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☛ NEWS FROM THE NCHA 11-9-18

Posted by on Nov 9, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NEWS FROM THE NCHA

 

NCHA SUSPENSION RULE CHANGED

Apparently something has transpired within the NCHA organization, which prompted them to assign a new rule change. Previously, while being suspended, an individual was allowed to sit in the stands by NCHA permission at an approved NCHA show. Today, the NCHA suspension Rule has been changed for any suspension issued after August 31, 2018.  This suspension would obviously follow that date.

An anonymous source has informed me that at the Disciplinary Committee hearing, they dismissed a complaint filed by Shona Dufurrena against individuals who filed a complaint against Ed and Brandon Dufurrena at a show in Whitesboro, Texas. The eight people were represented by Lew Stevens, Attorney at Law. The complaint filed by Shona Dufurrena alleged unsportsmanlike conduct against the eight individuals who filed the original complaint against Ed Dufurrena at the Whitesboro show while Ed was on suspension.

The new rule prohibits a suspended person from being anywhere near the show and be prohibited from the arena, loping pens, parking lot, exhibit hall or any other property that can be called “show grounds”.

The result on whether Dufurrena will be suspended for a violation of his existing suspension has not yet been released and I’m awaiting the decision of the Disciplinary Hearing Committee on the outcome of any further attachments in Ed and Brandon’s Dufurrena’s existing suspensions.

 

$100,000 BONUS MONEY PAYOUT CONTINUES AT 2018 NCHA FUTURITY

According to an NCHA press release, the $100,000 bonus money payout continuing at the 2018 NCHA Futurity. The North Texas Chevrolet Dealers and the Great American Insurance Group, will continue the bonus money payout for the 2018 NCHA’s World Championship Futurity.

This year the Amateur competitors will receive $40,000 to be divided between the Rios of Mercedes Boots Amateur Class and the McAlister Assets Unlimited Amateur Class; the Non-Pro Division will receive $16,000; the Limited Non-Pro will receive $4,000 and the Open will receive $40,000.

The bonus money will be distributed between the champions and reserve champions in each of the divisions.

This will be the 51styear for the NCHA Futurity to be held at the Will Rogers Coliseum. It will be held Nov. 15, 2018 and conclude on Sunday, Dec. 9, 2018.

 

MERCURIA WORLD FINALS & SALES:

The Mercuria NCHA World Finals will be held in conjunction with the Futurity and will feature the sport’s top older horses in 10 division scheduled from Nov. 23-Dec. 1. World Championship titles are on the line!

Also, the Western Bloodstock sales, held Dec. 3-8, will include close to 1,000 head of cutting horse prospects, seasoned show horses and breeding stock.

 

 

 

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☛ YIPPIE KA-YAY, THE RUSSIAN WAY-11-5-18

Posted by on Nov 5, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FEATURE ARTICLES, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

YIPPIE KA-YAY, THE RUSSIAN WAY

 By Rick Dennis
Information derived from The New York Times and Valuets Journal
Nov. 5, 2018

Quietly secluded in the Russian interior, amid Russia’s wilderness fabric is a seldom heard of but emerging new industry modeled after the United States economy and the cowboy way of life. That new industry is the Russian beef industry.

Russian Company Rustles Up Cowboys To Help Beef Up Demand For Steaks

The firm Miratorg is building an American-style beef steak industry from scratch. To make it work, it has to import everything from the cows, to the feed — right down to importing American cowboys. And now we have a story from Russia of a massive effort to import something that’s very, very American. Russia has lots of open land, which is good for grazing cattle, but steak remains something of a foreign idea. So one company is trying to single-handedly build a steak industry from scratch in Russia – importing American cows, importing American grass, saddles, horses, and even importing American cowboys.

 

Russians Learn the Ways of the Cowboy From American Ranch Hands

 VALUETS, Russia — A visibly tiring but stubborn Aberdeen Angus cow sank all of her four feet in the rich black mud of central Russia, refusing to budge. Try as they might, the two Russians yanking on the rope lassoed around her wide, wet neck could not pull that massive body out of the icy December slush.

 

The cowboys on this new Russian ranch here still have a few things to learn. And unlearn. In a throwback to the old Soviet way of doing things, while the two were trying to move the recalcitrant cow, four others were standing idly by shouting advice.

 

Watching the greenhorns from afar was Ashley Chester Corlett, one of 10 American trainers brought in by the ranch’s owner, the Miratorg company. It chose them over Brazilians and Australians in large part because of the similarity between the climate in Wyoming and central Russia, where temperatures can drop to 20 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (minus 29 Celsius).

“At first people always want to use pressure to handle the cattle and don’t realize how much like a predator they seem to the cow,” said Mr. Corlett, a thickset fourth-generation cowboy from Riverton, Wyo. “If you want to get the best out of that cow, you have to understand how it thinks. It opens so much understanding.”The aspiring cowboys also have to get used to working long days in harsh conditions, a concept that often seems novel to many of them.

 

“Working here is hard. Many people cannot stand it, especially the need to stay sober,” said Viktor P. Buivolov, who installed elevators in Moscow before becoming the manager of the ranch. “We even have a Breathalyzer here,” he said, navigating a Russian UAZ Patriot sport utility vehicle through a herd of cattle.

 

Agriculture all but disappeared from this and many other parts of Russia years ago, after the final screw was turned into scrap metal at the last surviving Soviet collective farms. But as oil prices have collapsed and Russia has imposed retaliatory sanctions against Western food products, reviving the economy with import substitution has become a priority for the Kremlin. President Vladimir V. Putin has said Russia has the potential to become a world leader in food production, and has set a goal of self-sufficiency by 2020.

 

Russian Cowboys Learn To Wrangle A Brand New Beef Industry

 As far as rodeos go, everything resembles an American rodeo, but the proceedings were just a little different. No swords here, but plenty of horses. And tons of people who came to watch. They brought signs and applauded their teams as they struggled to rope steers in the arena.

 

The Russian Rodeo embodied more than entertainment. It was a cacophonous celebration of a fledgling beef industry clawing its way into the Russian countryside. It was also part of a larger national goal to gain self-sufficiency with food production.

 

By copying the structure of Western beef operations, Miratorg skipped more steps. Miratorg is single-handedly trying to create an American-style beef industry, but in a very condensed time period. It now has about 400,000 cows, the largest herd in the world. The company has had to build fences in a country without any, to train veterinarians, and to also import everything from horses and grass seed to tractors. But the hardest part of managing this immense operation is not the science or the planning.

 

It’s finding workers. Cowboys. So the company imported some of them, too. One of them, Shawn Weekes, has been in Russia for two years. He’s a fourth-generation, Montana-born cowboy with a great, big mustache, Western boots, a hat, and a tucked in button up shirt. “I grew up doing this,” he said. “A rope was actually my first toy.

 

“He’s worked on ranches all over the U.S. but the growth of Miratorg, from zero to the largest herd in the world, stood apart. “I’ve never seen anything grow this fast. Ever. And sometimes it kind of set me back a little bit, like, whoa, let’s slow this train down a little bit. But this is their program and this is what they want, so I just try to help them,” Weekes said.

 

His job is teaching locals to cowboy. The new hires, mostly young men from nearby villages, have no experience. Most of them have only seen cowboys in black and white movies. Miratorg now employs 1,000 Russian cowboys, though they call them ‘operators. “The difference is they’re starting out from scratch, there’s only a handful of us here to teach all these people how to do this,” he said.

 

Which ever way the Russian beef industry turns out, I’m sure the American beef industry and entrepreneurs supporting this industry will have a boost in their sales economy.

 

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Freelance Writer and Author
Office/Mobile: (985) 630-3500
Email: richardedennis51@gmail.com
Website: http://www.richardedennis.net

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☛ Correction in NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity article 10-31-18

Posted by on Oct 31, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

CORRECTION IN NRCHA SNAFFLE BIT FUTURITY ARTICLE

By Glory Ann Kurtz

On Thursday, Oct. 29, I posted an article about the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity and the winners: SJR Diamond Mist, ridden by Corey Cushing. In the article, a paragraph said SJR Diamond Mist, bred and owned by John and Brenda Stephenson of the San Juan Ranch, Weatherford, Texas, would stand the 2019 breeding season at the Oswood Stallion Station in Weatherford, Texas, with a $3,500 breeding fee. Actually CD Diamond, the sire of SJR Diamond Mist will be standing at Oswood Stallion Station for a $3,500 breeding fee. I’m sorry for this error.

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☛ BLM Roundups include 887 mustangs & took place in Elko County, Nevada 10-10-18

Posted by on Oct 10, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

MORE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT WILD HORSE ROUNDUPS

 

THE MOST RECENT INCLUDED 887 MUSTANGS IN ELKO COUNTY, NEV.

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Oct. 10, 2018

While I recently reported on 1000 wild horses being rounded up in California today, I just received information that the U.S. Bureau of Land Management just completed their second big wild horse roundup in northern Nevada in recent weeks. They removed 887 mustangs from the range in Elko County.

 

The agency reported that horses were gathered Sept. 19-Oct. 2 in the Antelope Valley and Goshute herd management areas where their numbers were supposedly eight times what is considered the appropriate management level.

 

Also, on Oct. 4, the Bureau also completed the removal of 873 horses from the Owhyee complex in Elko and Humboldt counties near the Idaho line.

 

Horse advocates continue to be greatly upset, saying the Bureau of Land Management exaggerates the impact of mustangs while ignoring the impact of livestock, owned by individuals, that greatly outnumber the number of horses grazing on Federal land.

Economic-Facts-of-Public-Lands-Grazing

 

According to an AP article, the recent animals captured were taken to an agency corral in Fallon, where they will be prepared for adoption or public sale, which are certain to include slaughterhouse buyers.

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☛ Dual Pep passes away at age 33

Posted by on Sep 28, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

DUAL PEP PASSES AWAY PEACEFULLY AT AGE 33

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Sept. 27, 2018

If you’ve ever watched an athletic cutting horse win a major event that has the name “Dual” in his name, chances are that the great sire Dual Pep are in his or her pedigree. However, great horses don’t live forever. So is the case with the great sire Dual Pep.

 

Dual Pep, one of the most influential sires in the cutting horse industry, was humanely euthanized on Tuesday, Sept. 25 at the age of 33. According to his co-owner, Dottie Hill, Glenrose, Texas, who purchased the stallion in 2011, “He left the world gracefully.”

 

She and her husband, Bobby, owned the stallion that died during the Brazos Bash Futurity, one of the most successful cutting-horse aged events of the summer, held Sept. 19-30 in Weatherford, Texas.  Ironically Dual Pep’s daughter Tears From Heaven won the Brazos Bash Futurity Open title, ridden by Michael Cooper, making Dual Pep the oldest living sire ever to have a major cutting futurity champion. In addition Stunner Cat and CDs Kual Gun, whose maternal granddams were sired by Dual Pep, placed second and third in the same event.

 

But that wasn’t out of the ordinary for Dual Pep, who was bred by Nic-A-Lode Farms, that according to the NCHA is in Boise, Idaho, while Equi-Stat says the farms are located in Cody, Wyo. (They are not included in the latest NCHA membership guide.) His breeding was the best as he was sired by Peppy San Badger out of Miss Dual Doc by Doc’s Remedy.

 

At age 6, at the end of his cutting career, Dual Pep had earned $302,054 in earnings, according to NCHA (Equi-Stat says  $307,384) in the cutting pen, including the Open Reserve title of the 1989 Memphis Futurity for then owner, Reidy Land and Cattle company. His next owner was Bobby Pidgeon, who owned a beverage distributing company in Memphis, Tenn., and who bought Dual Pep for his own non-pro mount. In 1991, Pidgeon started up the now well-known Bar H Ranche in Weatherford, Texas and hired Winston Hansma as manager and trainer. Later Winston’s brother Paul Hansma also joined the Bar H Ranche as a trainer. Dual Pep was also shown successfully by Pat Earnheart.

 

However, the sign of a great sire is in his offspring – and Dual Pep got an “A” for that. His offspring earned $24,031,926 according to NCHA ($25.8 million according to Equi-Stat), Dual Pep ranks fifth on the roster of all-time leading sires and is the only stallion among the top five with a son on the list with offspring earning $36,790,588. That was Dual Rey, who also died earlier this year.

 

According to Equi-Stat, Dual Pep’s highest money-earning offspring was Dual Rey Me, foaled in 1999 and shown by Jeremy Barwick, out of Miss Smart Rey Jay x Smart Little Lena ($818,177 according to Equi-stat and $812,942 according to NCHA); Dually Lena, $395,616 earnings, out of Bingos Lena by Doc O’Lena; Olena Dually, $302,342, out of Miss Sabrina Lena by Doc O’Lena; Tapt Twice, $285,226 out of Tap O Lena by Doc O’Lena and Playboy McCrae ($269,583, out of Playboys Madera x Freckles Playboy.

 

Being a broodmare sire is also important and Dual Pep also got an “A” for that. He was a stellar broodmare sire, siring dams of earners of $32.6 million, according to Equi-Stat, including Sister CD (CD Olena x Little Baby Sister x Dual Pep,with earnings of $852,612 and Dont Look Twice (High Brow Cat x Tapt Twice by Dual Pep) winner of $850,628.

 

During his later years, Dual Pep, who will always be remembered as one of the greatest cutting horses, sires and broodmare sires, stood at Dr. Baker’s breeding facility.

 

 

 

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☛ Was it a magnificent con job or just bad attendance? 9-9-18

Posted by on Sep 9, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

WAS IT A MAGNIFICENT CON JOB OR JUST BAD ATTENDANCE

 

MAGNIFICENT 7 INVITATIONAL STOCK HORSE CHAMPIONSHIP TURNS OUT TO BE A “NO PAY”

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Sept. 9, 2018

 

Are horse events getting a bad name, with some associations running short of cash and others increasing entry fees, adding little or no money, cancelling events and now – not paying the winners?

 

An exciting cowhorse event called the “Magnificent 7 All-Around Stock Horse Championship,” held June 8, 2018 at Cal Expo in Sacramento, Calif., seems to be attempting to solve their insolvency by not paying the winners of the competition.

 

The Magnificent 7 all-Around Stock Horse Championship is an exciting four-event competition based on an event originally called the World’s Championship All-Around Stock Horse contest crafted by Bobby Ingersoll in the 1970s and was actively supported by Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame members Cotton Rosser and Walt Rodman. The contest was held periodically over the years until Western States Horse Expo CEO and founder Miki Nelsen, Bill Lefty and others resurrected and revitalized the event, giving it a “forever home” at the Cal Expo.

 

The competition, that was invitational for the seven entries, included four events: herd work, rein work, steer stopping and fence work.

 

The total purse wasn’t a huge amount of cash, $29,908.35, but the seven entries paid a total of $2,060, which included a $1,500 entry fee, a $200 cattle fee, $180 stall fee for show the horse and $180 for a turn-back horse  last May to try their chances for an advertised “hefty cash prize, a great buckle and the title of Magnificent 7 all-Around Stock Horse Champion.”

 

When all was said and done, Call Me Mitch, owned by Estelle Roitblat and ridden by Phillip Ralls, won the event with a total score of 295, giving Roitblat a $8,372.00 paycheck (that hasn’t yet arrived).  The reserve title, Very Smart Choice, owned by Rocking BS Ranch, ridden by Lance Johnston, scored a 291 and should have pocketed $6,578.00.

 

Ken and Ramona Wold owned Real Smooth Cat, ridden by Ken to a 287.50 and third place, good enough for a $5,083.00 paycheck, if it would have arrived.

 

Fourth, taken by Very Smart Cowhorse, owned and ridden by Aaron Brookshire to a 266.50, and would have been owed a $3,588.00 paycheck; fifth was Short N Catt, owned by Sarah Davis and ridden by Phillip Ralls to a 284, for $2,691; sixth was Overabarrel, owned and ridden by Darrell Norcutt to a 214 for $2,093 and seventh was Tomcatontheprowl, owned and ridden by Justin Jones to a 201.50 and $1,503.35.

 

However, according to Ramona Wold, it’s now been close to four months and the winners haven’t received their checks from Miki Nelson, owner of Horse Expo and Magnificent 7. Her excuse: “The sponsors hadn’t paid her so she couldn’t pay the exhibitors.”  However, the announcer, the judge and the cattle providers have been paid.

 

“I called Ernie at Western Horsemanmagazine, who was advertised as one of the sponsors, and I was informed that they were not sponsors as they were advertised,” said Ramona.”

 

For this article, I also called Miki Nelson and asked her about the missing payout. She said, “We’ve had this event going since year 2000. We started when the NRCHA cancelled the “World’s Greatest Horseman.” It used to be well-attended event but then the economy hit a downturn. We kept it going in 2015 (with Horse Expo funds) but the people just weren’t coming to watch. This was its 20thAnniversary, so we said, ‘Let’s get on a roll and get people excited.’ But only one sponsor –  RAM Trucks. But they are taking six months to pay us. Attendance at the Expo was down 30 percent and you could count the number people in the bleachers.

 

“The facility holds all of our admission funds and controls all the income. They were contracted to pay us in 30 days but they paid out in 60 days. We got the money a month ago. It has put us in a cash strap but we should be out of it in 30 more days.

 

“I realize we are 60 days late today and we never meant not to pay anyone. We’ve been in business 21 years and we’re not going to start not paying out now.  We are as horrified as the seven contestants. We love this sport but the reined cow horse seems to be dying in California – it’s going to Texas.”

 

The 21stanniversary annual event will occur next year; however, it will be held at the Murieta Equestrian Center in Rancho Murieta, Calif.

 

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