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☛ NCHA Summer Spectacular Sale results 8-16-16

Posted by on Aug 16, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 2 comments

NOODLES BROWN TOPS NCHA SUMMER SPECTACULAR SALE AT $34,000

 

WITH 130 CONSIGNED, 109 SOLD AVERAGING $8,851

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Aug. 16, 2016

The NCHA Summer Spectacular Sale, produced by Jeremy Barwick’s Western Bloodstock, held Saturday, Aug. 6, in the Watt Arena of the Will Rogers Complex, featured 130 consignments, with 109 selling for $964,800, averaging $8,851 for an $8,000 median (Median is halfway between the highest- and lowest-selling horse). This is down from the 2015 sale, which had 171 consignments and 135 selling for $1,359,350, averaging $10,069. The high-selling horse in the 2015 sale, Miss Aristolcrat, brought $85,000.

 

This year the high-selling horse, brought a $34,000 final bid. Noodles Brown, a 3-year-old red roan mare sired by Metallic Cat out of Jitters Brown by Smart Little Lena, bred by David Brown, Gainesville, Texas, and sold by Thomas Guinn, Philadelphia, Miss. Noodles Brown had been sold by David Brown as a yearling to Jody Galyean, who six months later resold the mare in December 2014 to Guinn.

Click for Sale catalog order w/prices>>

 

Showing the results from a poor economy this year, last year, six head brought over $30,000, while this year only the top two sellers brought $30,000 or more. The second high seller, bringing $30,000, was Lil Pepto Memory, a yearling sorrel stallion consigned by the Shrontz Family Ltd. Partnership, sired by Sweet Lil Pepto out of NCHA Futurity Champion, Some Kinda Memories by Smart Little Lena.

Click for horses selling – high to low>>

 

Although one 6-year-old gelding brought $21,000, a 3-year-old stallion and a 7-year-old gelding brought $20,000, a weanling mare brought $19,500 and an 8-year-old gelding brought $15,000, leading the average of multiples by the age of the horses, were six 4-year-old geldings averaging $14,617, nine 3-year-old mares averaging $14,367 and two 3-year-old geldings averaging $14,250.

 

These figures more than likely show that buyers are currently looking for young, trained cutting horses they can show and have fun with, with 14 money earners (that were not broodmares) averaging $14,879 for a $14,000 median. Money-earning broodmares averaged $8,786 on seven head.

 

Probably thinking the economy would be better in two or three more years, three weanlings sold, averaging $15,000; however, 36 yearling mares averaged a disappointing $6,803 and 20 yearling stallions averaging $6,360. One yearling gelding only brought $2,200.

Click for horses ranked by age>>

Click for horses sold ranked by age/sex>>

Click for money earners>>

 

SIRES:

The leading sire of horses, with 2 or more sold) was High Brow Cat, with three head selling for an $18,667 average. Catish, a 2012 gelding brought $23,000, Cats Reyvenge, a 2013 stallion brought $20,000 and Drs Starlight, a 2012 gelding brought $13,000, for a total of $56,000 and $18,667 average.

 

The second leading sire was Once In A Blue Boon, with two head averaging $18,250. They included two unnamed weanlings bringing $19,500 and $17,000, for an $18,250 average. Third was Smooth As A Cat, with two head averaging $15,500, followed by Metallic Cat with nine head averaging $15,222.

 

Woody Be Tuff had the most offspring selling, with 17 head averaging $9,788.  All of his offspring were sold by Center Ranch, the owner of Woody Be Tuff, with the high-selling offspring, CR Purrty Tuff, a yearling filly bringing $25,000, followed by CR Tuff Telecatster and CR Della Wood, both yearling fillies bringing $20,000 each.

Click for Sires chart>>

 

No buyers were provided by the sale company.

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☛ Reined Cow Horse News 6-26-16

Posted by on Jun 26, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

REINED COW HORSE NEWS

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
June 26, 2016

 

NRCHA NEWS:

It’s time to consigned your horses to the 2016 National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) Snaffle Bit Futurity Sales held Sept. 29-Oct. 1 in Reno, Nev., in conjunction with the NRCHA Futurity. The entry deadline is July 15. Entry forms and sale requirements are available on www.snafflebitsales.com. The sale company will be Parnell Dickinson. For more information on the NRCHA go to: www.nrcha.com.

 

NATIONAL STOCK HORSE ASSOCIATION NEWS:

The 2016 National Stock Horse Association (NSHA) Futurity is scheduled for Aug. 16-20, 2016 in Paso robles, Calif. The Open Futurity Champion will receive a new Logan Riot, two-horse, slant, bumper-pull trailer sponsored by All American Trailers.

 

The Non-Pro Limited Futurity and Derby Champions will receive a beautiful Mark Luis Cow Horse Trophy saddle, crafted by Cactus Saddlery and sponsored by Chandler Ranch.

 

For more information on the NSHA, go to www.nationstockhorse.com or call 559-789-7007.

 

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☛ NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity to be in Fort Worth 6-2-16

Posted by on Jun 2, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NRCHA CHOOSES FORT WORTH FOR THEIR SNAFFLE BIT FUTURITY

 

BONUS ADDED TO PAYOUT; CHAMPION’S PAYCHECK RAISED TO $125,000

 

Press Release from NRCHA
June 2, 2016 

 

After months of deliberation, the National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) Board of Directors has announced the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity, one of the largest and most prestigious events in the Western performance horse industry, will be held at the historic Will Rogers Equestrian Center in Fort Worth, Texas, beginning in 2017. The NRCHA has committed to hold the Snaffle Bit Futurity in Fort Worth for the next three years, through 2019.

 

In December 2015, the NRCHA announced it was seeking a community partner to host the Snaffle Bit Futurity in 2017 and beyond. More than a dozen facilities made initial contact after the public request for proposal.  Four facilities – located in Denver, Fort Worth, Reno, and Scottsdale – submitted complete written bids detailing suitability and interest. The NRCHA outlined specific selection criteria, including facility location and amenities; availability of incentive and sponsorship money; and reasonable access to cattle.

 

“The Board took its time with this decision. All the proposals we received were attractive, with Fort Worth providing the most appealing package overall. The Will Rogers facility was much more affordable than the other locations, as far as what it is charging the NRCHA to hold the Futurity there. The amenities, cattle supply, and the central location in a great city like Fort Worth, convinced the Board that it would be the ideal home for the Snaffle Bit Futurity,” said NRCHA President Todd Bergen, Eagle Point, Oregon.

 

Further adding to Fort Worth’s appeal was a substantial Futurity added money offer from a group of reined cow horse owners, breeders, exhibitors, and professionals, representing all regions of the U.S.. This coalition supported the Fort Worth location by pledging a large bonus to the payout for three years if the Futurity moved there. The bonus added money currently stands at six figures and growing, as more supporters join the effort.

 

“This additional money means we will be awarding the 2017 through 2019 Futurity Open Champion a check for $125,000, as compared to our traditional $100,000 payout,” said NRCHA Vice-President Paul Bailey, Sparta, Tennessee. “Furthermore, it is our hope that this funding will allow us to award all the Futurity Open finalists a check for at least $10,000, as well as increase the payout for the Futurity Non-Pro divisions.”

 

Besides the venue change, the 2017 Snaffle Bit Futurity will also come with a date change, tentatively scheduled for October 1 – 14. Exhibitors can also look forward to a more forgiving show schedule, because the NRCHA will have access to the entire Will Rogers Equestrian Center complex, including all show, warmup and sale arenas, barns, and exhibit space. This will permit the association to streamline the schedule to better accommodate participants and spectators, while continuing to offer an exciting lineup of Snaffle Bit Futurity Horse Sales and a vibrant shopping experience at the popular Best of the West Trade Show.

 

“We anticipate growth across the board at the Snaffle Bit Futurity in 2017 and beyond,” Bergen said. “Moving to Fort Worth puts our biggest event in the middle of the country, within easier reach for participants, and we are expecting growth in entries. As if the Futurity didn’t give a reined cow horse fan enough reason to come to Fort Worth in early October, that time of year usually means  wonderful weather, not to mention all the recreational and cultural opportunities outside the show arena.”

 

Bergen emphasized the gravity of the Board’s decision to re-locate the Futurity from its historic home on the West coast. Reno has been home to the majority of Snaffle Bit Futurities since the first event in 1970.

 

“There is an emotional attachment to the Snaffle Bit Futurity being a West coast event, and I believe all of us on the Board acknowledge the history with Reno. The Board labored long and hard over this decision. We were very engaged in the process of trying to ensure that we chose what was in the best interest of the NRCHA for its future growth. We look to the future with optimism, feeling as if we have taken a positive step for the entire association,” Bergen said.

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☛ NCHA Super Stakes Sale 4-20-16

Posted by on Apr 20, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY

 

NCHA SUPER STAKES SALE HIGHER AVERAGE AND HIGH-SELLING HORSE FROM 2015

 

HOWEVER NO OF CONSIGNMENTS DOWN 76% AND SUNRISE RANCH CARRIES SALE

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 20, 2016

Six of the top seven horses in the NCHA Super Stakes Sale were consigned by the Sunrise Ranch – topped by Miss Reycine, selling with an embryo by Metallic Cat.

If I were writing a press release for the 2016 NCHA Super Stakes Sale, held Saturday, April 16, in the Watt Arena of the Will Rogers Equestrian Center in Fort Worth, Texas, during the Finals night of the NCHA Open and Non-Pro Super Stakes, it would be upbeat! As it was last year, the sale was produced by Jeremy and Candace Barwick’s Western Bloodstock Sale Co., and auctioneered by Steve Friskup.

 

THE GOOD:

According to the sale results published on Western Bloodstock’s web site, the sale average this year was up from 2015:  $10,551 to $19,584 this year. The median price of the horses was also up from $9,250 in 2015 to $11,750 this year. The high-selling horse was up from Metallic Flo, a 2012 daughter of Metallic Cat, consigned by Alan Chappell, being the higher-selling horse bringing $60,000 in 2015. This year, the high-selling horse, Miss Reycine, brought a whopping $170,000! (No buyers were reported last year or this year following the sale; however, a check with AQHA shows that Metallic Flo sold on sale day, April 18, 2015, to W. Cody Erwin, Vancouver, Wash. On Sept. 16, 2015, she resold to Diane P. Rubino Ferrara, San Jose, Calif., and according to NCHA records, currently has $46,499.61 in NCHA dollars.)

 

This year John Walker’s Sunrise Ranch, Fayetteville, Ark., consigned eight top-bred cutting horses to the sale and it was announced prior to the sale, they would all change hands. When the sale was over, the eight head netted $379,000 for a whopping $47,375 average and a $31,500 median.

 

Six of the top seven horses in the sale were consigned by the Sunrise Ranch – topped by Miss Reycine, a 2002 daughter of Dual Rey out of Smart Pudden by Smart Little Lena, with $134,894 in lifetime earnings. She was the NCHA No. 2 Leading Producer in 2013 and currently has offspring earning $412,000, including the NCHA Non-Pro Horse of the Year, Reyzin, the earner of $359,542. She sold with an embryo conceived June 13, 2015 by Metallic Cat. The remaining two consignments by Sunrise Ranch were yearlings, bringing $9,000 and $7,000.

 

One Super Cat was the highest-selling horse NOT consigned by the Sunrise Ranch. The 2012 red roan gelding by One Time Pepto, consigned by John and Hope Mitchell that was in the Non-Pro Finals that evening, brought a final bid of $48,000. He was not demonstrated on cattle during the sale and is shown by Gary Bellenfant.

The highest-selling horse not consigned by Sunrise Ranch was One Super Cat, a 2012 red roan gelding by One Time Pepto out of Sarahs Super Cat by High Brow Cat, consigned by John and Hope Mitchell.  The pretty gelding did not work cattle in the sale as he was showing in that evening’s Non-Pro Finals with Hope in the saddle, and it was announced that ownership of the horse would not take place until after the Finals. The gelding brought a final bid of $48,000.

 

With 76 of the 105 head selling last year, there was a net of 72 percent of the horses selling. With 38 of the 48 horses selling this year, the percentage of horses selling was up to 79 percent.

Click for chart ranked high-selling to low-selling horses>>

Click for chart ranked by sellers>>

 

THE BAD … AND THE UGLY:

Consistent with the current downturn of the nation’s economy, taking with it the horse sale industry, the number of horses consigned, going through the sale ring and being sold this year, was down drastically from 2015. A total of 218 horses were consigned in 2015, while only 53 were consigned in 2016 – down 76 percent. A total of 48 went through the sale ring this year, compared to 105 in 2015 – down 54 percent from last year.

 

THE GOOD:

But the sale company made the best of a bad situation by getting the Sunrise Ranch horses consigned. Without the eight Sunrise Ranch horses, the net sales this year would have totaled $365,200, for an average of $12,173, rather than the $19,584 that it was. And the median would have only been $10,600, rather than the $11,750 that it was.

 

BROODMARES AND MONEY-EARNING HORSES BRING TOP DOLLARS:

Mainly due to the sale of Miss Reycine for $170,000, broodmares topped the average, with 8 head averaging $40,963, placing second in the median with $13,600. (Median is halfway between the highest- and lowest-selling horse.)  In fact four of the top-selling broodmares were consigned by Sunrise Ranch and besides Miss Reycine included Cats Ruby, $55,000; Playin Tag, $50,000 and Genuine Gold Cat, $25,000.

 

The largest section of horses selling were “money-earning” horses and the 16 that sold, placed second in the average with $16,413, but first in the $13,850 median. The high-selling money-earning horse was One Super Cat, a 4-year-old red roan gelding by One Time Pepto out of Sarahs Super Cat by High Brow Cat, consigned by John and Hope Mitchell and bringing a $48,000 final bid. The gelding was not shown on cattle, as he had advanced to the Non-Pro Finals of the Super Stakes that evening.

 

Third in the average and fourth in the median were two yearlings and an embryo, with all three consigned by the Sunrise Ranch. The three averaged $14,000 for a $9,000 median. The embryo, sired by Metallic Cat out of Miss Reycine by Dual Rey, was selling without return to Metallic Cat if something should happen to the colt.

 

Fourth in the average and third in the median were 3- and 4-year olds without earnings, with eight selling for an $11,625 average and $11,250 median. The high-selling 3 year old was Stylena Cat, a red roan daughter of Metallic Cat out of Smart Stylena by Docs Stylish Oak. The filly, sold by Clay Johnson, brought a final bid of $20,000.

 

The high-selling 4-year-old was Nurse Smoothie, a sorrel daughter of Smooth As A Cat out of Nurse Nellie by Dual Pep, consigned by Linda and Lloyd Wolf Sr. She brought a final bid of $15,000.

 

Finishing fifth in both the average and the median were three 2-year-olds, with Bingabang Bingaboon, a daughter of Boon A Little out of Sweat Wood by Doctor Wood, consigned by Gina Stopher bringing $6,200.  The three averaged $5,467 for a $5,200 median.

Click for chart ranked by age of horses sold>>

Click for chart of all horses going through the ring>>

Click for a copy of the Super Stakes Sale catalog>>

 

WHO IS THE SUNRISE RANCH LLC?

While the sale was going on, I had several individuals ask who the Sunrise Ranch was … and these weren’t newcomers to the industry. The Sunrise Ranch LLC of Fayetteville, Ark., has been around for years. It was originally owned by Willard and Pat Walker who were involved in the cutting horse and cattle industry years ago. Their son, John Walker now runs the ranch, including cattle and horses, with the help of Chad Vanlandingham, who keeps his ear to the health of the industry.

 

According to an article written by Jan Cottingham of the Arkansas Business in July 2, 2012, Willard Walker was the first manager of Sam Walton’s Five & Dime Store in Fayetteville and later managed a Wal-Mart Store in Springdale. Then, when the company went public in 1970, Walker had great faith in his friend Sam Walton’s business acumen and took out bank loans to buy as much stock as he could. As a result, he retired from Wal-Mart as a very wealthy man.

 

Three Wal-Mart stores were incorporated in the 1960s. Wal-Mart Inc. was incorporated on May 14, 1962 and opened for business in July 1962. Directors included Sam M. Walton, Bentonville, Ark., President; James L. Walton, Versailles, Mo.; Helen R. Walton, Bentonville, Ark., and Don Whitaker, Rogers, Ark.

 

On April 23, 1964, Wal-Mart of Springdale, Inc. opened for business In October 1964. Directors included Sam M. Walton, President; James L. Walton, Helen R. Walton, Robert L. Bogle, Bentonville, Ark., and it was then that Willard Walker, Springdale, Ark., entered the picture as a Director. As a stockholder, he owned 40 shares or 6 percent of the company.

 

Wal-Mart of Harrison, Inc., incorporated on June 11, 1964 and opened for business in August 1964. Directors included Sam Walton, President; Helen Walton, James L. Walton, C. C. Baum, Fayetteville, Ark., Robert L. Bogle, Bentonville, Ark., Don Whitaker, Rogers, Ark., and Willard Walker, who owned 50 shares or 8.3 percent of that Wal-Mart.

 

THE WILLARD AND PAT WALKER CHARITABLE FOUNDATION:

After the Walkers began reaping the financial benefits of investing in Wal-Mart, they decided to give back by establishing the Willard and Pat Walker Charitable Foundation in 1986, investing in human lives by philanthropically providing for healthcare and education.

 

That year they gave $100,000 to a $5 million capital campaign for the Arkansas Cancer Research Center at the University of Arkansas (UA) for Medical Sciences. In April 1999, the Willard and Pat Walker Charitable Foundation gave $4 million to John Brown University in Siloam Springs for a community center and classrooms. The center was to house the Donald G. Soderquist Center for Business Leadership & Ethics. In October 2000, the Walker Charitable Foundation gave $7 million to the University of the Ozarks in Clarksville for a building to house teachers’ education and communications program.

 

In July 2001, the Walker Foundation gave $3 million for a cardiovascular center at Washington Regional Medical Center in Fayetteville and in August, it gave $3 million to the UA for a new health center. They also donated $1.1 million to UAMs to endow a chair in orthopedic surgery.

 

In May 2002, the Walkers pledged $6 million to the Harvey & Bernice Jones Eye INSTITUTE AT THE university of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. UAMS announced that it would rename the Arkansas Center for Eye Research within the Institute, the Pat & Willard Walker Eye Research Center.

 

In April 2003, two months after Willard Walker’s death, the Walker family donated $8 million for a graduate school building at the UA’s business college and the building became the Willard J. Walker Hall.  In 2004, the Foundation announced a $21.5 million donation to UAMS to go toward its eye institute, Alzheimer’s disease research and the school’s psychiatry program. Much of the money, $15 million, paid for a five-floor expansion of the Harvey & Bernice Jones Eye Institute and the expansion was called the Pat Walker Tower. The Foundation also gave $2 million to build the Circle of Life Hospice and Palliative Care Complex at Har-Ber Meadows in Springdale and it became the Willard and Pat Walker Family Center.

 

In 2012, the Willard and Pat Walker Charitable Foundation gave $1.5 million for a student education center at the UAMS’ Northwest Arkansas campus, bringing to at least $48 million in donations that the Walkers gave to UAMs.

 

THE WALTON FAMILY FOUNDATION:

All the while, the Walton family was also busy donating millions of dollars. Sam Walton started the Walton Family Foundation in Bentonville with $1,000. In 2007, the year that Sam Walton’s widow, Helen, died, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported: “Since 1998, the Walton family has contributed more than $359 million to the state’s flagship university through the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and private family gifts.

 

The Walton family had started the Wal-Mart Foundation and by 2012, Wal-Mart money stood behind at least five of the 25 largest nonprofit organizations in the state – $2.2 billion in assets and a billion-dollar-plus art museum. According to the Foundation Center of New York, The Walton Family Foundation, Arkansas’ largest nonprofit by asset size, was No. 50 on the center’s ranking of largest U.S. foundations by asset size, only behind Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, when ranked by total giving. Over the years, they have donated billions, including large amounts donated to the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville.

 

Alice Walton, well known in the cutting horse industry, is the only daughter of Sam and Helen Walton, who in 1994-1995, and along with her family helped raise $15 million to begin work on the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport in Highfill. The Walton family pledged the purchase of $5 million in bonds. The $109 million, 2,185-acre airport opened in 1998 and the terminal was named the Alice L. Walton Terminal Building.

 

In May 2005, Alice paid an estimated $35 million for Asher B. Durand’s painting “Kindred Spirits,” and the Walton Family Foundation announced that the piece would be displayed in an art museum planned for Bentonville. A few weeks later, Walton officially announced plans for Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, described as a $5 million project projected to open in 2009. The value of the building and its artwork eventually soared past the $1.2 billion mark and Crystal Bridges opened in November 2011.  Unfortunately, last year, Alice sold her cutting horses, saying she needed to spend more time with the Museum.

 

JOHN WALKER PURCHASES SPOTS HOT:

In 2012, John Walker purchased Spots Hot, the winner of the 2004 NCHA Open Futurity, from Wesley Galyean, Claremore, Okla. The 2001 stallion sired by Chula Dual out of Sweet Shorty Lena by Shorty Lena, had $529,435 in lifetime earnings and was trained and shown by Wesley.  By the time the stallion retired he had seven major event championships, six major event reserve championships and was a finalist 22 times, earning $529,471.

 

In his first few years of siring offspring, he had an NCHA Open Futurity finalist in all three of his first foal crops. His offspring have won more than $2.8 million, including Hottish, earning $301,843. Spots Hot currently stands at ESMS On the Brazos, Weatherford, Texas.

 

Those that know John, say he is a wonderful, humble and friendly man … and obviously, also very charitable. With that being said, we now know why John Walker and the Sunrise Ranch LLC have such well-bred cutting horses that sell for such high dollars! The ranch is definitely the “Good,” in “The Good, The Bad and the Ugly.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Don’t miss this mare at the NCHA Super Stakes Sale!

Posted by on Apr 11, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SELLING IN THE 2016 NCHA SUPER STAKES SALE

HORSE NO. 15 ON APRIL 16

 

SHE WON $9,087 IN HER ONLY SHOW, THE 2015 NCHA FUTURITY, AND IS READY TO GO TO THE AGED EVENTS.

 

 

DUNN DREEMIN

Dunn Dreemin, a 4-year-old daughter of High Brow CD and a mare with offspring earnings of $685,093 is selling No. 15 in the NCHA Super Stakes Sale. Her owner is from Australia and can’t make it to the US to show her on the aged-event circuit. Hart Photo.

Dunn Dreemin, a 2012 daughter of High Brow CD out of the Australian mare Dreams Of Oak, has $9,087 earned in just three non-pro and amateur classes at the 2015 NCHA Futurity, earning $9,087. He was shown by his owner Peter Dunn from Australia and those classes were the only classes the mare was entered in. The pair scored a 217 ½ in the first go-round of the Unlimited Amateur Futurity with 181 entries. The 2015 NCHA Futurity is the only show she has been entered in and has $0 in eligibility toward Novice classes.  The only reason Peter Dunn is selling this good mare is because due to business and personal situations, he is unable to show her in the aged-event circuit in the United States this summer and shipping her to Australia would be very costly. He was also unable to return to show her in the Super Stakes, which she was originally entered in.

 

 

DREAMS OF OAK (Dam)

The 1991 mare Dreams Of Oak by Docs Freckles Oak by Doc’s Oak, was bred in Australia and had 18 offspring with 11 (61%) being money earners. According to AQHA records they earned $685,093 in the National Cutting Horse Association competition.

 

They highest money earner was Cats In Ya Dreams, a 2007 gelding by High Brow Cat, with earnings of $250,399.87, 11 youth points, COA, Bronze, Silver & Gold Awards.

 

2nd highest money earner was Hoo Rey For Dreams, 2005 mare by Dual Rey, with $173,677.89 in earnings.

 

HIGH BROW CD (Sire)

High Brow CD is a son of High Brow Cat, the leading sire of all time and, according to the March 2016 Chatter, is the second leading sire for 2016.

 

The fourth leading sire for 2016 is High Brow CD with $215,150 in offspring earnings.  His total get have earned $4,207,601. High Brow CD has lifetime earnings of $542,101 and has been an NCHA Horse of the Year and NCHA Horse of the Year sire. An ad in the March issue of the Chatter, claims that “No stallion in NCHA history has sired more champions and reserves from a single foal crop in a year.”

 

How Brow CD’s high money earner is Reyzin, $351,717, followed by Some Kinda Highbrow, $224,774 and Highbrow Time, $163,735. So far this year, High Brow CD’s offspring have been champions at the 1) Abilene Spectacular (8 champions, Reserve Champions, Senior Champions, Unlimited Amateur Champion, Stallion Incentive Reserve Champion and Limited Non-Pro Classic Reserve Champion ),   2) Augusta Futurity (2 champions including Derby Champion and Classic Non-Pro Champion, 3) The Ike (4 champions including Reserve Open Derby, Clssic Non-Pro Reserve, Limited Non-Pro Classic and $50K Amateur Classic Sr. Champion and $50K Classic Amateur Reserve Champion.)

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☛ Dunn Dreemin in April 16 Super Stakes Sales 4-2-16

Posted by on Apr 2, 2016 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SELLING IN THE 2016 NCHA SUPER STAKES SALE

HORSE NO. 15 ON APRIL 16

 

SHE WON $9,087 IN HER ONLY SHOW, THE 2015 NCHA FUTURITY, AND IS READY TO GO TO THE AGED EVENTS.

 

 

DUNN DREEMIN

Dunn Dreemin, a 4-year-old daughter of High Brow CD and a mare with offspring earnings of $685,093 is selling No. 15 in the NCHA Super Stakes Sale. Her owner is from Australia and can’t make it to the US to show her on the aged-event circuit. Hart Photo.

Dunn Dreemin, a 2012 daughter of High Brow CD out of the Australian mare Dreams Of Oak, has $9,087 earned in just three non-pro and amateur classes at the 2015 NCHA Futurity, earning $9,087. He was shown by his owner Peter Dunn from Australia and those classes were the only classes the mare was entered in. The pair scored a 217 ½ in the first go-round of the Unlimited Amateur Futurity with 181 entries. The 2015 NCHA Futurity is the only show she has been entered in and has $0 in eligibility toward Novice classes.  The only reason Peter Dunn is selling this good mare is because due to business and personal situations, he is unable to show her in the aged-event circuit in the United States this summer and shipping her to Australia would be very costly. He was also unable to return to show her in the Super Stakes, which she was originally entered in.

 

 

DREAMS OF OAK (Dam)

The 1991 mare Dreams Of Oak by Docs Freckles Oak by Doc’s Oak, was bred in Australia and had 18 offspring with 11 (61%) being money earners. According to AQHA records they earned $685,093 in the National Cutting Horse Association competition.

 

They highest money earner was Cats In Ya Dreams, a 2007 gelding by High Brow Cat, with earnings of $250,399.87, 11 youth points, COA, Bronze, Silver & Gold Awards.

 

2nd highest money earner was Hoo Rey For Dreams, 2005 mare by Dual Rey, with $173,677.89 in earnings.

 

HIGH BROW CD (Sire)

High Brow CD is a son of High Brow Cat, the leading sire of all time and, according to the March 2016 Chatter, is the second leading sire for 2016.

 

The fourth leading sire for 2016 is High Brow CD with $215,150 in offspring earnings.  His total get have earned $4,207,601. High Brow CD has lifetime earnings of $542,101 and has been an NCHA Horse of the Year and NCHA Horse of the Year sire. An ad in the March issue of the Chatter, claims that “No stallion in NCHA history has sired more champions and reserves from a single foal crop in a year.”

 

How Brow CD’s high money earner is Reyzin, $351,717, followed by Some Kinda Highbrow, $224,774 and Highbrow Time, $163,735. So far this year, High Brow CD’s offspring have been champions at the 1) Abilene Spectacular (8 champions, Reserve Champions, Senior Champions, Unlimited Amateur Champion, Stallion Incentive Reserve Champion and Limited Non-Pro Classic Reserve Champion ),   2) Augusta Futurity (2 champions including Derby Champion and Classic Non-Pro Champion, 3) The Ike (4 champions including Reserve Open Derby, Clssic Non-Pro Reserve, Limited Non-Pro Classic and $50K Amateur Classic Sr. Champion and $50K Classic Amateur Reserve Champion.)

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