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☛ The dark world of horse slaughter 1-7-17

Posted by on Jan 7, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

THE DARK WORLD OF HORSE SLAUGHTER

By Robin Fowler
Jan. 7, 2017

A shipment of 40 Appaloosas of all ages kept Grenwood Stables and Equine rescue in Kansas busy in November; however, all found new homes in a week’s time. Many were registered horses.

It was the truckload of foundation-bred Appaloosa horses that sent Kansas horse slaughter rescuers into a panic during one week in November. Some 40 Appaloosas, many of them registered, had been trucked to a Peabody, Kansas, kill pen near Greenwood Stables and Equine Rescue.

There, and at other kill lots across the country, horses may have only a few days – in some cases only a few hours — to appeal to potential rescuers and be saved. Those who can’t find homes will be packed into another truck and sent to Mexico to their deaths, their carcasses butchered for dinner tables overseas.

Amazingly, all of these Appaloosas were adopted. That week, for the first time, the slaughter trucks from Peabody were canceled.

How did this band of Appaloosas get into this predicament? It was through no fault of their own. Their breeder had moved to a retirement home and his horses were sent to a kill buyer. Amy Bayes, founder of the Greenwood nonprofit, says that kind of thing happens more often than one would think.

Horse slaughter is illegal in the United States but horses can be transported from the United States. to slaughter in other countries, usually Canada or Mexico. Horses must be able to bear weight on four limbs and walk unassisted. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, they cannot be blind in both eyes, under six months of age or pregnant and likely to foal during the trip. But rules can be open to interpretation. For example, some mares are so emaciated by former owners that kill buyers can say, truthfully, that they didn’t know the horse was pregnant.

In late December 2014, the European Union banned the importation of horse meat and meat products from Mexico, in part because of inhumane treatment of slaughter-bound horses during the trip from kill pens in the United States to slaughterhouses in Mexico. Yet the demand for horsemeat continues, and prices per pound remain high.

This Wyoming weanling filly’s wobbly legs may have been the reason she ended up in a Kansas kill pen, but a veterinarian determined that a good diet and regular trims could do wonders for this well-traveled baby. she found a home in Texas with three young children.

Pure and simple, the mission of Greenwood Stables and Equine Rescue, and others like it, is to intercept horses bound for slaughter. Bayes endeavors to save 10 to 20 of the 60 to 120 horses in the Peabody kill pens every week with the help of a few volunteers and the 13,500 friends of her Facebook page.

The price of an average-sized slaughter-bound horse at Greenwood is $650, approximately what the kill buyer would receive for the horse at the slaughter facilities in Mexico. Average price paid at slaughter is 65 cents per pound, according to Bayes. Young, healthy horses can bring more, older injured or sick horses less.

The kill buyer comes out ahead on horses that Bayes sells because he doesn’t have to pay transport to Mexico. Some kill buyers elsewhere charge more: $850-$950 on Facebook pages operated by rescue groups around the country. Prices set by kill buyers usually are not negotiable.

“I have the worst job in the world,” Bayes recently wrote in a Facebook post. “I have to go to the kill pens and decide who lives and who dies.”

It is a mission that is heartrending on a daily basis but Bayes must choose the horses most likely to capture the attention of potential adopters willing to pay their “bail” and take them home. Less likely to find homes are unhandled youngsters and horses that are old, sick, injured or underweight. Stallions are less likely to find new homes than mares, and all horses have a better chance to be saved if broke to ride or registered with a breed association, according to Bayes. Most horses that wind up in kill pens come directly from auctions where bids are low.

Bayes claims that recipient mares are among those at risk. Young mares often initially escape slaughter because they are in demand as recipient mares destined to carry the foals of high-dollar show mares and stallions. It’s a job that prolongs their lives for a few years, but as they age and become reproductively challenged, many eventually are shipped to slaughter as early as age 12.

Greenwood helps its supporters buy horses from a local kill buyer and allows them to make donations toward the bail of slaughter-bound horses that they can’t adopt personally. If the donation campaign is successful, the horse is given to the rescue if space is available and is offered for adoption. But Greenwood does not give free horses to would-be adopters.

“We have found that if a person doesn’t have ‘skin in the game,’ they are more likely not to care for the horse,” Bayes says. “No one wants to see the horses return to a kill pen.”

“None deserves its fate,” Bayes says of horses that do not attract a new owner and are loaded into the Mexico-bound trucks for slaughter.

Some horses simply slip through the cracks. In mid-December, an 18-year-old Thoroughbred stallion that had been donated by its elderly owner to Texas A&M University – Commerce (TAMUC) was discovered at the small Red River Horse Sale north of Bonham, Texas. Luckily for Tricky Prospect, Texas rescuers had learned the stallion would be in the sale and outbid kill buyers to pay the meager purchase price of $385. As if the winning bid wasn’t a clue, TAMUC, that is known for its equestrian program, said through a spokesman that it had been unaware kill buyers might be among bidders.

Horses donated to church camps also can find themselves in dire straits. Many camps acquire horses every spring and then send them to kill pens in the fall so they don’t have to feed horses over the winter. The practice happens so often that entire rescue groups are devoted solely to saving camp horses – some of which are donated by owners who have no idea what is about to happen to their longtime equine companions.

Bayes, a fulltime professional librarian, and her daughter Saje operate Greenwood with the help of a few volunteers and equine professionals, including vets, farriers and haulers who provide services at a discount. She also has support from her community residents who donate hay and used equipment. Bayes has reservations about working alongside kill buyers but realizes she can save more horses if she does. Her disdain, though, mainly is targeted toward horse owners who sell to kill buyers.

But Bayes can’t afford to ruminate long on week-to-week successes and failures, because there’s always another truckload on the way. Little more than a week after she found new owners for the 40 Appaloosas, a truckload of trained kid-proof horses arrived from a church camp. There’s no word as to what the church tells its children when asked about the whereabouts of last summer’s missing favorites.

Robin Fowler is a freelance writer in Weatherford, TX, whose personal herd ranges from a BLM Mustang to an AQHA World Champion. She recently acquired two weanling fillies that did time in kill pens before they were saved.

 

The Need for Equine Rescue

Kill pens have no monopoly on rescue issues when it comes to horses but needs wax and wane over the years. An example is the plight of the Premarin mares.

At its peak more than a decade ago, some 400 farms in the United States and Canada utilized more than 50,000 horses in the manufacture of the Pfizer drug Premarin that is derived from the urine of pregnant mares and used in human hormone therapy. The mares were kept constantly pregnant and made to stand for six months at a time in small stalls where they could move only a few inches in any direction. They and their foals often were sent to slaughter once their usefulness to Pfizer ended.

Since then the manufacture of Premarin primarily has moved overseas to China and other countries where animal welfare laws are lax. When many of the Premarin ranches in North America lost their contracts, rescue groups geared up to find homes for the mares and their foals. Many of those rescuers found the demise of Premarin farms bittersweet when they were replaced by farms on another continent.

There still are about 3,500 Premarin mares on ranches in the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, says Jennifer Kunz, director of operations at Duchess Sanctuary south of Eugene, Ore., founded in 2008. The 1,120-acre sanctuary, operated by The Fund for Animals affiliated with The Humane Society of the United States, is home to about 75 Premarin mares and 40 offspring of mares who arrived in foal, as well as mustangs and other horses rescued from slaughter. The sanctuary’s horses have arrived at their “forever home” and are not available for adoption, Kunz says.

But even though the number of Premarin mares has been greatly reduced in North America, there are always other issues to take their place. Among them:

* Nurse mare foals: Last Chance Corral is a rescue organization in Athens, OH, devoted to nurse mare foals whose dams were bred to provide nourishment to Thoroughbred race prospects. Of the foals actually born to nurse mares, fillies sometimes are raised to become future nurse mares, but abandoned colts may be left to die of malnourishment. Last Chance Corral rescues 150 to 200 foals a year.

* Abuse: Blaze’s Tribute Equine in Jones, Okla., is a nonprofit devoted to neglected, starved and abused horses, with a primary focus on animal cruelty cases. Rescue personnel often are called to help with cases handled by the Oklahoma City Animal Welfare staff. More than 1,300 horses have been rescued by Blaze’s Tribute since 2002 and most have been returned to health and rehomed.

Tips for Potential Buyers

Saje Bayes hugs a kill-penhorse with a ssevere leg injury that could not be repaired by veterinarians. Greenwood Stables and equine Rescue bought the mare and humanely euthanized her so she did not have to make the 30-hour trip to a Mexican slaughterhouse.

Disposing of unwanted horses is an old problem that needs new solutions, says Cie Sadeghy at Oklahoma’s Caring and Sharing rescue group.

“It’s done in an old-fashioned way. Somebody needs to figure out a new way,” she says.

For those considering horse rescue, these are among tips recommended by rescue groups and equine professionals.

  • “Please do not spend your grocery or bill money to save these horses. Just use your Starbucks funds,” advises Sadeghy, whose rescue group was among the first to target kill pen horses. Although not a 501(c)3 nonprofit charity, Sadeghy’s Facebook group commands more than 22,500 supporters.
  • Kill pens are riddled with diseases. Purchasers should expect horses that have been housed in kill pens to get sick and budget appropriately for veterinary care, says Amy Bayes with Greenwood Stables and Equine Rescue in Kansas, a charity whose 501(c)3 designation allows it to accept tax-deductible contributions. Rescue organizations often can offer advice as to reasonably priced quarantine facilities or provide quarantine themselves.
  • Rescue groups also may be able to recommend vets, farriers and haulers who offer discounts to buyers of their horses. Because of the high incidence of illness in the kill pens, make sure the hauler disinfects his rig between trips and won’t be hauling dirty.
  • If you adopt directly from a rescue organization rather than a kill buyer, your new horse is more likely already quarantined, vetted and current on shots and may even cost less. Some rescue contracts require adopters to return the horse rather than resell it if they can no longer keep it. That clause is designed to make sure the horse never again ends up in a kill pen regardless of its owner’s circumstances, according to Bayes. However, buying directly from a kill buyer carries with it no-strings ownership and the immediacy of saving a life otherwise destined to end in Mexico.
  • Your rescue horse is unlikely to be accompanied by Coggins results or a health certificate and you will be responsible for arranging for necessary paperwork before you transport the horse.
  • If the ability to make tax-deductable donations is important to you, make sure the rescue organization you are dealing with is an accredited 501(c)3 charity and has a track record.
  • If you want to help but can’t afford to adopt a horse or don’t have a place to keep one, consider making donations toward the purchase price of specific horses that you would rescue if you could. Even small donations that lower the price may make it easier for someone else to adopt the horse and save its life.
  • Be prepared for special needs. Some rescue horses are painfully thin, for example. For persons rescuing underweight horses, Sadeghy recommends senior feeds and warns that worming emaciated horses can lead to colic. Instead, wait for a 50- to 100-pound weight gain, she suggests.

 

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☛ Today’s News 1-2-17

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TODAY’S NEWS

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Jan. 2, 2017

Black Little Lena put down at age 28; NCHA looking for an Executive Director and Western Bloodstock reports the 2016 NCHA Futurity Sales claim a $23,235 average, with 13 horses selling for $100,000 or more.

 

BLACK LITTLE LENA PUT DOWN AT AGE 28

A TOP CUTTING HORSE THAT SIRED VERSATILE OFFSPRING 

 

Black Little Lena put down at age 28

Black Little Lena, a beautiful 1988 black son of Smart Little Lena out of a foundation-bred mare Missy Dry by Dry Doc out of Silver Creek Til by Cutting Hoss, was put down for Dec. 29, 2016, following complications of old age. The loss was a great one for owner Phyllis Vincent, Terrell, Texas, who had owned the stallion for the past three years.

Bred by Benny J. and Rebecca Martinez, Bakersfield, Calif., he was sold as a yearling during the 1989 NCHA Futurity to the Reidy Land & Cattle Company, Houston, Texas. They sold the stallion as a 3-year-old to Stephen or Phyllis Ward, Terrell, Texas, where he competed in and won most of his money in NCHA aged-event competition.

With lifetime earnings of $93,000, several aged-event finals and and an NCHA Certificate of Ability, Bronze, Silver and Gold awards from the NCHA, the stallion was also in the Top 10 of the Open Division of the NCHA in 1995. Some of his titles included being a semifinalist in the 1991 NCHA Open Futurity, ridden by John Wold. The pair went on to be a finalist in the 1992 Montgomery Open Futurity Classic for 4-year-olds, also ridden by Wold. In the 1992 Gold Coast Winter Championship Derby, John Ward rode the stallion to the finals, while Wold continued to ride him to the finals of the NCHA Derby, 1994 Augusta Classic, Georgia National for 5-and 6-year olds, 1995 Augusta 7-Up class and 1995 NCHA Super Stakes 7-Up class.  Following the aged events, the stallion continued winning at NCHA weekend shows and was the NCHA Fort Worth Open Stock Show Champion.

His offspring were very diversified. According to NCHA records, as a sire, Black Little Lena sired 189 AQHA-registered foals in 22 crops with 33 of them performing in NCHA; AQHA in Open, Amateur and Youth competition, with several receiving Register of Merit titles in various divisions; NRHA; NRCHA and United States Penning Association competition. Several offspring also excelled in roping competition, both in AQHA and other roping associations. His highest number of foals came in 1995 through 2002.

 

NCHA SEARCHES FOR NEW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The NCHA is searching for a new Executive Director, following the exit of Jim Bret Campbell. According to the NCHA website, the Executive Director is the chief administrative executive officer of NCHA and reports to and is responsible to the chief elected officer (President – currently Phil Rapp) of the Association and the Executive Committee. He provides leadership, management and vision necessary to ensure the Association will effectively increase member satisfaction, grow members, purses, service, revenue and programs. He will direct all aspects of the Association and is responsible for the staff and the financial assets of NCHA. He is also responsible for promoting and marketing the Association and the sport of cutting, as well as implementing and being responsible for implementing the goals and objectives of the Association. Click below for full NCHA press release.

NCHA Executive Director opening | NCHA News

 

 

WESTERN BLOODSTOCK CLAIMS A DAZZLING WEEK OF SALES DURING NCHA FUTURITY

Western Bloodstock reports the 2016 NCHA Futurity Sales claim a $23,235 average, with 13 horses selling for $100,000 or more. The high-selling horse was Lot 5145, Sly Playgirl, a 2007 mare by That Sly Cat, bringing $800,000; followed by the popular stallion Spots Hot, a 2001 stallion by Chula Dual, bringing $550,000. Another top stallion, Third Cutting, a 2005 stallion by Boonlight Dancer, also brought $285,000. Allaboutcutting.com will be publishing of breakdown of these sales during the next few weeks. Go to the Western Bloodstock website (www.westernbloodstock.com) to see all the sale results and go to the NCHA website at www.nchacutting.com for a press release from Western Bloodstock about the sales.

 

 

 

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☛ Nominations for BLM horse-slaughter committee; new para-mutuel rules; gelding clinic 12-31-16

Posted by on Dec 31, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TODAYS INCIDENTAL NEWS:

Dec. 31, 2016

BLM SOLICITS NOMINATIONS FOR WILD HORSE AND BURRO SLAUGHTER ADVISORY BOARD

Currently there is only one member on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) advisory board for the BLM Wild Horse and Burro program that is an advocate for the horses. Ginger Kathrens is the only member to vote against butchering tens of thousands of wild horses that the BLM has illegally captured and currently confines at taxpayer expense. According to those in the know, “Ginger is the only advocate; the rest are all special interest, pre-screened appointees that are interested in only horse slaughter, welfare ranching,  hunting and personal affirmation.

Recently the Department of the Interior send out a notice with the purpose being to solicit public nominations for three positions on the Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board that will become vacant on April 3, 2017. The Board provides advice concerning the management, protection and control of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by the Department of the Interior through the BLM.

Board members serve without compensation; however, while away from their home or regular places of business, Board and subcommittee members engaged in Board or subcommittee business, approved by the Designated Federal Official, may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem, in lieu of subsistence in the same manner as persons employed intermittently in government service.

Nominations for a term of three years are needed to represent the following categories of interest: Natural Resource Management, Wild Horse and Burrow Research, Public Interest (Equine behavior).

The Board meets one to four times annually but may call for additional meetings in connection with special needs for advice. Individuals may nominate themselves or others.

Send all mail via the U.S. Postal Service to: Division of Wild Horses and Burros, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Boothe, WO-260, Washington, DC 20240.

Mail send by Fed Ex or UPs should be addressed to: Wild Horse and Burro Division, U. s. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street SE, Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Both, Washington, D.C. 20003.

You may also e-mail PDF documents to Ms. Boothe at: dboothe@blm.gov.

Nominations must be postmarked or submitted to the BLM no later than Feb. 10, 2017.

BLM soliciting public nominations

 

IRS ISSUES NEWLY PROPOSED REGULATIONS RELATING TO PARI-MUTUEL WINNINGS

According to the Paulick Report, in a 31-page rule-making document, the Treasury and the IRS has issued newly proposed regulations relating to withholding and reporting with respect to pari-mutuel winnings. The document, entitled “Withholding on Payments of Certain Gambling Winnings, accomplishes the goals started and spearheaded by the NTRA more than two years ago.

The proposed regulations clarify “the amount of the wager’ to include the entire amount wagered into a specific pari-mutuel pool by an individual – not just the winning base unit as is the case today – as long as all wagers made into a specific pool by an individual are made on a single totalizator ticket if the wager is placed onsite.

The proposed regulations will impact a significant percentage of winning wagers, particularly those involving multi-horse or multi-race exotic wagers and result in tens of millions of dollars in additional pari-mutuel churn.

The proposed regulations will undergo a 90-day comment period and it is conceivable that they could be in place prior to the 2017 Triple Crown. The NTRA will soon establish a convenient and simple method for industry stakeholders to encourage enactment of the proposed regulations.

To follow this, go to http://www.paulickreport.com

 

OPERATION GELDING CLINIC GELDS 100TH STALLION

According to a press release put out by the Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC), Operation Gelding clinic organizers Lacey Edge and Kaye Garrison have gelded 100 stallions through the organization’s Operation Gelding Program.

Kaye and her daughter, Lacey,  have been organizing clinics since the program began in 2010. Lacey, 13 at the time, earned about the program after conducting research for a school project. This year, she returned from West Texas A&M University to continue the tradition.

A 2-year-old, Crash, named for crashing through several fences when he was only a few weeks old, was the 100th stallion to be gelded.

Since 2010, the UHC’s Operation Gelding program has provided funding to geld 1,562 stallions at 122 clinics in 31 states. This year, 348 stallions were castrated, just 18 fewer than the last two years combined. Numbers are expected to surge again in 2017 when the program will pay $100 per horse, an increase that was approved by the UHC at its annual meeting last June. Vouchers are also available to owners with financial need.

Individuals interested in hosting a clinic should contact the UHC office at 202-737-7325 or uhc@horsecouncil.org, or visit the UHC website at www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org.

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☛ Today’s News 11-11–16

Posted by on Nov 11, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TODAY’S NEWS

 

Nov. 11, 2016

 

ROSS AND MADGE LLOYD LOSE THEIR DAUGHTER

Nov. 11, 2016

The daughter of Ross and Madge Lloyd, who own 3 Bar L Transport died completely unexpectedly and they are struggling to get a grip on it.

According to Madge, ”she was found in a comma, then a stroke followed. She had an aneurysm, Never regained consciousness after surgery.

“She was so full of life and had so much to look forward to. Her first grandchild is due and she was so excited.”

The Lloyds are set up along the row with the insurance agents at every NCHA Sale and have been for years and years. She always has cookies out! They have the huge semi rig that Ross customized.

 

The Lloyds live in Mineral Wells but used to live in California years ago. They are very active in the Cowboys for Christ, giving out bibles at their booth.

 

“It’s quite a shock to a mom’s spirit,” said Madge. “Please pray for me. I feel so low, heavy and tired. I know it’s just stress but I just can’t get over it. Maybe the funeral will finalize things. I pray.”

 

CAVENDERS BUYS LUSKEY’S RYONS IN FORT WORTH

 

Press release from Luskey’s Ryon’s

Luskey’s, the popular western clothing store that has been a part of Fort Worth for nearly a century, has been sold to a larger competitor, Cavender’s.

The Luskey’s/Ryon’s Western Store at 2601 N. Main St. in the Stockyards will be closed Monday for renovations and then reopen a day or two later under the Cavender’s name. The remodeling likely will be ongoing for several weeks.

“It was a family decision, and we have been working with them for a long time,” Alan Luskey, who co-owns the store with his cousin Mike Luskey and other relatives, said Friday. He said the family approached Cavender’s about a possible merger months ago, and negotiations have taken place since February.

 

AMERICAN PAINT HORSE ASSOCIATION TO RELOCATE TO FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS

 

CURRENT PLANS ARE TO RENT OUT THE SPACE IN THE BUILDING THEY CURRENTLY OWN

 

According to a June 24-26 article in the Fort Worth Business Journal, The American Paint Horse Association plans to relocate the Fort Worth Stockyards’ Horse & Mule Bars at East Exchange Avenue.

 

Officials from the APHA said they plan to relocate their headquarters, 45-member staff and retail store in the winter of 2017 and 2018 from the organization’s home since 1999 – the Mercantile Center Business/Industrial park in Northeast Fort Worth.

 

Although the final lease agreement is still being negotiated, Billy Smith, the executive director of the 50,000-member association, said they were retooling their whole business model to become leaner and meaner by cost cutting, enhancing member services and expanding equestrian competition accessibility, affordability and variety to reboot their membership and horse ownership. They have cut headquarter staff from 150 people in 2004-2007 down to 45.

 

Smith claims they don’t need the 40,000-square-foot home space in its own 1999 contracted new building and they are planning on leasing the current headquarters and the plan is that their income from the building will cover most if not all of the Stockyards site’s leasing costs.

 

 

USDA ANNOUNCES VET MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM AWRD IN TEXAS

 

 

Press release from the Texas Animal Health Commission

 

AUSTIN, TX –  The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) awarded 48 American veterinarians the VMLRP award to help repay a portion of their veterinary school loans in return for serving in areas lacking sufficient veterinary resources.

 

One Texas veterinarian was awarded the VMLRP award this year and will be fulfilling the shortage of public practice (Type III) needs in Brazos County. Type III awards are limited to 10 percent of total nominations and available funds.

 

While the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) does not administer the VMLRP loan, each year the TAHC solicits input from a broad range of stakeholders including veterinarians, veterinary educators, livestock producers, and the public to identify which geographic areas of Texas to nominate for the VMLRP. A total of eight shortage areas in Texas were identified in 2016, of which six were Type II and two were Type III.

 

“The public veterinarian shortage situation in Brazos County comes from difficulty in recruitment and retention, with prolonged searches and even an inability to fill vacancies in the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL),” said Dr. Bruce Akey, TVMDL Director. “The trend has increasingly been to fill positions with non-veterinarians due to an inability to attract qualified or interested veterinarians, resulting in a loss of critical clinical expertise.”

 

Due to the size of the animal agriculture industries in Texas, this shortage poses a risk beyond the state borders, as animals and animal products move across state lines daily, and are traded internationally.

 

A map of veterinary service shortage areas by state is available online.

 

In its seventh year of operation, the VMLRP program helps qualified veterinarians repay up to $75,000 of debt they incurred while pursuing their veterinary medicine degrees in return for three years of veterinary service in a designated veterinary shortage area. Participants are required to serve in one of the three types of shortage situations.

 

• Type I are private practices dedicated to food animal medicine at least 80 percent of the time.

• Type II are private practices in rural areas dedicated to food animal medicine up to 30 percent of the time.

• Type III are dedicated to public practice up to 49 percent of the time.

For more information contact the VMLRP via email at vmlrp@nifa.usda.gov. Comments or questions related to the designated shortage areas may be directed to susan.culp@tahc.texas.gov.

 

 

 

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☛ Purina surprises horse rescue with feed gift 11-11–16

Posted by on Nov 11, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PURINA ANIMAL NUTRITION SURPRISES HORSE RESCUE WITH LARGE DONATION

A Colorado horse rescue receives two tons of Purina horse feed to support rehabilitation and education programs.

  

Press Release from Purina
Nov. 11, 2016

A horse rescue in Fairplay, Colo., received a huge but welcome delivery on Saturday afternoon. Far View Horse Rescue was surprised with a donation of free horse feed from Purina Animal Nutrition.

 

The gift arrived during a volunteer and rescue appreciation event held at the 40-acre ranch near Breckenridge. Volunteers gathered to share stories of the team’s hard work and remember the countless horses saved and rehomed by Far View. During the event, the world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales, who have a longstanding relationship with Purina and are exclusively fed Purina feed, made a surprise visit to help Purina deliver the two tons of horse feed.

 

“To date, we have donated more than 800 tons of horse feed to help rehabilitate horses across the country through our sponsorship of A Home for Every Horse,” explains Purina Animal Nutrition Director of Lifestyle Marketing James Kinnear.  “We are pleased to offer this gift to Far View Horse Rescue and hope it helps the organization continue to make such a positive impact on the horses and volunteers involved.

 

Representatives from A Home for Every Horse were also in attendance. The A Home For Every Horse program helps connect rescue organizations to resources and people available to help. Far View Horse Rescue is one of more than 600 horse rescues across the United States impacted by the partnership between Purina and A Home for Every Horse.

 

“Every horse deserves a good home. When we can find new homes for rescued horses, it makes everything worthwhile,” says Page Van Meter, lead volunteer of Far View Horse Rescue.

“We couldn’t do all of this without the help of our youth and adult volunteers and the support of programs such as A Home for Every Horse and Purina Horse Feed.”

 

To learn more about feeding rescue horses, connect with Purina Animal Nutrition and A Home for Every Horse at www.purinamills.com/horse-feed, or Purina Horse Feed on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Purina Animal Nutrition LLC (www.purinamills.com) is a national organization serving producers, animal owners and their families through more than 4,700 local cooperatives, independent dealers and other large retailers throughout the United States. Driven to unlock the greatest potential in every animal, the company is an industry-leading innovator offering a valued portfolio of complete feeds, supplements, premixes, ingredients and specialty technologies for the livestock and lifestyle animal markets. Purina Animal Nutrition LLC is headquartered in Shoreview, Minn. and a wholly owned subsidiary of Land O’Lakes, Inc.

 

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☛ Dual Peppy moves to Babcock Ranch 10-4-16

Posted by on Oct 4, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 25 comments

DUAL PEPPY MOVED TO BABCOCK RANCH

 

By Rick Dennis
Oct. 4, 2016

 

Dual Peppy today!

In my www.allaboutcutting.com opinion piece entitled “The Dual Peppy Saga,” dated Nov. 1, 2014, the article illustrates a highly publicized Colorado animal abuse case involving the NCHA World Champion Cutting Stallion Dual Peppy and his then owner Sherry Brunzell. Notwithstanding, the article includes other horses involved in the abuse case aside from Dual Peppy, e.g., cutting horses previously owned by NCHA Non-Pro World Champion Kay Floyd of Stephenville, Texas.

 

After an executed search warrant by law enforcement, Brunzell was arrested, prosecuted and convicted and a number of horses were seized by the State of Colorado – including Dual Peppy.

 

The seized horses were placed with a horse rescue in Colorado that cared for them throughout this ordeal with Brunzell being court ordered to pay the bill. At last information, Brunzell was appealing her conviction. For the record, this horse abuse case received National and International attention under the moniker “Justice For Dual Peppy.” For additional information in this case refer to the following link:

Click for Dual Peppy article>>

Today there is a new saga for Dual Peppy as he has been purchased by Jim Babcock, Sanger, Texas, one of the leading breeders in the cutting, reining and reined cow horse industry.

 

HISTORY

Dual Peppy came into this world in 1992 through the breeding genius of Greg Ward of the Ward Ranch, Tulare, Calif. Greg, a member of the NRCHA Hall of Fame, was well known in the reined cow horse industry as “The Master.” His accomplishments are scribed in the “Book of Legends” and his successes will be forever listed in the annals of history.

 

Dual Peppy was born at the legendary Ward Ranch in Tulare and was the second full brother in the four-brother creation by Greg Ward. These wonderful and famous creations are commonly known in performance horse circles as the “Dual Pep” line of horses.

 

The other full brothers include Dual Pep, Mister Dual Pep and Dually Pep. All four of the brothers are sired by Peppy San Badger and are out of the Ward Ranch mare Miss Dual Doc by Docs Remedy. Keeping it all in the family, Miss Dual Doc’s dam, Miss Brooks Bar, is another one of Greg Ward’s creations. Each of these brothers has become an icon in their own right in the performance horse industry.

 

After he sold Dual Pep, Greg realized he had formulated the “magic cross” with this match up of Peppy San Badger and Miss Dual Doc. Greg started breeding Dual Peppy at the age of 2 and his first foal, Dual Train, was another magic cross for Greg and later became the foundation mare of my reined cow horse training facility in Louisiana – the Wind River Ranch.

 

Dual Train is by Dual Peppy and out of Nics Train by Reminic. Reminic is still another legendary Greg Ward creation. Reminic is by Docs Remedy and out of Fillinic, the Ward Ranch’s legendary foundation and Hall of Fame mare.

 

Dual Peppy was broke, trained and shown by Greg Ward and the pair accumulated a successful money-earning show career. In 1998, Dual Peppy was sold to Colorado purchasers Rick and Sherry Brunzell and Dual Peppy was transported to Jim Babcock at the Babcock ranch in Texas where he was successfully shown. Later Dual Peppy was transferred to the Kay Floyd training facility where he was shown in NCHA cutting events by Glen Blankenship under the watchful eye of Floyd. The cutting team accumulated an NCHA World Championship Cutting Horse title.

 

GREG’S BREEDING SUCCESS

Sire records reveal Dual Pep is the No. 7 all-time leading cutting horse sire with offspring earnings in excess of $19 Million, Dual Peppy has offspring earnings in excess of $700,000, Mister Dual Pep has offspring earnings in excess of $1,611,109 and Dually Pep is standing at stud in Brazil.

 

The uniqueness with this line of horses is their ability to traverse and master the three disciplines required in the NRCHA events: reining, cutting and cow horse, as well as other specialized disciplines. Also, they have all become prolific sires in the performance horse industry.

 

Other Ward Ranch stallions include the No. 6 NRCHA leading sire Just Plain Colonel, with foal earnings of $1,581,453; NRCHA Hall of Fame inductee Master Remedy with foal earnings in excess of $756,000; Smart Lil Pepinic, with foal earnings in excess of $1,319,543 and NRCHA No. 4 leading sire; NRHA Hall of Fame Inductee Boomernic, with foal earnings in excess of $1 million, Hall of Fame Inductee Reminic, with foal earnings in excess of $3,800,000. Overall, Greg and the Ward Ranch produced five million-dollar sires and five Hall of Fame inductees – including Greg himself, who is in the NRCHA Hall of Fame. The Ward Ranch is still the second leading breeder of reined cow horses with $2,422,280 in lifetime earnings.

 

Fillinic is in the AQHA Hall of Fame, Master Remedy is in the NRCHA Hall of Fame, Boomernic is in the NRHA Hall of Fame and Dual Pep is in the NCHA Hall of Fame.

 

A COLLABORATION OF TWO SUCCESSFUL BREEDERS – GREG WARD AND JIM BABCOCK

 

Dual Peppy shown today in his new stall at the Babcock Ranch.

From the Ward Ranch, I trained and participated in NRCHA events for three years riding and promoting my own stock: Nic Chex and Dual Train. While competing in these events, I had the opportunity of observing a myriad of horses competing in the NRCHA West Coast events that came from breeders around the country. Having had stock participating in and in the finals of every NRCHA event, I was appreciative of the fact each show was a meeting of the best horsemen and best horses striving for a coveted Championship title.

 

Aside from the coveted GW brand, the next brand I became familiar with was the Babcock Ranch brand.  First hand, I saw offspring of the legendary Smart Chic Olena being shown by some of the best trainers in the industry. One of the things that entwines all three of us is the fact that Greg bred, trained and showed Reminic; I owned and had a son of Reminic competing in the NRCHA West Coast events and Reminic later stood at stud at the Babcock Ranch.

 

However, Reminic wasn’t the only Greg Ward creation wearing the coveted “GW” brand that eventually gravitated to the Babcock Ranch. The other two are Mister Dual Pep and now Dual Peppy.

 

Greg’s theory with Reminic was that he wanted to send his creation to Texas to improve his breeding capability. Thus, respecting and having confidence in Babcock, the transfer was made and the rest is history. I’m sure if the truth were known, Greg is smiling down from heaven and approving the Dual Peppy transition to Jim and the Babcock Ranch, if not for one reason. Dual Peppy was Greg Ward’s favorite horse. In the evenings, Greg and Dual Peppy enjoyed roping steers at the ranch after training was over.

 

Unfortunately, the entire horse industry lost a legend when it lost the four-time NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity Champion, to cancer on Dec. 6, 1998 at the age of 63. Just two months earlier, Greg had claimed his fourth NRCHA Futurity World Championship with an inspirational performance, while visibly battling the illness that would kill him only months later. He was showing Reminics Pep, a fourth-generation NRCHA Futurity Champion he had raised. He handily won the event with a 12-point lead over the second-place horse.

 

For the record Babcock is a successful breeder of performance horses. The May 15, 2016 statistics published by Quarter Horse News, show Babcock as the fifth leading breeder of all time in the cutting and reining industry, with total earnings of $994,831 – cutting  $148,823 and reining $846,008. In the Oct. 15, 2016 Reined Cow Horse issue of Quarter Horse News, listing Equi-Stat Lifetime Reined Cow Horse Statistics, Babcock was also fifth, with reined cow horses he bred earning $854,106.

 

Babcock said that stallions he owned, showed or stood as breeding stallions at his Texas Babcock Ranch during the past 47 years included Smart Chic Olena, Reminic, Trashadeous, Cowboy Smarts, Paid by Chic, Lucky Little Lena,  Mister Dual Pep, Ima Chairman, Elans Playboy, Chic Please, Peppy Badger Chex, Bueno Fritzinic, Bristol Pep, Lenas Wright On, Lenas Sugarman, Steady Tradition, Talk About Smart, Smart Peppy Doc, Smart Peppy Lena, HB Instant Choice, Royal Blue Quixote, Bar Passer, Poco Ray Mount, Two Eyed Request, Scorps Mister Tuffy, Bonanza Scorpion and  Mito Commander, Top Impressive, Dynamic Deluxe,  Aguila Baron, Dealin Dirty, Start Me A Tab, Smart Equalizer, Boomernic, Deluxe Doc Smoke and Elan Dynabid.

 

According to Babcock, he and the Babcock Ranch have also owned many great mares including Cowgirls Are Smart who won the NRCHA World’s Greatest Horseman title; A Captive Heart, AQHA World Champion Cutting Horse; Boons Holly Bar, AQHA World Champion Cutting Horse; Playboys Sugar Baby; AQHA Reserve World Champion Cutting Horse; Docs Michelle, AQHA Reserve World Champion Cutting horse and Jenny Montana, AQHA World Champion Cutting Horse.

 

During 2017 Jim and the Babcock ranch will be standing Heaven Sent Chic, Define Good, El Senor Red, New Addition and another Greg Ward creation Dual Peppy.

 

 

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