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☛ Where have I been lately? HOT news! 7-18-17

Posted by on Jul 19, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 19, 2017

I have had several individuals question whether or not I am continuing with my website www.allaboutcutting.com, as lately my news has been rather scarce and for that I am sorry.

My answer is “Yes,” I am continuing with my website; however, lately I have had several distractions which have cut back on my time to write articles. These include the following:

1) I was in the process of selling my horse operation since my husband passed away 9 years ago and I am unable to physically and financially keep this facility going. I recently solved that problem as I have sold my Boyd facility and purchased a much smaller place in Grandview, Texas. I will be moving the end of August but in the meantime I have to pack over 30 years of possessions and memorabilia.

2) Many of you old timers may remember Lee Dale, who created the pedigrees for sale catalogs, including the NCHA sales. Some 20 years ago she had a stroke and has been paralyzed on one side of her body and bedridden in nursing facilities ever since. Over the years all of her relatives have passed away and just before her sister died, I  agreed to take on her medical power of attorney. However, lately, Lee has gone downhill and though she has been in a nursing home for years, during the last few weeks she has been in the Wise Regional Hospital in ICU and currently is in Hospice at Senior Care in Decatur. Her mind is still pretty good and she remembers all you old-time cutters and all the stories that go with them!!!

3) On July 4, fireworks were going off in the middle of the highway in front of my place. The one horse I have left, Cougarand, a 31-year-old champagne son of Peppy San Badger out of a daughter of Doc Bar, is used to highway noises and even fireworks, but one must have come into his pasture and probably even hit him, which in the dark sent him into a pipe fence covered with wire where he fell with a leg getting stuck under the sucker rod at the bottom of the wire. I found him there the next morning and got him up; however, he had obviously injured the hind leg that was under the fence and was lame.

Even though I haven’t had a need to call a vet for some time, I called three different vets in the area – only one called me back; however, he didn’t show up. After doctoring Cougarand myself for a couple of weeks, I remembered my old friend and miracle worker – an equine kinesiologist and chiropractor named Laird Burke. He came and looked at Cougar and couldn’t believe what good shape he was in at 31 years of age – but most of all, he was surprised he hadn’t died lying under that fence all night.

After working on him for about 20 minutes, he said, Turn him loose and he will be just fine tomorrow.”Today is tomorrow – and like Laird promised – Cougarand is just fine, walking normal! In fact, when Laird got done working on him, I took his halter off. He usually runs off when he discovers he is loose; however, this time he followed me until I got out the gate. I guess he thought I had fixed his pain!

Laird has been a friend of Bob and me for many years and has “fixed” many horses that have had accidents or in some way had disturbed their skeletal frame or muscles. We had a baby colt one time who missed the gate when the horses, including his mother, headed out to the pasture. The colt jumped the fence and landed on his back. When he got up, he could walk, but it was like a car with a bent frame – he would walk toward you but he looked like he was actually going another way. We took him to vets and they said there was nothing they could do. About 3 months later, Laird came and stayed with us and he suggested we put the colt in the barn while he worked on him several times over the following week. His magic worked and the colt was soon walking normal and remained that way as long as we owned him. I became a lifetime fan!

Bob and I  met Laird years ago when he was working with and helping horses performing at the All American Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, Ohio. He eventually came and stayed with us for several months when he suddenly found himself with a lot of business in Texas, and he and his lovely wife Brenda soon moved to North Texas and have been helping horses over the past few years all over the country at major shows and ranches.

So that’s are my story and I’m sticking to it. I’m sure that in the short term, I will not be posting as often as I did before for awhile as I have this huge move in front of me. I have lived here for 38 years and imagine the “stuff” I have accumulated. They include Quarter Horse Journals back to the 1970s – that I am trying to give away to someone who would like to study the history of the wonderful Quarter Horse.

THE LATEST NEWS:

The latest news came from an e-mail last night wondering if I would like to expose wrong doing at the highest level in the cutting industry. The person said, “There is a Red Hot current situation about a well-known horse owner shooting a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol at a horse show in Whitesboro, Texas, Saturday, July 8, with witnesses, one of which took a video.”  They felt someone needed to pursue this in order to hold the NCHA accountable with their highly advertised zero tolerance “horse-cruelty” policy.

The caller said Russell McCord from the NCHA was called and told what was going on. He told the caller to do whatever it took to stop it and make the person shooting the horse leave, which he did.

I’m looking for someone who was there and watched the incident so I can report more about it. If you know such a person who is willing to talk with me, my phone no. is 940-433-5232 or cell 940-393-1865. I need to know who the person calling is but I do not have to give their name in my article – however, I would like for them to confirm the name of the perpetrator. I’m waiting by my phone(s).

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☛ Reined Cow Horse industry to have 3 major futurities 7-14-17

Posted by on Jul 14, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

REINED COW HORSE ENTHUSIASTS TO HAVE THREE MAJOR FUTURITIES IN 2015

 

EVENTS TO BE HELD 1,640 MILES APART

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 13, 2017

There’s a new kid on the block that is holding a reined cow horse futurity and sale within the industry’s list of reined cow horse futurities.

 

At first there was one: the National Reined Cow Horse Association Futurity in Reno Nev. Then a branch of members broke off and started the National Stock Horse Association, which holds an annual Futurity in Paso Robles, Calif. And now a new group, headed by Smoky Pritchett, has formed the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity, which will take place in Reno, Nev., since the NRCHA Futurity that had been held in Reno, has moved to Fort Worth, Texas.

 

THE NEW EVENT – RENO SBF:

This year, the NRCHA announced that they were moving their Reno event over 1,600 miles from Reno to Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas, where they would receive state and city money for the event. That left Reno without a Reined Cow Horse Futurity.

 

That didn’t sit well with several California owners and riders of snaffle bit horses. In an open letter on the Internet, Smoky Pritchett wrote, “You are all aware of the move of the Snaffle Bit Futurity from Reno to Texas. California lost the Hackamore Classic along with the Bridle Spectacular several years ago. Now we are losing our largest show and sale (The NRCHA Futurity and Sale).”

 

With the help of Lucas Oil and Save The Harvest, who have been sponsoring a lot of horse events lately, there will now be a new Snaffle Bit Futurity, Horse Show and Sale called the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity & Sale, scheduled to be held Sept. 8-17 in Reno, Nev., taking the place of the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity. The new group advertised that there will be a whole day dedicated to the Amateur riders on Sunday, Sept. 17.

 

They need your support so as not to lose more California cow Horse events, especially in Northern California. We have entry forms available if you cannot download one from their web page: https://www.renosnafflebitfuturity.com.

 

So this year, there will be three snaffle bit futurities, starting with the National Stock Horse Association’s event, scheduled for Aug. 22-27 in Paso Robles, Calif. Next will be the new snaffle bit futurity event in Reno Sept. 8-17, with $200,000 in added money, and the final event will be the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity in Fort Worth, Texas, with added money of over $606,000..

 

Editor’s Note: A call was made to Shawn Martin of the NSHA regarding the added money for their Futurity; however, my call was not returned. Martin can be reached at 623-217-3879

 

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☛ House Committee votes to reopen horse slaughter plants 7-14-17

Posted by on Jul 14, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

American horses are held in export pens in Texas and New Mexico before transported to slaughter in Mexico. Photo by Kathy Milani/The HSUS

The same lawmakers who voted July 12 to reopen U.S. horse slaughter plants are blocking a different bill backed by The HSUS that would forbid the transport of horses for slaughter for human consumption to other countries.

Can the bill be amended or defunded before it reaches the President’s desk?

The following is a press release from Wayne Parcelles,the President and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States.

July 12, the Appropriations Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives voted narrowly to give the green light for the reopening of horse slaughter plants in the United States. There were 27 members of Congress who voted against the bipartisan amendment offered by Reps. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., and Charlie Dent, R-Pa., to bar horse slaughter operations in the United States, and 25 who supported it. All but one Democrat on the committee voted to oppose this dreadful idea, while 26 of 30 Republicans favored it.

The vote on the amendment was as unimaginable as the rhetoric from the horse slaughter crowd was hypocritical.

Unimaginable because American horses deserve a better fate than to be gathered up by a disreputable “kill buyer” who outbids a rescuer at an auction, loaded onto an overcrowded truck, and then stunned, hoisted up by a leg, and pulled apart piece by piece – which is exactly what the 27 lawmakers who voted against the Roybal-Allard/Dent amendment are trying to sanction. We don’t do this to dogs or cats when we don’t have homes for them, and it should be unthinkable to do this to the domesticated animal that helped settle the nation. I pity the people who don’t see the majesty of these American icons and who are numb to their suffering.

Hypocritical because the lawmakers who spoke out against the amendment to ban horse slaughter – again, these are the Representatives who want to allow horse slaughter – actually feigned an interest in protecting horses. A couple of them lamented the long-distance transport of American horses to Canada and Mexico for slaughter for human consumption, and said that we might as well slaughter horses here in the United States so they don’t have to be transported.

That logic would make a little sense until you realize that these same lawmakers are blocking a different bill backed by The HSUS that would forbid the transport of horses for slaughter for human consumption to other countries. Only one of the lawmakers who voted to reopen horse slaughter plants in the United States is a cosponsor of that broader anti-slaughter bill, the Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act, H.R. 113, which is led by four animal welfare champions — Reps. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Janice Schakowsky, D-Ill., Ed Royce, R-Calif., and Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M.

How can you lament the long-distance transport of horses for slaughter to Canada or Mexico and then fight the bill that addresses that very thing? You can do so only if you say one thing and do another.

The defeat of the amendment to bar U.S.-based horse slaughter plants from operating is an ugly start for the House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J. The newly anointed chairman represents a suburban district in New Jersey, and his constituents favor our position in droves. He defied their wishes on this vote, just as he defied their wishes earlier in the year in voting to overturn a Fish and Wildlife Service rule to stop the aerial tracking, landing, and shooting of grizzly bears, and to stop the shooting of wolves and other predators during their denning seasons on national wildlife refuges.

What kind of person wants to kill grizzly bears on wildlife refuges and slaughter American horses on U.S. soil?

Reps. Robert Aderholdt, R-Ala., Tom Cole, R-Okla., and Mark Amodei, R-Nev. also favored horse slaughter in the debate today. To their credit, Reps. Roybal-Allard, Dent, Sanford Bishop, D-Ga., Barbara Lee, D-Calif, and Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., spoke in favor of the ban on U.S. horse slaughter.

“As a lifelong Republican, I’m deeply saddened and quite ashamed to see my fellow conservatives go to such great lengths to promote the slaughter of American equines,” said Marty Irby, who heads the HSUS equine campaign. “I hope the members who profess to be fiscal conservatives will reflect upon this vote that would have saved millions of taxpayer dollars annually – and begin to practice what they preach.”

As Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., noted in a public statement, this battle is not over. If House leaders bring the agriculture spending bill to the floor, our congressional allies may be able to offer the amendment there and win when all House lawmakers have a chance to vote on the issue. And if even that doesn’t happen, we expect to win a horse slaughter defund amendment in the Senate, which would give us a chance to prevail when the final bill is negotiated and sent to President Trump.

This is how lawmakers voted on the amendment to protect horses:

YES (25)

Peter Aguilar, D-Calif.-31, Sanford Bishop, D-Ga.-2, Matt Cartwright, D-Pa.-17, Katherine Clark, D-Mass.-5, Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn.-3, Charlie Dent, R- Pa.-15, David Joyce, R-Ohio-14, Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio-9, Derek Kilmer, D-Wash.-6, Barbara Lee, D-Calif.-13, Nita Lowey, D-N.Y.-17, Betty McCollum, D-Minn.-4, Grace Meng, D-N.Y.-6, Chellie Pingree, D-Maine-1, Mark Pocan, D-Wis.-2, David Price, D-N.C.-4, Mike Quigley, D-Ill.-5, Tom Rooney, R-Fla.-17, Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif.-40, Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md.-2, Tim Ryan, D-Ohio-13, José Serrano, D-N.Y.-15, Peter Visclosky, D-Ind.-1, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla.-23, and Kevin Yoder, R-Kan.-3

NO (27)

Robert Aderhold, R-Ala.-4, Mark Amodie, R-Nev.-2, Ken Calvert, R-Calif.-42, John Carter, R-Texas-31, Tom Cole, R-Okla.-4, Henry Cuellar, D-Texas-28, John Abney Culberson, R-Texas-7, Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla.-25, Chuck Fleischmann, R-Tenn.-3, Jeff Fortenberry, R-Nev.-1, Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J.-11, Kay Granger, R-Texas-12, Tom Graves, R-Ga.-14, Andy Harris, R-Md.-1, Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash.-3, Evan Jenkins, R-W.Va.-3, John Moolenaar, R-Mich.-4, Dan Newhouse, R-Wash.-4, Steven Palazzo, R-Miss.-4, Martha Roby, R-Ala.-2, Harold Rogers, R-Ky.-5, Michael Simpson, R-Idaho-2, Chris Stewart, R-Utah-2, Scott Taylor, R-Va.-2, David Valadao, R-Calif.-21, Steve Womack, R-Ark.-3, and David Young, R-Iowa-3

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☛ Brunzell court documents revealed 5-8-17

Posted by on May 8, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE LAWSUITS, HORSE NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SHERRI BRUNZELL COURT DOCUMENTS REVEALED

May 8, 2017
By Glory Ann Kurtz

On April 27, 2017, I published the following article about Sherri Brunzell going to jail for 60 days for animal cruelty; however, today  I have received  the court documents regarding the penalties that Brunzell received and am attaching then at the end of this article.

Although Sherri only got 60 days in jail, along with a 5-year probation term, she paid royally for letting those horses starve with a few even dying. With 14 charges against her, she was acquitted on six of them and found guilty on eight.  She could have originally gotten 550 days in jail; however, 490 days were suspended pending the successful completion of probation – restitution for 91 days and 60 months probation.

Sherri was fined $500 for each of the eight counts of guilty, she was ordered to not possess, own, manage, lease, or care for any horses, llamas, livestock or any other herd animal; pay costs and fines imposed; ordered to attend 16 individual counseling sessions and two post-treatment assessments as per animal evaluation; forfeit horses to El Paso County and provide registration on each horse. Total costs to Brunzell for this case totaled $40,191.50.

During her jail time, she must serve 60 days straight, a work release is not authorized and the court will review in 120 days for potential proposed plan/possibility of unsupervised probation.

“THE SHERRI BRUNZELL CASE:

Showing the difference a couple of years can make, Sherri Brunzell, who owned the 10 horses, including an emaciated Quarter Horse cutting stallion, Dual Peppy, along with llamas that were found living in a crypt-like Black Forest, Colo., barn in 2014. The barn contained the decomposing remains of the living horses’ former stablemates..

In May 2015, an El Paso County jury convicted Brunzell of eight “misdemeanor” counts of animal cruelty; however, she filed appeal after appeal until they ran out. However, Brunzell had paid a financial price, as she was ordered to pay $5,400 per month for the horses’ care and the AQHA automatically suspended her and denied her any and all privileges, including privileges associated with registration related to transactions and participation in any AQHA events. The horses were sent to a Colorado rescue and Sherri never received ownership of the horses again.”

All that time, Judge Stephen James Sletta said he would have liked to give her more time, but during her 2015 jury trial, that was all he could give her, according to the law at that time.

If this case would have been held in 2016, Sherri could have more than likely been sentenced to prison for years rather than days. On Jan. 1, 2016, horse abuse became a felony.

Click for Brunzell court records>>

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☛ Is Tax Court biased in favor of IRS? 2-6-17

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

IS THE TAX COURT BIASED IN FAVOR OF THE IRS?

 

By John Alan Cohan, Attorney at Law
Feb. 6, 2017

The U.S. Tax Court is a critically important institution.  It is the the most common forum in which taxpayers litigate federal tax disputes.  The court frequently decides IRS assertions that the taxpayer understated the correct tax liability, resulting in a tax “deficiency.”

Many commentators argue that Tax Court judges are biased in favor of the IRS.  Judges hear cases alone, without a jury.  Many Tax Court judges have worked in the IRS Chief Counsel’s office or in the Tax Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.  The Tax Court does not assign judges randomly to cases.  The procedures are extremely burdensome.  The burden of proof is “preponderance of the evidence,” which is a loose standard of evidence, and highly subjective.  It means the the IRS could win if 51% of its evidence is more convincing to the judge than the taxpayer’s.

The Tax Court makes budget requests to Congress’s tax-writing committees.  In justifying its budget requests, the Tax Court invariably explains to congressional committees how well it is enforcing the tax laws.

A Tax Court judge, Diane L. Kroupa, was indicted on tax evasion, conspiracy to defraud the United States, and obstruction charges, raising questions about whether any of her rulings could be vulnerable to challenge as a result.  (Judge Kroupa abruptly resigned prior to the indictment without explanation.  Her husband, now divorced, was also indicted.)  As a Tax Court judge, Kroupa heard and decided a wide range of cases, including some that came down against taxpayers in the horse and cattle industries.  In October, 2016, she pleaded guilty to conspiring to defraud the IRS and other crimes.  When sentenced at a later date, she is likely to serve a significant prison term.

Another judge, L. Paige Marvel, has also been harsh with respect to the horse industry.  In a recent case, Carmody v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo 2016-225, Judge Marvel came down hard on a taxpayer’s efforts to run his horse racing venture profitably.

The taxpayer, Jerald Carmody, has owned race horses for more than 20 years, mainly as co-owner with others, and worked full-time as a sales representative for a helicopter company.

He owned lower priced horses which were actively raced in Washington State.  Professional trainers were employed.  He spent time every day on his horse racing activity, researched horses that would be in competition, and searched for other horses to purchase.

He purchased and improved a five-acre property with a 4,000 square-foot barn, horse stalls, a 5,000-square-foot arena, indoor horse shelters, and nine pastures.  He personally cleaned stalls and pastures.

Some of the horses won several races each, and one was the alltime race winner at Emerald Downs with 21 wins.  Mr. Carmody was named owner of the year at Emerald Downs.  The races entered ranged in purses from $8,000 to $50,000.

During a 10-year period, the taxpayer’s losses were from $16,064 to $81,345, with no profit year.  But there was income in each year, ranging from $17,917 to $128,068.

When horses were retired from racing, they were sold or given away.  Of 36 horses sold, there was a net gain on only eight of those sales.

Mr. Carmody had a horse racing bank account, but paid for expenses out of his personal account as well as the racing account.

Mr. Carmody kept a folder for each horse with various receipts and documents related to that horse.

Judge Marvel said that Mr. Carmody did not use any of his records to reduce losses or to achieve profitability.  The court noted that Mr. Carmody had no written business plan, no budgets and no economic forecasts.  “In fact, the record is devoid of any credible evidence that petitioner engaged in any meaningful financial management with respect to his horse racing activity.”

The court said, “While a taxpayer need not maintain a sophisticated cost accounting system, the taxpayer should keep records that enable the taxpayer to cut expenses, generate or increase profits, or evaluate the overall performance of the operation.”

The court also faulted Mr. Carmody for commingling his personal and horse racing finances.  “This commingling of personal and horse racing activity funds is not indicative of a businesslike practice.”

The court also noted that Mr. Carmody realized no profits in a 20-year period, and that “he contends that he suffered losses because he reinvested his gross receipts back into the horse racing activity and that he used his gross receipts to improve his barns, arena, and other horse racing activity property.  Petitioner’s contentions are woefully insufficient to justify or even explain an unbroken string of over 20 years of substantial losses.”

The court concluded that the petitioner did not engage in his horse racing activity with the predominant, primary, or principal objective of making a profit.

The only silver lining in this case is that the judge rejected the IRS’ accuracy-related penalties because the taxpayer had reasonably relied on his accountant’s advice in taking the deductions.

One of the important lessons in this case is that taxpayers need to somehow review records so as to reduce expenses or enhance the possibility of generating income.  It is important to keep track of expenses on a per-animal basis.  And it is important to prepare financial statements, profit and loss projections, budgets, breakeven analyses, or marketing surveys, as the IRS considers these to be significant financial tools to aid in evaluating the overall performance of an operation.

[John Alan Cohan is an attorney representing people in federal and state tax disputes, IRS appeals, and Tax Court litigation, and is a long-standing author of a legal advice column published in numerous sporting magazines.  In addition, he advises organizations on compliance with newly enacted laws and regulations.  John is also author of the book, Turn Your Hobby Into A Business — The Right Way.  He can be reached at:  (310) 278-0203, or email at johnalancohan@aol.com.  His website is JohnAlanCohan.com.]

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☛ NSHA holds stallion auction 2-9-17

Posted by on Jan 9, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NATIONAL STOCK HORSE ASSOCIATION HOLDS STALLION AUCTION

Press release from NSHA
Jan. 9, 2017

Bidding will begin on Jan. 15, 2017 for the National Stock Horse Association Stallion Auction. With 25 stallions already subscribed to the auction, bidding will begin on Jan 15, 2017. To bid, go to http://nshastallionauction.com/. All proceeds from the auction will go toward the 2017 NSHA show purse.

 

The bid price covers the breeding fee only. Bidders will be responsible for all additional fees, including chute fees and shipped semen, which needs to be paid to the stallion owner or breeding facility. Prior to bidding, prospective bidders are advised to check with the breeder for information on all fees.

 

If you are a stallion owner and would like to donate a breeding, please request a Stallion Service Contract by calling the NSHA at 559-789-7007 or fax 866-868-0967.

 

Stallions subscribed so far include Blue One Time, owned by the Victor Cattle Company; Brother Jackson, owned by Dan Perez; Busy Winning Chex, owned by Hilldale Farm; CD Diamond, owned by the San Juan Ranch; Desires Little Rex, owned by Victor Cattle Company; Fletch That Cat, owned by Don and Teresa Martin; Gunner On Ice, owned by Hilldale Farm; Hen Magnet, owned by 7J Consulting; Hickory Holly Time, owned by DT Horses LLC; Judge Boon, owned by Red Tail Ranch; Lil Cataloo, owned by Gene and Michelle Morris; Matt Dillon Dun It, owned by Victor Cattle Company; Nic It In The Rey, owned by Wayne Hanson; Lena Oak, owned by LaDona Emmons/Nicole Scott; One Fine Vintage, owned by Robertson Ranches; One Time Pepto, owned by Matthew Cutting Horses; One Time Royalty, owned by SDM Quarter Horses; Pepto Cee Lena, owned by Hy Performance Horses; Sinful Cat, owned by Russell and Tanna Dilday; Smart Boons, owned by Eric and Wendy Dunn; Spin It N Whiz It, owned by Sovereign Performance Horses, TheCrowdLovesMe, owned by Yellow Creek Ranch; Time For A Diamond, owned by Triple D Ranches; Tom Cat Chex, owned by Amazing Grace Ranch and Travelin Jonz, owned by Chris Dawson.

 

For further information, go to www.nationalstockhorse.com, or call 559-789-7007.

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