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☛ Is NCHA’s destiny at a crossroads? 1-17-16

Posted by on Jan 18, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

IS NCHA’S DESTINY  AT A CROSSROADS?

 

NCHA TRAINER-CALLED MEETING REVEALS SHOCKING STATE OF NCHA FINANCES

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Jan. 18, 2016

A Friday, Jan. 15 meeting called by two trainers, Matt Miller and Tatum Rice, on social media, inviting all NCHA members, was soon addressed by NCHA Executive Director Jim Bret Campbell on the NCHA website, saying they “wanted to keep everyone informed.”

 

The letter also stated that “during last year’s convention, the directors approved a change in the payout calculations that essentially made each class a standalone, jackpot cutting with the purse generated by the entry fee and number of entries, not by added money, unless there was a sponsor specifically dedicated to supporting that class.” The letter also included a chart highlighting the METF reimbursement program to the NCHA.

Click for letter from Campbell>>

 

The meeting soon blossomed into an overload of participants at the hotel where it was planned and moved to the Fort Worth Convention Center on Friday, Jan. 15.  For those unable to attend, a webinar was facilitated so directors and members could log in and listen.

 

The meeting was precipitated by some entries who received checks from the 2015 NCHA Futurity and then complained they were much lower than expected. The meeting lasted from 2 p.m. to close to 6 p.m., with around 100 members, directors and members of the Executive Committee in attendance.

 

MAJOR EVENT TRUST FUND:

The major items discussed were the Major Event Trust Fund (METF) money from the State of Texas and City of Fort Worth and its effect on the Triple Crown events (Futurity, Super Stakes, and Summer Spectacular) as well as the current financial situation the NCHA has found themselves in.

 

President Jo Ellard opened the meeting with news that the METF money was no longer available for purse money – only for the expenses to put on the Triple Crown events, saying there was a need for solutions and recommendations regarding the structuring of the payouts of these events and how they were going to be paid for. Also the METF had been moved from the office of the Comptroller to the new Governor’s Office, with former Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott taking the governorship of the state of Texas. The METF has put up a new website; however, unlike the old one doesn’t yet list all organizations who have applied for funds and which ones have been paid.

Click for new Texas METF information>>

 

Lach Perks, Vice Chairman of the Finance & Audit Committee, was the first to talk, saying,  “Please don’t shoot the messenger.” He continued that early in November, they saw a sign there was a shift from the norm, when prior to the two final payments, 80 horses transferred out of the Open, costing the association some $200,000. At that time, they developed a Payout Task Force, who logged in some 250 hours of time on the problem.  They knew they had to create a larger task force and push across a goal to get to the Executive Committee before the Super Stakes. Ironically, that day was the date for the final payment for the Super Stakes.

 

He also said that the Texas METF owed the NCHA $3.8 million, going back to 2014 and owing for their last five events, and the Super Stakes Stallion owners owe $1.5 million, for a total of $5.3 million. Also, he said the NCHA has $1.2 million in cash and a $1.5 million emergency purse reserve in case the METF money goes away. However, he stressed they need to watch their cash flow until the METF money comes in – they are in a cash-flow pinch.  The problem with the METF money is that they have to file their report AFTER the events are over and they have paid all the bills and they do not receive the money from the state – sometimes for a year or more.

 

As far as new sources of revenue, it was mentioned that the website can provide some new sources of revenue, they have an option of using 3 ½ rather than 4 cows per contestant – or they could even do away with the semifinals. All these have just been talked about – not done yet – and none are easy choices to make.

 

A question from the floor asked what our chances are of getting all that METF back money and Lach said, “We should get it all.” However, he did mention that the American Paint Horse Association (APHA) didn’t get all their money when the state disallowed some of their expenses; however, they allowed them to refile their request.

 

The NCHA is still adding money for the political PAC in entry fees for the major events, trying to be sure the money does not disappear or decline. That money goes to the politicians who may or may not vote to keep the fund going. Also the NCHA lobbyist Jim Short has talked to the Governor’s office several times to try to facilitate the continuation of the fund money. However, it’s interesting to note that on the 2015 NCHA Futurity entry blank, they do not state on the entry blank how much money that PAC donation is. (The amount was previously $100 for the Open and $50 for the Non-Pro) Therefore, if you want to opt out, you don’t know the amount you can subtract from the entry fee on the entry blank if you want to opt out of paying in money for the PAC. It’s interesting to see in the Futurity Program that the 2015 Futurity paid out $1,813,913 in the Open, compared to 2014′s $2,083,901. Entries were down from 599 to 556. In the Non-Pro paid out $667,300, compared to 2014′s $800,241 and entries were down from 301 to 289.

Click for 2015 NCHA Futurity entry blank>>

 

Since the METF money has been going down each year (ie – $2.6 million in 2013-2014, $2.19 million in 2014-2015 and $1.78 million in 2015-2016) suggestions were made that the NCHA should figure out how not to depend on someone else to provide the money for the events, leaving the NCHA out of control. “We need some kind of an alternative plan – and maybe that’s some really good sponsors,” was one of the suggestions. According to Lach, “the Triple Crown cuttings creat $2 million in profit, which is essential for the health of the association.”

 

However, Lach reminded them this was a “short-term” issue and they had to figure out how to do payouts on events that are soon to be held. “We need a brain trust,” he said. “We don’t want to paint a bright picture or a bad picture.”

 

PAYOUT CHARTS:

Many charts were shown, comparing the various events though the years, including total purse, no. of entries, how much and what percent was paid in the semis and how much the winner of the semis won.

 

Payout charts were massaged by things impacting them (ie) entry fees, no of entries, how many places to pay, top loading first few places, etc.

Lach stressed that the Association has a crucial short-term problem, which is the payout for the Super Stakes, and it must not take months, it needs to be done next week. They have selected a Payout Task Force to take care of the short-term problems. He stressed that contestants should be able to figure out what their paycheck is before it is posted. “Anyone with a cell phone should be able to do the math and figure that out.”

 

Office charges in the Triple Crown events were mentioned, with $325 for the Futurity and $525 for the Super Stakes and Summer Spectacular. Asked why they were different, he said, “That’s how it came through the Convention in order to maintain profitability.”

 

EMPLOYEES:

Employee salaries were brought up and had only gone up 3%, which is the inflation rate, and includes benefits. Total salaries in 2015 were $2,312,230. “Rick Ivey, the previous treasurer, was the only one outside the norm for a non profit of our size,” said Lach. “We are in the median of the pay scale for a non-profit of our size.” Ivey has since been eliminated.

 

A chart of the number of NCHA employees from 2010 through 2015 was posted, with the number being reduced from 32 in 2010 to 30 in 2015.

 

“If you don’t pay competitively, the only employees you will lose are the good ones,” said Lach.

 

Lach also said that Jim Bret and the staff are holding back on not filling open positions without any intervention; however, they do not have a successful laundry list of reduction of costs.

 

REASONS FOR LOSSES:

Several reasons were given for the association’s losses over the years and included: 1) addition of more classes and awarding of a lot of buckles in each class. More classes mean more day for the Will Rogers facility, more contract labor and $25,000 to $40,000 per day for additional cattle.

 

2) Loss of Champions Club

 

3) Most people live locally now during the major events and we have lost stall and practice pen income.

 

4) We have eliminated work-offs in the finals and now allow ties, which mean more awards.

 

5) Inflation. While the cost of cows and gas is ok, contract labor is up more than 3 percent.

 

OBJECTIVES OF PAYOUT TASK FORCE:

1)   Clear and concise rules.

2)   Transparency – make it auditable by a third party

3)   Eliminate guaranteed payouts.

4)   Minimizing top loads, bottom loads etc. Make it easy to understand the payouts.

5)   Retain the philosophy to pay competitors as strong and deep as practical.

6)   If there is a semis, one tie the entry fee would be minimum payout.

7)   Eliminate wild card rounds.

8)   Keep NCHA event best value in the industry.

9)   Retain the current levels of profit – $2 million from the Triple Crown shows, unless they can replace with alternative sources.

 

PAYOUT VS COST:

One important thing to remember is that the cost of the payout should be less than the entry fee. In the last NCHA Open Futurity the entry fee was $3,165 per entry, but the cost was $3,250. In comparison, Abilene’s 4-year-old Open had an $1,895 entry fee and a cost of $1,657; the BI’s 4-year-old Open entry fee was $2,450 and the cost was $2,199. Another major association had a $2,148 entry fee in their futurity, at a cost of $3,077.

 

SPONSORSHIPS:

The word was a good one: Sponsorships were up. However, they are eliminating “in-kind” sponsorships, (ie) a saddle maker gives us a saddle if we buy one.

 

Also, a $100,000 deal with the Fort Worth Business Press went away, which on the books showed a $100,000 decrease in revenue.

 

Lucas Oil and Great American Insurance will be coming back as sponsors; however, members should call or write the sponsors and let them know that you appreciate them. If they don’t hear from anyone, chances are they won’t come back. The have to justify their sponsorship money.

 

Prior to showing a variety of charts, changing no. of entries, added money, leaving out semifinals, etc., Lach said the “Best thing to do to raise the purse is to have people from around the world compete or watch. That will run the METF crazy and they will want to be part of our events.” That happened in 2014 when the NCHA had the anniversary celebration.

 

 

 

 

 

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☛ Today’s Cutting Horse News 12-2-15

Posted by on Dec 2, 2015 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TODAY’S CUTTING HORSE NEWS

 

INCLUDING SALES HELD DURING THE NCHA FUTURITY

 

Dec. 2, 2015
By Glory Ann Kurtz

 

NCHA EC PASSES NP EXCEPTION RULE

Although not all NCHA members concur with the the recent decision of the NCHA Executive Committee, they recently passed the new Non-Pro Exception rule of 3 yrs/$100k. (If you have not trained in 3 years and have less than $100,000 in Open lifetime earnings in any discipline, you are eligible to get your Non Pro card back). However, there is a new Non Pro Exception form that must be notarized and signed by a director and reviewed by the Non Pro/Amateur Review Committee before a change of status is granted. The new rule will go into effect starting with the 2016 point year. Contact Julie Davis in the NCHA office for the new form.

 

HELP REX ROSSOLL:

Rex Rossoll, a long-time cutting horse trainer and member of the cutting horse industry is experiencing a hard time right now.  Rex was having bad headaches recently and doctors found that he has an aneurysm.  He underwent surgery on Nov. 23 and with great relief found the aneurysm to be caused by a trauma, which made it more easily treatable. The surgeon placed a stent to relieve the aneurysm due to the fact that it is so close to the spinal cord.

 

Rex has no insurance at this time. Cutters Caring and Sharing was contacted to help Rex through this difficult time.  Any donations are greatly appreciated and are tax deductible. Please write checks payable to:  WCEF/CC&S-Rex Rossoll. Mail the checks to:  PCCHA, P.O. Box 108, Lockeford, CA 95237

 

NORMAN BRUCE PASSES AWAY AT AGE 80

Norman Bruce, left, receiving a plaque from Billy Morris at the 2008 Augusta Futurity for 40 years of service in Area 18.

Norman Bruce, Rutledge, Ga., 80, a member of the NCHA Members Hall of Fame as well as the NCHA Non-Pro Hall Of Fame, passed away on Sunday, Nov. 29. Bruce was also a past president of the Southeast’s Area 18 Cutting Horse Association, President of the Augusta Futurity and an NCHA Executive Committee member.

 

Bruce was a fierce competitor in the arena, as well as a breeder of cutting horses. He was a contender for the Top 10 NCHA World Championship. He owned and showed the great mare Doc’s Haida and after he retired her, she was bred to Peppy San Badger, with the result being Haidas Little Pep, a top cutting horse sire who was the 1986 NCHA Open World Champion. He also owned other well-known stallions, including Docs Sugs Brudder, his son Squeak Toy and Haidas Magic. His son Reid Bruce was also very active in the cutting horse industry.

 

A graveside service for Norman Bruce was held Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015 at Eternal Hills Memorial Gardens, Snellville, Ga. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to Cutters In Action, c/o NCHA Foundation, 260 Bailey Avenue, Fort Worth, TX, 76107. Condolences may be viewed or sent to www.wagesfuneralhome.com.

 

COLORADO’S STANLEY GLOVER PASSES AT AGE 88

An icon in Colorado’s cutting horse industry passed away Oct. 9 at his Avondale, Colo., home. Services were held Oct. 20 at the First Baptist Church in Benjamin, Texas.

 

Glover started show horses when he worked for Jimmie Randals, Montaya, N.M. During his cutting career, he placed horses in the NCHA Top 10 twice, making 21 AQHA World Champions. He also held judges’ cards for the NCHA, AQHA, PHBA and the APHA. He retired in 2014 at the age of 87.

 

Glover is survived by his wife Beverly, Avondale; son, John Dee Glover, also of Avondale; two stepsons: Doug Bryant and his wife Kathy, Crawford, Colo., and Charlie Bryant, Dubois, Wyo. and two grandchildren.

 

Memorials can be given in Glover’s name to the Sangrede Cristo Hospice, 124 W. Cranston, Fowler, CO 81039 and you can send your condolences to his family at 3787 Avondale Blvd., Avondale, Co.

 

 

GEORGE FERRANTE LOSES BATTLE WITH CANCER

George Ferrente

George Ferrante, Somis, Calif., lost his battle with brain cancer on Oct. 18. The well-known competitor, trainer, judge and clinician was diagnosed in May 2014. Several ranch sortings, auctions and other money-making events were held to raise money to offset the high medical costs, medication and loss of income as the family was trying to raise the money so they wouldn’t be forced to sell their Somis, Calif., ranch that has been in the family for 150 years. A GoFundMe page has also been set up.

 

Survivors include his wife, Kathie and two daughters. Send your condolences to 7694 Bradley Rd., Solis, CA 93066.

 

 

NCHA EVENTS TOP MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS TO ECONOMIC IMPACT OF EQUESTRIAN EVENTS AT WILL ROGERS

According to an article in the Fort Worth Business CEO quarterly publication, in 2013, the NCHA’s three major aged events: the NCHA Futurity, Super States and Summer Spectacular, topped the list of events making the largest economic impact of major equestrian events at the Will Rogers Memorial Center with a total of $26 million. (The NCHA Futurity contributed $11.8 million, the Super Stakes, $8 million and the Summer Spectacular $6.2 million.

 

According to the article in the Winter 2015 edition written by former NCHA Executive Director Jeff Hooper, “As a result, Fort Worth is now recognized as one of the nation’s premier destinations for major horse shows and equestrian events, with those activities centered on the equestrian center at Will Rogers Memorial Center located in Fort Worth’s cultural district. Not including the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo, more than 250 days of horse show activity contribute more than $64 million in incremental spending in Fort Worth and serve as a catalyst for year-around horse breeding and training operations in the area, that contribute millions of dollars annually to the region’s economy.”

 

According to Kirk Slaughter, the director of public events for Fort Worth, claims the events have helped make Fort Worth arguably the “Horse Show Capital of the World,” that was pushed upward by the passage of The Events Trust Fund legislative initiatives that the city and equine associations can utilize to help direct the state’s share of certain tax revenues generated by the events back to the city to utilize specifically for those events.

 

“Since then there have been over $80 million in improvements at the Will Rogers facilities, with none of it coming from the city’s general fund,” said Slaughter.

 

Other major events held at the Will Rogers facilities and their contribution including the Reichert Celebration $13.4 million, Arabian Region IX, $4.2 million, ApHC Nationals, $4.1 million and AphC World Show $3.8 million, APHA fall Show, $3.7 million, Ranch Sorting Nationals, $2.9 million, Mustang Million, $2.6 million, AjPHA world Show, $1.6 million, AMHA (miniature) World Show, $1.3 million and Ranch Sorting Regionals, $500,000.

 

 

NCHA FINALS AND 7 HORSE SALES CULMINATE NCHA FUTURITY

The NCHA Futurity will culminate on Saturday, Dec. 12 with the Open Finals; however as well as the last of seven horse sales held within six days, with over 1,000 head cataloged.

 

Managed by Jeremy Barwick’s Western Bloodstock, the sales will begin on Dec. 7 at 9 a.m. in the Watt arena, with a 2-year-old session selling 140 horses. The balance of the 2-year-old session, with 121 horses, will continue on Dec. 8 at 9 a.m. Also, that evening, 50 Select Yearlings, will be held at 6 p.m. in the Round-Up Inn.

 

A new “Cowhorse Sale, with 129 consignments, will start at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 9, in the Watt Arena, followed by the Select Cow Dog Sale.

 

On Thursday, Dec. 10, Session 1 of the Preferred Breeders Sale, featuring 205 horses, will start at 9 a.m. in the John Justin arena, with breakfast being held at 8 a.m.

 

On Friday, Dec. 11, Session 2 of the Preferred Breeders Sale, featuring 206 head, will start at 8 a.m. in the John Justin Arena, with breakfast at 8 a.m.

 

The final sale, the NCHA Cutting Horse Sale, will be held Saturday, Dec. 12, with 150 cutting horses selling, starting at 9 a.m. in the Watt Arena. Breakfast will be served at 8 a.m.  Hopefully the sale will be over by 6 p.m. when the Open Finals start in the Will Rogers Coliseum.

 

For the complete Futurity Schedule, draws and scores, go to www.nchacutting.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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☛ Marketplace at Ardmore Sale averages $16,440 for top 10 11-17-15

Posted by on Nov 17, 2015 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

 

MARKETPLACE AT ARDMORE SALE AVERAGE $16,440 FOR TOP 10

Press release
Nov. 17, 2015

 

NCHA money earner Doc’s High Flyin Cat (High Brow Cat x Annie Prairie by Winnin Doc) was the high-selling mare at $22,000. Consigned by Wayne Czisny as agent, the mare sold to Ronzon Mora.

THE MARKETPLACE AT ARDMORE’S NOVEMBER 7 SALE PLAYED HOST TO A GOOD SIZED CROWD ON A SUNNY SATURDAY AT THE HARDY MURPHY COLISEUM IN ARDMORE, OK. IN ADDITION TO THE SALE OFFERING DOMINATED BY SHOW HORSES, MANY CAME TO BUY PART OF HISTORY WITH PURCHASES FROM DICK PIEPER’S TACK ROOM COLLECTION WHICH INCLUDED BITS, SPURS, SADDLES AND ASSORTED GEAR ACQUIRED BY THIS INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED HORSEMAN DURING A STORIED CAREER AS AN EXPERT TRAINER, FIERCE COMPETITOR AND RESPECTED JUDGE IN THE PERFORMANCE HORSE INDUSTRY.

PIEPER KICKED OFF THE SALE WITH SOME OF HIS BIGGER PIECES INCLUDING THE COMPETITION-READY CHUCK WAGON COMPLETE WITH A MATCHING TEAM OF MULES AND DOUBLE SET OF HARNESS, ALL OF WHICH GARNERED THE WINNING BID OF $16,000. THE KLAPPER BITS FROM PIEPER’S COLLECTION BROUGHT FROM $4,000 TO $7,500.

“DICK WAS REALLY IN HIS ELEMENT AT THE SALE, “ SAYS SALE MANAGER SUSIE REED. “HE WAS ABLE TO VISIT WITH MANY OLD FRIENDS AND OF COURSE HAD LOTS OF STORIES TO SHARE ABOUT HIS TACK ROOM COLLECTION. HIS THINGS SOLD REALLY WELL AND SET THE TONE FOR THE REST OF REGULAR SALE OFFERING OF PERFORMANCE HORSES. AFTER THE FIRST 8 LOTS OF DICK’S COLLECTION, WE GOT DOWN TO THE BUSINESS OF SELLING HORSES AND SAW THE TOP 10 HEAD AVERAGE $16,400.” THE TOP 20 HEAD AVERAGED $11,967 WITH THE OVERALL SALE AVERAGE WAS $5,147.

THE HIGH SELLING MARE, A 2010 SORREL MARE BY HIGH BROW CAT, WAS DOCS HIGH FLYIN CAT AT $22,000. THIS NCHA WINNER OF $5,537 SOLD TO RONZON MORA AND WAS CONSIGNED BY WAYNE CZISNY, AGENT.

THE HIGH SELLING GELDING WAS A TIE BETWEEN DB SMART REY, NCHA EARNER OF $13,293, AND YOUNG GUN MERADA, NCHA EARNER OF $12,193, EACH SELLING FOR $19,500. DB SMART REY WAS CONSIGNED BY KIM AND BARRY SYRA AND SOLD TO T.L. WALKER. NED TWINING PURCHASED YOUNG GUN MERADA CONSIGNED BY VIKI WILLIAMSON.

 

Dick Pieper in the driver’s seat of his 1926 John Deere Triumph chuck wagon. The wagon, mules and harness sold for $16,000.

“WE TOUT THIS SALE AS THE PLACE TO BUY AND SELL YOUR SHOW HORSE, AND HAVE WORKED REALLY HARD TO ATTRACT AS MANY OF THE RIGHT KIND OF HORSES AS WE CAN. WE ARE SEEING OUR EFFORTS PAY OFF.” REED CONTINUES, “WE TRIED SOMETHING NEW LAST SPRING BY OFFERING OUR CONSIGNORS A ‘FREE RIDE’ – THOSE CONSIGNING 6 OR MORE HEAD GOT TO SELL 1 HORSE FOR FREE, MEANING NO CATALOG FEE, NO FRESH CATTLE CHARGE AND NO SALES COMMISSION WERE COLLECTED ON THAT ONE HORSE. FOR THIS SALE, WE HAD HALF A DOZEN CONSIGNORS TAKE US UP ON THE OFFER WHICH MEANT MORE HORSES FOR OUR BUYERS TO CHOOSE FROM WHILE GIVING THE CONSIGNORS A NICE PERK. WE EXPECT TO SEE MORE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE ‘FREE RIDE’ NEXT SPRING.

THE SPRING MARKETPLACE AT ARDMORE SALE HAS CHANGED ITS WEEKEND TO THE 4TH SATURDAY IN APRIL WHICH IS APRIL 23, 2016. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT SUSIE REED 580-276-4830, CELL 580-490-1103 OR VISIT THE WEBSITE: WWW.THEMARKETPLACEATARDMORE.COM.

 

CUTLINES:

DICK PIEPER IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT OF HIS 1926 JOHN DEERE TRIUMPH CHUCK WAGON. THE WAGON, MULES AND HARNESS SOLD FOR $16,000.

 

NCHA MONEY EARNER DOCS HIGH FLYIN CAT (HIGH BROW CAT X ANNIE PRAIRIE BY WINNIN DOC) WAS THE HIGH SELLING MARE AT $22,000.

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☛ Congress Super Sale averages $6,261.27 – 10-24-15

Posted by on Oct 24, 2015 in BREAKING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

CONGRESS SUPER SALE GROSSES $889,100 FOR $6,261.27 AVERAGE

 

142 HORSES SOLD

 

Press release from Congress Super Sale

Oct. 24, 2015

 

The high selling horse for the 2015 Congress Super Sale, at $47,500, was Batt Attitude, a 2014 mare sired by Batt Man

According to a press release from the Congress Super Sale, produced by Pro Horse Services, the Gross Sales figure of $889,100 for the 2015 Congress Super Sale, held during the Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, Ohio, showed an increase of $68,300, or 8 percent, over 2014 for the horses that came to the Super Sale.

 

The completed sales tallied 87 percent of the horses sold, up 2 percent from last year.

 

The average price for the horses sold this year is $6,261.27. While lower than in 2014, the figure is still stronger than the 2013 average price per horse of $5,619.

 

The high selling horse for the 2015 Congress Super Sale, at $47,500, was Batt Attitude, a 2014 mare sired by Batt Man. At the 2015 Congress, this filly was the Champion of the NSBA Open Longe Line Stakes and Reserve in the Non Pro. She was consigned to the auction by Pete Mead of Indiana and sold to Terri Smith of Michigan.

Click for Congress Super Sale results>>

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☛ Telford wins first NRCHA SBF 10-7-15

Posted by on Oct 7, 2015 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

JAKE TELFORD WINS FIRST NRCHA SNAFFLE BIT FUTURITY; WARD TAKES NON-PRO

 

FUTURITY DIVISIONS PAY $981,400

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Including info from NRCHA press releases
Photos by Primo
Oct. 7, 2015

 

Jake Telford riding Starlight Kisses to the championship of the NRCHA Open Snaffle Bit Futurity. Photo by Primo

“Kisses” were the name of the game at this year’s NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity, held Sept. 21-Oct. 3 in the Reno Events Center in Reno, Nev., as both the Open Champion and the Non-Pro Champion rode horses with Kisses in their name, but both had much different pedigrees.

 

Jake Telford, Caldwell, Idaho, was the only NRCHA Million Dollar rider who had not won the Open or Non-Pro NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity, but that all changed Saturday night, Oct. 3, when he rode Starlight Kisses, a daughter of Shady Lil Starlight out of Kiss My Shiny Lips by Shining Spark, owned by Nancy Crawford-Hall’s Holy Cow Performance Horses to a whopping 656 total score, a half point above fellow competitor and Reserve Champion Erin Taormino and Plain Wright (Hes Wright On x Isabellena x Quejanaisalena). The Open Futurity paid out $586.447 to the 25 finalists, including the prelimary checks in each of the three divisions: herd, rein and cow work. The amount paid out in all Futurity divisions totaled $981,401.

 

Telford’s $100,000 paycheck pushed his lifetime earnings to close to $1.7 million, making him the top money-earning rider at the Futurity.  The win pushed the mare’s sire Shady Lil Starlight to second place in the event’s sire earnings list from the entire Futurity, as the stallion had three offspring earning $130,793.80. The win also made Nancy Crawford-Hall’s Holy Cow Performance Horses the second leading owner with only one money-earner. The leading sire of the event was Hes Wright On, with four offspring earning $164,321 and the leading owners were Garth and Amanda Gardiner, with three offspring earning $108,072.

 

Telford credited Starlight Kisses’ owners for his success, saying, “I couldn’t do this without my owners. She sent me horses that were way better than I ever was and it taught me so much and it’s because of her that I advanced like I did. He also thanked his wife Jessie, saying, “She supports me so much.”

 

Telford won his first NRCHA money in 1999, winning $110 in the Open Hackamore at an Idaho show. He previously piloted One Time Rey Jay, owned by Aspen Meadows Ranch to the Reserve championship of the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity. He gave credit to his mentors, including Ted Robinson, who has been his herd help since his first show in Reno, Dan Roeser, who has been in my corner from the beginning and is one of my best friends and biggest supporters and Anne Reynolds, who also helped him.

 

Taormino’s second-place paycheck in the Open was $80,500; however, she pocketed a total of $93,000, riding three horses: Plain Wright in the Open and Intermediate Open and Bet On Boon and A Smoothie Please in the Intermediate Open. Taormino showed Plain Wright’s full brother in the Open Futurity and Intermediate Finals last year and won the Level 1. This year Plain Wright showed in the arena nine times. “He never quits,” she said, “I just love him.”

 

INTERMEDIATE OPEN:

Nicholas Barthelemy rode Mr Shiney Lights to the championship of the NRCHA Intermediate Open Futurity. Photo by Primo.

Nicholas Barthelemy won go-round money in the Open and won the Intermediate Open Finals with a composite score of 661.5, a 7.5-point lead on his competitors. He was riding Mr Shiney Lights (CD Lights x Lil Miss Shiney Chex x Shining Spark). The pair picked a total of $32,900 for owner Sheri Jamieson, along with saddles, trophies, buckles, hats, jackets, etc. The check made him the eighth leading money earner of the Futurity. He also was quick to thank his wife Stacy who “is up early every morning at the barn.”

 

 

LIMITED OPEN:

Sarah Dawson and Shine Smarter won the Limited Open for $13,469 however that was only a small part of the $68,644 she took home on the mare. Photo by Primo.

Sarah Dawson rode Shine Smarter (WR This Cats Smart x Shiney Tari x Shining Spark) to the championship of the Limited Open Division, with a composite score of 654; however her $13,469.20 paycheck in the finals and preliminaries was a small part of the $68,644.20 she took home on the mare owned by Richard and Cheryl Winters. Her largest paycheck of $40,000 came from the pair’s fifth place in the Open, as well as $15,175.00 for Reserve in the Intermediate Open.

 

 

NON PRO:

Friday, Oct. 2 was ladies’ night as every championship in the division was claimed by a female rider: the Futurity Non-Pro, Intermediate Non-Pro and Novice Non-Pro. Even the Open Bridle event held that night was taken by a woman rider: Lyn Anderson riding Tuckers Smart Cat (WR This Cats Smart x Smoke Time Tuck x Doc Tom Tucker, scoring a 445 total score. Smoke Time Tuck was inducted into the NRCHA Hall of Fame the night before the gelding’s win.

 

Laurie Ward rode Kiss Me A Lot to the championship of the NRCHA Non-Pro Snaffle Bit Futurity. This was her second win of the event. Primo photo.

Laurie Ward, riding Kiss Me A Lot (Master Getta x Kiss Me A Little x Smart Little Pepinic), to a composite of 649, won the 19-horse finals of the Non-Pro, taking home the first-place paycheck of $18,309 of the $91,544 paid out in the Non-Pro division. This was the second Non-Pro Futurity championship for Ward, as she won the division in 2002 on Justa Hot Chic. Kiss Me A Lot was a Ward Ranch-bred and trained mare, with Master Getta being sired by Mister Dual Pep, who was out of Miss Dual Doc, and out of Get A Master 2001 by Master Remedy out of Get A Nic by Reminic. She had received the mare only months before the event in her divorce from John Ward.

 

Terry Forst was the Non-Pro Reserve Champion of the Futurity riding Seven S Indian Maid. She also won the Intermediate Non-Pro and Novice Non-Pro, making her the leading money-earning Non-Pro of the Futurity and ninth overall. Photo by Primo.

Reserve Champion Non-Pro was Terry Forst, riding Seven S Indian Maid, a daughter of Hickorys Indian Pep out of Seven Fiesta x Playgun, to a $13,731.60 paycheck. However, Forest also won the Intermediate Non-Pro and the Novice Non-Pro, taking home a total of $23,870.80, making her the leading money-earning Non-Pro of the Futurity and the ninth leading money-earning rider of the entire Futurity. The Non-Pro paid out a total of $101,519 while the Intermediate Non-Pro paid out $43,522 and the Novice Non-Pro paid out $16,174.

 

Forst’s son Robert Forst trained the mare. The family has been breeding horses for 70 years and they have owned five or six generations of the mare’s family.

 

 

LIMITED NON PRO:

LaDonna Emmons, Ione, Calif., won the Futurity Non-Pro Limited division aboard her gelding Stylish Ike (Playin Stylish x Miss Carty Cash x Nu Cash), scoring a 639 composite. She collected a total paycheck of $3,007. The Limited Non-Pro paid out $10,025.

 

AMATEUR:

Lyle Proctor rode SJR All Time Cash earned a total of $15,147, winning the Amateur and placing in three other divisions. Primo photo.

Lyle Proctor, riding SJR All Time Cash, sired by One Time Pepto, won the Amateur Division, earning $5,960, a division that paid out $20,500. However, Lyle left the event with a total of $15,147, also placing ninth in the Non-Pro for $4,011, seventh in the Intermediate Non-Pro for $3,226.54;and fourth in the Novice Non-Pro for $1,949.14.

 

 

LEADING RIDERS:

With his $100,000 paycheck, NRCHA Futurity Champion Jake Telford was the leading rider of the Futurity, followed by Erin Taormino riding three horses to $93,000; Phil Ralls, $67,167 riding two horses; John Swales, $66,000 on two horses and Sarah Dawson taking home $68,644 in four divisions on one horse.

 

LEADING OWNERS:

The leading owners were Garth and Amanda Gardiner, with three horses, all sired by Hes Wright On, taking home $101,597, including the Futurity Reserve Champion Plain Wright winning $80,500. Amanda and Garth picked up the remaining paychecks in Non-Pro competition.

 

The second leading owner was Holy Cow Performance Horses, owned by Nancy Crawford-Hall, who owned Shady Lil Starlight, the event’s $100,000 champion.

 

LEADING SIRES:

Hes Wright On, a 2003 bay stallion by Lenas Wright On by Smart Little Lena out of Shesa Lota Nic by Reminic, is the leading sire of this year’s Futurity, with four offspring earning $164,321.52, including the Reserve Champion of the NRCHA Open Futurity. The stallion was bred by Don Bradford, Acampo, Calif., and was transferred to Maureen Cosby, Victoria, B.C. on Dec. 1, 2004; Michael Vanteight, Sannichton, B.C., March 9, 2007 and to the current owners Gardiner Quarter Horses, Ashland, Kan, of May 1, 2008.

 

According to the AQHA, the stallion has $158,609.60 in NRCHA earnings and other monies in the NCHA and NRHA. His earnings include AQHA World Show qualifications in cutting, working cow horse, Sr. Heeling, Sr. Reining, Dally Team roping Heeling, Jr. Reining, Jr. Working Cow Horse and Jr. Heeling. He has earned his Performance Register of Merit in the AQHA, with 126.5 Open Performance points. From seven foal crops, he has 48 registered foals with seven being performers.

 

The second leading sire was Shady Lil Starlight with three offspring earning $120,314.40. From there on, the leading sires came from the cutting arena, with third being Metallic Cat, with three offspring winning $93,527; CD Lights with five offspring earning $74,354; WR This Cats Smart with one offspring earning $67,419 and Dual Rey $40,664.

 

NRCHA SALES:

Every horse that changed hands through the 2014 Snaffle Bit Futurity Select 2-Year-Old Sale and returned to Reno to compete as a 3-year-old was eligible for the rich Sale Incentive purse which paid the owner and the consignor of he Futurity Sale graduate with the highest score of the preliminaries.

 

In the Open Division it was Mr Hoo Ray (Play Dual Rey x What Chics Wanna Doo x Chic Please) shown by NRCHA $2 million-dollar rider Todd Crawford, Blanchard, Okla., scoring a 648.5 to win $19,600 in Open Sale Incentive money for owners Mike and Diane McCabe. Crawford, who consigned Mr Hoo Ray to the Snaffle Bit Futurity Sale, also collected a $1,500 Sale Incentive reward.

 

Only one horse was eligible for the 2-Year-Old Non Pro Sale Incentive. Another Heart Remedy (Heart Of A Fox x PSB Smart Remedy 499 x Smart Little Lena) scored a 579 composite for owner/rider James P. Cleary, earning 48,400. A $500 check went to Another Heart Remedy’s consignor Sprig Haven Farms.

 

The Yearling Sale incentive rewards the high-scoring Futurity horse who changed hands at either the Classic or Select Yearling and Broodmare Sale and were paid into the incentive by the consignor or buyer. The Open Yearling Incentive went to Pepe Le Wright (Hes Wright On x Soula Jule Forever x Soula Jule Star), with a 652.5 composite. Pepe Le Wright, shown by Phillip Ralls, won an $8,821 check for owners Jim and Linda Schrack.

 

The Non-Pro Yearling Incentive check for $928 went to Lyle Proctor, the owner/rider of SJR All time Cash (One Time Pepto x Shesa Lota Cash x Nu Cash). They scored a 636 in the Futurity Non-Pro preliminaries.

 

HIGH SELLERS:

The high seller in the Snaffle Bit Futurity Select 2-Year-Old Sale was Metallic Look (Metallic Cat x Smart Lookin Hi Brow x High Brow Hickory), consigned by Justin Lawrence and his wife Kelcie, Alzada, Mont. Metallic Look sold for $77,000 to Fults Ranch, Ltd., Amarillo, Texas, who own and stand Metallic Cat.

 

In the Performance Horse Sale, the high seller was Jules Hickory Star (Soula Jule Star x Turn Liz Loose x Doc’s Hickory), a 2010 gelding consigned by Ken Wold and his wife Ramona, Wilton, Calif. Jules Hickory sold for $20,000 to Christine Bugenig, Auburn, Calif.

 

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Photos by Primo. Some information and quotes for the above article was received from the NRCHA.

 

 

 

 

 

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☛ Marketplace Sale/Pieper Tack Room Sale 9-28-15

Posted by on Sep 28, 2015 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

MARKETPLACE SALE AT ARDMORE; DICK PIEPER’S TACK ROOM COLLECTION

 

SCHEDULED FOR SATURDAY, NOV. 7

 

Sept. 28, 2015

A $250 catalog fee, fresh cattle for $50, no “no-sale” fees and all sales at only 8 percent commission. That’s the Marketplace at Ardmore Sale for performance horses scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 7 at the Hardy Murphy Coliseum, in Ardmore, Texas. Also Susie Reed is offering a “Free Ride,” where if you consign six head or more, you get one free: no catalog fee, no sales commission and no fresh cattle charge. In addition to fresh cattle in the live demo while selling, a flag is now available in the practice pen. The next sale won’t be until Nov. 7, 2015.

 

Also, selling will be Dick Pieper’s Tack Room collection of over 60 years. According to Pieper, who is a trainer and respected judge in the performance horse industry, he will be moving to West Texas to manage the new horse division at Jerry Bob and Eugenie Daniel’s Circle Bar Ranch.

 

His collection includes Klapper spurs and bits, Ortega breaded gear, Cheaney, Leddys and Joey Jemison saddles, a 1930 Model A Ford, totally restored, a 4-Star Horse Trailer with dressing room and tack, several pieces of horse-drawn equipment and a team of mules.

 

You can click on the links below or give Susie a call at 580-490-1103, or e-mail her at polo@ardmore.com. Her mailing address is P.O. Box 505, Marietta, Okla., and her fax is 580-276-4281.

 

Click for Marketplace website>>

Click for brochure on Pieper Tack Room Sale>>

 

 

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