Pages Navigation Menu

ON-LINE MAGAZINE & WEB SITE - SCROLL DOWN FOR NEWS

☛ Today’s News 1-26-17

Posted by on Jan 30, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TODAY’S NEWS

 

Jan. 26, 2017

Funeral services for NCHA’s Murlene Mowery scheduled; Marsha Chestnut fighting breast cancer and NCHA VP candidates announced.

 

SERVICES FOR MURLENE MOWERY

Services for Murlene Mowery, Millsap, Texas, will be held Tuesday, January 31. Services will be held at Greenwood Chapel located at 3100 White Settlement Road in Fort Worth at 1:30 pm. In lieu of flowers, Murlene’s family wishes donations be made to the Sandy Sokol Memorial Fund.

 

Mowery, an irreplaceable part of the NCHA, passed away on Saturday, Jan. 21, following a brief illness.

 

MARSHA CHESTNUT FIGHTING BREAST CANCER

Marsha Chestnut, wife of trainer Mark Chestnut, Whitesboro, Texas, reportedly has breast cancer, and is headed to the M.D. Anderson Hospital at Houston, Texas, on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017; services for Murlene Mowery, Millsap, Texas; NCHA VP President candidates announced. Send your notes to her at Marsha Chestnut, P.O. Box 364, Millsap, Texas 76273.

 

NCHA VICE PRESIDENT CANDIDATES ANNOUNCED

According to the NCHA website, two candidates have been selected for the 2017 Vice President election, said Lewis Wray, Chairman of the Officer Nominating Committee.  Those two candidates are: Garry Merritt of King, N.C., and Ron Pietrafeso of Elbert, Colo.

 

Ballots with background information on the two candidates will be sent via email and mail to all NCHA members no later than April 10, 2017 with votes due by midnight on May 22. The votes will be tabulated on Tuesday, May 23.

Additionally, information on the two candidates will appear in the April and May issues of the Cutting Horse Chatter and on the NCHA website. Please feel free to notify other NCHA members of the Vice Presidential candidates.

 

Read More

☛ Stephenville’s Lone Star arena to be sold on courthouse steps 1-27-17

Posted by on Jan 27, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

STEPHENVILLE’S LONE STAR ARENA TO BE SOLD ON COURTHOUSE STEPS

 

Jan. 27, 2017

According to the Stephenville Empire Tribune, the Lone Star Arena has been posted online and in the lobby of the Erath County Courthouse as being in foreclosure and will be auctioned off to the highest bidder(s) between 1 and 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 7 at the Erath County Courthouse.

 

The sale will include the arena on Hwy. 377 North, just outside of Stephenville city limits, Erath Iron and Metal, Inc., on Hwy 377 and CR 378 between Stephenville and Dublin, and a third property located on Elm Street in Dublin.

 

Loans on the property total several million dollars and were made by Coleman County State Bank -Abilene Banking Center.

 

Previous owners Paul and Marcie Sullivan sold Lone Star Arena to Brad and Nicole Boyd in 2011 and a potential buyer for the arena, Cody Johnson – owner of Twisted J Apparel – had recently sought assistance from the Stephenville Economic Development Authority regarding the possibility of buying the Arena. However, it was discovered that the facility is situated just outside the extraterritorial jurisdiction of the city of Stephenville.

 

The arena has been highly popular for rodeos, including PRCA, American Bucking Bull, PBR, USTRC etc. There are several events already on the 2017 schedule. Click below for full article from the Stephenville Empire Tribune.

Lone Star on Auction 1-17-17

Read More

☛ Farmer Fair Practice delayed 1-25-17

Posted by on Jan 25, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

FARMER FAIR PRACTICE RULES DELAYED FOR 60 DAYS

 

Release from the Texas Farm Bureau
Jan. 25, 2017

President Trump directed government agencies to delay new rule implementation by 60 days. The Farmer Fair Practices rules, which includes three separate documents, was among those delayed.

The first is an interim final rule from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Grain Inspection and Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA), allowing individual farmers and ranchers to challenge processor contracting and buying practices. Prior to this rule, farmers must prove harm to the entire industry in order to substantiate a violation of GIPSA rules.

The other two GIPSA rule proposals set parameters for poultry grower ranking systems, such as a tournament, and give clarity to what GIPSA considers unfair, unjustly discriminatory or deceptive practices that would be viewed as a violation of the act.

The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) has supported the proposed rule “stating the Agriculture Department’s Farmer Fair Practices Rules take an important step toward leveling the playing field in the poultry industry by ensuring companies follow the law and treat farmers fairly, without disrupting beef and pork markets.”

These rules are temporarily on hold and under evaluation by stakeholders. The comment period ends Feb. 20, and AFBF has requested a 120-day extension.

Another final rule proposal from the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service is set to tighten animal welfare regulations for organic products. It expands the outdoor access requirement for organic poultry and covered porches would no longer be sufficient to meet the requirement. Poultry would be required to have direct contact with the ground, which many argue could increase exposure to disease and predators.

In addition to housing standards, the proposed rule clarifies existing requirements that cover care and production practices. The comment period ends March 20.

Read More

☛ Murlene Mowery passes 1-22-17

Posted by on Jan 22, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NCHA LOSES AN ICON WITH DEATH OF MURLENE MOWERY

 

Jan. 22, 2017
Edited 1/26/17

Murlene Mowery, Millsap, Texas, who was an irreplaceable part of the NCHA, passed away on Saturday, Jan. 21, following a brief illness.Services will be held Tuesday, January 31. Services will be held at Greenwood Chapel located at 3100 White Settlement Road in Fort Worth at 1:30 pm. In lieu of flowers, Murlene’s family wishes donations be made to the Sandy Sokol Memorial Fund.

 

She knew the sport of cutting, she knew NCHA history, she knew the players and she knew the members. And everyone knew her as the go-to person. Before working at the NCHA, Murlene was secretary of several NCHA affiliates and she and her husband, Bill, hosted the Sun Circuit at the feedlot in Casa Grande from the 1970s through the 1990s. She will be greatly missed.

 

With a vivid history of the cutting industry Murlene, a long-time secretary, was inducted into the NCHA Members Hall of Fame in 2009 for her years of contributions to the association. Her life was steeped in the cutting horse industry as she and her husband, Bill Mowery, who passed away several years ago, had two sons, Rick and Mike Mowery, who are both trainer involved in the cutting industry for many years. Both sons have had huge success in NCHA events and are both AAAA judges.

 

For a full article on Murlene’s life history, go to www.sallyharrison.com.

Read More

☛ What can be done about horse slaughter 1-14-17

Posted by on Jan 14, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE ABUSE, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 17 comments

HORSE ABUSE, PART 8

 

WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT HORSE SLAUGHTER?

 

By Rick Dennis
Jan. 14, 2017

 

As we move into 2017, it has come to my attention that the repugnant business of slaughtering U.S. horses in Mexico and Canada is still an ongoing and viable business trade. Kill buyers still monitor U.S. auction barns seeking new slaughter prospects and the Canadian and Mexican slaughter plants are in full swing.

 

I recently received a 2013 video, by the Humane Society, illustrating the barbaric killing and dismembering of our beloved horses at a Mexican slaughter plant. The video captures the entire shocking scenario from the stabbing and severing of the animals’ spinal cord with a knife to the final rendering process.

 

The stark reality of the end-of-life process for our horses can be viewed by clicking on the following link. Caution: This video contains extreme graphics!

Click for Horse Slaughter video>>

 

2016 SLAUGHTER STATISTICS

Statistical data provided by the USDA Livestock, Poultry, and Grain Market News through Jan. 5, 2017, revealed a total of 103,717 horses, burros, mules and ponies went to slaughter in 2016. A total of 78,077 U.S. animals were sent to slaughter and were transported from the U.S. to Mexico, via, Las Cruces, N.M. The statistics are arranged by breeding males, breeding females, geldings and burros/mules/ponies.


 Live Horse Export figures, from the U.S. to Canada in 2016 revealed 25,640 animals were sent to Canada.

 

 

 

 

ORIGINS OF THE HORSE SLAUGHTER PIPELINE

Theoretically, the three main components contributing to the horse slaughter pipeline are:

 

Overpopulation produced by:

Over breeding, which includes intentional breed-specific foals and haphazard or backyard or unintended breeding, e.g.: 1) American Quarter Horse – Performance and Racing, Thoroughbred Association, Paint Horse breed, Appaloosa Horse, Morgan Horse, Arabians.

Cross-bred or unintentional breeding: Unorthodox breeding practices such as Multiple Embryo Transfer or ICSI – (Intra- cytoplasmic Sperm Injection).

These two breeding methodologies are scientific processes whereby a single mare can produce multiple foals in a single year by removal of produced eggs. These methods clearly place the small breeder at a disadvantage to the affluent breeder from a production cost and foal production ratio alone. The average embryo transfer per/foal is $3,500 plus the stud fee. The average cost per ICSI foal using frozen semen is $12,500 plus the stud fee.

 

Unwanted or abandoned horses produced by economic decline.

Today’s economic decline certainly has taken a toll on American lives that, in turn, has caused a downward spiral in horse ownership and participation in the U.S. The simple law of physics “so-to-speak.” For every action, there’s an opposite and equal reaction.

This downward trend and spiral is well documented in horse ownership, class participation at equine events, as well as significant membership declines with nonprofit horse organizations such as AQHA, NRHA, NCHA, etc.

When the choice arrives between feeding your family or paying a mortgage note to house your family or feeding a horse usually results in getting rid of the horse. This unfortunate circumstance usually explains why a significant number of horses end up at low-end sales that, in turn, provide kill buyers with easy access to healthy horses.

 

BLM management of wild horses and mustangs. This category is included due to the fact BLM-branded animals have been documented being sent to a Mexican slaughter in the past, even though BLM vehemently denies this exists. However, and for the record, statistics state BLM captured and corralled horses that cost the U.S. taxpayer $50 million annually.

The attached video, taken by www.animalsangels.org, documents the unloading process at a Mexican horse slaughter plant in Mexico. An article entitled, U. S. Government selling horses to known kill buyer, is attached hereto.

 

Click for Animals Angels Video>>

Click for BLM article>> 

 

LARGEST CONSUMERS OF HORSEMEAT:

According to an article in the Huffington Post dated Feb. 17, 2013 there are nine countries that love horsemeat, including: France, China, Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Germany, Belgium, Japan, Switzerland and Scotland. 

These are the markets U.S. horses are generally destined for.

Click for EU horse meat trade>>

 

ECONOMICS OF HORSE/FOAL PRODUCTION

All horse/foal production, except for unintended or backyard breedings, are primarily regulated and driven by MONEY. As the old cliche’ goes, “Money Is The Root Of All Evil.” So it is with horse/foal production. Affluent investors seek to make a profit in horse/foal production, 501(3) c nonprofit equine organizations seek to make money on breeding reports, foal registrations, horse ownership/transfer registrations, as well as horse show and/or racing participation. Racing owners seek profits on the racetrack. Stud owners seek to make money on breedings and top mare owners seek to make money on egg or embryo sales.

 

Furthermore, equine Veterinarians, trainers, farriers, feed organizations, tack suppliers, show producers, arena owners, Pro Rodeo organizations and participants, video production companies, magazines, book authors and supplement manufacturers all enjoy a profit from the horse – myself included.

 

 THE BIG GAMBLE

Each year thousands of horses are produced in the U.S. in hopes of fulfilling a profit derived from the horse. Many foals are produced but many are also washed out, due in part to genetics, age development limitations, debilitating accidents during training or raising, as well as bad trainers, performance or racing accidents and illegal drug use. In many cases these washouts become prime candidates for the horse slaughter pipeline before they are 5 years old. In today’s equine market, horses have essentially become throwaway commodities for many.

 

I believe this is a dangerous mindset for the beloved horse. A callous, greedy and unyielding mindset will only further fill the slaughter pipeline with an endless supply of unsuspecting and innocent horses. Their only guilt is being of no further financial benefit to their owner. It seems the horse is no longer revered by society as it was in days past. Money has replaced compassion, as well as responsible horse ownership.

 

HORSE NONPROFITS

Over the years, horse-related nonprofit rescues have emerged in our society under the guise of being a viable alternative to horse slaughter. However, in truth and reality, a lot of these groups have fallen by the wayside in their commitment to the noble horse. Commonplace news articles clearly define the abuse horses are subjected to by being starved. The owners are arrested and prosecuted and the remaining horses are seized by the state for reassignment with other agencies.

 

The valuable lesson to learn here is to perform a diligent background check on the alleged nonprofit. The best place to start is www.Guidestar.org, a governmental website that lists the 990 tax returns for all nonprofits in the United States.

 

The main focus of your research is to ascertain whether or not the 501(c) 3, or other designation, is current on their 990 tax filings. In some instances these same rescues sell your horse for a profit and in many cases individuals posing as horse rescues sell your donated horse to kill buyers. If your selected rescue is not current on its 990 filings, abandon that rescue and find a more suitable one.

 

DETERRING AN OVERPOPULATION OF HORSES

There are many avenues available to the responsible equine breeder to limit the annual foal production, one of which is limiting foal production. I have adopted this responsible breeding practice by limiting annual breedings to a specific number each year. Other practices include: 1) Unwanted stallions and stallions unsuited for breeding purposes should be gelded as soon as possible

2) Equine nonprofits advocating Multiple Embryo Transfers should be lobbied to stop this unorthodox breeding practice that only adds to the overpopulation of horses

3) Lobby the BLM to return to the original ideology of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. Essentially, the BLM has upset the balance of nature by removing the predators on our rangelands that would normally cull sick, old, dying and young horses by natural attrition. Essentially, individuals like Forrest Lucas and his company Protect The Harvest have lobbied for years for increased cattle production on our rangelands while demanding the removal of our wild horses and burros as well as predators. (For the record, Lucas has become highly publicized as the benefactor of major equine sporting events. Don’t be fooled by the narrative.)

4) Lobby the Congress and The Senate for the passage of the S.A.F.E. Act. Since introduction, the bill has languished in passage. Passing the S.A.F.E. Act will eliminate U.S. horses from going to slaughter.

5) Stop selling your horses on Craig’s List or low-end auctions where kill buyers abound.

6) Do diligent research on a chosen equine rescue before donating.

7) Only own the number of horses you can adequately take care of and afford to own.

 

However, the most important mindset to change is the American public and being a responsible horse owner. Stopping horse slaughter begins with us.

 

“Until Next Time, Keep ‘Em Between The Bridle!”

 

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Office/Mobile: (985) 630- 3500
Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com
Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com

 

 

 

Read More

☛ NSHA holds stallion auction 2-9-17

Posted by on Jan 9, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NATIONAL STOCK HORSE ASSOCIATION HOLDS STALLION AUCTION

Press release from NSHA
Jan. 9, 2017

Bidding will begin on Jan. 15, 2017 for the National Stock Horse Association Stallion Auction. With 25 stallions already subscribed to the auction, bidding will begin on Jan 15, 2017. To bid, go to http://nshastallionauction.com/. All proceeds from the auction will go toward the 2017 NSHA show purse.

 

The bid price covers the breeding fee only. Bidders will be responsible for all additional fees, including chute fees and shipped semen, which needs to be paid to the stallion owner or breeding facility. Prior to bidding, prospective bidders are advised to check with the breeder for information on all fees.

 

If you are a stallion owner and would like to donate a breeding, please request a Stallion Service Contract by calling the NSHA at 559-789-7007 or fax 866-868-0967.

 

Stallions subscribed so far include Blue One Time, owned by the Victor Cattle Company; Brother Jackson, owned by Dan Perez; Busy Winning Chex, owned by Hilldale Farm; CD Diamond, owned by the San Juan Ranch; Desires Little Rex, owned by Victor Cattle Company; Fletch That Cat, owned by Don and Teresa Martin; Gunner On Ice, owned by Hilldale Farm; Hen Magnet, owned by 7J Consulting; Hickory Holly Time, owned by DT Horses LLC; Judge Boon, owned by Red Tail Ranch; Lil Cataloo, owned by Gene and Michelle Morris; Matt Dillon Dun It, owned by Victor Cattle Company; Nic It In The Rey, owned by Wayne Hanson; Lena Oak, owned by LaDona Emmons/Nicole Scott; One Fine Vintage, owned by Robertson Ranches; One Time Pepto, owned by Matthew Cutting Horses; One Time Royalty, owned by SDM Quarter Horses; Pepto Cee Lena, owned by Hy Performance Horses; Sinful Cat, owned by Russell and Tanna Dilday; Smart Boons, owned by Eric and Wendy Dunn; Spin It N Whiz It, owned by Sovereign Performance Horses, TheCrowdLovesMe, owned by Yellow Creek Ranch; Time For A Diamond, owned by Triple D Ranches; Tom Cat Chex, owned by Amazing Grace Ranch and Travelin Jonz, owned by Chris Dawson.

 

For further information, go to www.nationalstockhorse.com, or call 559-789-7007.

Read More