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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 4-24-18

Posted by on Apr 24, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
April 24, 2018

Thurston adds Red Bluff to win list

RED BLUFF, Calif. – While it was a perfect day for rodeo at the Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up, saddle bronc rider Zeke Thurston wasn’t basking in just the sun following his April 22 outing.
Rusty Wright’s 85-point ride set the standard earlier in the weekend, but for Thurston, a combination of skill and draw saw the 23-year-old cowboy net the win. Atop Calgary Stampede’s Urgent Delivery, Thurston posted an 86.5-point ride to win his first Red Bluff Round-Up title.
“It’s awesome,” Thurston said. “I love this rodeo. I look forward to it every year. It’s one of the first outdoor rodeos of the year, the weather is beautiful, and I just have a good time here.”
His time spent in Northern California was made much more pleasant when he saw his name next to the 9-year-old Urgent Delivery. In a one-go format such as Red Bluff, a Wrangler ProRodeo Tour stop, Thurston knew he was in contention with the hefty bay horse.
“He’s real big,” the 2016 world champion cowboy said. “He’s kind of a bucker. I just knew that if I did things right, I’d have a good chance to win some money, and luckily, I did that. I was happy.”
And that he did, as his one and only ride was worth a check of just more than $6,000 and a brand-new buckle.
Thurston, who won $265,449 on his way to his first world title in 2016, has seen his fair share of impressive bucking horses. No matter, he believes that you can’t force points on the scoreboard. A cowboy can only take what’s given to him.
“You never know what to expect,” he said. “I figured I’d do what I have control over, do my part and try as hard as I could. My horse had a really good day and he really bucked, so I was just happy to get him rode.”
A win in Red Bluff gives Thurston his second major win of the 2018 season. Following his triumph in Denver at the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo, a victory that netted the Canadian nearly $11,000, Thurston’s $6,148 in Red Bluff moved him into ninth place of the newest world standings. With the mania of the summer run on the horizon, Thurston likes where his game is.
“(A win) is always good for a guy’s confidence, and obviously for his bank account,” Thurston said. “Just keep rolling on, take it one ride at a time, one rodeo at a time and it really does help.
“I’ve been riding as good as I ever have. Drawing good horses and taking advantage of them, you make the best of them as you can. It’s a long season with a lot of rodeo left, but you just go out there and have fun. That’s why I started doing it in the first place.”
Other winners at the $265,616 rodeo were all-around cowboy Rhen Richard ($3,479, tie-down roping and team roping), bareback rider Jamie Howlett (87.5 points on C5 Rodeo’s Virgil), steer wrestler Tyler Pearson (21.0 seconds on four head), team ropers Cody Snow/Wesley Thorp (29.1 seconds on four head), tie-down roper Tyler Milligan (38.2 seconds on four head), barrel racer Jessi Fish (34.53 seconds on two runs), and bull riders Jordan Hansen (88.5 points on Corey & Lange Rodeo’s Rewind), and Garrett Tribble (88.5 points on Rosser Rodeo’s Compton Kid).

2. AGCO’s Sowing Good Deeds Program open

DULUTH, Ga. – AGCO Corporation (NYSE: AGCO) announced recently the open application period for the second annual Sowing Good Deeds campaign – a program showcasing rodeo committees throughout North America and the substantive impact they have in their local communities.
AGCO, a proud sponsor of the PRCA through its Hesston® and Massey Ferguson® brands, will award a Massey Ferguson tractor, valued at more than $35,000, to a deserving rodeo committee at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas in December.
“Rodeos are part of the fabric of America,” Meghann McNally, AGCO’s director of marketing excellence in North America, said in a press release. “The dedication of local rodeo committees across the country – who contribute endless hours and resources to supporting not only rodeo competitions, but also local agricultural organizations, including FFA and 4-H – is something AGCO is proud to support. In 2017, AGCO, together with the PRCA, launched the Sowing Good Deeds program to recognize these hard-working rodeo committees. We were overwhelmed with applications in 2017 and are excited to see even more in 2018.”
The recipient of the inaugural Sowing Good Deeds honor was the Clovis (Calif.) Rodeo.
“The Clovis Rodeo is able to give back to our community because of the dedication and generous support of our volunteers, sponsors and fans,” said Gary Bower, president of the Clovis Rodeo Association. “We’re excited to get our new Massey Ferguson tractor in the arena to work the dirt during the 104th Clovis Rodeo, April 26-29, so our entire rodeo family can see what they won!”
A committee of judges selected by Hesston, Massey Ferguson and the PRCA will evaluate the applicants based on three key criteria: community impact, innovation and adversity. These criteria highlight work that improves the local community, exemplifies the spirit of entrepreneurship within the nonprofit sector and has initiated change or responded to significant challenges to build a stronger, more sustainable organization.
“The 600-plus, PRCA-sanctioned rodeos would not be possible without the dedicated groups of volunteers who work tirelessly behind the scenes to ensure that millions of rodeo fans enjoy a night out to see their favorite cowgirls and cowboys,” said George Taylor, CEO of the PRCA. “The Second Annual AGCO Sowing Good Deeds program helps us recognize these committees for the amazing charitable work they do in their communities. The difference they make is immeasurable, and it is an honor to partner with AGCO in recognizing their community service.”
The application deadline for the Sowing Good Deeds initiative is Sept. 15, 2018, at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time. Rodeo committees can submit their application at hesston.com/sowinggooddeeds. There is a limit of one application per rodeo committee.
Finalists will be announced during the 2018 Wrangler NFR in Las Vegas, Dec. 6-15, 2018. The winning rodeo committee will be recognized at the PRCA Awards Banquet and on Hesston night at the NFR.
For more information, visit hesston.com/sowinggooddeeds.

3. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoTV.com will livestream Rodeo Corpus Christi (Texas), April 28 at 7 p.m. (CT) and April 29 at 3 p.m. Rodeo Corpus Christi is part of the new Wrangler ProRodeo Tour. The Tour will feature 23 rodeos – it began with Logandale, Nev., (April 11-15) and concludes with the Justin Finale, Sept. 6-9 in Puyallup, Wash. To subscribe to ProRodeoTV.com visit this link http:/www.prorodeo.com/prorodeotv-subscribe. WranglerNetwork.com will livestream the Clovis (Calif.) Rodeo, also part of the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour, April 28 at 2 p.m. (PT) and April 29 at 2 p.m. … Steve Kenyon and ProRodeoLive.com will broadcast Ropin’ Dreams Cowboy Fellowship PRCA Rodeo in Jourdanton, Texas, April 27 at 7:30 p.m. (CT) and April 28 at 7:30 p.m. and the Gold County ProRodeo in Auburn, Calif., April 28 at 4 p.m. (PT) and April 29 at 2 p.m. … The next PRCA Rodeo Camp will be April 28 in Prescott, Ariz. The camp will run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (PT). Registration is required at www.prorodeo.com/prorodeo/rodeo/youth-rodeoBrett Ortland, of Caldwell, Idaho, is the winner of the 2018 Top Hand Award for the Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up.The award is given each year to a volunteer who has dedicated their time to assisting with the Round-Up. Ortland was honored with a buckle for the Top Hand Award on April 14.Ortland, who has deep roots in Red Bluff, has been volunteering at the rodeo for the past 30-plus years. He began as a young adult, untying calves and opening gates. For the past two decades, his job has been to pull the latches on the chute gates. When the bull rider, bareback rider or saddle bronc rider is ready to ride, the cowboy nods his head, Ortland pulls the latch open, and Rod Moore, a director with the Round-Up, pulls the rope to open the gate … Blue Mountain Community College, the Pendleton (Ore.) Round-Up and the city of Pendleton continue to work on the FARM 2 project, which would see an indoor arena and classrooms built on the rodeo grounds. Mayor John Turner said that facility is just one part of the plans for the area.”The city is interested in building a hotel attached to the convention center,” he said in the April 23 edition of www.mycolumbiabasin.com. “In my mind, I kind of link all of these projects together and it creates a parking problem for us, so we’re all working on that together.” Turner said the additional cars from a hotel, in addition to events at the proposed indoor arena, could not be contained in the parking that would exist after a hotel is built. He said both the city and the rodeo association are working to solve the potential problem in advance. “The city owns some land west of 18th street and the Round-Up owns some land west of 18th street,” he said. “We’re looking at seeing how we can collaborate on those.” The 2018 Pendleton Round-Up is Sept. 12-15.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “It would mean a lot to win the all-around here. Anytime you can win the all-around at something like Guymon (Okla.) or Cheyenne (Wyo.) or Salinas (Calif.) – somewhere that it’s a cowboy event – that’s great”
– Steer roper/team roping header JoJo LeMond about the upcoming Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo May 4-6 in a press release by Ted Harbin.

4. Next Up

April 24           Division 2 Xtreme Bulls, Wharton, Texas, begins
April 24           Angelina County Benefit Rodeo, Lufkin, Texas, begins
April 26           Rodeo Corpus Christi (Texas), Wrangler ProRodeo Tour, begins
April 27           Henderson County Go Texan Rodeo, Athens, Texas, begins
April 27           Division 1 Xtreme Bulls, Del Rio, Texas, begins
April 27           Ropin’ Dreams Cowboy Fellowship PRCA Rodeo, Jourdanton, Texas, begins
April 27           Camrose (Alberta) Spring Classic Pro Rodeo, begins
April 27           Clovis (Calif.) Rodeo, Wrangler ProRodeo Tour, begins
April 27           Kananaskis ProRodeo, Coleman, Alberta, begins
April 27           Lakeside (Calif.) Rodeo begins
April 27           Minnesota Horse Exposition Rodeo, St. Paul, Minn., begins
April 28           Gold County ProRodeo, Auburn, Calif., begins
April 28           Springville (Calif.) Sierra Rodeo begins
April 28           National Circuit Finals Steer Roping, Torrington, Wyo., begins
April 29           Rodeo del Seminario, Chihuahua, Mexico

5. 2018 PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through April 23, 2018
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$84,702
BB:
Caleb Bennett, Trementon, Utah
$66,995
SW:
Cole Edge, Durant, Okla.
$47,581
TR-1:
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$51,240
TR-2:
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$51,240
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$83,638
TD:
Tyson Durfey, Decatur, Texas
$54,122
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$122,041
SR:
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
$37,566

6. 2018 PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through April 23, 2018
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$84,702
2
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
  50,722
3
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
  50,118
4
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
  37,894
5
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
  27,283
6
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
  25,174
7
Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss.
  25,138
8
Wesley Brunson, Terry, Miss.
  24,279
9
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
  18,333
10
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  17,289
11
Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash.
  16,988
12
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  16,587
13
McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla.
  11,278
14
Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
  11,264
15
Zack Jongbloed, Iowa, La.
  11,171
16
Tanner Green, Cotulla, Texas
   9,986
Cole Elshere, Faith, S.D.
   8,668
Bareback Riding
1
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
$66,995
2
Mason Clements, Springville, Utah
  64,308
3
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
  49,703
4
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
  41,710
5
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
  41,503
6
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
  39,487
7
Tilden Hooper, Carthage, Texas
  38,003
8
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
  37,693
9
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
  35,403
10
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
  32,766
11
Luke Creasy, Hobbs, N.M.
  27,937
12
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
  27,171
13
Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah
  24,412
14
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
  23,053
15
Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho
  23,050
16
Blade Elliott, Centreville, Ala.
  21,952
17
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
  21,838
18
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France,
  21,605
19
Logan Corbett, Las Cruces, N.M.
  19,971
20
Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore.
  19,778
Steer Wrestling
1
Cole Edge, Durant, Okla.
$47,581
2
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
  40,229
3
Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, Mont.
  38,878
4
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
  36,531
5
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
  35,989
6
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
  35,949
7
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
  34,307
8
Chason Floyd, Buffalo, S.D.
  33,946
9
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
  29,696
10
Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla.
  26,522
11
Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif.
  26,305
12
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
  23,914
13
Tanner Brunner, Ramona, Kan.
  22,604
14
Jacob Shofner, Huntsville, Texas
  22,367
15
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
  22,121
16
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
  21,879
17
Blake Mindemann, Blanchard, Okla.
  21,312
18
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
  20,899
19
Josh Garner, Live Oak, Calif.
  20,246
20
Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, N.D.
  19,979
Team Roping (header)
1
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$51,240
2
Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C.
  41,495
3
Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, Okla.
  39,691
4
Cody Snow, Los Olivos. Calif.
  37,299
5
Logan Olson, Flandreau, S.D.
  35,322
6
Andrew Ward, Edmond, Okla.
  35,095
7
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
  29,101
8
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
  23,349
9
Joshua Torres, Ocala, Fla.
  21,848
10
Travis Dorman, Dade City, Fla.
  21,810
11
Spencer Mitchell, Orange Cove, Calif.
  21,714
12
Kaleb Driggers, Hoboken, Ga.
  20,874
13
Cory Kidd V, Statesville, N.C.
  20,779
14
Nelson Wyatt, Clanton, Ala.
  20,308
15
Tyler Wade, Terrell, Texas
  19,712
16
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
  18,902
17
John Alley, Adams, Tenn.
  18,861
18
Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn.
  18,580
19
Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M.
  18,465
20
Steven Duby, Melba, Idaho
  17,867
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$51,240
2
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
  41,495
3
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
  37,483
4
Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb.
  36,252
5
Reagan Ward, Edmond, Okla.
  35,095
6
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
  33,610
7
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
  29,101
8
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
  25,865
9
Logan Medlin, Tatum, N.M.
  25,749
10
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
  23,349
11
Jason Duby, Klamath Falls, Ore.
  22,004
12
Jonathan Torres, Ocala, Fla.
  21,848
13
Bradley Massey, Perry, Fla.
  21,810
14
Trey Yates, Pueblo, Colo.
  21,532
15
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
  20,874
16
Clint Summers, Lake City, Fla.
  20,814
17
Clark Adcock, Smithville, Tenn.
  18,861
18
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
  18,852
19
Brad Culpepper, Sylvester, Ga.
  18,580
20
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
  17,836
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$83,638
2
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
  57,085
3
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
  53,071
4
Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa
  52,594
5
Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah
  40,779
6
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
  35,877
7
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
  35,444
8
J.J. Elshere, Hereford, S.D.
  33,905
9
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
  33,618
10
Joey Sonnier III, New Iberia, La.
  32,409
11
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
  29,479
12
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
  26,703
13
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
  24,573
14
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
  23,155
15
Colt Gordon, Comanche, Okla.
  22,906
16
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
  21,137
17
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
  17,834
18
Joe Lufkin, Sallisaw, Okla.
  17,811
19
Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.
  17,746
20
Jade Blackwell, Rapid City, S.D.
  17,332
Tie-down Roping
1
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
$54,122
2
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
  54,000
3
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
  43,735
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
  41,795
5
Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, Wash.
  40,888
6
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
  39,900
7
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
  38,629
8
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
  37,959
9
Sterling Smith, Stephenville, Texas
  36,735
10
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
  31,627
11
Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas
  26,413
12
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
  24,708
13
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
  24,579
14
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
  24,309
15
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
  23,172
16
Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, Okla.
  21,963
17
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
  20,603
18
Jesse Clark, Portales, N.M.
  18,871
19
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
  17,180
20
Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas
  17,008
Steer Roping
1
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
$37,566
2
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
  33,329
3
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
  29,877
4
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
  22,407
5
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
  22,075
6
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
  20,267
7
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
  20,061
8
Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas
  15,883
9
Will Gasperson, Decatur, Texas
  15,816
10
Brodie Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla.
  15,281
11
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
  13,609
12
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
  12,489
13
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
  12,429
14
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
  12,373
15
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
  11,360
16
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
  10,995
17
Chad Mathis, Morristown, Ariz.
  10,256
18
Jim Locke, Miami, Texas
   9,866
19
Ralph Williams, Skiatook, Okla.
   9,651
20
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
   8,686
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$122,041
2
Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont.
83,984
3
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
60,007
4
Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla.
57,241
5
Dustin Boquet, Bourg, La.
54,607
6
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
49,687
7
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
47,626
8
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
45,764
9
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
41,155
10
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
37,079
11
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
33,597
12
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
31,514
13
Chase Dougherty, Canby, Ore.
30,948
14
Lane Nobles, Gatesville, Texas
30,541
15
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
30,240
16
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
27,767
17
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
25,325
18
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
23,533
19
Jordan Hansen, Ponoka, Alberta
22,741
20
Koby Radley, Montpelier, La.
22,386
*2018 Barrel Racing (April 23, 2018)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
$85,332
2
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
  71,666
3
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
  71,186
4
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
  68,657
5
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
  55,834
6
Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas
  43,120
7
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
  41,464
8
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
  40,309
9
Kylie Weast, Comanche, Okla.
  37,008
10
Tiana Schuster, Krum, Texas
  35,316
11
Christine Laughlin, Pueblo, Colo.
  35,231
12
Kelly Bruner, Millsap, Texas
  33,899
13
Jessi Fish, Franklin, Tenn.
  32,392
14
Shelly Anzick, Shepard, Mont.
  28,372
15
Jessica Telford, Caldwell, Idaho
  25,281
16
Carman Pozzobon, Aldergrove, British Columbia
  24,822
17
Jessica Routier, Buffalo, S.D.
  23,647
18
Ericka Nelson, Century, Fla.
  23,125
19
Lucinda Rose, Willard, Mo.
  22,357
20
Nikki Hansen, Dickinson, N.D.
  22,188
7. 2018 Wrangler ProRodeo Tour Standings
Unofficial through April 23, 2018
Bareback Riding
1
Tilden Hooper, Carthage, Texas
210
2
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
185
3
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
175
4
Zack Brown, Red Bluff, Calif.
130
5
Mason Clements, Springville, Utah
106
6
Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho
95
7
Jamie Howlett, Weatherford, Texas
80
8
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
56
9
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
55
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
55
11
Jessy Davis, Power, Mont.
35
12
Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah
30
Seth Hardwick, Ranchester, Wyo.
30
14
Morgan Wilde, McCammon, Idaho
20
15
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
10
16
Kash Wilson, Gooding, Idaho
6
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
6
Kyle Charley, Lukachukai, Ariz.
6
Steer Wrestling
1
Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, Mont.
335
2
Aaron Vosler, Cheyenne, Wyo.
260
3
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
170
Chase Black, Coalville, Utah
170
5
Newt Novich, Twin Bridges, Mont.
150
6
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
125
7
Dirk Tavenner, Rigby, Idaho
105
8
Jesse Brown, Baker City, Ore.
95
9
J.D. Struxness, Milan, Minn.
80
10
John Franzen, Riverton, Wyo.
75
11
Michael Bates Jr., Mexican Springs, N.M.
70
Kody Dollery, Caldwell, Texas
70
13
Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif.
60
14
Stan Branco, Chowchilla, Calif.
55
15
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
50
16
Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis.
40
Timmy Sparing, Helena, Mont.
40
18
Brad McGilchrist, Marysville, Calif.
35
Coltin Hill, Blackfoot, Idaho
35
20
Tommy Cook, Coupland, Texas
30
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
30
22
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
20
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
20
Harley Cole, Okotoks, Alberta
20
Tucker Allen, Oak View, Calif.
20
Team Roping-Header
1
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
235
2
Andrew Ward, Edmond, Okla.
230
3
Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C.
225
4
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
205
5
Joshua Torres, Ocala, Fla.
180
6
Kaleb Driggers, Hoboken, Ga.
160
7
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
155
8
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
150
Spencer Mitchell, Orange Cove, Calif.
150
10
Brandon Beers, Powell Butte, Ore.
120
11
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
115
12
Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta
85
13
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
80
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
80
Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, Okla.
80
J.B. James Jr., Bennett, Colo.
80
17
C.J. DeForest Jr.., Wheatland, Calif.
70
18
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
60
Victor Ugalde, Orovada, Nev.
60
20
Jake Orman, Prairie, Miss.
55
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
55
22
Brock Hanson, Casa Grande, Ariz.
45
23
Ryan Reed, Modesto, Calif.
40
Trey Blackmore, Hillside, Ariz.
40
25
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
30
Brenten Hall, Jay, Okla.
30
Team Roping-Heeler
1
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
235
2
Reagan Ward, Edmond, Okla.
230
3
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
225
4
Cody Cowden, Atwater, Calif.
205
5
Jonathan Torres, Ocala, Fla.
180
6
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
160
7
Bronc Boehnlein, Riverside, Calif.
155
8
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
150
9
Daniel Braman IV, Victoria, Texas
120
10
Patrick Smith, Lipan, Texas
115
11
Jason Duby, Klamath Falls, Ore.
110
12
Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta
85
13
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
80
Cesar de la Cruz, Tucson, Ariz.
80
Clint Summers, Lake City, Fla.
80
James Arnold, Midway, Texas
80
17
Andy Holcomb, San Juan Batista, Calif.
70
18
Walt Woodard, Stephenville, Texas
60
Caleb Twisselman, Santa Margarita, Calif.
60
20
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
55
Will Woodfin, Marshall, Texas
55
22
Ryan Motes, Weatherford, Texas
45
23
Clay O’Brien Cooper, Gardnerville, Nev.
40
Matt Costa, Turlock, Calif.
40
Dalton Pearce, San Luis Obispo, Calif.
40
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah
210
2
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
175
3
Wyatt Casper, Pampa, Texas
133.33
4
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
130
5
Tyrel Larsen, Weatherford, Okla.
90
6
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
83.33
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
83.33
8
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
65
Mitch Pollock, Winnemucca, Nev.
65
10
Cody Wright, Milford, Utah
50
Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah
50
Jade Blackwell, Rapid City, S.D.
50
13
Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D.
40
14
Alex Wright, Milford, Utah
25
15
Louie Brunson, New Underwood, S.D.
20
Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa
20
Tie Down Roping
1
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
205
2
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
180
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
180
4
Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, Okla.
175
5
Stetson Vest, Childress, Texas
130
6
Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas
125
7
Taylor Santos, Creston, Calif.
105
8
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
100
9
Adam Gray, Seymour, Texas
90
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
90
11
Ty Baker, Van Horn, Texas
85
12
Trent Creager, Stillwater, Okla.
80
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
80
14
J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah
70
Bo Pickett, Caldwell, Idaho
70
16
Reese Riemer, Stinnett, Texas
65
17
Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas
60
18
Fred Whitfield, Hockley, Texas
50
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
50
Cody McCartney, Ottawa Lake, Mich.
50
21
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
40
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
40
23
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
30
24
Colton Farquer, Oakdale, Calif.
25
25
Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas
20
Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, Wash.
20
Bull Riding
1
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
390
2
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
150
3
Chris Roundy, Panguitch, Utah
130
4
Shad Heiner, Morgan, Utah
100
Jesse Petri, Athens, Texas
100
6
Jordan Hansen, Ponoka, Alberta
75
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
75
8
J.W. Harris, Goldthwaite, Texas
60
9
Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah
50
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
50
Dave Mason, Burnet, Texas
50
12
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
30
13
Rylan Wright, Midway, Utah
20
14
Aaron Williams, Pismo Beach, Calif.
10
8. 2018 Xtreme Bulls standings
Unofficial through April 23, 2018
 
1
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
$32,388
2
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
  31,211
3
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
  27,413
4
Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla.
  21,285
5
Lane Nobles, Gatesville, Texas
  21,264
6
Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont.
  14,510
7
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
  13,334
8
Riker Carter, Stone, Idaho
  13,172
9
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
  11,882
10
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
   9,926
11
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
   9,016
12
Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M.
   9,000
13
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
   7,991
14
Nate Perry, Elk City, Okla.
   7,730
15
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
   7,649
16
Jordan Hansen, Ponoka, Alberta
   7,646
17
Fulton Rutland, Stilwell, Okla.
   7,616
18
Dustin Boquet, Bourg, La.
   7,519
19
Koby Radley, Montpelier, La.
   7,021
20
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
   6,869
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☛ AQHA Changes at 2018 Convention

Posted by on Apr 24, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AQHA members/board approved bylaw/registration changes at Convention

Nine registration-related items approved by AQHA members and Board

 

Press release from AQHA
April 24, 2018

As a reminder, AQHA and The American Quarter Horse Journal are the official source for all Association news.

Modifications to AQHA bylaws, as well as nine registration-related items, were approved by AQHA members and the AQHA Board of Directors at the 2018 AQHA Convention, March 2-5 in Jacksonville, Florida. Per the Association’s bylaws, the board of directors has the final authority when it comes to AQHA’s bylaws and rules of registration. Rule-change recommendations from all of the other standing committees were reviewed and approved by the board of directors. Those recommendations go to the AQHA Executive Committee for review, modification and/or approval at its April meeting.

Nominations and Credentials Committee

Four bylaw changes were considered by the AQHA Nominations and Credentials Committee at the 2018 convention. Here are the committee’s recommendations that were approved by AQHA Board of Directors:

  • To deny proposals to modify Article III of the Bylaws to (a) create a 10-year term limit for elected directors, international directors and appointed international directors and (b) create a new category of directors (directors cum laude). Instead, a group consisting of the members of the Nominations and Credentials Committee at the 2018 convention shall study Article III for purposes of recommending potential solutions to address AQHA’s growing board size and accessibility to new candidates. Such group shall report its initial solutions to AQHA by August 1, 2018. The group’s final recommended solutions, if any, shall be placed on the Nominations and Credentials agenda for the 2019 AQHA Convention.
  • To approve recommendation to modify Bylaw Article III Sections 1(c)(d)&(f) to require all directors with voting privileges to timely submit their Year-End Directors Survey and IRS Form 990 Board of Directors Annual Reporting Questionnaire, failing which they shall be automatically removed from the board (if they are an elected director or international director) or lose their voting privileges (if they are a director emeritus, director-at-large or honorary vice president).
  • To approve adding a new provision to Bylaw Article III Sections 1(c)(d)&(f) specifying that directors emeritus, directors-at-large and honorary vice presidents do not have to serve on an AQHA standing committee if they so choose.
  • To approve request to modify Bylaw Article III Section 1(f) to rename the international district “Oceana and Others” to “Australasia-Africa.”

Stud Book and Registration Committee
The following Stud Book and Registration Committee agenda item approvals were adopted by AQHA Board of Directors:

  • To approve the Executive Committee developing a business plan to move forward with microchip identification implementation.
  • To approve task force’s recommendation that the rules not be changed to allow the registration of offspring resulting from the breeding of an Appendix to Appendix.
  • To approve member’s request to amend REG102 as follows: In regard to involuntary transfers pertaining to an unregistered horse, including, but not limited to court judgment, stableman’s lien or security interest foreclosure, AQHA may accept the signature of the interested party or stableman on a foal application for registration in lieu of the record mare owner at time of foaling and on a transfer report if: (1) the interested party had possession of the unregistered horse and its dam at time of foaling, (2) the judgment or foreclosure was made against the owner as reflected on AQHA records, (3) the stallion owner at time of breeding provides a breeder’s certificate, (4) the foal is parentage-verified through DNA testing, (5) all other registration requirements are satisfied, and (6) the interested party signs an indemnity waiver releasing AQHA from all future claims pertaining to the horse. In the event an interested party did not have possession of the mare and foal at time of foaling, the interested party will need to provide a court judgment as evidence of ownership being awarded to the interested party. AQHA may accept the signature of the party awarded ownership by the court on a foal application for registration in lieu of the recorded mare owner at time of foaling and on a transfer report so long as: (1) the judgment explicitly identifies the horse, (2) the judgment was against the owner reflected on AQHA records for the mare at time of foaling, (3) the stallion owner provides a breeder’s certificate, (4) the foal is parentage-verified through DNA testing, (5) all other registration requirements are satisfied, and (6) the interested party signs an indemnity waiver releasing AQHA from all future claims pertaining to the horse.
  • To approve the Executive Committee creating a task force to evaluate criteria for inclusion of additional tests in the genetic panel test.
  • To approve the recommended changes to REG102.3 and REG110.5 with regard to listing a Thoroughbred on AQHA records since The Jockey Club is eliminating printed certificates beginning with the 2018 foal crop. (Previously, AQHA rules required a photocopy of the Thoroughbred’s registration certificate when registering a foal by or out of that Thoroughbred.)
  • To approve the recommended changes to REG112 to clarify the requirements for oocyte and embryo permits, while also approving the concept of allowing a stallion owner to sign an embryo permit application without releasing the breeder’s certificate.
  • To approve the recommended changes/deletions to rules REG108.2 and REG108.3 so as make them consistent with rules that require all mares and stallions to be DNA-typed before foals can be registered.
  • To approve removing REG108.4 since all breeding stallions are now required to have a genetic panel test on file with AQHA.
  • To approve adding REG109.8.7 as follows: For determining the above defined marking limitations, an inspection of a horse, including a horse in a standing position, may be conducted from any angle or distance from the horse, and the person conducting the inspection may be in a standing, crouching or any other position.

What happens to the board of directors’ recommendations after convention?

After convention, the board of directors’ recommendations (except changes to AQHA’s bylaws and rules of registration) then go to the AQHA Executive Committee to consider during its April meeting. The Executive Committee can approve, modify, table, deny or send a recommendation back for consideration at the next year’s convention. There are various reasons for the Executive Committee’s decisions – feasibility of implementing, programming conflicts, budget and many other reasons are taken into consideration.

Watch the video or read moreabout AQHA’s rule-change process.

As a reminder, AQHA and The American Quarter Horse Journalare the official source for all Association news. Any updates or rule changes will be posted after the April Executive Committee meeting.

For more information on convention, visit www.aqha.com/convention.

AQHA News and information is a service of the American Quarter Horse Association. For more news and information, follow @AQHAnews on Twitter and visit www.aqha.com/news.

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☛ NRBC/NCHA hold major events

Posted by on Apr 23, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TWO MAJOR VENUES AND EVENTS HOLD FINALS 

 

NCHA SUPER STAKES AND NATIONAL REINING BREEDERS CLASSIC CROWN CHAMPIONS

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 23, 2018

Duane Latimer

Two major performance events culminated on Sunday, April 22, with the finalists lining their pockets with cash.

 

Duane Latimer cashed in for the most dough by winning the Level 4 Open Finals and the Open Prime Time Finals in the National Reining Breeders Classic (NRBC) held April 15-22 at the Great Southwest Equestrian Center in Katy, Texas. Latimer won a total of $76,950 from the event after winning the Level 4 Open for $75,000 with a 228 score as well as taking the Prime Time title riding Modern Gun (Gunners Special Nite x Taris Modern Design x Mr Boomerjac), owned by MS Stables.

Kobie Wood, Stephenville, Texas, took home $69,076 for the championship of the National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) Open Super Stakes held March 29 through April 22 at the Will Rogers Equestrian Center, Fort Worth, Texas. Riding Cool N Hot (Hottish x Donas Cool Cat x High Brow Cat) owned by his wife Paula, the pair scored a whopping 227 points.

 

 

NATIONAL REINING BREEDERS CLASSIC:

This year’s win for Latimer was a first NRBC Classic Open title since 2000 when he won the title on Conquistador Whiz. Latimer had trained Modern Gun, nicknamed “Mickey” since he was a 2-year-old.

“He was dialed in really, really good today. I was really happy,” said Latimer following the beautiful palomino’s winning run.

The Reserve title was split between Andrea Fappani, riding Epic Titan (Colonels Smoking Gun x Princess In Diamonds) owned by Clinton Anderson, and Pedro Baiao, riding Smokesgottachicolena (Spooks Gotta  Gun x Braz Us), owned by Michael Garnett, with each marking a 225.5. Each went home with a $41,000 paycheck.

 

Fappani also finished ninth, scoring a 222 on Ifwhizwereguns (Spooks Gotta Gun x Ifwhizsweredollars) owned by Rancho Oso Rio, collecting an additional $15,000 for a grand total of $56,000.

 

Pedro Baiao and Spookesgottachicolena also won the Level 3 finals, taking home an additional $20,782.26, for a total of $61,782.86. Baio’s finals score of 225.5 was the highest of his career.

 

The Level 2 Championship was won by Ricky Nicolazzi riding Spooks Show Time (Spooks Gotta Whiz x Dolittle Lena x Shining Spark) to a 219 score and an $8,128 paycheck. The 5-year-old gelding is also owned by Rancho Oso Rio.

 

There was a three-way tie in the Level 1 Open shared by Benny Maddox, Chris Dawson and Gabril Borges, with each scoring a 218 to earn $2,103.  Maddox’s win on Thebettertohearuwith (Spooks Gotta Whiz x Chex Out The Cowgirl x Lean With Me) owned by Bill Coburn, it was his first major championship.

 

Dawson rode Shiney Outlaw (Shiners Nickle x Mereyda x Dual Rey) owned by Michelle Canon. He previously took the 6-year-old stallion to the 2017 AQHA Junior Working Cow Horse World Championship.

 

Borges rode Checksworth (Big Chex To Cash x Banjoes Shining Star x Shining Spark) to the 2017 tulsa Reining Classic Futurity Level 2 Open Co-Championship The 4-year-old mare is owned by Terry Leffew. For full results go to NRBC.com.

NRBC Open Classic Finals Results

 

NCHA SUPER STAKES:

Kobie Wood, Stephenville, Texas, is a five-time NCHA Open World Champion; however, he was experiencing his first NCHA Triple Crown (Futurity, Super Stakes,  Summer Spectacular) win when he scored 227 points in the finals of the Open Super Stakes riding Cool N Hot by Hottish, one of the hottest new sire in the cutting horse industry, out of Donas Cool Cat sired by High Brow Cat. Owned and also shown by Kobie’s wife, Paula, Cool N Hot picked up $69,076 for their Open win at the Super Stakes; however, Paula and Cool N Hot were also finalists in the Super Stakes Non-Pro Finals, winning an additional $13,337 for total earnings of $82,413 for the show. Donas Cool Cat currently has lifetime earnings of $189,284.

 

Kobie is also, an NCHA Horse of the Year rider and 1993 NCHA Hall of Fame Rider inductee. He earned his first Triple Crown championship in the 1988 NCHA Classic aboard Cash Quixote Rio, a horse that Wood also showed to two NCHA Open World Championship wins.

 

The Reserve title in the Super Stakes and $60,476 paycheck went to Rollz Royce (Dual Smart Rey x Show Biz Kitty), owned by Thomas Guinn, Philadelphia, Miss., ridden by NCHA Hall of Fame rider Beau Galyean to a 222.5. Prior to the Super Stakes, the pair won $51,975 in aged events. Beau has lifetime earnings of close to $3.4 million.
NCHA Super Stakes Open finals

 

But the Open Division of the Super Stakes and Super Stakes Classic were very profitable to the Galyean family, as Beau also rode Stevie Rey Von (Metallic Cat x Miss Ella Rey) owned by the Fults Ranch, Amarillo, Texas, to the Open title in the Super Stakes Classic for a $26,216 paycheck.

 

In the Super Stakes, Beau’s brother Wesley tied for 4/5 riding Duramax Dually with a 219, taking home $44,381 and his father, Jody, also took home $14,642 riding Desiresomemettalic, owned by Beau and his wife Ashley. In fact, the Galyean family and had total winnings of $119,499 from the Open Super Stakes and Super Stakes Classic.

NCHA Super Stakes Classic Open Finals

The Non-Pro Division of the Super Stakes was split between Chad Bushaw, Weatherford, Texas, riding Bittersweet (Metallic Cat x Miss Sea Rey x Dual Rey) and Megan Miller, Poolville, Texas, riding Carolena Reyn (Dual Smart Rey x Carolena Moon), with both winning $36,319 for their 222 score.

 

This is the second time Bushaw has shared the NCHA Super Stakes Non-Pro title. In 2008, he rode Cats Ruby to a 222-point tie for the championship with Paula Wood on Cash My Boon. He also won the 2012 NCHA Derby on Bet On A Cat. Bushaw ranks third among all-time top NCHA Non-Pro money earners, also won the 2001 NCHA Futurity Non-Pro aboard Jerryoes, the 2008 NCHA Super Stakes Non-Pro with Cats Ruby and the 2012 NCHA Derby on Bet On A Cat.

 

Megan Miller, an NCHA Non-Pro Hall of Fame Inductee and the earner of $1,021,452 won the 2009 NCHA Super Stakes Non-Pro with Itawtathenapuddycat and the 2009 NCHA Super Stakes Classic Non-Pro on Travs Scooter. She also finished fourth in this year’s Non-Pro Super Stakes with a 216 score riding Hey Boo Boo (Dual Smart Rey x Travs Scooter), taking home a total of $62,581.

NCHA Super Stakes NP finals

The NCHA Super Stakes Classic Non-Pro Champion was Steve Anderson, Victoria, Texas, riding Littlemak (Starlights Gypsy x Justa Swinging Gal) to a 224, collecting a $16,999 paycheck. The Reserve title went to Alexa Stent, Gardnerville, Nev., riding Bowmerang (High Brow Cat x Bowmans Little Jewel), to a 223.5 and collecting $15,480.

NCHA Super Stakes Classic NP Finals

For full results go to nchacutting.com

 

 

 

 

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☛ AQHA Amateur Ranch Riding World Champ disqualified for drug violations

Posted by on Apr 20, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AQHA 2017 AMATEUR RANCH RIDING WORLD CHAMPION SARAH MCKIBBEN DISQUALIFIED FOR DRUG VIOLATION

 

SHE AND HUSBAND MOZAUN MCKIBBEN SUSPENDED AND FINED FOR DRUG VIOLATIONS AT AQHA WORLD SHOW

 

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 20, 2018

Mozaun McKibben

Following a recent meeting of the AQHA Executive Committee, it was announced that disciplinary action had been taken against Mozaun McKibben and his wife Sarah, as a result of four horses testing positive for Guanabenz at the 2017 Lucas Oil AQHA World Championship Show held Nov. 2-18 in Oklahoma City. Guanabenz is a depressant of the cardiovascular system and is a forbidden drug per AQHA Rule VIO401.2. At the World Show, each world champion is drug tested and additional horses are tested based on random drawings that are selected months before each event.

 

Mozaun McKibben, 53, from Cooke County, Texas, was suspended from membership in the AQHA for 18 months, on probation for five years after his suspension, fined $10,000, and evocation of his status as an AQHA Professional Horseman, when four horses he owned, trained and/or exhibited were found positive for drugs during the 2017 AQHA World Show, held Nov. 2-18, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla.

 

McKibben’s wife Sarah, who was named the 2017 AQHA Amateur Ranch Riding L3 Champion, was stripped of her title and also suspended from the AQHA for 12 months, fined $3,000 and put on probation for five years following the end of her 12-month suspension.

2-AQHA: AQHA Disciplinary Actions

 

Ironically, the disciplinary action was taken less than a year after Mozaun was booked on June 28, 2017 for Burglary of Habitation, after which he bonded out with a $5,000 bond. Other court records show that he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor in 1998.

3-Mozaun Arrest – Cooke County, TX

4-Click for Penalties for burglary>> 

5-McKibben History

 

THE HORSES INVOLVED:

Samples were taken from the following horses following their classes with positive drug tests being returned on His Royal Cat and Wimpy Tejano, shown in the Jr. Ranch Riding L3 Preliminaries on Nov. 4, with Mozaun McKibben being the responsible party, as the owner, trainer and exhibitor; Wimpys Shining Jac, in the Senior Ranch Riding L3 Finals, Nov. 6, with Mozaun McKibben as trainer and exhibitor and Chex Are Cashin shown Nov. 7 in the Amateur Ranch Riding L3 Finals, with Mozaun McKibben as trainer and Sarah McKibben as the rider.

 

Sarah McKibben was also the responsible party at the time in question for His Royal Cat (as owner), Wimpys Shining Jac (as owner) and Chex Are Cashin (as owner and exhibitor)

 

AQHA RECORDS ADJUSTED:

AQHA has stated they have adjusted its records to reflect the above disqualifications and is notifying those exhibitors whose horses moved up in the placings as a result of such disqualifications. Notification to associations who afford reciprocity to AQHA medication disciplinary has been taken.

 

However, I have been told that within a few days of Chex Are Cashin’s stripped title, he was sold for well over $100,000.

 

DRUG-TESTING PROTOCALS:

While writing this article, I reached out to Rick Dennis, who has done drug testing for many Fortune 500 companies and has lectured before Congressional sub-committee in Washington D.C. on drugs of abuse in the private sector. He has also co-owned a drug-testing company.

 

Rick, who has written many legal as well as interesting horse articles for AllAboutCutting.com, responded to me with an article entitled “Drug Testing Protocols.”

 

Rick’s conclusion to the drug problem is that a company or an association should implement a “Split Sample Collection and Testing” process which is the fairest system ever devised. It not only affords the requiring agency of the assurance that the test results are accurate as well as affording the donor every legal opportunity to challenge the positive test results prior to receiving disciplinary action in lieu of a positive test result. It also insulates the requiring agency against liability and defamation lawsuits due to a positive test result and any disciplinary action imposed thereafter. Following is his article:

BACKGROUND:

The Managing Member of the WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC – Richard E. “Rick” Dennis has been an entrepreneur in the private security sector since January 28, 1984. Rick’s been involved in the private sector employee drug and alcohol testing industry ever since its inception, in 1987.  His expertise in the drug testing field is expansive and includes: Being one of the owners and operators of the first employee drug testing laboratory in Louisiana – “Certified Lab, Inc.”

 

Also, Rick’s written drug and alcohol testing policies for Fortune 500 Companies such as: Exxon Company, USA, Mobile Oil Company, Campbell Soup, Kerr McGee Corporation, Dupont, Marathon Oil Company, and Atlantic Richfield to name a few. Further, Rick’s lectured before a Congressional sub-committee in Washington D.C. on drugs of abuse in the private sector.

 

According to Rick, in 1987 the Federal Government initiated designing drug and alcohol testing protocols for Federal Workplace Drug testing of specific Department of Transportation worker categories, (e.g. – Department of Aviation, Federal Highway Administration, Oil & Gas Transmission Pipelines, and the Marine Industry, etc.  Hearings were held on the design and implementation of the new Federal Drug and Alcohol Testing rules and regulations and each specific category was published in the Federal Register.

 

SPECIMEN COLLECTION PROTOCOLS – DRUGS OF ABUSE: Urine Specimens were initially selected for drugs of abuse testing, due to the fact urine samples were determined to be a better conductor for drug testing results versus blood samples.  However, this protocol was expanded to include blood, saliva, and hair testing. Essentially, the protocols included a format for the collection of the specimen, the design of a chain of custody form to track the collection, shipping, transportation, testing, and storage of the collected specimen.

 

LABORATORY TESTING PROTOCOLS: 

 The National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) designed the laboratory certification and testing standards for testing and confirmation of submitted samples, as well as initial and confirmation testing levels, classifications of drugs tested for, testing procedures, and requirements.  Two positive laboratory tests are required in order to report a specimen sample as being positive for prohibitive drug(s), (e.g. an initial positive test result has to be confirmed by a positive confirmation test result).

 

SPLIT-SAMPLE COLLECTION: 

 In order for the testing procedures and subsequent results thereafter to be certified and authenticated, NIDA designed and implemented the “Split Sample Collection and Analysis Process” whereby two samples were made using one specimen collection.  Sample (A) and Sample (B) couldn’t be made using two separate collections.  Sample (A) would be the primary sample for initial analysis and confirmation, and sample (B) would be frozen and used in the event of a donor challenge to the positive result of Sample (A).

 

In the event of a donor challenge to the positive test result of Sample (A), the donor is afforded the opportunity to challenge the positive test result of Sample (A) at another testing laboratory by testing Sample (B). However, the NIDA retesting protocols specifically states the second testing laboratory must meet “the same laboratory testing standards and certifications as the initial testing laboratory”. 

 

Further, a “Chain-Of-Custody” log must be completed relative to the transportation, analysis, storage, and certification of Sample (B).  In the event the two sample results are positive, then the sample is deemed positive.  In the event there are two conflicting sample results, (e.g., one positive and one negative), a negative test result is afforded to the benefit of the donor due to conflicting results.

 

MEDICAL REVIEW OFFICER:

 Federal 49,CFR, Part 40 requirements include a Medical Review Officer as a liaison between the testing laboratory and the donor.  The duty of the Medical Review Officer is to certify that all sample collection, transportation, storage, testing, and test result communications have been adhered to.  The Medical Review Officers other duties includes monitoring and ordering the testing of Sample (B) in the event of a donor challenge.

 

CONCLUSION:

 It’s Rick’s opinion, that the Split-Sample Collection and Testing process is the fairest system ever devised.  It affords the requiring agency of the assurance that the test results are accurate, as well as affording the donor every legal opportunity to challenge the positive test results prior to receiving disciplinary action in lieu of a positive test result.  Also, the split sample specimen collection and analysis procedure insulates the requiring agency against liability and defamation lawsuits due to a positive test result and any disciplinary action imposed thereafter.

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☛ ProRodeo Hall of Fame announces induction class

Posted by on Apr 19, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

ProRodeo Hall of Fame announces 2018 induction class

 

Press release courtesy PRCA
April 29, 2018 

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Team roping stars Speed Williams and Rich Skelton had no equals from 1997-2004, as each won eight consecutive PRCA world championships.

Now, the duo will be immortalized in rodeo history.

Williams and Skelton headline the 10-member 2018 induction class for the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. The ceremony takes place Aug. 4 at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Williams and Skelton join gold buckle-winner Deb Greenough (bareback riding, 1993), contract personnel recipient Leon Coffee, stock contractor Billy Minick, rodeo notable Walt Garrison and the committee for the Black Hills Roundup in Belle Fourche, S.D., as the PRCA inductees.

For the second time in the history of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame – 2017 being the first – barrel racers from the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) will be among the class of inductees, and their class includes Kristie Peterson, Billie McBride and a WPRA equine inductee, French Flash Hawk (Bozo).

In addition to the 10 inductees, former PRCA Chief Operating Officer Kay Bleakly will receive the Ken Stemler Pioneer Award, which honors individuals in recognition of their groundbreaking, innovative ideas and forward thinking.

 

Williams and Skelton were the pinnacle of team roping for nearly a decade.

“I remember going to the high school finals and stopping in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame and I was blown away with the history of ProRodeo,” Williams said. “It’s a great honor to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Rich and I had a fairytale career and words don’t really describe how I’m feeling.”

Skelton also was taken aback to receive this prestigious honor.

“This is cool, and I don’t know when this will sink in,” said Skelton, who still competes on the PRCA circuit. “I wanted to make the NFR and I wanted to win the world, and then things just kept going our way. When you look back at it, we had good horses, and everything was set up at that time and that’s all we thought about and that’s all we did was rope. To me, we had so much success because Speed changed the heading and started roping fast and I just tried to be consistent.”

Williams qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo 15 times (1988, 1994, 1996-2008), and Skelton has 22 NFR qualifications on his résumé (1990-2006, 2009-10, 2013-15).

“I don’t think there was any secret to our success,” Williams said. “We came together at the same time and we had the same desires and we wanted to rodeo and that’s what we did every day, but I never even dreamed that we would win eight gold buckles in a row.”

 

Peterson, a four-time world champion, and her great horse French Flash Hawk, better known as Bozo, will fittingly go into the Hall together. Following on the heels of Charmayne James and her great horse, Scamper, it was Peterson and Bozo that ended James’ streak of 10 straight world titles, capturing their first of four world titles in 1994.

Although Peterson and Bozo were not successful in defending their title in 1995, the duo would return to the top of the sport in 1996 and then win three straight.

“How wonderful … that is just awesome,” Peterson said upon learning the news of the induction honor. “I feel very honored and humbled. To go in with Bozo is definitely the carrot on top. I am just speechless.”

When asked how it felt to follow James and Scamper, both in the arena and now into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, Peterson simply said, “Being in the shadow of Scamper is a great place to be.”

 

McBride joins Peterson and Bozo in the Hall as another four-time WPRA champion. She will be inducted posthumously having passed away at the age of 90 on May 10, 2017.

McBride first saw barrel racing at an open rodeo event in 1937 and decided at 10 years old that it was the path she wanted to travel. McBride was a charter member of the Girls Rodeo Association (GRA), formed in her hometown of San Angelo, Texas, just over a decade later.

“She would be overwhelmed and thrilled,” said Alva Jean Meek, McBride’s daughter. “We are approaching the one-year anniversary since we lost her, but this news would have made her ecstatic. The GRA was a big part of her life, and she put her heart and soul into the earlier association.”

 

Greenough, 54, qualified for the National Finals Rodeo 13 consecutive years (1988-2000), tied with Joe Alexander for the fifth-most overall NFR qualifications in PRCA history. His 15 career NFR go-round wins at the NFR is also fifth most in his event. Greenough won a bareback riding world title in 1993 and a NFR average title in 1992.

Greenough was also known for his success within the Montana Circuit, where he went on to win five circuit titles. Greenough remains tied for the most National Circuit Finals Rodeo wins among all bareback riders with three career wins, in 1995-96 and 1999.

 

Coffee cried tears of joy when he found out he was selected for induction into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

“It kind of brought me to the milk right there, it brought tears to my eyes, that’s an old cowboy phrase for it made you cry,” Coffee said. “To know that my heroes, my friends and heroes, who are in there, and I’m in there with them – that’s just something I dreamed of. I’m just tickled to death to be in there and say, ‘Yes, I am in the PRCA Hall of Fame.’ It’s pretty wild.”

As a PRCA Gold Card Member and NFR barrelman, Coffee has enjoyed a long and lively career in ProRodeo as one of only three cowboys to be both a barrelman and a bullfighter at the NFR.

Since 1973, this Texas cowboy has fought bulls at the NFR twice (1979, 1984) and was a barrelman at the NFR in 1991, 1994 and 1997. Coffee also won PRCA Clown of the Year and was in the Top 3 every year from 1984-2001.

“I enjoy putting smiles on faces, and my motto of life is God put me on Earth to do two things – make people happy and help people out, and I can do both in the arena,” Coffee said.

Coffee also worked at the first National Circuit Finals Rodeo in 1987, the Texas Circuit Finals Rodeo (1980-82, 1992, 1996-97, 2003-04) and the Canadian Finals Rodeo twice (1985-86).

He was featured in many movies, including “8 Seconds” and “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys.”

 

Garrison was two different types of cowboy, a fullback with the Dallas Cowboys and a ProRodeo competitor. He went on to combine his stardom with football and rodeo to raise more than $4 million for multiple sclerosis with his Walt Garrison All Star Rodeos over the course of 20 years.

“I think that dad played football as a career, but he got really fortunate when he retired from the NFL and Copenhagen/Skoal hired him to be a spokesperson,” said Walt Garrison’s oldest son, Marty.

The Texas cowboy was instrumental in the U.S. Smokeless Tobacco and Winston sponsorships in ProRodeo and the programs those sponsors provided – such as the Winston Scoreboard, sponsorships for individual cowboys and helping college rodeo athletes get scholarships.

“His first love was rodeo, no doubt, ever since he was really young,” Marty Garrison said. “That’s what he would have done had he not played football in college and then got drafted by the Dallas Cowboys. His whole life, his love was rodeo.”

 

Minick was short on words when he received the phone call that he was being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, only because he hadn’t had time to process his new place in immortality.

“It took my breath away at first,” said the 79-year-old Minick. “I got a few tears. To be among those guys, even the past and the present and future cowboys, it’s kind of like that famous old quote that’s been said by all the cowboys, and even in song. ‘All I ever wanted to be was a cowboy.'”

Minick, born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas, began his professional rodeo career in 1959, enlisting in the Rodeo Cowboys Association after winning titles both in high school and college. Minick qualified for the National Finals Rodeo as a bull rider in 1966. In 1968, Minick purchased the Harry Knight Rodeo Company from Knight and legendary entertainer Gene Autry.

The Billy Minick Rodeo Company eventually produced top NFR bucking stock, including the bucking horse Streamer in 1972 and the bull Tiger in 1973. Tiger would also win Bull of the Year in 1974.

Through the years, Minick helped to produce such rodeos as the Fort Worth (Texas) Stock Show and Rodeo, Rodeo Houston, the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo, the Santa Rosa Roundup (Vernon, Texas), Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days, and many more.

 

This summer marks a historic year for the Black Hills Roundup in Belle Fourche, S.D. Not only can the rodeo now boast being an inductee to the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, but this year will also be its 99th annual competition.

The Black Hills Roundup started when 15,000 people gathered in a field in Belle Fourche to raise money for World War I in 1918. At the time, the population of Belle Fourche was 1,410.

The next year marked the first time the rodeo took place.

“The board and committee put a lot of time and effort into it,” Black Hills Roundup Chairman Clay Crago said. “It’s pretty special to us to see the recognition and get into the Hall of Fame.”

The big number of people to attend continues today, with an estimated 10,000-15,000 attending a parade during rodeo week in the town of about 6,000.

The historic rodeo, which is 100 percent volunteer-run, also boasts that President Calvin Coolidge attended in 1927.

With the 2018 class included, the ProRodeo Hall of Fame will have enshrined 267 people, 34 animals and 29 rodeo committees.

 

The WPRA contributed to this release.

 

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☛ Secretary-Treasurer of Idaho Cutting Horse Ass’n found guilty of felony

Posted by on Apr 15, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 2 comments

SECRETARY-TREASURER OF IDAHO CUTTING HORSE ASSOCIATION FOUND GUILTY OF A FELONY.

 

DOLLY MARIE MARTIN ORDERED TO 6 YEARS OF SUPERVISED PROBATION AND TO REPAY ASSOCIATION $29,745.80

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 16, 2018

On April 9, 2018, Dolly Marie Martin, Bellevue, Idaho, the wife of NCHA Hall of Fame Rider Scott Martin, was found guilty of a felony and received a suspended sentence and was ordered to serve Supervised Probation, as well as repaying the Idaho Cutting Horse Association $29,745.80 that she stole from the association while she was Secretary-Treasurer.

 

According to an unnamed source, she was Secretary-Treasurer of the association for only 15 months. The association has two shows a year: a Limited Age Event and a weekend show in the spring and a Limited Age Event and Mercuria cutting in the fall.

 

“She had stolen the money “pretty quick,” said the unnamed source; however, it took almost two years to get her through the judicial system.”

 

Represented by her lawyer, Doug Nelson,Esq, of the Roark Law Firm, LLP, Hailey, Idaho, Dolly entered a plea of guilty of Grand Theft, a felony, on Jan. 12, 2018. She agreed to pay court costs of $245.50 and a fine of $5,000 (that was suspended). She agreed to pay all costs, fees and fines ordered by the court and was sentenced to a minimum period of confinement of 3 years, followed by an indeterminate period of custody for 5 years, with the total sentence not to exceed eight years. (The execution of the prison portion of the sentence was also suspended, although the costs and fine portion were not suspended.)

 

She was then placed on supervised probation for a period of 6 years, beginning April 9, 2018 under the control of the Idaho State Board of Correction, subject to abiding by the General Conditions of Probation.

 

She would be allowed time to pay the fines and restitution, with all of them needing to be paid before the end of her probation. She was allowed to set up a payment plan with her probation officer.

 

She would also serve 180 days in the county jail as a term and condition of probation; however, she would be granted a work release if she otherwise qualifies under the Sheriff’s classification system.

 

She was also ordered to serve up to 60 days of discretionary time at the discretion of her assigned probation officer, as a sanction for violating a term or condition of probation, subject to the requirements of IC.R 33(e). In no event may discretionary time be imposed or served that exceeds three (3) consecutive days.

 

She is also ordered to prepare an apology letter for the victim (Idaho Cutting Horse Association). The letter shall include an explanation of her actions and the ramifications of such actions.

 

The court also ordered a Judgment of Restitution to be entered in the sum of $29,745.80. A separate written Order of Restitution shall also be entered. The amount is payable though the Clerk of the District Court to be disbursed to the victim in the amount of $29,745.80.

 

Martin has 42 days from the date stamped by the Clerk of Court (April 11, 2018) to appeal the judgment. The Court also advised her that if she is unable to pay the costs of an appeal, she can apply for leave to appeal in forma pauperis, meaning the right as an indigent to proceed without liability for court costs and fees and the right to be represented by a court-appointed attorney at no cost to the defendant.

 

Martin must turn herself into the custody of the Sheriff of Blaine County, Idaho, by 5 p.m. on April 16, 2018 for service of the County Jail time ordered herein as a term and condition of probation.

Martin Judgment

Judgment of Conviction Order of Probation

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