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☛ Sex offenders and background checks 1-19-18

Posted by on Jan 19, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 6 comments

SEX OFFENDERS AND BACKGROUND CHECKS

 

DO YOU KNOW ALL THERE IS TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR ASSOCIATION’S OFFICERS OR HALL OF FAME MEMBERS?

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Jan. 19, 2018

Now is the time when horse organizations accept suggestions from their membership so they can honor some of their members to be in their respective Halls of Fame. Usually suggestions are made by members, with transcripts that include their great accomplishments in their particular industry. But do they really know all the information about the person they are suggesting be given the honors?

That’s kind of how our members of Congress are chosen and we know how that turned out. Or maybe it’s about the businessmen or women or film stars who have been highly successful, in great demand and are very wealthy. A group gets together and decides which of them should be honored … whether it be in film, music or business.  Or maybe it’s the news media who decides which businessmen have accomplishments worthy of some recognition. We also know how that all turned out.

That leads to the big question: “What DON’T we know about these individuals?” That’s been a lesson learned the hard way recently when several members of the U.S. Congress, as well as the top echelon of ownership and management of U.S. companies, who had to step down when they were accused of sexual harassment and assault. A majority of them didn’t even deny the allegations; they simply resigned to “being unmasked” as their female victims had finally came forward, saying  the sexual harassment had been going on for years. That includes the doctor at the Olympics who recently  had to face  his victims in court, with the parent of one of them revealing how her daughter had committed suicide after the sexual assault.

Sexual harassment and assault has also been going on in the horse industry for years – but in a much smaller scale than in the business or movie world as there are not many media outlets trying to seek out the perpetrators and unmask them to the industry. It’s easier to prove horse abuse than it is women or child abuse as usually there isn’t a lot of physical or court evidence available. It’s simply a woman’s or child’s word against the perpetrator’s and usually they are too ashamed or scared to report it in the first place. Personally, I know of instances where young girls have been abused for years and were too frightened of the perpetrator to report it.

However, the web site “RateMyHorsePro.com,” recently unmasked a National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) long-time member who is a trainer, clinician and a member of their Hall of Fame, who has a conviction for “rape by force or threat.” The site published a state of California rap sheet of him, including a photo and his offenses that took place in 1963. The website, that also does background checks on individuals, stated that the information “was obtained through the public domain and in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act.”

As a result, Les Vogt, 75, of Paso Robles, Calif., was exposed as a convicted felon through California’s Offense Code 261.3 Rape of Drugged Victim in 2002.

Click for Megan’s Law sex offender law in California>>

Recently California passed SB384, which is a new bill regarding sex offenders. However Vogt is still under the rules of the old bill as his offense was in 1963.

SB 384: California’s new 3-tiered sex offender registration system>>

According to his website, Vogt is “one of the horse world’s premier trainers, teachers and innovators, having won 15 World Champion Reining and Working Cow Horse titles, as well as countless other championships. He has been a member of the NRCHA Hall of Fame since 2004! Two years following his conviction for being a sex offender.

Les Vogt | NRCHA Hall of fame

Vogt’s website states, “As a teacher and clinician, Les lectures extensively in the United States, South America and Western Europe. His clinics welcome both professional and  non-pro students and every clinic is tailored for the participants.”

Vogt’s site emphasizes that his clinics focus on various aspects of the Western performance spectrum with special sessions available for reining, showmanship, working cow horse and young horses/young riders.  Vogt has 13 clinics planned for 2018 due to his success in the National Reined Cow Horse Association.

Vogt was also included in the film “Down The Fence,” regarding the reined cow horse that is promoted by the NRCHA and is now available on Netflix or can be purchased on Amazon.

WHAT CAN BE DONE PRIOR TO AN ASSOCIATION MEMBER’S NEW POSITION?

While there’s not much an association’s Board of Directors can do to make sure all their fellow members are not sex offenders, it is possible to assure that the members of the board and/or individuals who are honored or voted in as officers or Hall of Fame members and who are role models for their members – especially the youth – are not sex offenders or have any felony  convictions on their record. A conviction of being a sex offender is a felony. As of yesterday, I checked with Megan’s List in California and Vogt is definitely still on the list and is, therefore, a sex offender and a felon.

Click for Sex Offender Registry FBI>>

An association’s Board can make it mandatory that anyone running for an office or the board of directors or are nominated for a Hall of Famhttps://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/sex-offender-registrye or another honorary position at a equine association, have a “background check” before they are moved into that position. If you don’t control who your officers and Hall of Fame members are, and you know that they have a felony on their rap sheet, the Association could be liable for the actions of these honorary members of that association as the honors given to them by the association usually signifies they are trustworthy as clinicians.

However, Jay Winborn, the Executive Director of the NRCHA  was given a copy of this article prior to it being published, and after consulting with the Board of Directors of the NRCHA, he made the following statement: “NRCHA is an equine association that promotes and produces reined cow horse events and does not comment on situations involving the personal lives of our members.” He also asked that several statements be eliminated that he had previously made.

It is interesting to note that to be an AQHA Professional Horseman in the Trainers Directory, the individuals have to go through a background check.

Also, the NRCHA, along with several other horse organizations, including the NCHA and APHA receive city, state and federal money for their events held at the Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas. There is a possibility if there were a lawsuit filed by a victim of a sexual assault at one of these events, that the facility, city, state or federal government could also be included in the lawsuit. That could be the tipping point to get a background check on the board and officers of each of those associations. At the very least, if it was discovered that some of the individuals on these association’s board of directors had felony convictions for sex offenses, these governmental departments may not want to participate – as well the event’s sponsors.

According to the NRCHA, as of Oct. 23, 2017, nominations were being accepted for the next election cycle for the NRCHA Board of Directors for positions for nomination currently held by Sandy Collier, Brad Barkemeyer, Amanda Gardiner and Dan Roeser. Positions remaining in office for 2018 include Todd Bergen, Paul Bailey, Jake Telford, Joe Carter, Jim Lane, Trey Neal, Diane Edwards and Jon Roeser.

Attached is a copy of the NRCHA 2018 Election Notice, which interestingly includes in disclosure and eligibility requirements: (iv) full disclosure of any felony convictions on record and signing the NRCHA Code of Conduct and Confidentiality agreement.

Click for NRCHA 2018 Election Notice>>

However, there is no known check or penalties in place to make sure those signing it are being truthful, other than, “If discovered, they will be immediately suspended from the ballot or later from the board.” No mention of the loss of their membership in the NRCHA.

WHO ELSE SHOULD HAVE BACKGROUND CHECKS?

Also, another group of members of horse associations who have access to women and children are the horse trainers who have clinics on a regular basis, teaching, among others, such as women and children, how to ride and show horses. The NCHA, AQHA, APHA and NRCHA all have a Trainer’s Directory, so it would be easy to make a background check one of the requirements to be in the Trainer’s Directory, especially if they are training the riders. The cost of the background check could be up to the trainer, or part of their membership fee to be included in the association’s Trainer Directory. Several trainers are having their clinics at their own facilities.

However, according to my legal sources, if you’re not the trainer putting on the clinic, individuals or associations who are putting on clinics should check with the Sex Offender National Registry or the Sex Offender Registry in the state the clinician is living in to see if they are on the sex-offender list. If they fail to do that, the person or people, including associations, putting on the clinic could be involved in a lawsuit if the trainer they hired is accused of a sex offense during the clinic, should there be a complaint regarding sexual harassment or assault.

Also, if you are a horse facility owner and employ a trainer, if you do a background check on them, you can be assured that they are not sex offenders before they have the run of your facility and customers. If the trainer is coming from out of state, that state’s sex-offender registry should be checked if you don’t find them on the National Sex Offender chart. This could also help to alleviate any legal action against you.

Click for National Sex Offender chart>>

By today’s heightened awareness of sexual predation in our society, it seems prudent for 501 C 3 nonprofit organizations to design standards of care and rule adoptions to insure the safety and well being of its members and is especially prudent when an individual is a role model for new and upcoming generations. It would also be relevant for associations to have a hotline where victims can call into the association without being exposed as to who they are.

If you have any further questions regarding this problem, it is covered in Rick Dennis’ book “The American Horse Industry – Avoiding the Pitfalls,” available from Dennis at WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC, Richard E. Dennis, Managing Member

Phone: (985) 630-3500, Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com, Email – Personal: windrivercompany.rd@gmail.com, Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com, or from online sources such as Amazon.com.

WHERE TO GO FOR BACKGROUND CHECKS:

The first question most people ask is, “Where do I go to find someone to do a legitimate background check on upcoming officers or members of the Hall of Fame?” You can do a lot of research yourself by Googling “background checks” for a variety of choices. If you would rather have an outside service do the checking for you, Rate My Horse Pro, who did the background check on Vogt, does background checks as well as do most private investigators. It may be one of the best investments your company, facility or association can make.

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☛ PRCA News 1-17-18

Posted by on Jan 17, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA NEWS

Courtesy of PRCA
Jan. 17, 2018

1. ProRodeo Sports News goes digital

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – In order to continue to bring fans and competitors the best coverage in rodeo, the ProRodeo Sports News is going digital to keep readers updated 24/7 on the latest rodeo news. And for a limited time, the PSN is free online.
A new PSN will be online digitally in flip-book format for mobile phones, tablets and computers every two weeks to keep fans updated on the latest rodeos, events and stories. And because the digital version will be online, it can be updated continually to keep the rodeo world apprised of any changes to the rodeo schedule and Business Journal.
Not only will PRCA members and subscribers get 24 digital issues annually, but they’ll also get 12 printed issues.
The printed edition of the PSN will be published once a month and will be a combination of the digital magazines. It will list upcoming rodeos, highlight and feature cowboys and livestock, and will continue to deliver the best rodeo coverage in the industry.
Look for the PSN now on prorodeo.com.

2. Conway captures RMCFR tie-down roping average

GREAT FALLS, Mont. – Tie-down roping isn’t Nolan Conway’s best event.
However, that may change after Jan. 14.
The Cut Bank, Mont., cowboy, who acknowledged his best events are steer roping and being a team roping header, won the tie-down roping average at the RAM Montana Circuit Finals Rodeo.
Conway captured the title with a 30.1-second time on three head at the Four Seasons Arena.
“This feels so great,” said Conway, 32.
Conway also was crowned the all-around cowboy as he earned $10,359 in tie-down roping, team roping and steer wrestling. The $8,058 Conway earned in tie-down roping also propelled him to win the Montana Circuit year-end championship in that event for the first time in his career.
“I was down there (in the tie-down roping standings) coming into here, and I picked away at them and it ended up being great,” Conway said.
The performance of Conway was improbable since he only won the average one other time at the RMCFR and that was in 2012 in steer wrestling.
Conway kept with a simple plan in tie-down roping at the RMCFR.
“I drew some good calves and my horse worked outstanding, and I caught them and tied them down,” he said. “I just tried to stay consistent. I’m a bulldogger and team roper by trade and then I also tie-down rope. Tie-down roping is my favorite event, but I’m just not as good at it as I am in steer wrestling and team roping.”
Conway was solid in the first and second rounds as he came in second each time with times of 9.8 and 10.5 seconds, respectively. As the last contestant to go in the third round, Conway needed just a 15.5-second run to claim the average, but his nerves were running far too wild for him to have time to be crunching numbers.
“I was nervous as all heck,” Conway said, “I was just trying to make the catch, and then when I looked up and saw my time (9.8 seconds), it was something like I had never felt before. I was so happy. All the hard work I did for years finally paid off.”
Providing the horsepower for Conway was Jose, his 7-year-old horse.
“The way he worked was the key to helping me succeed,” Conway said. “He was outstanding all weekend.”
With his tie-down roping year-end and average titles in hand, Conway qualified to compete at the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo, April 5-8, in Kissimmee, Fla.
“I’ve never been to Florida,” Conway said. “My wife, Katelin, and I have two little girls, Addison, 5, and Deni, 2, and they can’t wait to go to Disney World. I think they are more excited than I am.”
Other winners of the $207,106 rodeo were bareback rider J.R. Vezain (253 points on three head), steer wrestler Bridger Chambers (15.3 seconds on three head), team ropers Dustin Bird/Chase Tryan (14.8 seconds on three head), saddle bronc rider Ricky Warren (230 points on three head), barrel racer Ashley Day (40.35 seconds on three runs) and bull rider Parker Breding (171 points on two head).

3. Adams secures trip to Kissimmee at RFFCFR

HARRISBURG, Pa. – As recent history will show, bull rider Mike Adams has been a consistent player within his circuit. At the RAM First Frontier Circuit Finals Rodeo, Adams called checkmate.
As the only cowboy to cover his allotment of bulls, Adams rode to a winning score of 236.5 points on three head Jan. 13. The 25-year-old not only won the average at the RFFCFR, but by placing no worse than second in all three rounds, Adams was rewarded with a total payout of $7,956. Naturally, the Pennsylvanian was jubilant following his triumph.
“It’s awesome,” Adams said. “I came in just barely qualifying because of an injury, so making the finals, and then winning it, was nice.”
The injury was a broken collarbone Adams suffered earlier in the 2017 season, forcing him to press his luck. Just three weeks after surgery, Adams returned to riding bulls, as he managed to narrowly reach the minimum number of rodeos to qualify for the RFFCFR.
Overcoming such early season adversity, the 2013 RFFCFR champion found his center.
“I haven’t been (riding bulls) as long compared to most guys, but I’ve finally figured out what works for me,” Adams said. “Just being way more relaxed. Once you’ve been to the finals a few times, I honestly believe it’s just another rodeo, instead of just trying to tell myself it is.”
Entering the Jan. 13 final round, Adams and eventual all-around champion Daylon Swearingen were locked in a duel for the bull riding average. Swearingen was bucked off, opening the door for Adams. His 74.5-point ride in the concluding go-round clinched the win and a trip to the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Kissimmee, Fla., in April.
“I’m very excited (to go to Kissimmee),” Adams said. “The last few years, I’ve been focusing on other things, so I haven’t really made it a top, top priority to be there. I’m glad to be back this coming year. Each year I’ve been there, I’ve gotten closer and closer to winning it, so hopefully this is the year I win it.”
The 2017 schedule marked Adams’ best year on the rodeo trail. His $13,831 in winnings was his highest season total since receiving his PRCA card in 2013. Now, with his 2018 campaign off to a scintillating start, Adams believes good things are on the horizon.
“It just keeps the ball rolling,” Adams said. “All I have to do is not change anything. I just need to keep doing what I’m doing and I look forward to 2018 for sure.”
Other winners at the $178,784 rodeo were all-around cowboy Swearingen ($10,005 in bareback riding and bull riding), bareback rider James Carter (237 points on three head), steer wrestler Joe Brown (16.5 seconds on three head), team ropers Eric Fabian/Jake Edwards (18.2 seconds on three head), saddle bronc rider Joe Farren (230 points on three head), tie-down roper Carmine Nastri (34.2 seconds on three head) and barrel racer Christina Mulford (44.24 seconds on three runs).

4. Lewis lands $4,500 at Odessa

ODESSA, Texas – Steer wrestler Tom Lewis’ new perspective on rodeo and life paid off in full at the Sandhills Stock Show & Rodeo in Odessa, Texas, Jan. 13. Combining good friends, skilled horses and a positive attitude added up to a $4,590 payday for the 40-year-old bulldogger.
“It’s always a sigh of relief,” Lewis said. “I hope it’s a sign for the rest of the year.”
Lewis’ 17th year of ProRodeo competition is different from past years as he recently learned that his mother, Peggy, is battling cancer.
“My priorities changed and now it’s to embrace the moment,” Lewis said. “Life is fragile, so we’re going to have fun and appreciate everything since you never know when you might lose it and it might be gone. So, we will go and have fun and give it all we got.
“We’re learning to appreciate the opportunities to compete and meet people. I appreciate the opportunity to do what I’m good at and what I enjoy.”
Lewis won the Dodge City (Kan.) Roundup Rodeo in August, as well as seven other rodeos that placed him 27th in the 2017 world standings.
In Odessa, Lewis used the same formula that worked in Dodge City – combining two of his own personally trained horses with his friend Levi Rudd as the hazer. Having Rudd on Momma and Lewis on Maverick was a smart bet for Lewis, since Maverick was at the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER with Tanner Milan, Scott Guenthner, Baylor Roche and Ryle Smith.
“He’s made it fun to steer wrestle and he enjoys his job,” Lewis said.
Maverick, a 12-year-old American Quarter Horse, was originally used for team roping, until Lewis started training him for bulldogging four years ago.
“He’s a blessing,” Lewis said. “It’s all about the horsepower and riding a horse who loves to do his job and loves to win. It’s exciting at this time of the year to win a PRCA rodeo – and it’s always a blessing.”
Competition was fierce in the first round in Odessa. Lewis nailed his first run in 4.3 seconds, but that was only good for a tie for sixth. Lewis cranked up the volume for the second round, tying for second in 3.8 – more than enough to place him at the top of the average with 8.1 seconds on two head.
“If you win at the beginning, it makes the winter a lot better,” Lewis said. “We will try to go all year long and this is a great start.”
Just like his horse, Lewis is no stranger to the big stage. He won Round 9 of the 2012 WNFR – and now he’s hungry for another round.
“I learned it’s a marathon and will go to every rodeo I can and see what happens at the end of it,” Lewis said. “This year, we will worry about one rodeo at a time. If we win a big rodeo or a little rodeo, it doesn’t matter – we appreciate all the rodeos. My goal is to enjoy each one and enjoy each moment and not get caught up in the end of it.”
Up next, Lewis, Rudd and their friends/hazers Kody Dollery and Blaine Jones are heading to the Mid Winter Fair & Rodeo in Lafayette, La., where Rudd already won the first round while riding Maverick. From there, it’s on to Denver and then Fort Worth, Texas.
“If he wins, we all win and we’re all excited,” Lewis said.

Other winners at the $231,955 rodeo were all-around cowboy Clay Smith ($5,471, team roping and steer roping); bareback rider Evan Jayne (84 points on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Nutrena’s Movie Madness); team ropers Jake Cooper/Logan Medlin (8.5 seconds on two head); saddle bronc riders Brody Cress (86 points on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Nutrena’s Painted Flower) and Heith DeMoss (86 points on JK Rodeo’s Stepper); tie-down roper Marcos Costa (8.5 seconds); barrel racer Taylor Langdon (14.95 seconds); steer roper Trevor Brazile (30.7 seconds on three head); and bull rider J.W. Harris (88.5 points on Powder River Rodeo’s Pill Pusher).

5. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

Steer wrestler Colin Wolfe was the winner of the slalom competition at the 43rd annual Cowboy Downhill in Steamboat Springs, Colo., Jan. 15. Wolfe beat WNFR bareback riders Wyatt Denny and Evan Jayne. Bull rider Kris Newman, of Casper, Wyo., won the Stampede race. Best crash of the day went to bareback rider Jamie Howlett of Snyder, Texas. The Legends and Friends Race winner was Todd Fike. The Cowboy Downhill is held in conjunction with the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo in Denver and began in 1975. The Downhill has become a fundraiser for the Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund, which provides financial assistance to injured PRCA cowboys … WranglerNetwork.com will livestream the Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event in Fort Worth, Texas, Jan. 16-17 at 7:30 p.m. (CT) each day. ProRodeoLive.com will also broadcast the Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event Jan. 16-17 in Fort Worth, Texas, beginning at 7:30 p.m. (CT) each day … Wright Howington, a former PRCA bullfighter, barrelman and specialty act, passed away in Bowie, Texas, Jan. 10. He was 77. Howington started his rodeo career at age 15 in 1955 and retired in 1994. He was born Feb. 20, 1940, in Fort Worth, Texas.  During his career he also competed in five events, but his love was bullfighting and entertaining. He worked in 41 states and three provinces of Canada. He was the barrelman at the National Finals Rodeo in 1970 and was inducted into the Texas Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame. Howington is survived by two daughters. His ex-wife, Terry, took care of him during his illness the past several years.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “You get to see a lot of new country, get to do a lot of new things you’d never get to do and meet a pile of people you’d never meet.”
– Bull rider Cain Smith about why he enjoys competing in the PRCA, in the Jan. 14 issue of The Denver Post.

6. Next Up

Jan. 16             Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event, Fort Worth, Texas
Jan. 16             National Western Stock Show and Rodeo, Denver, continues
Jan. 17             Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event, Fort Worth, Texas
Jan. 19             Xtreme Bulls Division 2 event, Toledo, Ohio, begins
Jan. 19             Amicus Club PRCA Rodeo, Alexandria, La., begins
Jan. 19             Southwestern Exposition and Livestock Show, Fort Worth, Texas, begins

Jan. 20             Peace River ProRodeo Classic, Wauchula, Fla., begins

7. 2018 PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Jan. 16, 2017

AA:
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
$17,994
BB:
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
$19,781
SW:
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
$18,914
TR-1:
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$25,941
TR-2:
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$25,941
SB:
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
$22,346
TD:
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
$21,071
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$29,470
SR:
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
$15,268
8. 2018 PRCA World Standings
Unofficial through Jan. 16, 2018
All-around
1
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
$17,944
2
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
13,827
3
Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss.
13,367
4
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
11,282
5
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
9,340
Bareback Riding
1
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
$19,781
2
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
18,819
3
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
18,028
4
Blade Elliott, Centreville, Ala.
15,152
5
Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La.
10,825
6
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France
9,815
7
Luke Creasy, Hobbs, N.M.
9,783
8
Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho
9,766
9
Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah
9,031
10
Tanner Phipps, Dalton, Ga.
8,702
11
Grant Denny, Minden, Nev.
8,692
12
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
8,510
13
Justin Pollmiller, Weatherford, Okla.
7,733
14
James Carter, Monroe City, Mo.
7,589
15
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
7,570
16
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
7,482
17
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
7,343
18
Jessy Davis, Power, Mont.
7,291
19
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
7,275
20
Tim Kent, Chambersburg, Pa.
6,965
Steer Wrestling
1
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
$18,914
2
Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla.
15,849
3
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
13,691
4
Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La.
12,607
5
Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif.
11,148
6
Jace Melvin, Bluff Dale, Texas
8,625
7
Justin Shaffer, Hallsville, Texas
7,993
8
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
7,952
9
Joe Brown, Oxford, Pa.
7,789
10
Tom Lewis, Lehi, Utah
7,750
11
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
7,344
12
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
7,095
13
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
7,085
14
Jule Hazen, Ashland, Kan.
7,076
15
Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, Mont.
6,906
16
Rhett Kennedy, Chowchilla, Calif.
6,852
17
Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, N.D.
6,840
18
Stockton Graves, Alva, Okla.
6,306
19
Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark.
5,989
20
Fenton Nelson, Marshall, Mo.
5,928
Team Roping (header)
1
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$25,941
2
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
13,115
3
Andrew Ward, Edmond, Okla.
10,430
4
Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss.
8,584
5
Logan Olson, Flandreau, S.D.
8,177
6
Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont.
8,057
7
Cody Snow, Los Olivos. Calif.
8,036
8
Eric Fabian, Gansevoort, N.Y.
7,610
9
John Alley, Adams, Tenn.
7,218
10
Tanner Baldwin, Vail, Ariz.
7,147
11
Ty Blasingame, Ramah, Colo.
7,142
12
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
7,118
13
Blake Teixeira, Tres Pinos, Calif.
7,055
14
Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn.
6,990
15
Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M.
6,980
16
Kelsey Parchman, Cumberland City, Tenn.
6,813
17
Cody Graham, Everton, Mo.
5,928
18
Jason Carlson, Two Dot, Mont.
5,890
19
Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C.
5,761
20
Travis Dorman, Dade City, Fla.
5,675
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$25,941
2
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
15,142
3
Logan Medlin, Tatum, N.M.
14,265
4
Reagan Ward, Edmond, Okla.
10,430
5
Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb.
9,107
6
Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont.
8,057
7
Jake Edwards, Fort Ann, N.Y.
7,610
8
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
7,317
9
Clark Adcock, Smithville, Tenn.
7,218
10
Monty Joe Petska, Turlock, Calif.
7,055
11
Trey Yates, Pueblo, Colo.
7,025
12
Jason Duby, Klamath Falls, Ore.
7,019
13
Brad Culpepper, Sylvester, Ga.
6,990
14
Cody Hogan, Benton, La.
6,813
15
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
6,665
16
Brady Norman, Springer, Okla.
6,524
17
Josh Fillmore, Penrose, Colo.
6,228
18
Jason Stroup, Cape Girardeau, Mo.
5,928
19
Zachary Schweigert, Livingston, Mont.
5,890
20
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
5,761
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
$22,346
2
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
19,352
3
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
16,966
4
Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa
13,873
5
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
13,328
6
Leon Fountain, Socorro, N.M.
12,939
7
Joey Sonnier, New Iberia, La.
11,603
8
Chet Johnson, Douglas, Wyo.
10,225
9
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
9,809
10
Jesse Kruse, Great Falls, Mont.
8,846
11
Tyler Baeza, Lake Charles, La.
8,511
12
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
8,294
13
J.J. Elshere, Hereford, S.D.
8,240
14
Troy Crowser, Whitewood, S.D.
8,148
15
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
8,081
16
Joe Farren, Cottondale, Fla.
7,739
17
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
7,712
18
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
7,293
19
Logan Allen, Crescent, Iowa
6,285
20
Shade Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
6,119
Tie-down Roping
1
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
21,071
2
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
14,264
3
Jesse Clark, Portales, N.M.
11,262
4
Riley Pruitt, Gering, Neb.
11,198
5
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
10,647
6
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
9,992
7
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
8,525
8
Reno Gonzales, Scott, La.
8,294
9
Nolan Conway, Browning, Mont.
8,057
10
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
7,777
11
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
7,001
12
Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, Wash.
6,898
13
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
6,709
14
Ike Fontenot, Ville Platte, La.
6,680
15
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
6,378
16
Trent Creager, Stillwater, Okla.
6,345
17
Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, Okla.
6,308
18
Carmine Nastri, Ballston, N.Y.
6,281
19
Ty Harris, San Angelo, Texas
6,274
20
Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas
6,181
Steer Roping
1
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
$15,268
2
Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas
8,403
3
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
8,367
4
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
8,026
5
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
6,662
6
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
6,546
7
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
5,952
8
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
5,878
9
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
5,768
10
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
5,630
11
Mike Chase, McAlester, Okla.
5,610
12
Corey Ross, Liberty Hill, Texas
5,522
13
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
5,468
14
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
5,454
15
John E. Bland, Turkey, Texas
5,453
16
Dee Kyler Jr., Pawhuska, Okla.
5,076
17
Kelton McMillen, Paden, Okla.
4,404
18
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
4,230
19
Trey Sheets, Cheyenne, Wyo.
4,025
20
Leo Campbell, Amarillo, Texas
3,941
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$29,470
2
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
20,304
3
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
15,594
4
Michael Riggs Jr., Claxton, Ga.
13,392
5
Bayle Worden, Cooper, Texas
12,709
6
Jimy Marten, Donahue, Iowa
12,664
7
Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont.
9,784
8
Mike Adams, Oxford, Pa.
9,188
9
Joseph Vazquez, Alamogordo, N.M.
8,882
10
Jeff Bertus, Avon, S.D.
8,813
11
Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla.
8,559
12
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
8,484
13
Cordell Curtis, Monte Vista, Colo.
8,284
14
Tate Smith, Litchville, N.D.
8,085
15
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
8,084
16
Cole Melancon, Batson, Texas
8,076
17
Koby Radley, Montpelier, La.
7,930
18
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
7,807
19
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
7,779
20
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
7,050
*2018 Barrel Racing (Jan. 16, 2018)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
$24,163
2
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
19,179
3
Kelly Bruner, Millsap, Texas
14,960
4
Ericka Nelson, Century, Fla.
12,277
5
Tiana Schuster, Krum, Texas
12,085
6
Nikki Hansen, Dickinson, N.D.
11,880
7
Lacinda Rose, Willard, Mo.
11,008
8
Christina Mulford, Franklinville, NJ
9,840
9
Carmel Wright, Roy, Mont.
9,363
10
Lori Todd, Willcox, Ariz.
9,035
11
Wendy Culberson, Okeechobee, Fla.
8,568
12
Kaley Bass, Kissimmee, Fla.
8,527
13
Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas
8,326
14
Kristen Spratt, Huntsville, Texas
7,617
15
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
7,357
16
Alex Lang, Harper, Texas
7,316
17
Jennifer Barrett, Buhl, Idaho
6,974
18
Ashley Day, Volborg, Mont.
6,906
19
Bobbi Grann, Sheyenne, ND
6,795
20
Trula Churchill, Valentine, Neb.
6,557
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☛ UHC announces “Operation Chip” 1-11-18

Posted by on Jan 11, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

UHC ANNOUNCES NEW PROGRAM “OPERATION CHIP”

 

PROGRAM WILL BE AN ADDITION TO OPERATION GELDING

Jan. 11, 2018
Press release from Unwanted Horse Coalition

(Washington, DC)- Starting in 2018, the Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC) will be offering a new service to its popular Operation Gelding program called “Operation Chip.”

“The industry as a whole is moving towards microchipping as the preferred method of identification,” said UHC Director Ashley Furst. “Initially, organizations hosting Operation Gelding clinics will be eligible to apply for microchips for Operation Chip. Eventually we hope to expand the program to be able to offer rescue organizations the opportunity to apply for just the chips to be inserted into the horses in their care. Microchipping horses in rescue organizations is one of the best ways to be able to track them through the system, as well as give the industry the ability to reunite them with their owner in the case of a natural disaster.”

The UHC has partnered with MicrochipID Equine to provide the microchips for the program. The chips provided will come with a chip syringe, as well as a pre-paid registration card, and the veterinarian providing the gelding services at the clinic will be responsible for inserting the chips. “In order to ensure the horses are getting registered, the UHC will also be covering the cost of registration for each chip that is put into a horse,” said Furst. “A survey of rescues that have participated in Operation Gelding showed that only 50% of rescues are scanning horses for chips upon intake. The cost of scanners can be prohibitive for rescues, so as a result the UHC will also be providing eligible 501c3 rescues with an opportunity to apply for a deeply discounted scanner.”

The UHC is able to provide the scanners and chips to participants due to the generosity of The Right Horse Initiative. “The Right Horse Initiative is proud to support the UHC in its efforts to provide a more robust identification system in equine welfare,” said Christy Counts, President of The Right Horse. “Lack of identification is a major barrier to safe transitions for horses in this country. Providing easy access to microchipping for horse owners and horse rescues is a relatively easy and inexpensive solution to achieving our collaborative goal of providing opportunities for at-risk horses.”

Information about Operation Chip and how to apply can be found on the UHC website here: http://www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org/operation-chip/. For any questions, please contact UHC Director Ashley Furst at 202-846-1607 or afurst@horsecouncil.org

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☛ Taylor tabbed for PRCA CEO 1-11-18

Posted by on Jan 11, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

GEORGE TAYLOR TABBED PRCA CEO

 

Press release from PRCA
Jan. 11, 2018

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association has named George Taylor its Chief Executive Officer.

Taylor is a former executive with Caterpillar, where he was most recently a company officer and vice president with responsibility for the Marketing & Digital Division. Taylor takes over for Karl Stressman, who retired as PRCA Commissioner after nine years at the helm. Taylor will begin his job as PRCA’s CEO on Jan. 22.

“I’m honored and humbled to have the opportunity to lead an organization with the history and the brand recognition of the PRCA,” Taylor said. “It’s a dream for me to be involved and I couldn’t be more excited about the future potential for our membership and the PRCA team.”

Over his 19 years with Caterpillar, Taylor, 56, also served as Chief Marketing Officer and President of Caterpillar Venture Capital, where he and his team drove enterprise brand, innovation and digital transformations for the industry-leading Fortune 50 Company.

Before working for Caterpillar, Taylor had extensive executive experience with IBM. He holds an M.B.A. from the University of Illinois and a B.S. in Computer Science from Illinois State University.

“I have had the opportunity to work for two iconic global companies during my career and I believe the PRCA is yet another example of an iconic organization representing the best in the sports and entertainment industry,” Taylor said.

Taylor has built a reputation as a big-picture thinker who can manage and inspire people on a day-to-day basis. He’s also known for his positive attitude and forward thinking, and he’s keenly aware of how digital solutions impact customers and business.

Among his early goals, Taylor wants to hear from PRCA members.

“First of all, I am going to spend time listening to the membership of the PRCA and the staff to prioritize initiatives that will move us forward,” Taylor said. “Secondly, I think that we need to physically and digitally innovate both the customer and member experiences. We have to keep advancing our sport to drive fan and membership engagement.  Leveraging digital technologies and rodeo content will be an important aspect of that. Lastly, PRCA needs to continue to expand rodeo’s reach to increase our fan base and deliver the Western lifestyle experience around the globe. In the end, it’s about continuing to grow revenue and the PRCA ProRodeo brand for the benefit of its members.”

Keith Martin, the Chairman of the PRCA Board of Directors, praised the hiring of Taylor.

“George’s business acumen and his ability to work with so many different types of people are going to be really strong attributes, because in our organization that’s really needed,” Martin said. “We appreciate his financial, digital and marketing strengths, and those things all enter into being a good fit for us, taking us into the next century. His communication skills are excellent, and I think that’s needed so much in our organization. Karl (Stressman) did a great job and left us in good shape, and the whole PRCA Board helped that endeavor. This is taking us to the next level.”

Before moving to Colorado Springs, Taylor and his wife, Chris, were living in Snowmass, Colo., where they enjoyed numerous outdoor activities, including hiking, biking and snowboarding. The Taylors have three adult children – two daughters and a son – and three grandchildren.

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☛ God, Guts, Guns and Taxes – 1-5-18

Posted by on Jan 5, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 15 comments

GOD, GUTS, GUNS AND TAXES

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Jan. 5, 2018

 

by Richard E. Dennis

The American Horse Industry, Avoiding the Pitfalls by Rick Dennis.

While growing up in Alabama in the 1950s, my grand father always stressed these four premises to live by:  “Always put GOD first in your life, have the GUTS to take on life and live successfully, keep a GUN handy in case you need it and always pay your TAXES.”

Paying taxes is a phrase resonating with every working American this time of the year simply due to the fact April 15 is the time we either file our taxes or file for an extension. Like the old adage, “There are two certainties in life: Death and Taxes!”  No one gets out alive and with new tax laws, Uncle Sam can and will tax you in the grave.

However, there are steps we can take to minimize the amount of taxes we pay by simply taking advantage of the built-in deductions and write offs included in the IRS tax code.

In my opinion, one fact of certainty is: “The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) seems to hate horses.”  In my book THE AMERICAN HORSE INDUSTRY, Avoiding The Pitfalls, I devoted an entire chapter to identifying whether your horse operation is a business or a hobby. One of the included items in this book is a chapter that stresses the importance of determining whether or not your horse operation is a business or a hobby as well as other necessary factors to successfully survive an IRS or State audit of your horse operation and yourself.

 

Case-In-Point:

In June 2016, I opened a new bank account at Chase Bank in Covington, Louisiana.  According to the information supplied by the bank officer who opened my account, new Federal and State tax regulations and laws require the financial institution to be the first line of defense in identifying fraudulent money laundering or illegal operations by account holders. Essentially, the bank opens your account with the information you supply them including providing your name, social security number, business name and business Tax Identification Number (TIN), along with a copy of your completed financial questionnaire to Federal and State taxing agencies for verification, authentication of your citizenship and to check for any outstanding tax bills, liens, etc.

Further, the brief financial questionnaire generally encompasses annual income, expenses, net profits for a given period, tax filings, assets and liabilities. In essence, and in my opinion, this is used for a comparison by the Federal and State taxing agencies to perform a brief audit of prior tax filings to determine the accuracy of your prior tax reports, among other items of interest. According to the Chase Bank officer, this is a requirement to open a bank account with Chase Bank. No completed financial questionnaire = no bank account!

 

Maintaining Immaculate Financial Records:

Another aspect stressed in my book is the importance of maintaining immaculate financial records for both your personal and business financial reporting. For the record, I’m in the horse business and I file a Schedule C, along with my personal 1040, which represents my Limited Liability Company’s financial records. In my case and after opening the bank account, I received an arbitrary tax assessment from the State of Louisiana for a tax bill of $41,589.73 for the 2015 year.

Knowing that I didn’t owe the proposed tax liability, I contacted the Louisiana Department of Revenue and inquired about the certified letter I had received and I was informed that an unnamed source had provided to the State that I made $701,400.00 in 2015. I informed the State of Louisiana tax representative that the figure she quoted me was more than my gross annual income. In fact, it was a well-documented and IRS-approved 20-year “carry-forward casualty loss” from Hurricane Katrina back in 2005.

However, I was told I had two choices: 1) Protest the arbitrary assessment through the tax process or 2) pay the amount assessed plus interest and penalty.

If I did not file an objection, I would also be assessed a taxable amount by the IRS to include interest and penalties. The worst that could happen if I didn’t address this scenario is: I would be charged with tax evasion, my bank accounts would be seized, tax liens would be filed on my property and I would face prosecution.

I elected to fight the proposed tax liability and requested a hearing. On the day of the hearing, I represented myself “in-proper-person,” essentially meaning I was my own lawyer. This is not a recommendation that I would make to everyone.

I figured that since I knew my tax records better than anyone, I would be the best person to explain my case at the hearing. On hearing day, I was armed with my Federal and State tax filings from 2005 forward, which completely documented the $769,000.00 20-year carry-forward loss as well as the very well documented IRS approval of the loss. At the hearing I explained, that whoever their “erroneous source” was, he or she failed to recognize that there was a minus sign in the front of my 2015 tax filing amount and the -$701,400.00 carry forward to my 2016 tax year had a minus sign, not a plus sign. Therefore, the amount was a loss and not income.

 

Resolution:

On Jan. 2, 2018 I received a letter from the Louisiana Department of Revenue dated December 29, 2017 stating, “The outstanding liability for the above referenced period(s) has been cancelled based on the information provided. Thank you for your cooperation in this matter.”

Over all, we all have to pay taxes.  My suggestion to all readers of this article is to keep and maintain immaculate financial records with every annual tax filing. I keep all of my annual tax filings instead of merely the three years suggested by the IRS.  If I hadn’t had all of my tax filings readily at hand, the outcome of this saga might have resulted in an ominous ending.

Click for tax letter from state of Louisiana>>

 

Another Happy Ending:


Recently I received a Federal Tax ruling entitled UNITED STATES TAX COURT, Finis R. Welch and Linda J. Waite – Petitioners Versus Commissioner of Internal Revenue – Respondent.  This tax ruling is an extremely good read and involves another individual in the cutting horse industry which resulted in the cancellation of millions of dollars in proposed tax liabilities due to their immaculate records retention.

Click for Stunning Tax Court Victory>>

Click for Center Ranch Tax Ruling>>

Certified Public Accountant (CPA):

For the record, I’m not a certified public accountant. However, I’ve been in business for 33 years with a 48-year professional background including: Criminal Investigations and Prosecutions, Forensic Audit, Risk Management and a 19-year history as a professional in the horse business but I highly recommend the incorporation of a certified public accountant in your life to formulate your tax filings.

 

Determining Whether You’re A Business Or A Hobby:

The key to operating a successful horse business is to determine whether you’re in the horse business for fun or to make a profit as a business owner doing something you love. If the former is your answer, go have fun. If the latter is your answer and you’ve decided to enter the equine industry as a business owner, then I suggest you perform a self evaluation of your proposed or existing business to determine if all of your bases are covered: For example:

1. What is your business entity: a Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Sole-Owned Proprietorship, Partnership, etc.,?

2. Does your business have its own Federal Tax Identification Number (which you should have), or are you using your social security number for this?

3. How are your bank accounts set up? In order to avoid the “co-mingling of Funds Rule,” i.e., mixing personal non-business funds with business funds, you need to have separate bank accounts: one for your personal and one for your business.

4. If your business is like mine, where I receive checks in the mail for services rendered as well as cash payments, are you incorporating the use of a cash book to keep track of these funds, especially if you aren’t depositing the cash in the bank?  If not, I suggest you incorporate one and each time you spend from this “stash of cash,” make a record of it along with maintaining a receipt for spent funds.

5. Are your accounting books immaculate? If not, seek the advice of a Certified Public Accountant to assist you in this matter.

6. Does your horse business have a written “Business Plan?”  If not, I suggest you consult with a Certified Public Account and write one.  Essentially, your business plan is your survivability insurance in the event of audit.  After the key phrase used by the auditors is, “Are you in business to make a profit?”

7. “Intent To Make A Profit” is your key phrase you should memorize in all of your business affairs. During an audit, this separates you and your horse business from being identified as a hobby versus a viable business. It’s OK not to make a profit if you truly intended to make a profit during an annual period. However, you need to consult with a Certified Public Accountant to further explain this aspect of the tax code.

In setting up your business, always show an intent to make a profit by using advertising. I suggest to all business owners that they should have a web site to promote their business on the internet. Also, it’s an impressive marketing tool for prospective clients to evaluate your services.

An immaculate and accurate set of books will allow your tax preparer to utilize all of the items available to you as a business owner to minimize the amount of taxes you pay during an annual tax filing cycle as well as a defense in the event of a tax audit.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!”

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis

Managing Member

Phone: (985) 630-3500

Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com

Email – Personal: windrivercompany.rd@gmail.com

Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com

 

 

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☛ South Point Hotel & Casino owner gives employees $1M bonus due to tax reform bill – 1-5-18

Posted by on Jan 5, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SOUTH POINT HOTEL, CASINO AND ARENA OWNER GIVING EMPLOYEES $1M – THANKS TO PRESIDENT TRUMP

Press release from Joyce Lupiani
Jan. 5, 2018

The Las Vegas South Point Hotel and Casino owner Michael Gaughan, has announced that he will be giving employees an extra $1M this year because of President Donald Trump’s tax reform bill.

“Las Vegas has experienced a significant amount of growth over the past few years and this tax reform will continue to drive the economy of the city,” said Gaughan. “The new bill will  have a monumental effect on our economy and, in turn, our property. We want to be sure that our extended family is taken care of.”

Gaughan also said that employee bonuses will also double this year, In addition, he is rescinding the price increase for employee health insurance,

The South Point is located on Las Vegas Boulevard, a couple of miles south of the Las Vegas Strip. The property is known for its equestrian event facility and also has a multi-million dollar professional bowling tournament facility.

The Gaughan family has been instrumental in the development of Las Vegas. Jackie Gaughan, Michael’s father was an early owner and is best-known for his ownership of the El Cortez in Downtown Las Vegas. Jackie Gaughan also owned the Las Vegas Club and The Plaza.

Michael Gaughan is also the former owner of a NASCAR team and the main sponsor of the 2018 NASCAR Cup playoff race. Michael is also the operator of the slot machines at McCaran International Airport.

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