpetrator. I’m waiting by my phone(s).

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☛ A great friend, Bobby George, dies at age 96 4-7-17

Posted by on Apr 7, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

A GREAT FRIEND BOBBY GEORGE PASSES AT AGE 96

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 7, 2017

Bobby George, a dedicated horseman, shown only months before he passed away at age 96.

It is with a heavy heart that I have to report that a friend of mine and my deceased husband Bob, Bobby Robert E. “Bobby” George, passed away on Tuesday, April 4, 2017, at the Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pa. He was 96.

 

Bobby was a partner with Bob on many horses when Bob lived in Pennsylvania, including Tabano Raider, a Tabano King stallion that Bob brought to Texas with him and stood at stud for several years. They both rode descendants of Tabano Raider for years after the stallion’s death.

 

Bobby and his daughter Becky called me the day before he died and he kept thanking me for all the good times he had with Bob and me. His voice sounded very weak and I knew he was failing, saying he thought he had bronchitis. He died the following evening.

 

But Bobby had a great life and enjoyed almost every bit of it. Bob and I had spent many summer days going to horse events in Pennsylvania with Bobby, as well as trail riding in the mountains. He and his daughter and a friend came to our cabin in Colorado one summer and we had a great time trail riding in the Colorado mountains. After Bob’s death, I continued to go to Pennsylvania and visit with Bobby George and his children.

 

Bobby was a farmer and owned a butcher market called George Farms, but his true love was his horses, a love he shared with his children and grandchildren. Bobby was especially proud of being a breeder of Quarter Horses for 50 years.
He was a member of Masonic Lodge 224, of Danville, the Mooresburg Presbyterian Church, the Liberty Township Fire Co., the Susquehanna Valley Corral, and the American Quarter Horse Association.
Bobby was born Aug. 10, 1920, in Catawissa, a son of the late Edgar and Ella May (Creasy) George. He was married to the late Ruth E. (Auten) George for 41 years, before her passing in 1985.

George Farms was a fourth generation family business. He routinely went to Curb Market. Bobby loved his family and their regular gatherings.

He is survived by three daughters: Jane Aikey and husband Larry, Rebecca Bourbeau, and Alice Ann George, all of the Danville area; two sons, Edgar R. George and Peter George, all of the Mooresburg area; a daughter-in-law, Sharon George; longtime friend, Clara Benfer; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.
In addition to his parents and wife, he was preceded in death by a son, Martin S. George Sr.; a sister, Ruth Marqueen Wintersteen; and a daughter-in-law, Lorraine George.

He was well loved in his community and will be missed by many, including me!
Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, April 10, at the Mooresburg Presbyterian Church, 9 Church Drive, Danville, with the Rev. John Shaw III officiating. Friends may visit at the church from 9 to 11 a.m. prior to the service. The family recognizes that many people might like to pay their respects, so friends are also welcome to visit after the services in the church.

Burial will take place in the Moorseburg Presbyterian Cemetery.

The family gratefully declines flowers. For those wishing, donations may be made in Bobby’s memory to the Mooresburg Presbyterian Church, Liberty Township Fire Company QRS, or the Mooresburg Presbyterian Cemetery Fund.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Brady Funeral Home, Danville.
Please send online condolences to BradyFuneralHome.com. – See more at: http://obituaries.dailyitem.com/story/robert-george-1920-2017-902769592#sthash.2ih6gqmC.dpuf

 

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