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☛ Tommy Manion on camera shooting stallion with BB pistol 7-20-17

Posted by on Jul 20, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 13 comments

TOMMY MANION CAUGHT ON CAMERA SHOOTING AN UNRULY STALLION WITH A BB PISTOL AT AN NCHA-SANCTIONED SHOW

 

BESIDES NCHA SANCTIONING, COULD HE AND/OR NCHA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS BE GUILTY OF STATE OR FEDERAL LAWS VIOLATIONS?

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 20, 2017

I have now heard from a credible witness, that they knew the well-known Non-Pro who was at an NCHA Cutting in Whitesboro, Texas, on Saturday, July 15, and shot a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol. Another witness had taken a video of the event and it was soon in the hands of the NCHA. The witness assured me that the Non-Pro  in question was NCHA Non-Pro Tommy Manion, who at one time had the pistol under a jacket draped over his hand and dropped it on the ground and bent over to pick it up – all of which is on the video.

After receiving and confirming the reported horse abuse by Manion, I reached out to Rick Dennis, a Threat Assessment/Risk Analyst who is also a former Drug Enforcement Agent, for clarification of penalties resulting from Manion’s actions – for Manion, those who witnessed the event and the NCHA. Essentially, Rick informed me there are two laws in play here, one Federal, the other state, as well as two NCHA rule infractions.

There is a little-known Federal Law entitled 18 USC 4 – Misprision Of A Felony, which specifically states:  “Whoever having knowledge of the actual commission of a felony cognizable by a court of the United States, conceals and does not as soon as possible make known the same to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.” Animal abuse is now a Federal Felony with hefty fines and prison sentences.

Click for Misprision Of A Felony>>

Also, the State of Texas Animal Cruelty Law, which rates animal abuse as a Felony, states those prosecuted could be punishable by two years in a state jail and/or a $10,000 fine.

Click for Texas Animal Cruelty laws>>

Therefore, since the NCHA has already been notified of the animal cruelty case, along with being supplied with a video of the act, Manion has placed the association in a precarious spot, as whoever doesn’t report this gross violation to law enforcement in accordance with the provisions set forth in the USC 4 Code -Misprision of a Felony – is in direct violation of the federal law and could be subjected to arrest and prosecution at a later date. This includes Russell McCord, who received the phone call, as well as the Executive Director and the entire Executive Committee who met last night after being informed of the incident and determined their association’s punishment for the offense – and possibly even the lawyer who was informed of the infraction and gave the Executive Committee advice, as well as show management.

Difference of penalties between NCHA and governmental agencies:

The other curious nature of Manion’s act is the two violations in the NCHA Rulebook pertaining to animal abuse and cruelty and how they differ from Federal and State laws.

More specifically, the NCHA Rulebook states “if show management or a judge at any NCHA-approved or sponsored event discovers inhumane treatment or abuse of a horse, they may immediately bar the responsible party and contestant’s horse from further competition in the event and the judge will give a score of zero. The Executive Director must be notified within seven (7) days of the closing date of the show involved and the complaint will be referred to the appropriate NCHA Committee for investigation and consideration. Note: the Federal law says “as soon as possible It must be made known to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States and (the person) is to be fined or  imprisoned for not more than three years.”

Click for NCHA Standing Rule 35>>

While the NCHA disciplines animal cruelty by offense with a fine ($1,000 to $10,000), probation and/or suspension, the State of Texas Animal Cruelty Laws say that the perpetrator could be punished by two years in a state jail and/or a $10,000 fine.

Also, the NCHA should make sure that the abused animal is made available as soon as possible to a licensed veterinarian for any damage that has been done, especially since the person who described the incident to me said the when the BBs hit the stallion, he crouched and his body shook in fear.

On May 15, 2015, Rick Dennis wrote an article addressing this very problem called “Horse Abuse Part IV.” There are many good and devoted trainers in this industry; however, unfortunately we do have our share of abusive Open and Non-Pro trainers that should be removed. Click here for a copy of this article.

What’s the  hurry?

Why did the NCHA Executive Committee jump on this animal abuse case so quickly. I feel it is because they just tried to strengthen their animal abuse penalties due to the fact that PETA might come down on them and the sport of cutting if they waited. A smart move!

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☛ From the Editor 7-20-17

Posted by on Jul 20, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 20, 2017

Yesterday I sent out a notice in “Latest News” that a “well-known horse owner shot a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol at an NCHA cutting in Whitesboro, Texas. An update to that information is that the show was held on Saturday, July 15, rather than July 8. Also, that well-known horse owner is a top non-pro. NCHA’s Director of Judges Russell McCord was called and told what was going on and he told the caller to do whatever it took to stop it and make the person shooting the horse leave, which he did.

A bystander did take a video of the shooting which is now in the hands of the NCHA, and I understand that they have initiated the process against the person that did the shooting, as it is definitely against’ the NCHA’s highly advertised zero tolerance “horse-cruelty” policy. Still no mention of that person’s name but I do know that that person is a Non-Pro and a large advertiser in the Cutting Horse Chatter, giving the NCHA some hard choices.

I was given the name of the perpetrator; however, that person who told me about the shooting was not at the show and heard the information from someone who was. I would like to hear it from anyone who was present at this cutting who knew who the shooter was. I will not reveal your name. Call me at 940-433-5232 or 940-393-1865 or e-mail me at glory.kurtz@gmail.com. Since the NCHA has taken action, If that person’s name is not revealed sooner, I’m sure the perpetrator’s name will show up eventually in the Chatter under “Suspensions,” or possibly (but hopefully not) under “Probations.”

NCHA SUMMER SPECTACULAR NEWS:

The second go-round of the Open Classic/Challenge was completed yesterday, with those 26 scoring a 435.0 and above, advancing to the finals. Jon Burgess, riding Littlemak (Starlights Gypsy x Just a Swinging), owned by Anderson Cattle Co., Victoria, Texas, topped the two go-rounds with a 440.5 total score.

Grant Setnicka, not only finished a close second by scoring a 440.0 riding Ichis My Choice (Cat Ichi x My Little Abra), owned by J Five Horse Ranch Mgmt, LLC, Weatherford, Texas, but was the only rider to qualify three horses for the Finals. Also tying for second with a total score of 440.0 was Ed Flynn, riding Play Miss Boonsmal (Peptoboonsmal x Play Miss) for Danny R. Jones of Canada. The Open Classic/Challenge Finals is scheduled for Saturday,July 22, following six sets of the NCHA Derby Amateur and UnlimitedAmateur first go-round.

The Non-Pro and Limited Non-Pro in the Classic/Challenge  go-round is being held today. Also, don’t forget that the Western Bloodstock Summer Spectacular Sale,with 145 consignments, will be held Saturday, July 22, in the Watt Arena, starting at 9 a.m.

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☛ Where have I been lately? HOT news! 7-18-17

Posted by on Jul 19, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 19, 2017

I have had several individuals question whether or not I am continuing with my website www.allaboutcutting.com, as lately my news has been rather scarce and for that I am sorry.

My answer is “Yes,” I am continuing with my website; however, lately I have had several distractions which have cut back on my time to write articles. These include the following:

1) I was in the process of selling my horse operation since my husband passed away 9 years ago and I am unable to physically and financially keep this facility going. I recently solved that problem as I have sold my Boyd facility and purchased a much smaller place in Grandview, Texas. I will be moving the end of August but in the meantime I have to pack over 30 years of possessions and memorabilia.

2) Many of you old timers may remember Lee Dale, who created the pedigrees for sale catalogs, including the NCHA sales. Some 20 years ago she had a stroke and has been paralyzed on one side of her body and bedridden in nursing facilities ever since. Over the years all of her relatives have passed away and just before her sister died, I  agreed to take on her medical power of attorney. However, lately, Lee has gone downhill and though she has been in a nursing home for years, during the last few weeks she has been in the Wise Regional Hospital in ICU and currently is in Hospice at Senior Care in Decatur. Her mind is still pretty good and she remembers all you old-time cutters and all the stories that go with them!!!

3) On July 4, fireworks were going off in the middle of the highway in front of my place. The one horse I have left, Cougarand, a 31-year-old champagne son of Peppy San Badger out of a daughter of Doc Bar, is used to highway noises and even fireworks, but one must have come into his pasture and probably even hit him, which in the dark sent him into a pipe fence covered with wire where he fell with a leg getting stuck under the sucker rod at the bottom of the wire. I found him there the next morning and got him up; however, he had obviously injured the hind leg that was under the fence and was lame.

Even though I haven’t had a need to call a vet for some time, I called three different vets in the area – only one called me back; however, he didn’t show up. After doctoring Cougarand myself for a couple of weeks, I remembered my old friend and miracle worker – an equine kinesiologist and chiropractor named Laird Burke. He came and looked at Cougar and couldn’t believe what good shape he was in at 31 years of age – but most of all, he was surprised he hadn’t died lying under that fence all night.

After working on him for about 20 minutes, he said, Turn him loose and he will be just fine tomorrow.”Today is tomorrow – and like Laird promised – Cougarand is just fine, walking normal! In fact, when Laird got done working on him, I took his halter off. He usually runs off when he discovers he is loose; however, this time he followed me until I got out the gate. I guess he thought I had fixed his pain!

Laird has been a friend of Bob and me for many years and has “fixed” many horses that have had accidents or in some way had disturbed their skeletal frame or muscles. We had a baby colt one time who missed the gate when the horses, including his mother, headed out to the pasture. The colt jumped the fence and landed on his back. When he got up, he could walk, but it was like a car with a bent frame – he would walk toward you but he looked like he was actually going another way. We took him to vets and they said there was nothing they could do. About 3 months later, Laird came and stayed with us and he suggested we put the colt in the barn while he worked on him several times over the following week. His magic worked and the colt was soon walking normal and remained that way as long as we owned him. I became a lifetime fan!

Bob and I  met Laird years ago when he was working with and helping horses performing at the All American Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, Ohio. He eventually came and stayed with us for several months when he suddenly found himself with a lot of business in Texas, and he and his lovely wife Brenda soon moved to North Texas and have been helping horses over the past few years all over the country at major shows and ranches.

So that’s are my story and I’m sticking to it. I’m sure that in the short term, I will not be posting as often as I did before for awhile as I have this huge move in front of me. I have lived here for 38 years and imagine the “stuff” I have accumulated. They include Quarter Horse Journals back to the 1970s – that I am trying to give away to someone who would like to study the history of the wonderful Quarter Horse.

THE LATEST NEWS:

The latest news came from an e-mail last night wondering if I would like to expose wrong doing at the highest level in the cutting industry. The person said, “There is a Red Hot current situation about a well-known horse owner shooting a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol at a horse show in Whitesboro, Texas, Saturday, July 8, with witnesses, one of which took a video.”  They felt someone needed to pursue this in order to hold the NCHA accountable with their highly advertised zero tolerance “horse-cruelty” policy.

The caller said Russell McCord from the NCHA was called and told what was going on. He told the caller to do whatever it took to stop it and make the person shooting the horse leave, which he did.

I’m looking for someone who was there and watched the incident so I can report more about it. If you know such a person who is willing to talk with me, my phone no. is 940-433-5232 or cell 940-393-1865. I need to know who the person calling is but I do not have to give their name in my article – however, I would like for them to confirm the name of the perpetrator. I’m waiting by my phone(s).

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☛ Two horses “back from the brink” 7-17-17

Posted by on Jul 17, 2017 in COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

DIARY OF AN INTERCEPT:

 

BACK FROM THE BRINK

 

By Robin Fowler
July 17, 2017

A mare and her companion, a red roan gelding who came to be known as Buddy during an intercept at the Mexico border, were saved from slaughter at the last minute by a horse rescue group that raised more than $2,000 on Facebook. The photo was taken after the two tired horses were returned to Oklahoma.

 

CREDIT: Photos courtesy of Caring and Sharing

It was the end of March when a Facebook administrator for an Oklahoma horse rescue group, Caring and Sharing the Oklahoma Feed Lot & Auction Horse, discovered that a mare targeted for rescue from an Oklahoma kill pen had instead been shipped by the kill buyer to Mexico for slaughter. Supporters were frustrated, but within hours the mood had become hopeful.

The mare was at the Mexico border but the truck she was on had not yet crossed the international boundary.

“If we can call and intercept, who is willing to help,” asked Shereen Jackson on the group’s Facebook page. The mare still might be saved through a last-ditch fund-raising effort, and the donations started rolling in: $5, $10, $30, $100, $150.

But quite a few more donations would be needed – and quickly. The kill buyer could expect only an average of about 65 cents per pound, perhaps $650, at the Mexico slaughterhouse, with the mare’s flesh likely destined for dinner plates in Europe or Asia. But the kill buyer demanded $1,100 from the rescue group.

All About Cutting happened across the Facebook page just as the effort got under way to save the mare and her companion, a handsome red roan gelding. Hours passed, filled with desperate, wrenching exhortations for help, but eventually a well-timed donation of $500 put the mare’s rescue over the top. Then Facebook denizens learned of the mare’s gelding friend, also bound for slaughter. And a frantic race began anew to save the gelding, also priced at $1,100.

“Payment has been sent to bail out the mare. Please, we need to get her buddy, the roan, now! She was screaming when they separated them at the lot,” posted administrator and animal advocate Cie Sadeghy. “Buddy is sitting at the border in a truck and he is not safe.”

The donations started flowing anew: $10, $20, $100, another $100. “So close,” posted Justine Kesselring. “Please save Buddy!”

A gelding who became known as Buddy first found himself in a very bad place – a kill pen – but then was at the right place at the right time to be saved as the friend of a rescued mare.
CREDIT: Photos courtesy of Caring and Sharing

Wrote another poster, “Prayers for Buddy, he kept his friend the mare calm in a tough situation, a strenuous journey to a terrible end. The story is in revision, the hope is there.”

And finally, a bigger donation, $400 this time. The gelding also was safe.

It didn’t go off without a hitch. Some well-meaning posters caused confusion by trying to expand the conversation to the plight of other equally deserving horses. As a result, some donors seemed unsure where their money was going. A few newcomers to the Facebook page wanted to be brought up to speed without bothering to read previous posts – although, in their defense, there were more than 500 of them, some from as far away as the United Kingdom. There even were posts from followers, presumably youngsters, who wanted to discuss names for the two horses if they could be rescued.

But some of the posts were tearfully poignant. “The devil was not expecting this,” wrote Mary Trostle. “He was sure in darkness she and her buddy would ship (across the border to Mexico for slaughter).”

One post by Nicki Wickline summed it up for latecomers who joined the emotionally draining 24-hour race to save the two horses. “LOL, she shipped. But the girls (from the rescue) accomplished a first. They bought her off the truck before crossing the border. Long story (short), she and her buddy are on the way back from their near death.”

Wrote Deborah Hardzog in praise of fellow Facebook followers, “I am both amazed and proud to be a part of this group, from those who work tirelessly on the front lines to those who rescue, those who share and those who send whatever they can to save a horse. This world is truly a better place with all of you in it.”

For more information on the rescue group and the horses that followers currently are trying to save, visit Caring and Sharing the Oklahoma Feed Lot & Auction Horse on Facebook.

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☛ Reined Cow Horse industry to have 3 major futurities 7-14-17

Posted by on Jul 14, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

REINED COW HORSE ENTHUSIASTS TO HAVE THREE MAJOR FUTURITIES IN 2015

 

EVENTS TO BE HELD 1,640 MILES APART

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 13, 2017

There’s a new kid on the block that is holding a reined cow horse futurity and sale within the industry’s list of reined cow horse futurities.

 

At first there was one: the National Reined Cow Horse Association Futurity in Reno Nev. Then a branch of members broke off and started the National Stock Horse Association, which holds an annual Futurity in Paso Robles, Calif. And now a new group, headed by Smoky Pritchett, has formed the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity, which will take place in Reno, Nev., since the NRCHA Futurity that had been held in Reno, has moved to Fort Worth, Texas.

 

THE NEW EVENT – RENO SBF:

This year, the NRCHA announced that they were moving their Reno event over 1,600 miles from Reno to Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas, where they would receive state and city money for the event. That left Reno without a Reined Cow Horse Futurity.

 

That didn’t sit well with several California owners and riders of snaffle bit horses. In an open letter on the Internet, Smoky Pritchett wrote, “You are all aware of the move of the Snaffle Bit Futurity from Reno to Texas. California lost the Hackamore Classic along with the Bridle Spectacular several years ago. Now we are losing our largest show and sale (The NRCHA Futurity and Sale).”

 

With the help of Lucas Oil and Save The Harvest, who have been sponsoring a lot of horse events lately, there will now be a new Snaffle Bit Futurity, Horse Show and Sale called the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity & Sale, scheduled to be held Sept. 8-17 in Reno, Nev., taking the place of the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity. The new group advertised that there will be a whole day dedicated to the Amateur riders on Sunday, Sept. 17.

 

They need your support so as not to lose more California cow Horse events, especially in Northern California. We have entry forms available if you cannot download one from their web page: https://www.renosnafflebitfuturity.com.

 

So this year, there will be three snaffle bit futurities, starting with the National Stock Horse Association’s event, scheduled for Aug. 22-27 in Paso Robles, Calif. Next will be the new snaffle bit futurity event in Reno Sept. 8-17, with $200,000 in added money, and the final event will be the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity in Fort Worth, Texas, with added money of over $606,000..

 

Editor’s Note: A call was made to Shawn Martin of the NSHA regarding the added money for their Futurity; however, my call was not returned. Martin can be reached at 623-217-3879

 

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☛ House Committee votes to reopen horse slaughter plants 7-14-17

Posted by on Jul 14, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

American horses are held in export pens in Texas and New Mexico before transported to slaughter in Mexico. Photo by Kathy Milani/The HSUS

The same lawmakers who voted July 12 to reopen U.S. horse slaughter plants are blocking a different bill backed by The HSUS that would forbid the transport of horses for slaughter for human consumption to other countries.

Can the bill be amended or defunded before it reaches the President’s desk?

The following is a press release from Wayne Parcelles,the President and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States.

July 12, the Appropriations Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives voted narrowly to give the green light for the reopening of horse slaughter plants in the United States. There were 27 members of Congress who voted against the bipartisan amendment offered by Reps. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., and Charlie Dent, R-Pa., to bar horse slaughter operations in the United States, and 25 who supported it. All but one Democrat on the committee voted to oppose this dreadful idea, while 26 of 30 Republicans favored it.

The vote on the amendment was as unimaginable as the rhetoric from the horse slaughter crowd was hypocritical.

Unimaginable because American horses deserve a better fate than to be gathered up by a disreputable “kill buyer” who outbids a rescuer at an auction, loaded onto an overcrowded truck, and then stunned, hoisted up by a leg, and pulled apart piece by piece – which is exactly what the 27 lawmakers who voted against the Roybal-Allard/Dent amendment are trying to sanction. We don’t do this to dogs or cats when we don’t have homes for them, and it should be unthinkable to do this to the domesticated animal that helped settle the nation. I pity the people who don’t see the majesty of these American icons and who are numb to their suffering.

Hypocritical because the lawmakers who spoke out against the amendment to ban horse slaughter – again, these are the Representatives who want to allow horse slaughter – actually feigned an interest in protecting horses. A couple of them lamented the long-distance transport of American horses to Canada and Mexico for slaughter for human consumption, and said that we might as well slaughter horses here in the United States so they don’t have to be transported.

That logic would make a little sense until you realize that these same lawmakers are blocking a different bill backed by The HSUS that would forbid the transport of horses for slaughter for human consumption to other countries. Only one of the lawmakers who voted to reopen horse slaughter plants in the United States is a cosponsor of that broader anti-slaughter bill, the Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act, H.R. 113, which is led by four animal welfare champions — Reps. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Janice Schakowsky, D-Ill., Ed Royce, R-Calif., and Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M.

How can you lament the long-distance transport of horses for slaughter to Canada or Mexico and then fight the bill that addresses that very thing? You can do so only if you say one thing and do another.

The defeat of the amendment to bar U.S.-based horse slaughter plants from operating is an ugly start for the House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J. The newly anointed chairman represents a suburban district in New Jersey, and his constituents favor our position in droves. He defied their wishes on this vote, just as he defied their wishes earlier in the year in voting to overturn a Fish and Wildlife Service rule to stop the aerial tracking, landing, and shooting of grizzly bears, and to stop the shooting of wolves and other predators during their denning seasons on national wildlife refuges.

What kind of person wants to kill grizzly bears on wildlife refuges and slaughter American horses on U.S. soil?

Reps. Robert Aderholdt, R-Ala., Tom Cole, R-Okla., and Mark Amodei, R-Nev. also favored horse slaughter in the debate today. To their credit, Reps. Roybal-Allard, Dent, Sanford Bishop, D-Ga., Barbara Lee, D-Calif, and Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., spoke in favor of the ban on U.S. horse slaughter.

“As a lifelong Republican, I’m deeply saddened and quite ashamed to see my fellow conservatives go to such great lengths to promote the slaughter of American equines,” said Marty Irby, who heads the HSUS equine campaign. “I hope the members who profess to be fiscal conservatives will reflect upon this vote that would have saved millions of taxpayer dollars annually – and begin to practice what they preach.”

As Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., noted in a public statement, this battle is not over. If House leaders bring the agriculture spending bill to the floor, our congressional allies may be able to offer the amendment there and win when all House lawmakers have a chance to vote on the issue. And if even that doesn’t happen, we expect to win a horse slaughter defund amendment in the Senate, which would give us a chance to prevail when the final bill is negotiated and sent to President Trump.

This is how lawmakers voted on the amendment to protect horses:

YES (25)

Peter Aguilar, D-Calif.-31, Sanford Bishop, D-Ga.-2, Matt Cartwright, D-Pa.-17, Katherine Clark, D-Mass.-5, Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn.-3, Charlie Dent, R- Pa.-15, David Joyce, R-Ohio-14, Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio-9, Derek Kilmer, D-Wash.-6, Barbara Lee, D-Calif.-13, Nita Lowey, D-N.Y.-17, Betty McCollum, D-Minn.-4, Grace Meng, D-N.Y.-6, Chellie Pingree, D-Maine-1, Mark Pocan, D-Wis.-2, David Price, D-N.C.-4, Mike Quigley, D-Ill.-5, Tom Rooney, R-Fla.-17, Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif.-40, Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md.-2, Tim Ryan, D-Ohio-13, José Serrano, D-N.Y.-15, Peter Visclosky, D-Ind.-1, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla.-23, and Kevin Yoder, R-Kan.-3

NO (27)

Robert Aderhold, R-Ala.-4, Mark Amodie, R-Nev.-2, Ken Calvert, R-Calif.-42, John Carter, R-Texas-31, Tom Cole, R-Okla.-4, Henry Cuellar, D-Texas-28, John Abney Culberson, R-Texas-7, Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla.-25, Chuck Fleischmann, R-Tenn.-3, Jeff Fortenberry, R-Nev.-1, Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J.-11, Kay Granger, R-Texas-12, Tom Graves, R-Ga.-14, Andy Harris, R-Md.-1, Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash.-3, Evan Jenkins, R-W.Va.-3, John Moolenaar, R-Mich.-4, Dan Newhouse, R-Wash.-4, Steven Palazzo, R-Miss.-4, Martha Roby, R-Ala.-2, Harold Rogers, R-Ky.-5, Michael Simpson, R-Idaho-2, Chris Stewart, R-Utah-2, Scott Taylor, R-Va.-2, David Valadao, R-Calif.-21, Steve Womack, R-Ark.-3, and David Young, R-Iowa-3

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