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☛ Jay McLaughlin reaches $1 million mark 7-16-16

Posted by on Jul 16, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

JAY MCLAUGHLIN 12TH NRCHA RIDER TO REACH $1 MILLION MARK

 

Press release from NRCHA
July 15, 2016

Jay McLaughlin shown riding CD Dee Vee Dee. NRCHA Photo

When Jay McLaughlin piloted one of his all-time favorite horses, CD Dee Vee Dee, to third place in the 2016 CD Survivor Memorial Bridle Spectacular at the NRCHA Derby in Paso Robles, California, the $14,900 paycheck elevated him into the elite ranks of the NRCHA Million Dollar Riders. McLaughlin is the 12th horseman in NRCHA history to achieve that honor. CD Dee Vee Dee (CD Lights x Shiners Missy Jay x Shining Spark) is a 10-year-old gelding McLaughlin and his wife, Wendy, own.

 

The National Reined Cow Horse Association’s list of top money earners continues to grow, as professional horseman Jay McLaughlin passes the seven-figure milestone to become the 12th NRCHA Million Dollar Rider.

 

As of July 11, 2016, McLaughlin’s earnings were $1,005,275.69.

 

“Among horse trainers, the Million Dollar Rider is an awesome title. It’s cool to be at the very top, and it’s an honor I have always wanted,” McLaughlin said.

 

McLaughlin was born in 1974, into a Missouri family where horses were a primary focus. McLaughlin’s father, Mike, was a versatile professional horse trainer who prepared Quarter Horses for many disciplines, including reining, pleasure, halter, western riding, horsemanship, trail, barrels, poles, and more. His mother, Julann, built a successful 4-H program from the ground up, and operated it for decades. McLaughlin credits her for instilling his strong foundation as a rider and competitor.

 

“When I was 10 years old, I wanted to ride in the ‘canter classes,’ as I called them. I didn’t want to do the walk-trot, I didn’t do the lead line. I always set my goals higher,” McLaughlin recalled. “Her rule for me was, I had to show in the horsemanship, the showmanship, all of that stuff, before I could do any of the reining or the barrels or the poles or any of the other fun classes. I think that has a lot to do with my horsemanship skills. It was fun for me because I’m very competitive, so I excelled at those too. I wanted to win. It’s hard for anybody to be second, but I really took it hard.”

 

McLaughlin’s competitive nature served him well as he grew up and followed in his father’s footsteps, starting his professional horse-training career at age 18. His initial focus on reining soon turned to the adrenalin-fueled challenge of reined cow horse.

 

“The cow horse is the most difficult discipline that I’ve ever been associated with. You can only ride so many cow horses a day. You have to learn how to train those horses in three events, or two events, depending on the age of the horse, not burn them out, and strive to have something that will go mark a 75 in every event,” he said.

 

According to NRCHA records, McLaughlin earned his first reined cow horse paycheck in 1999. In 2004, he made his debut at the Snaffle Bit Futurity, enjoying success that few first-timers can claim, qualifying for the Open and Intermediate Open Futurity Finals on SS Rosa (Sailing Smart x Snowmans Rose x Snowman Doc), owned by Julie Gibbons.

 

“I can still remember my scores that got me into the Open finals the first year I ever went. I marked a 209 in the herd, a 217.5 in the rein work, and a 219 down the fence. You can’t do that any more. There’s no way you could make the Open finals marking a 209 now. That’s how much I think it’s changed. It wasn’t very long ago, and it’s that much more competitive,” McLaughlin said.

 

He credits his wife, Wendy, for her stalwart support during his million-dollar journey, with its inevitable ups and downs.

 

“She’s put up with a lot of headaches, and the times we didn’t have any money, and living in a trailer, like every horse trainer has done once or twice, or still is, in their life. She’s pushed it all the way. She’s always there whooping and hollering, whether I suck or I don’t. That’s a pretty big deal. She sure has backed me 190 percent, and I love her,” he said.

 

The McLaughlins and their sons, Ryder and Cutter, live in Commerce, Texas, where Jay is resident trainer at Aaron Ranch. Cutter, a successful NRCHA Youth competitor, seems on track to continue the McLaughlin family horsemanship tradition – and Jay predicts his son will be able to achieve NRCHA Million Dollar Rider status more quickly than he did.

 

“I don’t think it will take as long for the younger guys to get it, now that the NRCHA is growing and adding more money all the time. I think that growth will make it a little easier for those guys to get the milestone if we keep climbing like we’re climbing. The NRCHA has a huge future ahead, if it keeps going like it’s going,” McLaughlin said.

 

Besides his new status as a NRCHA Million Dollar Rider, McLaughlin’s resume also includes 12 NRCHA and American Quarter Horse Association World Championships. He was the 2013 NRCHA Futurity Open Reserve Champion and the 2015 NRCHA Stakes Open Champion aboard Aaron Ranch’s Blind Sided (Peptoboonsmal x Lil Miss Shiney Chex x Shining Spark), and he has claimed numerous other championships, finals berths and top placings in reined cow horse and reining.

 

McLaughlin already has his sights set on becoming a NRCHA 2 Million Dollar rider, and predicts the best is yet to come.

 

“I’m not done, by any means. I’m not going to retire and say, ‘I’ve won what I need to win,’” he said. “At the end of this story, I want you to put, ‘Stay tuned,’ because there are going to be some more great horses, I’m telling you. It’s a fun ride!”

 

Click here to learn more about the NRCHA’s Million Dollar Riders. 

 

OTHER REINED COW HORSE NEWS:

In other reined cow horse news, the National Stock Horse Association will be holding their 2016 NSHA Snafle Bit Futurity and Derby Aug. 16-20 in Paso Robles, Calif. Open Futurity Champion will receive a NEW Logan Riot, 2-horse slant bumper pull trailer. Non-Pro Limited Futurity & Derby Champions will receive a beautiful Mark Luis Cow Horse Trophy saddle. Contact National Stock Horse Association, PO Box 1290, Strathmore, CA 93267, 559-789-7007 or go to www.nationalstockhorse.com.

The Southwest Reined Cow Horse Association is sponsoring the “Rode to Reno” Futurity, Derby and show, Aug. 17-21 in the John Justin Arena, Fort Worth, Texas. There will be two NRCHA/AQHA approved cow horse shows and two AQHA ranch riding and reining classes.  Entry deadline is Aug. 1. For more info call Gay Lenz 405-818-7556 – glenz@lenzenterprises.com.

 

Also the Colorado Reined Cowhorse Association is sponsoring the Mid-America Classic at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., with $23,500 added. There will be 2 sets of AQHA and Horseshow classses, Open and Non-Pro Futuriites and Derbies, Bridle and Two-Rein Spectaculars. It is the last show for the Northern Plains Circuit Series. Info at: ColoradoReinedCowhorse.com or call Jerry at 303-621-9625.

 

Also, the South Dakota Reined Cow Horse Association is sponsoring the Road to Reno Futurity and Derby with two full slates of NRCHA horse show classes July 29-31 at the Central States Fairgrounds Events Center, Rapid City, S.D. There will be $49,600 in added money. Contact Mike Sigman 605-381-6528 or email cuttnhorses@gmail.com

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☛ Keeping your finances secure when paying horse training facilities 7-11-16

Posted by on Jul 11, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 15 comments

HAVE HORSES IN TRAINING?

 

HOW TO KEEP YOUR FINANCES SECURE

 

By Rick Dennis
July 11, 2016

Rick Dennis

Over the years, I’ve worked on a myriad of Risk Management cases involving either the theft or embezzlement of funds from a client’s bank account or credit cards.  However, the conclusion or “Root-Cause-Analysis” allowing this theft to occur is generally the same. Inadequate or non-existent banking security practices, inadequate accounting practices along with misguided trust, on behalf of the client, is usually the culprit. More and more we’re seeing these types of thefts occurring in the horse industry emanating from horse-training facilities.

 

For the record, these types of criminal infractions aren’t relegated to one particular part of the horse industry but seemingly encompasses the industry “across-the-board.” Training facilities should be aware of the fact that if the proper security is not in place and maintained for a protection of client assets and a theft generates from an individual working at the facility acquiring the bank account and routing number off of a client-issued check for training or other purposes, or a credit card number, it’s quite possible the training facility can have culpable liability issues in the matter.

 

The two methods used to facilitate the thefts are:

 

1.         The clients bank account, and

 

2.         The clients credit card.

 

THE CLIENTS BANK ACCOUNT

 

Using No. 1 as an example, I just completed analyzing a case involving the theft of over $500,000 during a four-year period, using the client’s bank account and routing numbers as the extraction vehicle. The thefts emanated from a horse-training facility. While I’m not at liberty to discuss the specifics of the case due to an on-going criminal investigation, my “Root-Cause-Analysis” identified over-trust on the client’s behalf as well as non-secure banking practices, inadequate record keeping, i.e, usual and customary personal accounting practices, and the absence of an established and integrated Risk Management Program as the culprit.

 

However, by designing, implementing and integrating an active Risk Management Program, the clients are able to prevent future thefts of this type along with a possible recovery of assets. Upon discovery of the theft, the client filed criminal charges, the alleged perpetrator was arrested, criminally indicted afterwards and is awaiting trial.

 

Dakotah Lindsey Harrell (Defendant) is identified as a former assistant trainer at Merritt Wilson Cutting Horses. The thefts occurred while Harrell was employed at this location according to clients.  For additional information please click on the following link:

 

Click for Dakotah Harrell’s arrest warrant>>

Click for Dakotah Harrell’s booking>>

Click for Dakotah Harrell’s Facebook page>>

Click for Dakotah Harrell’s Indictment article>>

 

CLIENTS CREDIT CARD

Using No. 2 as an example, an ever-increasing and growing problem inundating the horse industry is the unauthorized use of, or misappropriation of, client’s assets using the clients credit card as the extraction vehicle. Generally, thefts of this type occur when an unsuspecting client provides a training facility with his or her credit card number for an incidental purchase of some type. Thereafter, the client discovers ongoing unauthorized purchases by the perpetrator, but the damage is already done and possibly significant. Afterwards, an arrest and prosecution usually follows. Again, as a Risk Analyst/Threat Assessment Manager, I can hypothetically surmise the “root-cause-analysis” as:

 

1.         Over trusting the recipient of this information on the client’s behalf,

 

2.         Inadequate accounting and monitoring practices on the clients behalf, and

3.         the absence of an active and integrated secure Risk Management Program within the confines of the client’s financial practices.

 

The following is an article published in Ratemyhorsepro.com regarding a Brock, Texas, trainer stealing money from a client’s credit card. She had previously been indicted in Alabama for the same offense.

 

Click for Ratemyhorsepro.com article>> 

 

RECOVERY OF ASSETS PURSUANT TO A THEFT

 Generally speaking, it’s very difficult to recover one’s assets after a theft. In the case of cyber-security breaches or thefts “over-the-internet,” the chances of recovery are almost nil simply due to the fact that the perpetrator is located in another country. In the case of domestic thefts, the probable chances of asset recovery is low simply due to the fact the accused has already spent your money and it’s gone and legal litigation for an attempted recover is an expensive proposition with no guarantees of success.

 

The two most used methods for a recovery of assets is by judicial restitution after the arrest and conviction of the violator, or filing a complaint with the IC3 Division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the event of credit card theft. For the record, credit card thefts are usually performed by the Secret Service. My best advice to prevent the theft or unauthorized use of a credit card is to prevent it before it occurs by instituting sound financial practices in your life style.

 

COMMON-SENSE BANKING PRACTICES

 When I’m providing a general security consulting service, designing and implementing a Risk Management Program after a review, or compiling and formulating a Risk Management report after a review, I always advise the client to use common-sense banking practices to safe guard his or her valuable assets. (e.g.)

 

1.         Never blindly trust an individual with your personal banking information,

 

2.         ALWAYS safeguard your financial institution information whether this information is your internet banking passwords, bank account routing and account numbers for checking accounts or credit card type and numbers,

 

3.         NEVER blindly provide this information to anyone,

 

4.         NEVER allow your computer to save your login information, (e.g.) user name and password, When using the internet to pay your bills, always make sure you’re on a secure network,

 

5.         When disposing of financial information, always use a shredder or completely burn this information,

 

6.         ALWAYS set up an auxiliary bank account with a limited amount of funds for use in conjunction with a trust or holding account. Never pay bills directly from a trust or holding account. In the event of a breach of security, the thief will only have a limited amount of assets to steal – not your entire bank account,

 

7.         ALWAYS monitor your bank account activity multiple times a week, if not on a daily basis, to apprise yourself of any suspicious activity on your bank account. In today’s high-tech banking industry, an app can be downloaded on your smart phone enabling this secure process and

 

8.         INVEST in a credit-monitoring service to alert you of any changes in your credit report or suspicious activity.

 

There are plenty of resources available to seek advice from to protect your assets and provide additional information on the subject matter. Knowledge and common sense are the keys to success and prevention.  Be proactive, not reactive!

 

“Until Next Time, Keep ‘Em Between The Bridle!

 

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis (CPP)

Email: windrivercompany.rd@yahoo.com

Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com

 

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☛ Don Strain loses battle with cancer at 83 – 7-10-16

Posted by on Jul 10, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

CUTTING LOSES A GREAT ADVOCATE

 

DON STRAIN, 83, LOSES LONG BATTLE WITH CANCER

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 10, 2016

Don Strain

The cutting horse industry lost a great friend and a life-long advocate of the cutting horse, when Don Strain, 83, White River, S. D., lost his long battle with cancer on July 7, 2016.

 

Don was a person that stayed hooked with whatever he did in life and what he believed in. He lived on the same family ranch, as a fifth-generation rancher, his entire life; he loved the cutting horse that he became acquainted with when he was in his 20’s and loved and raised until the day he died; was a member of the National Cutting Horse Association for 60 years and won his first buckle in 1956 and his last buckle just last year. He was an NCHA National Director for the NCHA for over 50 years and served on many committees plus their Executive Committee. He was inducted into the NCHA Members Hall of Fame in 2006.

 

He was also a 50-year Legacy Breeder in the American Quarter Horse Association. He went on to become a top judge in all the major horse breed organizations and judged every large stock show in the U.S., several in Europe, the AQHA World Championships several times, plus all the major events for the NCHA.

 

He served as President of the South Dakota Cutting Horse Association for several years and was a founding member of the Dakota Classic Breeders Futurity.

 

He showed his “stock-to-itiveness” in his personal life also.  He married Janet Lee Frick in 1954 while in the service and fathered four children: Kirk, Alicia, Craig and in Bret. However, in 1971, after 17 years of marriage, Janet lost her own battle with cancer.  In 1974, he married Kathleen Schurger, and the couple remained married for 42 years, until his death. Don also served on the White River School Board for 11 years while raising his family.

 

Family and friends were very important to Don and he enjoyed many life-long friendships, with the Strain Ranch being a meeting and gathering place for family and friends. And he had many friends from across the United States, as he had the unique gift for making people feel special. I felt Bob and I were included in his group of friends, as we visited his beautiful ranch in South Dakota and were made to feel at home.

 

Don was a true cowboy who learned his “cowboying” from old-timers who had worked the big herds of the late 19th Century. He appeared in Life Magazine in 1962, helping drive 1,800 head of cattle through a blizzard and over the frozen Big White River.  In the early 1920’s, he caught the cutting bug and bought his first cutting horse, Dun Gone, from Phil Williams on time. Within two months, he’d won nearly $1,000 on her, which he sent to Williams After Dun Gone’s death, he purchased Little Tom W from Williams for $5,000. Don borrowed the money and went on to win 39 shows in 1959, earning 33 checks He owned Little Tom W until the horse died at age 32.

Don soon became a show producer, affiliate president and $1 million breeder. He became an NCHA and AQHA judge in 1962 and served on the NCHA Judges Rules, Open Show and Long-Range Planning committees as well as serving six years on the Executive Committee – from 1999 to 2005.

 

Don is survived by his wife Kathy; sons Kirk and Sue Strain and their children Kellen, Samantha and Lucas; Craig and Melissa Strain and their children Afton, Geordan, Lauren and Kendall and Bret and Gina Strain and their children Bonnie and Joe Gesinger, and Janet and Donnie Hedrick; grandchildren Ashley and Tony Rolland, plus great-grandchildren Grace Gesinger, Farrah and Donald Ronan Hedrick; brother David and Betty Strain, sister-in-law Peri Strain, brothers-in-law Matt and Donna Schurger, Maurice and Nancy Schurger, Michael and Paula Schurger; father-in-law Robert and Casey Schurger; numerous cousins, nieces and nephews.

 

He was preceded in death by his first wife Janet Lee, parents Gene and Grace, brother Mick, daughter Alicia, great-grandson Wyatt, father-in-law Frank Frick, and mother-in-law Betty Schurger.

 

A Remembrance time will be at the ranch on Friday evening July 15 from 6-8 p.m. A celebration of life service will be held Saturday July 16 at the White River Community Events Center at 11:00 a.m.

 

Memorials will be given to the White River American Legion, Suncatcher Therapeutic Riding and Bravehearts.

 

Information for above was taken from South Dakota CH Assn, obituary from the Isburg Funeral Home and the NCHA.

 

Click for a memoriam from the SD Cutting Horse Association>>

 

 

 

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☛ Parker County benefits from drug dealers! 7-3-16

Posted by on Jul 3, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE LAWSUITS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PARKER COUNTY LAW ENFORCEMENT BENEFITS FROM DRUG DEALERS

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 3, 2016

Parker County, Texas, is known for its top cutting horses, the industry’s best trainers and million-dollar ranches. But it’s also known for something else now – drug dealers.

 

But not for long! On June 28, the Parker County Post reported that a home had been seized from Jimmy Wayne Mack, 41, Weatherford, Texas, who was arrested on March 22, 2012. In 2013, he was convicted of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance and sentenced to 20 years in federal prison.  The home sold last week for $225,000.

 

The case was on appeal for nearly three years before the judgment was affirmed by the Eastland Court of Appeals and the home could be sold, according to Assistant District Attorney Jeff Swaim, who handled the case. He said, “At his peak Jimmy Mack was the biggest methamphetamine dealer in Parker County. He was dealing upwards of a half-pound of meth per week.”

 

Since the seizure was initiated by the Parker County Special Crimes Unit, proceeds from the sale will be divided evenly between the Parker County Sheriff’s Office, Weatherford Police Department and the Parker County District Attorney’s Office.

Click for complete article>>

 

 

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☛ Why are veterinarians taking their own lives? 7-2-16

Posted by on Jul 2, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

VETERINARIANS TAKING THEIR OWN LIVES FOUR TIMES THAT OF THE GENERAL POPULATION

 

July 2, 20616

 

A recent article by Liz Brown on horsenetwork.com states that veterinarians are taking their own lives at a rate of four times the general population and twice the rate of medical doctors and dentists.

 

The article states that oe of the first mental health surveys of U.S. veterinarians conducted in 2014 by Dr. Randall J. Nett and Dr. Tracy Witte found one in six veterinarians may have considered suicide and one in 10 have experienced serious psychological distress. Witt, a suicide researcher at Auburn University, became interested when in 2010 she saw a U.K. study showing an abnormally high suicide rate among veterinarians She also said after diving into the literature, that vet techs and vet assistants, also show similar job stress levels.

 

Based on Witte’s data, there are several reasons for veterinarians taking their own lives, including: 1) Vets want to be vets – not office managers, 2) being a veterinarian becomes “nothing but work,” and is hard on marriages and families and 3) they have access to drugs used in euthanasia and the knowledge to use them. They view death as the end to pain.

Click for full article

 

 

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☛ Bill Parker dies from pancreatic cancer 6-27-16

Posted by on Jun 27, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

BILL PARKER DIES FROM PANCREATIC CANCER AT 62

 

June 27, 2016

Bill Parker

Well-known Billings Cowboy, Bill Parker, 62, died Thursday, June 23, at his home on Blue Creek of pancreatic cancer. Parker was a three-time National Finals Rodeo qualifier, once in calf roping and twice in team roping. Currently Parker with his wife, Jann, manage Billings Livestock Horses sales monthly horse sale.

 

He is survived by his wife, his parents Dick and Millie Parker of Lockwood, his brother Doyle of Bridger and many many close friends.

 

Funeral service will be at 2 p.m., July 7, at St. Bernard Catholic Church.

 

Mail your condolences to Jann Parker, P.O. Box 1499, Billings, MT 59103.

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