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☛ AQHA Amateur Ranch Riding World Champ disqualified for drug violations

Posted by on Apr 20, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AQHA 2017 AMATEUR RANCH RIDING WORLD CHAMPION SARAH MCKIBBEN DISQUALIFIED FOR DRUG VIOLATION

 

SHE AND HUSBAND MOZAUN MCKIBBEN SUSPENDED AND FINED FOR DRUG VIOLATIONS AT AQHA WORLD SHOW

 

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 20, 2018

Mozaun McKibben

Following a recent meeting of the AQHA Executive Committee, it was announced that disciplinary action had been taken against Mozaun McKibben and his wife Sarah, as a result of four horses testing positive for Guanabenz at the 2017 Lucas Oil AQHA World Championship Show held Nov. 2-18 in Oklahoma City. Guanabenz is a depressant of the cardiovascular system and is a forbidden drug per AQHA Rule VIO401.2. At the World Show, each world champion is drug tested and additional horses are tested based on random drawings that are selected months before each event.

 

Mozaun McKibben, 53, from Cooke County, Texas, was suspended from membership in the AQHA for 18 months, on probation for five years after his suspension, fined $10,000, and evocation of his status as an AQHA Professional Horseman, when four horses he owned, trained and/or exhibited were found positive for drugs during the 2017 AQHA World Show, held Nov. 2-18, 2017 in Oklahoma City, Okla.

 

McKibben’s wife Sarah, who was named the 2017 AQHA Amateur Ranch Riding L3 Champion, was stripped of her title and also suspended from the AQHA for 12 months, fined $3,000 and put on probation for five years following the end of her 12-month suspension.

2-AQHA: AQHA Disciplinary Actions

 

Ironically, the disciplinary action was taken less than a year after Mozaun was booked on June 28, 2017 for Burglary of Habitation, after which he bonded out with a $5,000 bond. Other court records show that he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor in 1998.

3-Mozaun Arrest – Cooke County, TX

4-Click for Penalties for burglary>> 

5-McKibben History

 

THE HORSES INVOLVED:

Samples were taken from the following horses following their classes with positive drug tests being returned on His Royal Cat and Wimpy Tejano, shown in the Jr. Ranch Riding L3 Preliminaries on Nov. 4, with Mozaun McKibben being the responsible party, as the owner, trainer and exhibitor; Wimpys Shining Jac, in the Senior Ranch Riding L3 Finals, Nov. 6, with Mozaun McKibben as trainer and exhibitor and Chex Are Cashin shown Nov. 7 in the Amateur Ranch Riding L3 Finals, with Mozaun McKibben as trainer and Sarah McKibben as the rider.

 

Sarah McKibben was also the responsible party at the time in question for His Royal Cat (as owner), Wimpys Shining Jac (as owner) and Chex Are Cashin (as owner and exhibitor)

 

AQHA RECORDS ADJUSTED:

AQHA has stated they have adjusted its records to reflect the above disqualifications and is notifying those exhibitors whose horses moved up in the placings as a result of such disqualifications. Notification to associations who afford reciprocity to AQHA medication disciplinary has been taken.

 

However, I have been told that within a few days of Chex Are Cashin’s stripped title, he was sold for well over $100,000.

 

DRUG-TESTING PROTOCALS:

While writing this article, I reached out to Rick Dennis, who has done drug testing for many Fortune 500 companies and has lectured before Congressional sub-committee in Washington D.C. on drugs of abuse in the private sector. He has also co-owned a drug-testing company.

 

Rick, who has written many legal as well as interesting horse articles for AllAboutCutting.com, responded to me with an article entitled “Drug Testing Protocols.”

 

Rick’s conclusion to the drug problem is that a company or an association should implement a “Split Sample Collection and Testing” process which is the fairest system ever devised. It not only affords the requiring agency of the assurance that the test results are accurate as well as affording the donor every legal opportunity to challenge the positive test results prior to receiving disciplinary action in lieu of a positive test result. It also insulates the requiring agency against liability and defamation lawsuits due to a positive test result and any disciplinary action imposed thereafter. Following is his article:

BACKGROUND:

The Managing Member of the WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC – Richard E. “Rick” Dennis has been an entrepreneur in the private security sector since January 28, 1984. Rick’s been involved in the private sector employee drug and alcohol testing industry ever since its inception, in 1987.  His expertise in the drug testing field is expansive and includes: Being one of the owners and operators of the first employee drug testing laboratory in Louisiana – “Certified Lab, Inc.”

 

Also, Rick’s written drug and alcohol testing policies for Fortune 500 Companies such as: Exxon Company, USA, Mobile Oil Company, Campbell Soup, Kerr McGee Corporation, Dupont, Marathon Oil Company, and Atlantic Richfield to name a few. Further, Rick’s lectured before a Congressional sub-committee in Washington D.C. on drugs of abuse in the private sector.

 

According to Rick, in 1987 the Federal Government initiated designing drug and alcohol testing protocols for Federal Workplace Drug testing of specific Department of Transportation worker categories, (e.g. – Department of Aviation, Federal Highway Administration, Oil & Gas Transmission Pipelines, and the Marine Industry, etc.  Hearings were held on the design and implementation of the new Federal Drug and Alcohol Testing rules and regulations and each specific category was published in the Federal Register.

 

SPECIMEN COLLECTION PROTOCOLS – DRUGS OF ABUSE: Urine Specimens were initially selected for drugs of abuse testing, due to the fact urine samples were determined to be a better conductor for drug testing results versus blood samples.  However, this protocol was expanded to include blood, saliva, and hair testing. Essentially, the protocols included a format for the collection of the specimen, the design of a chain of custody form to track the collection, shipping, transportation, testing, and storage of the collected specimen.

 

LABORATORY TESTING PROTOCOLS: 

 The National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) designed the laboratory certification and testing standards for testing and confirmation of submitted samples, as well as initial and confirmation testing levels, classifications of drugs tested for, testing procedures, and requirements.  Two positive laboratory tests are required in order to report a specimen sample as being positive for prohibitive drug(s), (e.g. an initial positive test result has to be confirmed by a positive confirmation test result).

 

SPLIT-SAMPLE COLLECTION: 

 In order for the testing procedures and subsequent results thereafter to be certified and authenticated, NIDA designed and implemented the “Split Sample Collection and Analysis Process” whereby two samples were made using one specimen collection.  Sample (A) and Sample (B) couldn’t be made using two separate collections.  Sample (A) would be the primary sample for initial analysis and confirmation, and sample (B) would be frozen and used in the event of a donor challenge to the positive result of Sample (A).

 

In the event of a donor challenge to the positive test result of Sample (A), the donor is afforded the opportunity to challenge the positive test result of Sample (A) at another testing laboratory by testing Sample (B). However, the NIDA retesting protocols specifically states the second testing laboratory must meet “the same laboratory testing standards and certifications as the initial testing laboratory”. 

 

Further, a “Chain-Of-Custody” log must be completed relative to the transportation, analysis, storage, and certification of Sample (B).  In the event the two sample results are positive, then the sample is deemed positive.  In the event there are two conflicting sample results, (e.g., one positive and one negative), a negative test result is afforded to the benefit of the donor due to conflicting results.

 

MEDICAL REVIEW OFFICER:

 Federal 49,CFR, Part 40 requirements include a Medical Review Officer as a liaison between the testing laboratory and the donor.  The duty of the Medical Review Officer is to certify that all sample collection, transportation, storage, testing, and test result communications have been adhered to.  The Medical Review Officers other duties includes monitoring and ordering the testing of Sample (B) in the event of a donor challenge.

 

CONCLUSION:

 It’s Rick’s opinion, that the Split-Sample Collection and Testing process is the fairest system ever devised.  It affords the requiring agency of the assurance that the test results are accurate, as well as affording the donor every legal opportunity to challenge the positive test results prior to receiving disciplinary action in lieu of a positive test result.  Also, the split sample specimen collection and analysis procedure insulates the requiring agency against liability and defamation lawsuits due to a positive test result and any disciplinary action imposed thereafter.

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☛ Congress approves ELD flexibility for equine industry

Posted by on Apr 20, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

Congress Approves ELD Flexibility for Equine Industry

Congress delays ELD enforcement for livestock to Sept 30, 2018

 

 Press release from AQHA
April 20, 2018

Shortly after 12:30 a.m., on Friday, March 23, the United States Congress approved a massive $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 to fund federal government operations through September 30.  The 2,232-page bill includes several regulatory measures that will provide flexibility for the horse industry, most notably H-2B visa cap relief for seasonal, guest workers and a temporary enforcement exemption for the transportation of livestock from the electronic logging device (ELD) rule. The legislation also includes policy “riders” to defund U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs that will impact the equine sector and broader agriculture economy.

Lawmakers Raise the Ceiling on H-2B Guest-Worker Visas:

Despite opposition from a large number of lawmakers from both political parties, the horse industry and its allies persuaded Congress to effectively raise the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) cap on H-2B temporary worker visas from the current cap of 66,000 to 129,500 visas for FY2018.  A provision tying the number of H-2B visas to a number not to exceed the maximum number of participants from the returning worker program in a previous year has effectively doubled the number of visas the agency may issue in 2018. Because of the fast-approaching seasonal labor needs for breeding farms, racetracks and other seasonal employers, AHC and its partners are urging DHS to implement the flexibility measures as quickly as possible to mitigate paperwork bottlenecks during the remainder of the year. Other key H-2B provisions include acceptance of private wage surveys to determine “prevailing wage” requirements, and language that defines “seasonal need” as a 10-month period within the context of the program. The coalition has already begun to focus efforts on creating permanent cap relief in future legislative vehicles. This would decouple the H-2B visa issue from the annual appropriations process and create an environment of investment certainty.

Congress Delays ELD Enforcement for Livestock to September 30:

On the heels of the DOT’s March 13 issuance of an additional 90-day exemption from ELD enforcement requirements for livestock, the bill includes a provision that would defund enforcement to at least September 30, which is the official end of the fiscal year. The delay will provide DOT and industry stakeholders more time to educate livestock haulers on the proper scope of the ELD mandate, which has caused uncertainty since being finalized in late 2015. Furthermore, the industry’s September 2017 request to push back the compliance deadline by a full year is still outstanding, leaving the possibility of another enforcement delay for livestock.

Lawmakers Fully Fund Tax Law Implementation, Defund Horse Slaughter Inspections, EPA Ag Emission and Reporting Rules:

In a rare move to increase resources for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Congress appropriated an additional $320 million through September 2019 for the nation’s tax collectors to help assure a smooth implementation of the 2017 tax law. The omnibus also includes a rider that bans funding of USDA personnel to inspect horses prior to slaughter, a provision which lawmakers have renewed within multiple spending bills during previous years to effectively shut down horse slaughter in the U.S. On the EPA front, the bill also defunds enforcement of rules that would do the following:

  • Mandate the reporting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from decomposing animal waste located on farms;
  • And reporting air emissions from farms resulting from hazardous substances, pursuant to the nation’s Superfund law.

AHC will deliver updates on more details within the 2018 omnibus spending package that impact the horse industry as they emerge. To view a copy of the 2232-page bill, please visit http://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20180319/BILLS-115SAHR1625-RCP115-66.pdf.

If you have questions about FY2018 appropriations, please contact Bryan Brendle, director of policy and legislative affairs, at bbrendle@horsecouncil.org.

Additional Resources

The American Quarter Horse Association is committed to keeping you up to date with the latest news regarding the ELD Mandate. For more press releases and information on this topic, visit www.aqha.com/membership/resources/eld-mandate/.

 

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☛ ProRodeo Hall of Fame announces induction class

Posted by on Apr 19, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

ProRodeo Hall of Fame announces 2018 induction class

 

Press release courtesy PRCA
April 29, 2018 

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Team roping stars Speed Williams and Rich Skelton had no equals from 1997-2004, as each won eight consecutive PRCA world championships.

Now, the duo will be immortalized in rodeo history.

Williams and Skelton headline the 10-member 2018 induction class for the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. The ceremony takes place Aug. 4 at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Williams and Skelton join gold buckle-winner Deb Greenough (bareback riding, 1993), contract personnel recipient Leon Coffee, stock contractor Billy Minick, rodeo notable Walt Garrison and the committee for the Black Hills Roundup in Belle Fourche, S.D., as the PRCA inductees.

For the second time in the history of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame – 2017 being the first – barrel racers from the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) will be among the class of inductees, and their class includes Kristie Peterson, Billie McBride and a WPRA equine inductee, French Flash Hawk (Bozo).

In addition to the 10 inductees, former PRCA Chief Operating Officer Kay Bleakly will receive the Ken Stemler Pioneer Award, which honors individuals in recognition of their groundbreaking, innovative ideas and forward thinking.

 

Williams and Skelton were the pinnacle of team roping for nearly a decade.

“I remember going to the high school finals and stopping in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame and I was blown away with the history of ProRodeo,” Williams said. “It’s a great honor to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Rich and I had a fairytale career and words don’t really describe how I’m feeling.”

Skelton also was taken aback to receive this prestigious honor.

“This is cool, and I don’t know when this will sink in,” said Skelton, who still competes on the PRCA circuit. “I wanted to make the NFR and I wanted to win the world, and then things just kept going our way. When you look back at it, we had good horses, and everything was set up at that time and that’s all we thought about and that’s all we did was rope. To me, we had so much success because Speed changed the heading and started roping fast and I just tried to be consistent.”

Williams qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo 15 times (1988, 1994, 1996-2008), and Skelton has 22 NFR qualifications on his résumé (1990-2006, 2009-10, 2013-15).

“I don’t think there was any secret to our success,” Williams said. “We came together at the same time and we had the same desires and we wanted to rodeo and that’s what we did every day, but I never even dreamed that we would win eight gold buckles in a row.”

 

Peterson, a four-time world champion, and her great horse French Flash Hawk, better known as Bozo, will fittingly go into the Hall together. Following on the heels of Charmayne James and her great horse, Scamper, it was Peterson and Bozo that ended James’ streak of 10 straight world titles, capturing their first of four world titles in 1994.

Although Peterson and Bozo were not successful in defending their title in 1995, the duo would return to the top of the sport in 1996 and then win three straight.

“How wonderful … that is just awesome,” Peterson said upon learning the news of the induction honor. “I feel very honored and humbled. To go in with Bozo is definitely the carrot on top. I am just speechless.”

When asked how it felt to follow James and Scamper, both in the arena and now into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, Peterson simply said, “Being in the shadow of Scamper is a great place to be.”

 

McBride joins Peterson and Bozo in the Hall as another four-time WPRA champion. She will be inducted posthumously having passed away at the age of 90 on May 10, 2017.

McBride first saw barrel racing at an open rodeo event in 1937 and decided at 10 years old that it was the path she wanted to travel. McBride was a charter member of the Girls Rodeo Association (GRA), formed in her hometown of San Angelo, Texas, just over a decade later.

“She would be overwhelmed and thrilled,” said Alva Jean Meek, McBride’s daughter. “We are approaching the one-year anniversary since we lost her, but this news would have made her ecstatic. The GRA was a big part of her life, and she put her heart and soul into the earlier association.”

 

Greenough, 54, qualified for the National Finals Rodeo 13 consecutive years (1988-2000), tied with Joe Alexander for the fifth-most overall NFR qualifications in PRCA history. His 15 career NFR go-round wins at the NFR is also fifth most in his event. Greenough won a bareback riding world title in 1993 and a NFR average title in 1992.

Greenough was also known for his success within the Montana Circuit, where he went on to win five circuit titles. Greenough remains tied for the most National Circuit Finals Rodeo wins among all bareback riders with three career wins, in 1995-96 and 1999.

 

Coffee cried tears of joy when he found out he was selected for induction into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

“It kind of brought me to the milk right there, it brought tears to my eyes, that’s an old cowboy phrase for it made you cry,” Coffee said. “To know that my heroes, my friends and heroes, who are in there, and I’m in there with them – that’s just something I dreamed of. I’m just tickled to death to be in there and say, ‘Yes, I am in the PRCA Hall of Fame.’ It’s pretty wild.”

As a PRCA Gold Card Member and NFR barrelman, Coffee has enjoyed a long and lively career in ProRodeo as one of only three cowboys to be both a barrelman and a bullfighter at the NFR.

Since 1973, this Texas cowboy has fought bulls at the NFR twice (1979, 1984) and was a barrelman at the NFR in 1991, 1994 and 1997. Coffee also won PRCA Clown of the Year and was in the Top 3 every year from 1984-2001.

“I enjoy putting smiles on faces, and my motto of life is God put me on Earth to do two things – make people happy and help people out, and I can do both in the arena,” Coffee said.

Coffee also worked at the first National Circuit Finals Rodeo in 1987, the Texas Circuit Finals Rodeo (1980-82, 1992, 1996-97, 2003-04) and the Canadian Finals Rodeo twice (1985-86).

He was featured in many movies, including “8 Seconds” and “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys.”

 

Garrison was two different types of cowboy, a fullback with the Dallas Cowboys and a ProRodeo competitor. He went on to combine his stardom with football and rodeo to raise more than $4 million for multiple sclerosis with his Walt Garrison All Star Rodeos over the course of 20 years.

“I think that dad played football as a career, but he got really fortunate when he retired from the NFL and Copenhagen/Skoal hired him to be a spokesperson,” said Walt Garrison’s oldest son, Marty.

The Texas cowboy was instrumental in the U.S. Smokeless Tobacco and Winston sponsorships in ProRodeo and the programs those sponsors provided – such as the Winston Scoreboard, sponsorships for individual cowboys and helping college rodeo athletes get scholarships.

“His first love was rodeo, no doubt, ever since he was really young,” Marty Garrison said. “That’s what he would have done had he not played football in college and then got drafted by the Dallas Cowboys. His whole life, his love was rodeo.”

 

Minick was short on words when he received the phone call that he was being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, only because he hadn’t had time to process his new place in immortality.

“It took my breath away at first,” said the 79-year-old Minick. “I got a few tears. To be among those guys, even the past and the present and future cowboys, it’s kind of like that famous old quote that’s been said by all the cowboys, and even in song. ‘All I ever wanted to be was a cowboy.'”

Minick, born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas, began his professional rodeo career in 1959, enlisting in the Rodeo Cowboys Association after winning titles both in high school and college. Minick qualified for the National Finals Rodeo as a bull rider in 1966. In 1968, Minick purchased the Harry Knight Rodeo Company from Knight and legendary entertainer Gene Autry.

The Billy Minick Rodeo Company eventually produced top NFR bucking stock, including the bucking horse Streamer in 1972 and the bull Tiger in 1973. Tiger would also win Bull of the Year in 1974.

Through the years, Minick helped to produce such rodeos as the Fort Worth (Texas) Stock Show and Rodeo, Rodeo Houston, the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo, the Santa Rosa Roundup (Vernon, Texas), Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days, and many more.

 

This summer marks a historic year for the Black Hills Roundup in Belle Fourche, S.D. Not only can the rodeo now boast being an inductee to the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, but this year will also be its 99th annual competition.

The Black Hills Roundup started when 15,000 people gathered in a field in Belle Fourche to raise money for World War I in 1918. At the time, the population of Belle Fourche was 1,410.

The next year marked the first time the rodeo took place.

“The board and committee put a lot of time and effort into it,” Black Hills Roundup Chairman Clay Crago said. “It’s pretty special to us to see the recognition and get into the Hall of Fame.”

The big number of people to attend continues today, with an estimated 10,000-15,000 attending a parade during rodeo week in the town of about 6,000.

The historic rodeo, which is 100 percent volunteer-run, also boasts that President Calvin Coolidge attended in 1927.

With the 2018 class included, the ProRodeo Hall of Fame will have enshrined 267 people, 34 animals and 29 rodeo committees.

 

The WPRA contributed to this release.

 

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 4-16-18

Posted by on Apr 16, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
April 16, 2018

Vosler snares Wrangler ProRodeo win in Logandale

LOGANDALE, Nev. – Steer wrestler Aaron Vosler picked a big night to have the best night of his career.
The Cheyenne, Wyo., cowboy clocked a 3.5-second time in the finals of the Clark County Fair & Rodeo on April 15 to catapult himself to the victory in the three-head average in 12.5 seconds.
“I’ve been here (to Logandale) four or five times and this was my first win here,” Vosler said. “This win ranks at the top of the list, and it feels great to be the champion.”
The Clark County Fair & Rodeo was the first in the PRCA’s new tour – the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour. The Tour will feature 23 rodeos – beginning with Logandale and concluding with the finale presented by Justin Boots, Sept. 6-9 in Puyallup, Wash.
“I would love to get into Puyallup,” Vosler said. “I really like this Tour, especially now that I won Logandale.”
When Vosler prepared for his final run, he was full of optimism.
“I knew I had the best steer, a steer they were 3.4 on in the long round,” said Vosler, 37. “I didn’t have a great run, but that steer was so good he made me look good. I’ve been blowing the barrier out everywhere I have been going and I just decided to keep doing what I’ve been doing. I’m not sure what I have been doing, but I’m trying not to mess with it, especially after tonight.”
The media coverage of the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour will be divided between ProRodeoTV.com and the Wrangler Network.
ProRodeoTV.com will livestream 12 broadcasts, while the Wrangler Network will livestream the other 11 Tour rodeos.
Winning the inaugural Wrangler ProRodeo Tour rodeo wasn’t lost on Vosler, nor was the $5,074 he earned before leaving town.
“This feels awesome,” Vosler said. “I’m so excited, and I can always use a check like this one I earned at Logandale.”
The victory was special for Vosler, and he knew he could not have done it without his horse, Flamer, 18.
“I’ve used him for the last seven years everywhere I’ve gone,” he said. “I bought him when he was 10 years old and he was a head horse who was born to be a bulldogging horse. I love rodeoing, everything about it. I love the people. I’m hooked. I have a horse that’s competitive and that’s what keeps me going. My horse is the reason I win.”
Vosler joined the PRCA in 2001 and is still chasing a bid to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. His best finish was 32nd in the PRCA World Standings in 2015.
“I would love to make the NFR,” Vosler said. “If I can build off this win and keep my momentum going and keep winning I will be in good shape.”
With the Wrangler Tour, all cowboys eligible to compete in the Tour rodeos will have the opportunity to earn Tour points and qualify for the Justin Boots Tour Finale in Puyallup.
For an explanation of the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour points system, go to www.prorodeo.com. The Wrangler ProRodeo Tour point standings were unable April 16, but will be updated April 17 on www.prorodeo.com.
Other winners at the $251,100 Logandale rodeo were all-around cowboy Trevor Brazile ($8,837, tie-down roping and team roping), bareback rider Tilden Hooper (177 points on two head), team ropers Andrew Ward/Reagan Ward (15.1 seconds on three head), saddle bronc rider Wyatt Casper (167.5 points on two head), tie-down roper Marty Yates (26.3 seconds on three head), barrel racer Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi (34.36 seconds on two runs), and bull rider Tyler Bingham (172 points on two head).
Steer wrestlers Chase Black and Bridger Chambers tied the Logandale rodeo record of 3.4 seconds. Black won the second round with his run and Chambers won the finals. They share the record with Brad Larue and Jason Frost, who each made their runs in 1998, and Kyle Callaway, who had the same time in 2012.

2. Mitchell and Cooper team up to win Oakdale

OAKDALE, Calif. – A new team roping partnership started off with a major win for Spencer Mitchell and Clay O’Brien Cooper. The duo placed in both rounds to win the average at the Oakdale (Calif.) Saddle Club Rodeo on April 14-15.
“Clay called me about two days before the books opened for Oakdale and asked if I wanted to rope,” Mitchell said. “That’s an opportunity you don’t want to pass up, he’s a legend in the sport.”
Cooper qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo 29 times and is a seven-time world champion (1985-89, 1992, 1994). Mitchell is no stranger to success, either, as he qualified for the Wrangler NFR in 2011-12.
“As long as things go as they have, we’ll keep it going for as long as we can,” Mitchell said.
If there’s going to be a change in roping partners, spring is the best time to do it, Cooper said, adding that Oakdale is basically the start of the spring run.
All told, their 13.9 seconds on two head was worth $3,757. While the money is nice, the confidence boost in their new partnership is just as valuable.
“It’s huge to start a new partnership on a win like that,” Mitchell said. “To place in both rounds and win the average is tough with the competition here, but it boosts your confidence.”
The partnership wasn’t the only new factor in the Oakdale arena for Cooper, as he started roping with a new, 13-year-old American Quarter Horse his wife and daughter named Maximus.
“I’m starting to get some runs under my belt and get to know him and him know me, and it’s starting to feel comfortable,” Cooper said.
Making good draws in both rounds helped the ropers, but good chemistry was a factor, too.
“I tend to stay more aggressive and Clay handles the rest, no matter what you throw at him,” Mitchell said.
Cooper agreed with Mitchell.
“We put those together in almost identical runs at 6.9 (seconds) and 7 flat, so it was two good, snappy runs,” Cooper said.
This wasn’t Mitchell’s first win at Oakdale, having won there in 2012 with Broc Cresta.
“It feels good – and in the home state dang sure is awesome,” Mitchell said.
Cooper has competed at Oakdale for more than 30 years. This year marks his second win at the historic rodeo.
“It’s unique because both guys come from the right side in team roping and there are only a couple of those in the PRCA with that setup, so it’s old-school and traditional,” Cooper said. “So, to get it a second time with Spencer, and it being our first one together, makes it special.”
Before winning Oakdale, Mitchell was 10th in the 2018 PRCA World Standings for team roping headers and Cooper was 35th among heelers. Having a successful start at Oakdale has Mitchell confident they’ll both be roping in Las Vegas at the Wrangler NFR in December.
“There are a lot of good rodeos coming up and we’re both happy our partnership looks like it’s something that could be great,” Mitchell said.
Other winners at the $117,773 rodeo were bareback rider David Peebles (88 points on C5 Rodeo’s Virgil); steer wrestler Blake Knowles (9.6 seconds on two head); saddle bronc rider Hardy Braden (80 points on Four Star Rodeo’s Fancy Pants); tie-down roper Kyle Dickens (17.9 seconds on two head); barrel racer Lynette Clyde (17.72 seconds) and bull rider Boudreaux Campbell (90 points on Four Star Rodeo’s Yellow Fever).

3. World champion Rogers out with knee injury

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Erich Rogers, the reigning team roping header world champion, will be out indefinitely while he recovers from tearing the medial collateral ligament (MCL), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscus in his right knee March 3 while steer wrestling at a non-PRCA event.
“I had to wait for the swelling to go down and then I had surgery March 30 (in Scottsdale, Ariz.),” said Rogers, 31. “I had a doctor’s appointment (April 11) and they said the surgery looks good and everything is going according to plan.”
Rogers believes the best-case scenario for him this season is returning to compete by the Reno (Nev.) Rodeo, June 14-23. Rogers was 34th in the April 16 team roping header standings with $12,066.
This season, Rogers is roping with Clint Summers. Rogers and Cory Petska had roped together since the 2013 season, culminating with both winning world championships last season.
However, Petska chose to reduce his roping schedule this year, going to 40 or 50 rodeos instead of 90, while Rogers wanted to maintain the same schedule he had in the past, so they opted for new partners. Petska said beginning at the Reno Rodeo, he is going to start roping with header Colby Lovell, a six-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2010-13, 2015-16).
Rogers, who resides in Round Rock, Ariz., finished last season with $265,417. He has qualified for the Wrangler NFR the last seven years.
“This (the injury) is just part of the game,” Rogers said.

4. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

WranglerNetwork.com will livestream the Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up, part of the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour, April 21 at 2:30 p.m. (PT) and April 22 at 1:30 p.m. … Steve Kenyon and ProRodeoLive.com will broadcast the Wichita Falls (Texas) PRCA Rodeo, April 20 at 7:30 p.m. (CT) and April 21 at 7:30 p.m. … The arena where the Oakdale (Calif.) Saddle Club Rodeo is held has hosted many other events over the years. While the Oakdale Saddle Club Rodeo held in April had a bull riding record of 89 points that was made in 2004 and then broken this year by Boudreaux Campbellwith his 90-point ride April 14, the arena has actually witnessed a higher score. Allan Jordan had a 96-point ride at the 1978 Stanislaus Peace Officer’s Rodeo, a PRCA-sanctioned rodeo held July 3-4, in Oakdale, Calif. …Breakout country band Old Dominion will kick off the Pendleton (Ore.) Round-Up and Happy Canyon week when they take the stage in the Happy Canyon Arena, Sept. 8. Old Dominion’s debut album, Meat and Candy, was certified Gold and hailed for hits like “Break Up With Him” (Platinum), “Snapback” (Gold), and “Song For Another Time,” which hit No. 1 on the Billboard Country Airplay and MediaBase charts. This isn’t the first time Old Dominion will take the Happy Canyon Arena stage. They opened the kickoff concert for Big & Rich in 2014. “We can’t wait to welcome Old Dominion back to the Happy Canyon Arena, but this time as our main act,” said Happy Canyon President Corey Neistadt in a press release. Tickets go on sale April 20 at 8:30 a.m. (PT) and range in price from $46 to $150. To reserve tickets, call 1.800.45.RODEO (select option 1 for tickets) or visit www.pendletonroundup.com. The 2018 Pendleton Round-Up is Sept. 12-15 … The Greeley (Colo.) Stampede Foundation is hosting its third annual “Young Trailblazer Art Competition” in conjunction with the 19th annual Western Art Invitational & Sale. Weld County High School seniors (class of 2018) and juniors (class of 2019) are invited to enter a piece of art into the competition. All genres and mediums are acceptable. Professional artists will select the recipients of two $2,500 college scholarships which will be announced at the invitational’s opening night gala June 21. All student art will be on exhibit during the Greeley Stampede, June 22 through July 4. The “Young Trailblazer Art Competition” entry form, rules and submission process are available at greeleystampede.org/p/scholarships or email youngtrailblazers@greeleystampede.org for more info … Youngsters from across the state came out to the Kootenai County Fairgrounds in Coeur d’ Alene, Idaho, April 14, for the PRCA Rodeo Camp, presented by the Gem State Stampede Rodeo Committee. The free instructional event featured several former professional riders teaching the kids the fundamentals of roughstock riding. Sean Culver, of Grandview, Wash., a former PRCA bareback rider, bull rider and team roper, and current PRCA judge, said the clinic was the first public event where he had instructed youngsters. Culver usually coaches high school students and adults privately, but he said this camp was about teaching kids the fundamentals. “A lot of these kids are really green, so our goal is to give them a better understanding of all three roughstock events and the fundamentals of each one,” Culver said in the April 15 edition of the Coeur d’ Alene Press. Culver was one of the five professional instructors present to offer guidance to the 25 young riders in attendance. The next PRCA Rodeo Camp will be April 28 in Prescott, Ariz. The camp will run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (PT). Registration is required at www.prorodeo.com/prorodeo/rodeo/youth-rodeo.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “You have to have the perfect bulls and the perfect day, and it’s hard to line everything up, but when you do it’s pretty awesome. I was just trying to get to the whistle more than anything. My heart was pounding, and I was pumped up.”
– Bull rider Boudreaux Campbell after breaking the Oakdale (Calif.) Saddle Club Rodeo record set by Matt Austin in 2004 with his 90-point ride on Four Star Rodeo’s Yellow Fever. This was Campbell’s first 90-point ride at a PRCA rodeo.

5. Next Up

April 20           Longview (Texas) PRCA Rodeo begins
April 20           Midwest Horse Fair & Rodeo, Madison, Wis., begins
April 20           Jesse Andrus & Mike Hillman Memorial, Roswell, N.M., begins
April 20           Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up, Wrangler ProRodeo Tour, begins
April 21           Ron Ross Memorial permit section steer roping, Liberty Hill, Texas, begins
April 21           Ron Ross Memorial Steer Roping, Liberty Hill, Texas, begins

6. 2018 PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through April 16, 2018

AA:
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$84,702
BB:
Caleb Bennett, Trementon, Utah
$66,995
SW:
Cole Edge, Durant, Okla.
$47,102
TR-1:
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$51,240
TR-2:
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$51,240
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$82,965
TD:
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$54,000
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$122,041
SR:
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
$36,494

7. 2018 PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through April 16, 2018

All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$84,702
2
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
  50,722
3
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
  50,118
4
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
  34,415
5
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
  27,283
6
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
  25,174
7
Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss.
  25,138
8
Wesley Brunson, Terry, Miss.
  24,279
9
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  17,289
10
Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash.
  16,988
11
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  16,587
12
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
  13,966
13
McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla.
  11,278
14
Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
  11,264
15
Zack Jongbloed, Iowa, La.
  11,171
16
Tanner Green, Cotulla, Texas
   9,986
17
Cole Elshere, Faith, S.D.
   8,668
Bareback Riding
1
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
$66,995
2
Mason Clements, Springville, Utah
  63,095
3
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
  48,847
4
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
  39,487
5
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
  38,318
6
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
  37,693
7
Tilden Hooper, Carthage, Texas
  37,202
8
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
  37,191
9
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
  35,403
10
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
  32,766
11
Luke Creasy, Hobbs, N.M.
  27,218
12
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
  27,171
13
Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah
  23,199
14
Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho
  23,050
15
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
  22,412
16
Blade Elliott, Centreville, Ala.
  21,952
17
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France
  21,605
18
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
  21,156
19
Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore.
  19,778
20
Jessy Davis, Power, Mont.
  19,623
Steer Wrestling
1
Cole Edge, Durant, Okla.
$47,102
2
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
  40,229
3
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
  35,949
4
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
  35,679
5
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
  34,307
6
Chason Floyd, Buffalo, S.D.
  33,946
7
Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, Mont.
  33,187
8
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
  30,644
9
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
  29,696
10
Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla.
  26,522
11
Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif.
  26,305
12
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
  22,986
13
Tanner Brunner, Ramona, Kan.
  22,604
14
Jacob Shofner, Huntsville, Texas
  22,367
15
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
  22,121
16
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
  21,879
17
Blake Mindemann, Blanchard, Okla.
  21,312
18
Josh Garner, Live Oak, Calif.
  20,246
19
Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, N.D.
  19,979
20
Taz Olson, Prairie City, S.D.
  19,825
Team Roping (header)
1
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$51,240
2
Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C.
  39,560
3
Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, Okla.
  37,756
4
Logan Olson, Flandreau, S.D.
  35,322
5
Andrew Ward, Edmond, Okla.
  35,095
6
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
  29,823
7
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
  29,101
8
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
  23,349
9
Travis Dorman, Dade City, Fla.
  21,810
10
Spencer Mitchell, Orange Cove, Calif.
  20,789
11
Cory Kidd V, Statesville, N.C.
  20,779
12
Nelson Wyatt, Clanton, Ala.
  20,308
13
Tyler Wade, Terrell, Texas
  19,712
14
John Alley, Adams, Tenn.
  18,861
15
Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn.
  18,580
16
Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M.
  18,465
17
Steven Duby, Melba, Idaho
  17,867
18
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
  17,599
19
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
  17,598
20
Jake Orman, Prairie, Miss.
  17,395
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$51,240
2
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
  39,560
3
Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb.
  36,252
4
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
  35,482
5
Reagan Ward, Edmond, Okla.
  35,095
6
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
  29,101
7
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
  26,133
8
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
  25,865
9
Logan Medlin, Tatum, N.M.
  25,749
10
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
  23,349
11
Jason Duby, Klamath Falls, Ore.
  22,004
12
Bradley Massey, Perry, Fla.
  21,810
13
Trey Yates, Pueblo, Colo.
  21,532
14
Clint Summers, Lake City, Fla.
  18,879
15
Clark Adcock, Smithville, Tenn.
  18,861
16
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
  18,852
17
Brad Culpepper, Sylvester, Ga.
  18,580
18
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
  17,836
19
Patrick Smith, Lipan, Texas
  17,599
20
Jonathan Torres, Ocala, Fla.
  16,210
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$82,965
2
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
  55,684
3
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
  53,071
4
Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa
  51,774
5
Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah
  36,680
6
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
  35,877
7
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
  34,648
8
J.J. Elshere, Hereford, S.D.
  33,905
9
Joey Sonnier, New Iberia, La.
  31,401
10
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
  29,479
11
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
  27,470
12
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
  23,753
13
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
  23,155
14
Colt Gordon, Comanche, Okla.
  22,906
15
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
  22,040
16
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
  20,801
17
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
  17,834
18
Joe Lufkin, Sallisaw, Okla.
  17,811
19
Jade Blackwell, Rapid City, S.D.
  17,332
20
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
  17,284
Tie-down Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$54,000
2
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
  51,219
3
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
  43,735
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
  41,628
5
Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, Wash.
  40,329
6
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
  39,900
7
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
  38,629
8
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
  37,959
9
Sterling Smith, Stephenville, Texas
  36,735
10
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
  31,627
11
Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas
  26,413
12
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
  24,708
13
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
  24,309
14
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
  23,172
15
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
  22,530
16
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
  20,603
17
Jesse Clark, Portales, N.M.
  18,871
18
Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas
  16,758
19
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
  16,311
20
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
  16,062
Steer Roping
1
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
$36,494
2
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
  31,088
3
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
  24,773
4
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
  22,075
5
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
  20,267
6
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
  16,457
7
Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas
  14,665
8
Brodie Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla.
  13,041
9
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
  12,829
10
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
  12,641
11
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
  12,489
12
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
  12,178
13
Will Gasperson, Decatur, Texas
  12,145
14
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
  11,358
15
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
  10,995
16
Chad Mathis, Morristown, Ariz.
  10,256
17
Ralph Williams, Skiatook, Okla.
   9,651
18
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
   8,686
19
Jim Locke, Miami, Texas
   7,918
20
Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M.
   7,749
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$122,041
2
Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont.
  83,984
3
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
  58,436
4
Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla.
  57,241
5
Dustin Boquet, Bourg, La.
  54,607
6
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
  47,626
7
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
  43,719
8
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
  41,978
9
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
  41,155
10
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
  37,079
11
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
  33,597
12
Chase Dougherty, Canby, Ore.
  30,948
13
Lane Nobles, Gatesville, Texas
  30,541
14
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
  30,240
15
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
  28,845
16
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
  27,767
17
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
  25,325
18
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
  23,533
19
Koby Radley, Montpelier, La.
  22,386
20
Ruger Piva, Challis, Idaho
  21,895
*2018 Barrel Racing (April 16, 2018)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
$85,332
2
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
  71,186
3
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
  68,657
4
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
  64,910
5
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
  55,834
6
Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas
  43,120
7
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
  40,147
8
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
  39,455
9
Kylie Weast, Comanche, Okla.
  36,534
10
Christine Laughlin, Pueblo, Colo.
  34,558
11
Tiana Schuster, Krum, Texas
  34,265
12
Kelly Bruner, Millsap, Texas
  33,899
13
Shelly Anzick, Shepard, Mont.
  28,372
14
Carman Pozzobon, Aldergrove, British Columbia
  24,822
15
Jessi Fish, Franklin, Tenn.
  23,834
16
Jessica Routier, Buffalo, S.D.
  23,647
17
Ericka Nelson, Century, Fla.
  23,125
18
Nikki Hansen, Dickinson, N.D.
  22,188
19
Teri Bangert, Olympia, Wash.
  22,147
20
Lucinda Rose, Willard, Mo.
  21,638
8. 2018 Xtreme Bulls standings
Unofficial through April 16, 2018
 
1
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
$32,388
2
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
  31,211
3
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
  27,413
4
Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla.
  21,285
5
Lane Nobles, Gatesville, Texas
  21,264
6
Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont.
  14,510
7
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
  13,334
8
Riker Carter, Stone, Idaho
  13,172
9
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
  11,882
10
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
   9,926
11
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
   9,016
12
Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M.
   9,000
13
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
   7,991
14
Nate Perry, Elk City, Okla.
   7,730
15
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
   7,649
16
Jordan Hansen, Ponoka, Alberta
   7,646
17
Fulton Rutland, Stilwell, Okla.
   7,616
18
Dustin Boquet, Bourg, La.
   7,519
19
Koby Radley, Montpelier, La.
   7,021
20
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
   6,869
Read More

☛ Secretary-Treasurer of Idaho Cutting Horse Ass’n found guilty of felony

Posted by on Apr 15, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 2 comments

SECRETARY-TREASURER OF IDAHO CUTTING HORSE ASSOCIATION FOUND GUILTY OF A FELONY.

 

DOLLY MARIE MARTIN ORDERED TO 6 YEARS OF SUPERVISED PROBATION AND TO REPAY ASSOCIATION $29,745.80

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 16, 2018

On April 9, 2018, Dolly Marie Martin, Bellevue, Idaho, the wife of NCHA Hall of Fame Rider Scott Martin, was found guilty of a felony and received a suspended sentence and was ordered to serve Supervised Probation, as well as repaying the Idaho Cutting Horse Association $29,745.80 that she stole from the association while she was Secretary-Treasurer.

 

According to an unnamed source, she was Secretary-Treasurer of the association for only 15 months. The association has two shows a year: a Limited Age Event and a weekend show in the spring and a Limited Age Event and Mercuria cutting in the fall.

 

“She had stolen the money “pretty quick,” said the unnamed source; however, it took almost two years to get her through the judicial system.”

 

Represented by her lawyer, Doug Nelson,Esq, of the Roark Law Firm, LLP, Hailey, Idaho, Dolly entered a plea of guilty of Grand Theft, a felony, on Jan. 12, 2018. She agreed to pay court costs of $245.50 and a fine of $5,000 (that was suspended). She agreed to pay all costs, fees and fines ordered by the court and was sentenced to a minimum period of confinement of 3 years, followed by an indeterminate period of custody for 5 years, with the total sentence not to exceed eight years. (The execution of the prison portion of the sentence was also suspended, although the costs and fine portion were not suspended.)

 

She was then placed on supervised probation for a period of 6 years, beginning April 9, 2018 under the control of the Idaho State Board of Correction, subject to abiding by the General Conditions of Probation.

 

She would be allowed time to pay the fines and restitution, with all of them needing to be paid before the end of her probation. She was allowed to set up a payment plan with her probation officer.

 

She would also serve 180 days in the county jail as a term and condition of probation; however, she would be granted a work release if she otherwise qualifies under the Sheriff’s classification system.

 

She was also ordered to serve up to 60 days of discretionary time at the discretion of her assigned probation officer, as a sanction for violating a term or condition of probation, subject to the requirements of IC.R 33(e). In no event may discretionary time be imposed or served that exceeds three (3) consecutive days.

 

She is also ordered to prepare an apology letter for the victim (Idaho Cutting Horse Association). The letter shall include an explanation of her actions and the ramifications of such actions.

 

The court also ordered a Judgment of Restitution to be entered in the sum of $29,745.80. A separate written Order of Restitution shall also be entered. The amount is payable though the Clerk of the District Court to be disbursed to the victim in the amount of $29,745.80.

 

Martin has 42 days from the date stamped by the Clerk of Court (April 11, 2018) to appeal the judgment. The Court also advised her that if she is unable to pay the costs of an appeal, she can apply for leave to appeal in forma pauperis, meaning the right as an indigent to proceed without liability for court costs and fees and the right to be represented by a court-appointed attorney at no cost to the defendant.

 

Martin must turn herself into the custody of the Sheriff of Blaine County, Idaho, by 5 p.m. on April 16, 2018 for service of the County Jail time ordered herein as a term and condition of probation.

Martin Judgment

Judgment of Conviction Order of Probation

Read More

☛ Is it “good sportsmanship” to refuse an NCHA buckle?

Posted by on Apr 14, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 2 comments

IS IT “GOOD” SPORTSMANSHIP TO REFUSE AN NCHA BUCKLE?

 

FROM THE EDITOR

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
April 14, 2018

There was an interesting post on my Facebook page yesterday when NCHA Vice President Ron Pietrafeso posted, “Sportsmanship has been and always will be the honor in which people participate in any type of competition, regardless of their personal opinion. What I along with others witnessed yesterday was not only ‘not good sportsmanship’ but was downright disgusting and disrespectful, to say the least.

 

There is no room in any sport for this type of action. What type of message does this send to our young members? The person who was responsible knows who he is and he should be ashamed of himself. What he did, watching the video, was deliberate by the mere fact that he could have just not shown up to receive his award but instead, he walked up as if he were there to receive his award and walked away leaving The presenters holding his award and wondering what just happened. You might expect this from some very young, spoiled brat but not from a grown man who supposedly knows better.

 

Luckily 99.9% of our members would never even think of doing something that is disrespectful but I guess there will always be that 1% who act out their stupidity.”

 

Since my Facebook page is open to the public for anyone to see and put statements on, I am publishing this situation to my readers.

 

From what I can gather from the chatter on my Facebook page, is that James Bankston was to receive a buckle for placing in the finals of the NCHA Super Stakes Classic Amateur and/or Senior Amateur, that was to be presented by former United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who has decided to become more involved with the NCHA. He, along with his wife, Renda, have been great supporters of the association, donating a lot of saddles. When Bankston came to receive his award, NCHA President Lewis Wray moved in to be a part of the award shot. Posts say that Bankston told Wray to get out of the picture and then walked away from Tillerson, who had his hand out to shake Bankston’s hand, without receiving his buckle. This was all caught on video.

NCHA Super Stakes Classic Amateur finals

 

Responses to Pietrafeso’s post came quick and fast.  Some were on Bankston’s side and others were appalled at what he did. As of today, Saturday, April 14, responses were as follows:

“Whether Mr. Bankston was right or wrong that should really be taken up by the directors of NCHA in a private letter, not on Facebook where everyone that does not like or respect him can take pot shots. He unfriended me too due to political reasons but I am not going to go after him with tar and feathers on Facebook because that is not going to solve the issue or change anything in a positive manner. If we are such “NICE” folks in NCHA, then treat people as such; there is just no need to air this on Facebook, whether you personally like the man or not. No one knows the backstory except for the people that were on that stage. If he was wrong, he was wrong; let him apologize and move on. Don’t persecute him on Facebook for it. Good Grief. “ From Cadace

 

“He made a choice to make this public at a major NCHA event. What he does in private or on his Facebook page is his choice but this was different. He writes articles in publications, he somewhat represents the NCHA and in my humble opinion what he did is a negative reflection and disrespectful” From June.

 

“I agree with Candace. This is enough .. let’s move on.” From Homer.

 

“I agree 100%. We all have our quirks. Bashing on Facebook is a great outlet for people’s rage but totally hypocritical to accuse someone of poor sportsmanship while demonstrating poor sportsmanship about it, as is being done here. Should have been handled differently, Ron, with all due respect.” From Maria.

 

“There are appropriate means/forums that deal with this situation in a professional manner. Facebook is not one of them.” From Bill.

 

“He certainly makes Facebook his broadcasting venue, even attacking others for their opinions, so why should he be exempt. He made the choice to make his statement on video in public.” From June.

 

“Myself, I would make a unilateral apology to Secretary Tillerson. I think Mr. Jimmy is a really nice man! But he is an adult that has really strong liberal views. Cutting is a sport that brings us all together, Democrats and Republicans. In a time that the NCHA needs more participation, there is no place for such behavior. I hope Mr. Jimmy makes his actions right. We all make stupid decisions. I sure hope Mr. Jimmy makes this right. He has unfriended me on Facebook but I still consider him a friend!” From Arthur.

 

Thanks for speaking out Mrs. Tillerson. Hey Team! Chill out! The situation was directed singularly at Lewis Wray. Not Rex and I. Lewis was a gentleman and the finalist was determined to stand up for his point of view. No foul. Just think about both sides .. to stand and have a smiley face photo op with someone you are having an issue with might be considered hypocritical to most. Both sides made strong statements. Lewis represented his office peacefully and the member voiced his wishes. Sleep well America! This public-service announcement was not approved by the Federal Government! From Tim.

 

“Be reminded of the “Code of the West.” Very simply put “You ride for and are loyal to ‘the brand,’ or you go elsewhere. Carol.

 

“Mr. Tillerson, who seems like a gracious man, probably ‘grinned and bared it,’ when posing with politicians he did not like. As my momma always said, “There is a time and place for everything.” I think we’ve all been in situations where the hypocrisy of that situation is almost unbearable. It’s the  ‘grown-up’ world. Children behave with their true feelings. I’m not saying this is right or wrong but head scratching from a grown-up’s perspective.

From Kathleen.

 

“Just don’t show up for the award; I mean getting there by marking a 213 isn’t exactly earth shaking. Does doing the “He’s not my President” remind you of anyone?

From William.

 

 

 

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