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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 5-24-17

Posted by on May 24, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

 

Courtesy PRCA
May 24, 2017

Proctor captures WCC Redding victory

REDDING, Calif. – Experience paid dividends for bull rider Shane Proctor May 20.

The 2011 world champion had all his talents on display – mainly his ability to recover – en route to an 87-point ride on Corey & Lange Rodeo’s O Zone to win the Wrangler Champions Challenge presented by Justin Boots at the Redding Rodeo Grounds.

“That was a great little bull of Mike Corey’s and on that third jump he got me to the outside really bad, but on the next jump he really hung in the air and it gave me a chance to get back to the center, and after that he was just awesome,” said Proctor, a five-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER (2011-13, 2015-16).

Proctor, who was competing for Team Coors, drew a bull that has been taking riders to the pay window this season. Derek Kolbaba split the win at the Redding Rodeo, which ended May 19, with his 87.5-point ride on O Zone.

Proctor had never been on O Zone and he acknowledged he thought he let a great opportunity slip through his hands about three seconds into his ride.

“I was thinking, ‘Damn, I messed this bull up,'” Proctor said. “I was mad at myself. But luckily I took the fight to him and fought back to the center and it was good from there.”

Proctor earned $4,756 for his performance before the cheers of the 6,200 fans in the stands, and he hopes this will kick-start his season. The Grand Coulee, Wash., native wasn’t in the top 50 in the May 22 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings.

“This is a big-time boost of confidence,” said Proctor, 32. “I was real excited to have this bull. It was getting frustrating this season and this is good for me as I start to go into the summer run. Every good streak starts with one (ride), and this is it.”

Proctor knows what’s like to make up ground in the world standings. A year ago, he made a late-season charge to qualify for the WNFR in the No. 15 spot. Once in Vegas, Proctor got on a heater and won the WNFR average title after earning $192,064. He finished third in the world.

“The plan is to get back to Vegas,” Proctor said. “When the summer starts, I just try to make up all the ground I can. I know I’ve done it before and I know I can do it again. Sometimes I just need to remember bull riding is fun and I need to go out at it like that. That’s what’s fun about going to rodeos and these Champions Challenges – it’s a fun atmosphere. I’m a cowboy and I love what I do.”

Other winners at the $92,800 rodeo were bareback rider on the Boot Barn team R.C. Landingham (87 points on Bridwell Pro Rodeos’ Adalida), steer wrestler Matt Reeves of Polaris RANGER (4.1 seconds), team ropers Kaleb Driggers/Junior Nogueira of Experience Kissimmee (3.4 seconds), saddle bronc rider Jake Watson of team Las Vegas (87 points on Big Stone Rodeo’s Rubels), tie-down ropers Marcos Costa of team Wrangler, and Cade Swor of team Coors (8.2 seconds each) and barrel racer Tiany Schuster of Justin Boots (17.15 seconds).

Driggers and Nogueira’s time is a new record for the WCC, which began in 2013, and the fastest team roping time so far in 2017. Trevor Brazile/Travis Graves and Tom Richards/Allen Bach shared the WCC team roping record as each posted 3.9-second times in Omaha, Neb., in 2014.

It also was a Redding Rodeo Grounds arena record. The arena record was 4.0 seconds, set by Wade Wheatley/Kyle Lockett in 2006.

 

  • Four cowboys have won money at all three 2017 Wrangler Champions Challenges presented by Justin Boots: reigning World Champion Team Ropers Levi Simpson and Jeremy Buhler, 2015 World Champion Saddle Bronc Rider Jacobs Crawley and 2015 World Champion Tie-down Roper Caleb Smidt. In 2016, only one cowboy kept his streak alive all season by winning money at all 10 Wrangler Champions Challenges – saddle bronc rider CoBurn Bradshaw.
  • Coors Banquet leads the unofficial WCC team standings with $36,192, followed by Justin Boots with $31,958 and Boot Barn with $31,146.
  • Here are the Wrangler Champions Challenge leaders in each event through three WCC events: bareback rider Orin Larsen, Coors, $7,888; steer wrestler Dakota Eldridge, B&W Trailer Hitches, $6,148; team roping header Levi Simpson, Polaris RANGER, $7,540; team roping heeler Jeremy Buhler, Polaris RANGER, $7,540 each; saddle bronc rider Jacobs Crawley, Resistol, $8,236; and bull rider Cole Melancon, $7,888. The next WCC events are Santa Maria, Calif., June 1, and Spanish Fork, Utah, June 3.
  •  Tie-down roper Hunter Herrin is the only cowboy to have three 7.0-second or faster runs for the season; he made 6.6-and 6.9-second runs in San Antonio and 7.0 seconds at the Rowell Ranch Rodeo in Hayward, Calif., last weekend. Herrin won the Rowell Ranch Rodeo and earned $1,816 for his performance.
  • There were a couple of changes atop the May 22 WEATHER GUARD®

PRCA World Standings. Caleb Smidt took the lead back in the all-around standings from Tuf Cooper. Smidt has earned $63,754, while Cooper is second with $59,667. Luke Brown is the new team roping heeler leader with $59,388. Erich Rogers dropped down to second in the standings with $55,672.

Pratt wins Redding and splits Killeen

REDDING, Calif. – Tie-down roper Jake Pratt was two-for-two this past weekend.

On May 19, he won the Redding (Calif.) Rodeo and then split the win at Rodeo Killeen (Texas) the next day.

Pratt was the first up for slack at Redding and nailed 16.5 on two – and before the dust settled in California and his win was solidified, he had already tied for the lead at Killeen with Reese Riemer at 8.9 seconds.

“That 6 a.m. flight wasn’t any fun,” Pratt said with a laugh. “People always ask what’s in my rope can.”

On May 17, the 29-year-old cowboy burst into the Redding arena on a borrowed horse named Irish, owned by Oregon cowboy Roger Nonella, and placed second in the first round with an 8.0. He went on to split the win in the second round with Shane Hanchey, clocking in at 8.5 seconds, which placed him 1.5 seconds ahead in the average.

“That horse was pretty dang awesome and a lot of that success is due to that horse,” Pratt said. “Those calves at Redding went to Red Bluff and Clovis (Calif.) and everyone knew them. I knew the one I had in the first round was good at the other rodeos – I just flew in there and rode.”

Prior to this win at Redding, Pratt wasn’t even in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings’ Top 50. Now, the $5,659 he won at Redding gave him a healthy boost in the world standings, to No. 30. He’s hoping for a shot at qualifying for what would be his first Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER.

“It’s been a slow year so far, but man, if I stay where I’m at, it would be a big boost for the summertime – just got to continue and keep winning and hopefully I’ll be in Vegas in December,” Pratt said. “I went to the winter rodeos and had a slow start, but this last month has been pretty good, so we’ll keep doing that the rest of the year.”

Pratt placed at some previous rodeos in California and credits his turning point this season to his new 10-year-old sorrel gelding American Quarter Horse that he got from Colorado cowboy Scotty Shelton.

“I got him in February and things started coming together,” Pratt said. “For me, he scores really good and he can run – so that helps a lot, those are his two best qualities.”

Pratt has been competing in ProRodeo since late 2008 and his best year was in 2014 when he ranked No. 17 in the world standings. Now, he’s on track to possibly top his personal best.

“I’ll continue what I’ve been doing and take advantage when I draw good calves,” Pratt said.

He already has his eyes set on Sisters, Ore., and Reno, Nev., in June.

Other winners in Redding were all-around cowboy Chant DeForest ($6,447 in tie-down roping and team roping), bareback rider Ty Breuer (84.5 points on Big Stone Rodeo’s Gone Fishing), steer wrestler Sterling Lambert (9.1 seconds on two head), team ropers Chant DeForest/Bronc Boehnlein (9.7 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Zeke Thurston (85.5 points on Four Star Rodeo’s Starbucks), barrel racer Lake Mehalic (17.21 seconds) and bull riders Derek Kolbaba (87.5 points on Corey & Lange Rodeo’s O Zone), Sage Kimzey (87.5 points on Bridwell Pro Rodeos’ Clean-n-sober), and Brady Portenier (87.5 points on Bridwell Pro Rodeos’ Cold Chill)

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

Any cowboys traveling through Wyoming this summer should be advised of a rockslide that occurred May 19, about 10 miles south of Thermopolis, Wyo., along U.S. Highway 20 between mileposts 121.7 and 122.2 – an area known as Big Windy Curve, according to the Wyoming Department of Transportation. Travelers should expect traffic delays of up to 40 minutes, six days a week, during the rock/mud cleanup and emergency repair project. Options for avoiding this key stretch of highway are limited. Travelers can head north from Casper along U.S. Highway 25 and cut across the Bighorn Mountains through Buffalo and into Worland. The route adds about four hours and involves steep mountain passes that could be dangerous for small vehicles towing large trailers. They can also head north from Rock Springs along U.S. Highway 191 through Jackson Hole and Yellowstone National Park. This route adds about three-and-a-half hours of driving – assuming there’s no traffic jams from the Park’s 4 million annual tourists – and a $30 park entrance fee at the gate as well. Travelers through the Cowboy State can monitor road conditions at https://map.wyoroad.info/wtimap/index.html or by calling 511 while in Wyoming … Dean Gorsuch, a two-time PRCA world champion steer wrestler (2006, 2010), was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award for Eastern Wyoming College in Torrington on May 12. Gorsuch received a certificate in welding and joining technology from EWC. In the fall of 2016, Gorsuch was added to the ranks of welding faculty at EWC. “I just love this place,” said Gorsuch in the Star-Herald (Scottsbluff, Neb.) May 19. “At other schools, it’s easy for students to get lost. Here at EWC, we get to know you, care about you, and put our hearts into ensuring your success.” … Billie Roy (Bill) Stephens, of Stephens Brothers Rodeo Co., passed away May 4 in Ontario, Ore. He was 77. Stephens was a PRCA Gold Card member and he and his family provided livestock to many collegiate and PRCA rodeos over the years, including the National Finals Rodeo from 1974-78 and 1981-89. Stephens Rodeo sent 86 animals to the WNFR, consisting of 28 bareback horses, 27 saddle bronc horses, and 31 bulls. There will be a celebration of life party in Stephens’ honor on June 10, at Kimball Park, 618 Irving Street, in Caldwell, Idaho, at the corner of Kimball and Grant, from noon to 3 p.m. (MT). Contact Tim McNarie at prcabullfighter@gmail.comfor more information … Kelley LaCoste, a former veteran PRCA bullfighter and clown, passed away May 11. He was 69. LaCoste worked the Canadian Finals Rodeo in Edmonton five times in the 1970s and 1980s as a bullfighter, and was chosen to work the CFR as a barrelman/clown from 1991-93. LaCoste retired from bullfighting in 1982 to concentrate fully on his clown acts … Matthew Hughes of West Plains, Mo., was hired recently as the new rodeo coach and faculty member at Mesalands Community College in Tucumcari, N.M. “Our rodeo team has responded extremely well to the new coach,” said Thomas W. Newsom, president of Mesalands. “We are very excited to have Matt leading our rodeo team, becoming a new faculty member and joining our community.” Hughes has competed in the rodeo arena since he was 7 years old and has been around all aspects of the sport. Specifically, Hughes has several years of experience in the business side of rodeo. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in public relations from Missouri Valley College (Marshall), and was the assistant rodeo coach at Missouri Valley College for the last two years … The late Hadley Barrett headlines the 13-member, 2017 class that will be inducted into the Nebraska Sandhills Cowboy Hall of Fame in Ainsworth. Barrett, who was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1999, passed away March 2, 2017, at age 87. The induction ceremony will take place June 10 in Valentine.

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through May 22, 2017

 

AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $63,754
BB: R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. $76,110
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $105,267
TR-1: Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas $59,388
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $55,672
SB: Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $84,110
TD: Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $61,865
BR: Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho $77,123
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas   $47,519

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through May 22, 2017

 

All-around
1 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $63,754
2 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 59,667
3 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 57,784
4 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 50,366
5 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 44,203
6 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 36,360
7 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 31,355
8 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 30,701
9 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 27,326
10 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 26,033
11 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 24,420
12 Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif. 21,731
13 Cole Elshere, Faith, S.D. 18,876
14 Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif. 18,639
15 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
16 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 14,779
17 McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla. 13,459
18 Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla. 13,039
19 Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta 12,713
20 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654

 

Bareback Riding
1 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. $76,110
2 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa 71,467
3 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 64,410
4 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 53,226
5 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 52,918
6 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 41,633
7 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 39,905
8 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 39,265
9 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 36,985
10 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
11 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 34,841
12 Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. 34,192
13 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 32,008
14 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 30,612
15 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
16 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 26,922
17 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 23,727
18 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 23,049
19 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 22,287
20 Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta 20,767

 

Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $105,267
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 65,669
3 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 46,016
4 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 41,077
5 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 39,988
6 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 35,591
7 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 35,039
8 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 31,732
9 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 31,622
10 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 31,558
11 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 29,779
12 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 29,072
13 J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn. 27,684
14 Justin Shaffer, Hallsville, Texas 25,803
15 Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta 24,664
16 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 24,272
17 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 23,704
18 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 22,992
19 Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev. 22,883
20 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 22,685

 

Team Roping (header)
1 Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas $59,388
2 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. 55,672
3 Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. 48,459
4 Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. 44,851
5 Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla. 43,304
6 Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. 41,315
7 Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore. 38,388
8 Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, Okla. 24,868
9 Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M. 24,639
10 Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz. 23,211
11 Jesse Stipes, Salina, Okla. 22,185
12 Travis Tryan, Billings, Mont. 21,335
13 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 20,587
14 Ryan Reed, Farmington, Calif. 20,464
15 Hayes Smith, Central Point, Ore. 20,326
16 Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta 19,246
17 Kelsey Parchman, Cumberland City, Tenn. 19,136
18 Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla. 19,080
19 Blake Teixeira, Tres Pinos, Calif. 18,729
20 Edward Hawley Jr., Surprise, Ariz. 18,524

 

Team Roping (heeler)
1 Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. $55,672
2 Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan. 50,859
3 Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas 45,468
4 Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil 44,851
5 Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas 44,634
6 Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. 43,304
7 Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. 42,583
8 Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 38,388
9 Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan. 30,622
10 John Robertson, Polson, Mont. 25,183
11 Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont. 23,587
12 Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo. 21,865
13 Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. 19,476
14 Cody Pearson, Tucson, Ariz. 19,260
15 Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta 19,246
16 Kinney Harrell, Marshall, Texas 19,136
17 Ty Romo, Whiteriver, Ariz. 18,524
18 Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev. 17,765
19 Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas 16,877
20 B.J. Dugger, Three Rivers, Texas 16,675

 

Saddle Bronc Riding
1 Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $87,110
2 CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah 60,475
3 Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta 57,767
4 Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla. 46,907
5 Tyrell J Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont. 41,645
6 Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas 41,365
7 Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah 38,756
8 Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta 33,584
9 Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D. 32,787
10 Jake Wright, Milford, Utah 27,625
11 Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah 27,440
12 Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas 27,141
13 Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah 26,595
14 Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La. 26,206
15 Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M. 23,788
16 Curtis Garton, Kaitaia, New Zealand 22,904
17 Nat Stratton, Goodwell. Okla. 22,630
18 Tyler Corrington, Hastings, Minn. 22,421
19 Jake Watson, Hudsons Hope, British Columbia 20,900
20 Cody Wright, Milford, Utah 20,591

 

 

Tie-down Roping

1 Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $61,865
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 55,196
3 Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas 52,015
4 Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La. 50,994
5 J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah 50,654
6 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 41,155
7 Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla. 39,933
8 Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas 39,792
9 Randall Carlisle, Athens, La. 39,410
10 Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla. 38,433
11 Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho 37,721
12 Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan. 32,592
13 Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas 30,077
14 Tim Pharr, Resaca, Ga. 28,985
15 Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas 26,389
16 Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas 26,230
17 Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas 25,961
18 Joseph Parsons, Marana, Ariz. 24,216
19 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,097
20 Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas 23,031

 

Steer Roping
1 Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas $47,519
2 John Bland, Turkey, Texas 37,676
3 Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas 34,242
4 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 33,320
5 Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. 30,063
6 Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas 29,517
7 Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas 28,248
8 J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas 25,687
9 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 24,587
10 Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. 24,371
11 Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas 20,603
12 Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo. 20,590
13 Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. 19,119
14 Shay Good, Midland, Texas 17,181
15 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 15,282
16 Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D. 14,685
17 J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla. 14,055
18 Reo Lohse, Kaycee, Wyo. 13,780
19 Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas 13,377
20 Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas 13,164

 

Bull Riding
1 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho $77,123
2 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 68,537
3 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. 65,071
4 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. 56,746
5 Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif. 48,177
6 Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah 45,096
7 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 42,492
8 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 42,223
9 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 42,152
10 Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas 39,834
11 Dalan Duncan, Ballard, Utah 35,381
12 Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas 35,380
13 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 33,230
14 Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla. 33,230
15 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 32,533
16 Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas 31,757
17 Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M. 31,047
18 Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah 29,921
19 Jeff Askey, Athens, Texas 29,464
20 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 28,161

 

*2017 Barrel Racing (May 22, 2017)

Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.

 

1 Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas $136,926
2 Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash. 80,797
3 Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas 76,501
4 Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore. 71,368
5 Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas 59,140
6 Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif. 46,139
7 Taylor Langdon, Aubrey, Texas 43,075
8 Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas 41,806
9 Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark. 40,882
10 Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas 40,405
11 Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo. 35,363
12 Carmel Wright, Roy, Mont. 32,808
13 Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas 29,560
14 Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas 26,105
15 Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas 26,000
16 Jana Griemsman, Piedmont, S.D. 25,819
17 Cayla Small, Bokchito, Okla. 24,919
18 Jordan Moore, Mauston, Wis. 24,595
19 Sammi Bessert, Grand Junction, Colo. 24,114
20 Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas 22,873

 

 2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings

     Unofficial through May 22, 2017

 

1 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $29,471
2 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. 23,075
3 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 21,492
4 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 21,086
5 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 16,564
6 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 15,995
7 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 14,861
8 Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas 11,892
9 Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas 10,313
10 Jeffrey Ramagos, Zachary, La. 9,281
11 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 8,208
12 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 8,146
13 Clayton Foltyn, Winnie, Texas 7,580
14 Dalan Duncan, Ballard, Utah 7,556
15 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 7,402
16 Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas 7,078
17 Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla. 6,666
18 Ednei Caminhas, Denton, Texas 6,639
19 Tanner Bothwell, Rapid City, S.D. 6,561
20 Christopher Byrd, Compton, Calif. 6,486

 

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☛ Trey Hunt succumbs to cancer; benefit planned 5-20-17

Posted by on May 20, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SERVICES FOR TREY HUNT SCHEDULED FOR WEDNESDAY, MAY 24

CHARITY  GOLF TOURNAMENT AND BENEFIT CONCERT TO BE HELD JUNE 11

Trey Hunt, a popular cuttinghorse trainer, passed away on Sunday, May 14.

By Glory Ann Kurtz
May 20, 2017
Services for Robert “Trey: Earl J Hunt III, Millsap, Texas, who lost his battle with cancer on Sunday, May 14, will be held Wednesday, May 24 at 2 p.m. at the Parker County Sheriff’s Posse Hall in Weatherford, Texas.

Hunt, a cutting horse trainer, husband to Jenna, father to Kay and son of Bobby Hunt, Comfort, Texas, fought the hard battle against stage 4 brain cancer, after being diagnosed in the fall of 2016. He had endured radiation and chemotherapy since November.

Prior to being diagnosed, Hunt competed in the 2016 NCHA Super Stakes riding Ultimately Stylish to the NCHA Super Stakes Classic John Deere Open Finals, marking a 20 and finishing 8th.

When it was discovered that the well-liked Hunt had cancer, several friends planned a benefit golf tournament which was to be held June 11. Even though Hunt is not alive to see his friends raise money for his family, the event is still scheduled to go on. Also, a Go Fund Me account has been created to support Hunt’s wife, Jenna and their daughter Kay.

Go to: https://www.gofundme.com/trey-hunt-family or attend the Trey Hunt Charity Golf Tournament & Benefit Concert.

The charity tournament and benefit concert has been organized by Trey’s close friends, Don Bell, Hunter Meinzer and Josh Drake. A Charity Golf Tournament and Benefit Concert will be held at Canyon West Golf Club on June 11th starting at 1p.m. Everyone is invited to come play and join in the fun. The four-man scramble is open to teams or Individuals who will draw for teams and the entry deadline was May 15.

After the golf tournament their will be a fully catered plated dinner followed by a benefit concert by Jake Hooker & The Outsiders with all proceeds going to Trey’s family. If you don’t want to play in the golf tournament you can still come for the dinner and concert afterwards starting at 7 p.m. and finishing around 9 p.m. There will also be a silent auction including Texas photographer Wyman Meinzer’s donation of three of his outstanding coffee table books for the silent auction. These books are packed full of breathtaking landscapes, cowboy gear, and wildlife imagery that only a true Texas frontiersman could capture.

Cost for the Golf Tournament is $100 per player or $400 per Team with the entry deadline being May 15 . Cost for a  Hole Sponsorship is $250. Contact Don Bell at 903-651-5615

Cost for the Plated Dinner and Benefit Concert is: $35 per person or $60 per couple. If you would like to Reserve a group table for your party please contact Hunter Meinzer at 940-256-3758

To sign up for the Golf tournament, purchase dinner/ concert tickets or more information please contact Bell, Meinzer or Josh Drake at 940-389-2776 or go to the event Facebook page.

Send your condolences to the Hunt family at 110 Hereford Lane, Millsap, TX 76066.

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☛ Metallic Cat and HERDA 5-18-17

Posted by on May 18, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE LAWSUITS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

METALLIC CAT OFFSPRING DOMINATE SUPER STAKES OPEN FINALS

 

BUT ARE BREEDERS BEING CAREFUL TO ELIMINATE HERDA?

  

By Glory Ann Kurtz
May 18, 2017
Edited May 20, 2017

 

Metallic Cat offspring dominate Super Stakes Open finals

A cutting horse dynasty started with the 1967 stallion Doc O Lena, the son of a severely foundered great mare Poco Lena. He was trained and ridden by Shorty Freeman to the championship of the 1970 NCHA Futurity, following a clean sweep of the futurity’s preliminary go-rounds, semifinals and finals. It was the bloodline that everyone wanted in a cutting horse and the most sought-after sire to breed to.

 

Next came his son Smart Little Lena, out of Smart Peppy, born in 1979, and ridden by Shorty’s son Bill Freeman. The pair not only won the 1982 NCHA Futurity, but also the NCHA Super Stakes and Derby. After he was retired to stud, his offspring won $34.9 million, according to AQHA records.

 

Showing she was just as prolific as her sire, Smart Little Lena, Smart Little Kitty produced High Brow Cat, sired by High Brow Hickory. Although he was not a great money earner himself, High Brow Cat was honored at this year’s NCHA Convention as the NCHA’s leading sire for the 12th consecutive year, having sired 483 money earners and up to 2015 had earned nearly $4 million, according to his owner Darren Blanton. Blanton stated he was “truly a magical genetic mix that only God himself could have created.” Blanton had purchased the 1998 stallion, bred by Hanes Chatham and Stewart Sewell as part of a package deal that included the colt’s mother from Jack Waggoner in January 2013.

 

METALLIC CAT
Today the bloodlines of these great cutting horses is ongoing with the 2006 stallion Metallic Cat, a double-bred Smart Little Lena offspring sired by High Brow Cat out of Chers Shadow, sired by Peptoboonsmal out of Shesa Smarty Lena by Smart Little Lena. Shesa Smarty Lena was out of Shesa Playmate (Freckles Playboy x Lenaette by Doc Olena), going back to Doc O’Lena on both the top and bottom side.
Metallic Cat Pedigree

 

Bred by the Roan Rangers, Weatherford, Texas, Metallic Cat was sold as a 2-year-old on Sept. 11, 2007 to Beau Galyean, who sold him one year later on Sept. 10, 2008 to Alvin C. Fults, Amarillo, Texas. Seven years later, on Oct. 1, 2015, Metallic Cat’s ownership was changed to Metallic Cat Ltd., Amarillo, Texas, who currently owns the stallion.
Click for Metallic Cat Ownership>> 

 

With a 2009 NCHA Futurity Championship, Horse of the Year title and an induction into the NCHA Hall of Fame under his belt, Metallic Cat is the second highest money-earning stallion (behind his sire Smart Little Lena) in the history of NCHA, earning $637,711. Beau Galyean, who owned the stallion at one time, rode the stallion in the finals of all the major events and never lost a cow. He is the highest money earning stallion of all of High Brow Cat’s offspring and the highest money-earning aged-event stallion in a 27-year-history.

 

According to Quarter Horse News statistics, the highest money-earning offspring of High Brow Cat is the mare Dont Look Twice, owned by Phil and Mary Ann Rapp, Weatherford, Texas, earning $845,476. It’s interesting to note that the two highest money-earning horses, all-ages, all-divisions, follow the same bloodlines, with Red White And Boon (88g), being sired by Smart Little Lena and Sister CD (02g) being sired by CD Olena, a son of Doc O’Lena.

 

Metallic Cat was the NCHA Sire of the Year in 2016 and with 1,894 offspring currently registered with AQHA, they have earned over $12.2 million. He is standing at the Fults Ranch in conjunction with Timbercreek Veterinary Hospital, for a $10,000 breeding fee.

 

METALLIC CAT’S GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT AS A SIRE:
However, Metallic Cat’s greatest achievement so far has been the recently held NCHA Open Super Stakes Finals that paid out $635,528, with High Brow Cat and his offspring as sires took home 74 percent of the total Open Finals purse – or $471,949! Metallic Cat, with nine Open finalists, earned 53 percent ($334,148) of the Total Open Finals purse.

 

2016 NCHA FUTURITY & 2017 SUPER STAKES OPEN FINALS:
I took the results of the Open finals of the 2016 NCHA Futurity and the 2017 NCHA Super Stakes, pulling out the offspring of Metallic Cat that earned money, offspring of High Brow Cat that won money and the offspring of High Brow Cat (other than Metallic Cat) whose offspring won money.

 

2016 NCHA Futurity
In the Open finals of the 2016 NCHA Futurity, a $1,516,020 total purse was paid out, with High Brow Cat’s offspring as sires winning $238,486 (16 percent of the total Open Finals purse); Metallic Cat offspring winning $312,778 (21 percent) and other sons of High Brow Cat’s offspring taking home $328,933 (22 percent), for a total of $880,197 or 58 percent of the total Open Finals purse.

 

2017 NCHA Super Stakes
However, the 2017 NCHA Super Stakes was a deal breaker. With a $635,528 total Open Finals purse being distributed among 21 finalists, in the Open Finals High Brow Cat and his offspring as sires – won $471,949 – or 75 percent of the total Finals purse. Only 33 percent of the finals horses were not High Brow Cat bred. Nine of 14 High Brow Cat-bred money earners (64 percent) were sired by Metallic Cat and they earned $334,148 or 52.6 percent of the total Open finals purse. They included the Champion Hashtags, the Reserve Champion Melting Snow, 4th place Some Like It Metallic, 5/6 tie Metallic Ina, 7/9 tie Kopykat, 12/13 tie Metallic Boom, 15 Kreepin Cat, 16/18 Johnny English and Magnetik Playboy.

 

Three more finalists were sired by other sons of High Brow Cat, including Bet Hesa Cat, Herding Cats and WR This Cats Smart. There were also three that were not related to High Brow Cat on the top side but they were out of mares sired by High Brow Cat and his son Smooth As A Cat. That left only four horses in the 21-horse finals (19%) that were not High Brow Cat related. (Incidentally, the Super Stakes Champion Hashtags, owned by Jose Raul Garcia, Caracas, Venezuela, ridden by Tatum Rice, was the only Metallic Cat offspring that took home an Open Finals paycheck in both the 2016 NCHA Futurity and the 2017 Super Stakes.)

3) Click for 2017 NCHA Super Stakes Open Finals>>

 

WHAT’S THIS GOT TO DO WITH HERDA?
A lot! In March I spent seven days at a jury trial in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, Sherman Division in Sherman, Texas, to settle a lawsuit brought by Shawn, Lisa and Lauren Minshall, Hillsburg, Ontario, Canada, against David Hartman DVM, owner of Hartman Equine Reproduction Center, P.A. (HERC), Gainesville, Texas. Prior to the trial Edward and Shona Dufurrena, who headed up Dos Cats Partners, Gainesville, Texas, the owners of the stallion Auspicious Cat, a stallion they had advertised as being HERDA N/N and told to the mare owners and Dr. David Hartman, the veterinarian that collected him and shipped semen, that he was HERDA N/N.

 

THE HERDA LAWSUIT:
However, it was later discovered the stallion was H/N – or a carrier of HERDA. The Minshalls had bred their Smart Little Lena mare that was H/N to the stallion and as a result had a full-blown HERDA affected offspring named Otto, with lesions on his body appearing while he was in training. They testified in court that they had previously been told by Dufurrena that Auspicious Cat was HERDA N/N.

 

When the Minshalls threatened to sue the Dufurrena’s, they immediately settled. The amount of the settlement is unknown since it was a private transaction. The Minshalls then sued Dr. Hartman, owner of HERC. The jury found the Dufurrena’s 60 percent responsible, the Minshalls 30 percent responsible and Hartman only 10 percent responsible; however, no damages were announced at the trial.

 

However, on March 30, 2017, the Minshall’s lawyers sued Dr. Hartman, who collected the semen from Auspicious Cat and shipped it to the Minshalls, for legal fees of $203,535. (In a previous article I said that the Minshalls had sued Hartman for legal fees; however, Lauren Minshall called me and said it was the lawyers who filed – even though that was not noted in the lawsuit documents, as, according to legal advice given me, the lawyers had to go through the original lawsuit to sue Hartman for legal fees.)

Click for Minshall lawsuit>> 

 

Almost a month later, Judget Mazzant issued a Final Judgment on April 26, 2017, that said, “Based on Memorandum Opinion and Order and the verdict, it is ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED that judgment is entered in favor of Plaintiffs Shawn Minshall, Lisa Victoria Minshall and Lauren Victoria Minshall in the amount of $3,000 plus costs and pre- and post-judgment interest thereon at the rate provided by law, against Defendant Hartman Equine Reproduction Center, P.A

Click for Final Judgment>>

 

ATTORNEY FEES:
On that same date, Judge Mazzant issued a Memorandum Opinion and Order, which said, “The jury only found Defendant negligent and did not find Defendant liable under any other cause of action.”

 

The Memorandum continued, “The Plaintiffs argued they were statutorily entitled to attorneys’ fees under Civil Practice and Remedies Code Section 38.001(6), which states that ‘a person may recover reasonable attorneys’ fees from an individual or corporation, in addition to the amount of a valid claim and costs, if the claim is for … killed or injured stock.’ ”

 

It continued, “Plaintiffs’ complaint did not seek recover of attorneys’ fees under Section 38.001(6). Further the jury did not make any findings regarding whether Otto was ‘injured’ for purposes of Section 38.001(6). Plaintiffs’ request for attorneys’ fees is denied.”
Click for Memorandum-Opinion>>

 

MOTION TO RECONSIDER:
On May 9, the Plaintiffs Motion to Reconsider Memorandum Opinion Order, denying Plaintiffs’ Motion for entry of Judgment (Dkt #1351) and Motion to Amend Final Judgment (Dkt #136) in which the Plaintiffs requested the Court amend the Final Judgment and award Plaintiffs $16,340.80, 10 percent of the total compensatory damages award of $16,340.80, $203,535 in reasonable and necessary attorneys’ fees and for such other and further relief in law or in equity to which Plaintiffs may show themselves justly entitled. Pursuant to Local Rule CV-7(g), and Plaintiffs requested an oral hearing.

 

CERTIFICATE OF CONFERENCE:
On May 9, 2017, Drew Thomas, counsel for Plaintiffs, emailed Caleena Svatek, counsel for Defendant, regarding this motion. No agreement could be reached due to an irreconcilable difference of opinion regarding Texas law on negligence and attorneys’ fees. Caleena Svatek confirmed Defendant was opposed to Plaintiffs’ motion via email correspondence on May 9, 2017. The discussions have ended in an impasse, leaving an open issue for the Court to resolve.

 

CASE CLOSED:

That Conference was the final legal document and after that document, the case was marked, “Case Closed.”

Denying Plaintiffs Motion=final judgment 5-9-17

 

LESSONS LEARNED FROM THIS LAWSUIT:
These lawsuits were the results of a HERDA H/N (carrier) stallion being bred to a HERDA H/N (carrier) mare and they show how expensive the results can turn out to be – especially if the sire is not advertised correctly. I checked with the AQHA (Since the trial, you can now call the registration department of the AQHA and find out the HERDA status of any horse) and Metallic Cat is H/N (a HERDA carrier) – even though his HERDA status was not advertised on the current ads for the stallion. Obviously Auspicious Cat (and for that matter Metallic Cat) SHOULD NOT have been bred to a HERDA H/N mare, as proven by the birth of Otto, with full-blown HERDA.

 

However, breeders evidently did their breeding to Metallic Cat, or other sons of High Brow Cat, correctly, (as far as HERDA is concerned) in this case, as their offspring in the 2017 NCHA Super Stakes Open finals, included the 14 High Brow Cat-bred finalists that were out of mares sired by Dual Rey, Dual Pep (2), Spots Hot, Doc’s Hickory, Peptoboonsmal (2), Dulces Smart Lena, Freckles Playboy (3), Docs Stylish Oak, Son Of A Doc and Hesa Peptospoonful.
Click for Metallic Cats Offspring

 

However, we don’t know how many offspring of Metallic Cat were born with HERDA symptoms after he was crossed with HERDA H/N mares – or if there were any in the 2013 crop of 321 foals registered with the AQHA. I only checked the nine in the 2017 NCHA Super Stakes Open Finals.

 

A disturbing fact that came out of the trial was that the owners of several stallions who are H/N (carriers of the HERDA gene) have advertised if, as a result of their breeding to a particular stallion, the offspring is born with HERDA symptoms, the mare owner will receive a rebreed. To me, this encourages breeding for possible “throw-away” horses, as the Minshall lawsuit exposes what it costs to keep one.

 

AS A RESULT, AQHA CUTTING HORSE GENETIC POOL IS SHRINKING
On Jan. 15, 2015, I published an article on www.allaboutcutting.com written by Rick Dennis and entitled “American Quarter Horse Genetic Pool Shrinks,” which revealed an article in the American Quarter Horse Journal, stating that “the present state of the breed is becoming more and more inbred” (It is now worse two years later) and AQHA is allowing it even though AQHA’s Mission Statement includes “maintaining the welfare of its horses.” I am including a link to this article as I feel every breeder of cutting horses should read and digest it. In short, according to the article, the “highest average inbreeding was found in Quarter Horses bred for cutting.

 

According to Dr. Molly McCue, “The study found that due to the contribution of popular sires, relatedness within the groups is on the rise. This increase in relatedness, or co-ancestry, is likely to lead to an increase in the number and extent of inbred individuals.”

 

Since the AQHA’s Mission Statement in part is “To record and preserve the pedigree of the American Quarter Horse while maintaining the integrity of the breed and welfare of its horses,” Dennis questioned whether the executives at the AQHA, their Executive Committee members, especially the Stud Book and Registration Committee, had any forethought about the ramifications their expansive breeding rule adoptions would have on the Quarter Horse breed and industry over time.

 

As a “risk analyst,” Dennis examined the specific breeding rules adopted by the AQHA, namely Multiple Embryo Transfer and Frozen Semen, which he felt is aiding the inbreeding of cutting horses, which he feels is actually a form of “animal cruelty.”

Click for AQHA Genetic Pool Shrinks>>

 

Although the Minshalls spent a lot of money on a lawsuit without receiving much in return, I thank them for getting a “set precedent” on the court case as far as responsibility is concerned, getting the AQHA to make HERDA information available to all members on every registered horse (currently by a phone call and later when their new computer system is online), as well as all the other valuable information for breeders of cutting horses that came out in court.

 

 

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 5-9-17

Posted by on May 9, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

 

Courtesy PRCA
May 9, 2017

 

Erickson keeps victory parade rolling

GUYMON, Okla. – It didn’t take much more than a moment for steer wrestler Ty Erickson to create another winning moment.

The Montana cowboy, who is having a phenomenal season, added the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo to his 2017 victory list.

Erickson claimed his latest title with a 13.0-second time on three head to win the average.

“Man, anytime you can win a ProRodeo it means a lot,” said Erickson who stands 6-foot-5 and weighs 245 pounds. “It doesn’t matter whether it’s Helena (Mont.), Guymon (Okla.) or San Antonio, anytime you can win a rodeo against the caliber of guys who are going, it always feels really special.”

For Erickson’s latest victory, he earned $4,779 – $2,638 for the average.

Erickson came into the weekend leading the May 1 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings with $95,501. Now, he has $100,279 and a $36,287 lead in the May 8 standings over second-place Tyler Waguespack, the reigning world champ and Erickson’s traveling partner.

“In steer wrestling, horsepower means so much,” he said. “If you’re riding a good horse it gives you a chance to win every time, and makes your job that much easier.”

Erickson acknowledged this present regular season has been hard for him to fathom.

“This year has been unbelievable,” Erickson said. “It seems like every rodeo I’ve gone to, I’ve had chances to win. I have drawn a lot of good steers, but I also think a lot of it is that I’ve been able to ride good horses and travel with a good crew. We (Waguespack and Clayton Hass, his traveling partners) feed off each other. If one man is not doing so well that week the other two are right there encouraging him to do good. I think that is what is pretty special about our rig.”

During his Guymon victory, Erickson had horsepower provided by Outlaw, a horse owned by Waguespack.

A year ago, Erickson arrived at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER as the season leader, but left Las Vegas in seventh place in the final world standings.

“It’s a long season and we are just going to keep going to the rodeos we go to, and try and win as much money as we can,” Erickson said. “I didn’t do so hot at the Finals last year and I learned that rodeo is pretty humbling and you just have to worry about one steer at a time and not worry about the last one.”

Other winners at the $253,433 rodeo were all-around cowboy Trevor Brazile ($7,199 tie-down roping, team roping, and steer roping), bareback rider Clayton Biglow (86.5 points on Pickett Rodeo’s Bar Code), team ropers Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison and Brooks Dahozy/Tommy Zuniga (23.6 seconds on three head each), saddle bronc riders Heith DeMoss (87 points on Lancaster & Jones Pro Rodeo’s Total Equines Angel Fire), and Rusty Wright (87 points on Powder River Rodeo’s Look Again), tie-down roper Brazile (23.1 seconds on three head), barrel racer Tracy Nowlin (35.0 seconds on two runs), steer roper Brian Garr (41.0 seconds on three head) and bull riders Trevor Reiste (84 points on Lancaster & Jones Pro Rodeo’s Bandit) and Roscoe Jarboe (84 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Apollo’s Gold).

  • There was one change atop the May 8 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings. Tuf Cooper surpassed Caleb Smidt to take the lead in the all-around standings. Cooper has earned $59,445, while Smidt is right behind at $58,619..
  • Tie-down roper Trevor Brazile’s 23.1-second time in the three-head average at Guymon was a new arena record. Hunter Herrin held the three-head average record with a 23.6-second time in 2012.

Powder River Rodeo’s Lipstick N Whiskey passes away

Courtesy of Susan Kanode

            RIVERTON, Wyo. – Lipstick N Whiskey, a 13-year-old mare owned by Powder River Rodeo of Riverton, Wyo., died May 6 from complications during foaling. Lipstick N Whiskey had made five trips to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, where she carried four saddle bronc riders to go-round wins.

Her first trip to Las Vegas for the WNFR was in 2010, where  2009 World Champion Jesse Kruse rode her for 87 points. In 2015, Rusty Wright won the third round on her with an 86.5. Last year, his younger brother, Ryder, had the exact same result. Then, their father, Cody, rode her in the eighth round for 88 points to earn another go-round buckle.

“We are devastated,” said Lori Franzen, who along with her husband, Hank, own Powder River Rodeo. “She was an outstanding mare and not just an important part of our program, she was part of our family.”

The Franzens buried Lipstick N Whiskey on their ranch next to her sire, Cut The Cards, who was selected for the NFR three times. He passed away last year.

Her dam, Bay Rum, had also been selected for the NFR. Also buried in Powder River’s bucking horse cemetery is Khadafy Skoal, who was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2012. He earned PRCA’s top bareback horse of the NFR on three occasions – in 1994, 1996 and 1999.

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

Bull rider Cody Rostockyj, who made his debut at the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER, finishing seventh in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings, is sidelined for six weeks while recovering from a broken right (riding) wrist. Rostockyj suffered the injury April 25 when he was bucked off Dakota Rodeo’s Red Bone at the Xtreme Bulls Division 2 event in Wharton, Texas. Rostockyj had surgery on May 3. “I wish I had a cool story about getting stepped on or hurt somehow; but I got on the bull and he walked out, and when he did, I got up over him a little bit and he hop-skipped and jerked my wrist really hard. I had a fracture in my wrist and they put a screw in it during surgery to make sure it heals. I just need to get healthy and get back rolling again and get done as much as I can.”

Soren Anton “Tony” Wiese, a three-time qualifier for the National Finals Rodeo in steer wrestling (1979, 1983-84), passed away March 10 in Tulsa, Okla. He was 71. Wiese finished 12th in the world standings in ’79 and ’83 and was 15th in ’84. He finished a career-best ninth in the average at the ’83 NFR. That season, he also won a career-best $40,393. Anyone who would like to share a story or memory about Tony, or receive a card memorializing him, please send your contact information to his daughter Melissa Sizemore, P.O. Box 45, Ripley, OK 74062

 

“Longmire” actors Robert Taylor (Walt Longmire) and Adam Bartley (Deputy Ferg) will be the grand marshals at the Cody (Wyo.) Stampede Parade on July 4. The Cody Stampede kicks off on June 30 with the Xtreme Bulls event, followed by the four-day long stampede rodeo. The author of the “Longmire” novels that the Netflix series is based on will also be a special guest at this year’s Cody Stampede. Craig Johnson is a resident of Ucross, Wyo., near where the “Longmire” series takes place in fictitious Absaroka County.

 

Children at the Driscoll Children’s Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, got a rodeo experience of their own during Rodeo Corpus Christi as Miss Rodeo America Lisa Lageschaar, barrelman/rodeo clown Gizmo McCracken, bullfighters Blue Jeanes and Weston Rutkowski, and rodeo commissioner Bill Lathrop Jr. took time out of their busy schedules to help put smiles on the kids’ faces. The rodeo group paid a visit to the hospital on the morning of April 28 to sign autographs, cheer up the children and inspire them.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“We tried to brighten up their day. It was a lot of fun. Sometimes I wonder if it doesn’t encourage us more than it does the kids.”

– Barrelman/rodeo clown Gizmo McCracken said about the visit he made with a rodeo group to Driscoll Children’s Hospital on April 28.

 

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through May 8, 2017

 

AA: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $59,445
BB: R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. $67,977
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $100,279
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $55,672
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $55,672
SB: Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $84,152
TD: Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $58,882
BR: Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho $75,493
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas   $47,519

 

 

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through May 8, 2017

All-around
1 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $59,445
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 58,619
3 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 57,784
4 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 49,327
5 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 40,457
6 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 34,190
7 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 31,355
8 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 27,869
9 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 24,535
10 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 24,494
11 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 19,458
12 Cole Elshere, Faith, S.D. 18,876
13 Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif. 17,511
14 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
15 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 14,205
16 Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla. 13,039
17 McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla. 12,864
18 Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta 12,713
19 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
20 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 10,740

 

Bareback Riding
1 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. $67,977
2 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa 65,067
3 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 62,905
4 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 50,472
5 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 47,495
6 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 40,083
7 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 39,905
8 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
9 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 36,272
10 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 35,658
11 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 33,910
12 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 29,553
13 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
14 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 26,515
15 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 26,501
16 Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. 26,139
17 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 22,078
18 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 20,982
19 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 20,568
20 Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev. 19,337

 

Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $100,279
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 63,992
3 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 44,798
4 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 39,988
5 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 36,514
6 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 35,591
7 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 35,039
8 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 29,779
9 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 28,917
10 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 27,625
11 J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn. 26,466
12 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 26,219
13 Justin Shaffer, Hallsville, Texas 25,803
14 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 24,716
15 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 24,272
16 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 22,685
17 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 22,417
18 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 22,376
19 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 21,086
20 Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii 20,636

 

Team Roping (header)
1 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $55,672
2 Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas 53,399
3 Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. 48,459
4 Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla. 43,304
5 Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. 40,907
6 Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. 35,512
7 Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore. 31,886
8 Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, Okla. 24,868
9 Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M. 24,639
10 Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz. 22,608
11 Travis Tryan, Billings, Mont. 21,335
12 Jesse Stipes, Salina, Okla. 21,242
13 Hayes Smith, Central Point, Ore. 20,326
14 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 19,547
15 Kelsey Parchman, Cumberland City, Tenn. 19,136
16 Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla. 19,080
17 Edward Hawley Jr., Surprise, Ariz. 18,369
18 Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont. 17,765
19 Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta 17,256
20 Ryan Reed, Farmington, Calif. 17,191

 

Team Roping (heeler)
1 Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. $55,672
2 Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan. 44,870
3 Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas 44,634
4 Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. 43,304
5 Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil 40,907
6 Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. 40,812
7 Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas 39,666
8 Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 31,886
9 Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan. 30,622
10 John Robertson, Polson, Mont. 24,143
11 Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont. 23,587
12 Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo. 21,865
13 Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. 19,476
14 Kinney Harrell, Marshall, Texas 19,136
15 Ty Romo, Whiteriver, Ariz. 18,369
16 Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev. 17,765
17 Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta 17,256
18 Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas 16,877
19 B.J. Dugger, Three Rivers, Texas 16,675
20 Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla. 16,171

 

Saddle Bronc Riding
1 Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $84,152
2 CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah 58,261
3 Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta 52,250
4 Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla. 43,782
5 Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas 40,901
6 Tyrell J. Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont. 39,541
7 Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah 38,292
8 Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D. 32,339
9 Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta 32,018
10 Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas 27,141
11 Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La. 26,206
12 Jake Wright, Milford, Utah 25,083
13 Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah 24,298
14 Curtis Garton, Kaitaia, New Zealand 22,904
15 Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah 22,679
16 Nat Stratton, Goodwell. Okla. 22,468
17 Tyler Corrington, Hastings, Minn. 22,421
18 Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M. 22,204
19 Cody Wright, Milford, Utah 20,591
20 Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah 20,202

 

Tie-down Roping
1 Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas $58,882
2 J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah 50,654
3 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 50,061
4 Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La. 45,458
5 Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas 45,117
6 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 40,736
7 Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla. 39,896
8 Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas 38,303
9 Randall Carlisle, Athens, La. 38,288
10 Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla. 34,447
11 Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho 33,107
12 Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan. 31,298
13 Tim Pharr, Resaca, Ga. 27,675
14 Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas 26,389
15 Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas 26,321
16 Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas 26,230
17 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 23,262
18 Joseph Parsons, Marana, Ariz. 23,029
19 Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas 22,960
20 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 22,192

 

Steer Roping
1 Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas $47,519
2 John Bland, Turkey, Texas 34,458
3 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 33,320
4 Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas 31,425
5 Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas 29,517
6 Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas 28,248
7 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 24,587
8 Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. 24,371
9 Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. 24,229
10 J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas 21,596
11 Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas 20,000
12 Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo. 19,652
13 Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. 19,119
14 Shay Good, Midland, Texas 16,846
15 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 15,282
16 Reo Lohse, Kaycee, Wyo. 13,780
17 Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D. 13,411
18 Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas 13,377
19 Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas 13,164
20 Roger Branch, Wellston, Okla. 12,240

 

Bull Riding
1 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho $75,493
2 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. 63,862
3 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 60,798
4 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. 49,366
5 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 42,492
6 Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif. 41,610
7 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 41,095
8 Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah 40,704
9 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 40,164
10 Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas 39,285
11 Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas 35,380
12 Dalan Duncan, Ballard, Utah 34,224
13 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 32,533
14 Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M. 31,047
15 Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla. 29,790
16 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 29,295
17 Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas 28,421
18 Jeff Askey, Athens, Texas 28,121
19 Scottie Knapp, Albuquerque, N.M. 26,984
20 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 26,966

 

*2017 Barrel Racing (May 8, 2017)

Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.

1 Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas $128,695
2 Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash. 80,797
3 Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas 76,501
4 Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore. 69,301
5 Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas 56,017
6 Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif. 45,569
7 Taylor Langdon, Aubrey, Texas 41,938
8 Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark. 40,882
9 Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas 36,042
10 Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas 35,339
11 Carmel Wright, Roy, Mont. 32,808
12 Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas 28,181
13 Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo. 27,261
14 Jana Griemsman, Piedmont, S.D. 25,819
15 Jordan Moore, Mauston, Wis. 24,436
16 Sammi Bessert, Grand Junction, Colo. 24,114
17 Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas 23,895
18 Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas 23,541
19 Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M. 22,594
20 Cayla Small, Bokchito, Okla. 21,882

 

2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings

     Unofficial through May 8, 2017

1 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $29,471
2 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. 23,075
3 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 21,492
4 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 21,086
5 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 16,564
6 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 15,995
7 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 14,861
8 Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas 11,892
9 Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas 10,313
10 Jeffrey Ramagos, Zachary, La. 9,281
11 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 8,208
12 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 8,146
13 Clayton Foltyn, Winnie, Texas 7,580
14 Dalan Duncan, Ballard, Utah 7,556
15 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 7,402
16 Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas 7,078
17 Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla. 6,666
18 Ednei Caminhas, Denton, Texas 6,639
19 Tanner Bothwell, Rapid City, S.D. 6,561
20 Christopher Byrd, Compton, Calif. 6,486
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☛ Brunzell court documents revealed 5-8-17

Posted by on May 8, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE LAWSUITS, HORSE NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SHERRI BRUNZELL COURT DOCUMENTS REVEALED

May 8, 2017
By Glory Ann Kurtz

On April 27, 2017, I published the following article about Sherri Brunzell going to jail for 60 days for animal cruelty; however, today  I have received  the court documents regarding the penalties that Brunzell received and am attaching then at the end of this article.

Although Sherri only got 60 days in jail, along with a 5-year probation term, she paid royally for letting those horses starve with a few even dying. With 14 charges against her, she was acquitted on six of them and found guilty on eight.  She could have originally gotten 550 days in jail; however, 490 days were suspended pending the successful completion of probation – restitution for 91 days and 60 months probation.

Sherri was fined $500 for each of the eight counts of guilty, she was ordered to not possess, own, manage, lease, or care for any horses, llamas, livestock or any other herd animal; pay costs and fines imposed; ordered to attend 16 individual counseling sessions and two post-treatment assessments as per animal evaluation; forfeit horses to El Paso County and provide registration on each horse. Total costs to Brunzell for this case totaled $40,191.50.

During her jail time, she must serve 60 days straight, a work release is not authorized and the court will review in 120 days for potential proposed plan/possibility of unsupervised probation.

“THE SHERRI BRUNZELL CASE:

Showing the difference a couple of years can make, Sherri Brunzell, who owned the 10 horses, including an emaciated Quarter Horse cutting stallion, Dual Peppy, along with llamas that were found living in a crypt-like Black Forest, Colo., barn in 2014. The barn contained the decomposing remains of the living horses’ former stablemates..

In May 2015, an El Paso County jury convicted Brunzell of eight “misdemeanor” counts of animal cruelty; however, she filed appeal after appeal until they ran out. However, Brunzell had paid a financial price, as she was ordered to pay $5,400 per month for the horses’ care and the AQHA automatically suspended her and denied her any and all privileges, including privileges associated with registration related to transactions and participation in any AQHA events. The horses were sent to a Colorado rescue and Sherri never received ownership of the horses again.”

All that time, Judge Stephen James Sletta said he would have liked to give her more time, but during her 2015 jury trial, that was all he could give her, according to the law at that time.

If this case would have been held in 2016, Sherri could have more than likely been sentenced to prison for years rather than days. On Jan. 1, 2016, horse abuse became a felony.

Click for Brunzell court records>>

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☛ Retirement home for cutting horses 5-6-17

Posted by on May 6, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

BEYOND THEIR PRIME

 

INJURED CUTTING HORSES FIND A RETIREMENT HOME

 

By Robin Fowler
May 6, 2017

Pete May Jr. and his wife Amanda operate Cutting Edge Retirement Foundation in Springtown, Texas.

As equine competition becomes increasingly specialized, so do the injuries valuable cutting horses endure.

And that’s where Cutting Edge Retirement Foundation of Springtown, Texas, and farrier Pete May Jr. step in. Cutting Edge is dedicated to caring for performance horses that have suffered career-ending injuries and are no longer able to compete. Call it assisted living for horses.

While injured mares and stallions still have value as breeding horses into their old age, injured geldings – which make up the bulk of the residents at Cutting Edge – have few prospects unless they can be rehabilitated for light riding or remain comfortable enough to serve as companion horses. Many of their problems involve stifle, suspensory ligament injuries or other lameness issues.

Some 70 to 80 percent of horses at Cutting Edge are retired cutters that can benefit from May’s 20-year expertise as a professional farrier. About 99 percent of his customers are cutters, including some of the top cutting horses, trainers and owners in the business. Some horses have landed at Cutting Edge from as far away as California and Colorado.

Spookys Catmando, a 2001 gelding (High Brow Cat x San Starlight) gives Petre May Jr. a hug. The gelding earned more than !65,000 during his NCHA cutting career.

“We have had cutting horses who have earned six figures, but they’re all special to us,” May says, noting that former show horses in residence at Cutting Edge have averaged $70,000 in earnings. The herd has included a few other types of performance horses as well, including an AQHA World Champion rope horse. One of the early horses that inspired May to form Cutting Edge was an abandoned pony whose hooves were so long that she could hardly walk.

Since the beginning of his career as a farrier, May’s attention has been focused on crippled horses that needed more help than others. He attended farrier school in 1997 at age 16, then apprenticed with legendary farrier Gene Cunningham. From the beginning he was concerned about the dilemma faced by the industry’s most famous injured performance horses and wanted to learn how to help them live a productive retirement.

“We give them a good retirement,” says May. “Some are still rideable for kids, some are not rideable at all, and some are suitable only as companion horses. Some are adopted out,” he says, but those with significant injuries spend the rest of their lives with May and his family at the foundation’s Springtown facility.

“We adopted out five at the end of last year,” May recalls. One couple, he says, wanted a companion for their 15-year-old gelding whose pasture mate had died. May showed them three that he thought were appropriate – two former show horses and a former turnback horse – and the couple couldn’t decide which they liked best. “So they took all three,” said May with a smile.

Some arrive in pairs or buddy up quickly – but for some, it is the first time in their lives they have had friends — human or horse. May likens them to professional athletes and believes many have been confined to stalls too long. In some cases, that can lead to atrophy both of body and mind, he says.

“At first they often don’t interact with other horses or people,” said May.

Pete May Jr. and his mother, Toby May. Most of the residents at Cutting Edge are geldings and Widows Peek, a 1985 gelding (Docs Borrego x Chunky Widow) found his way there in his old age.

During their show careers, horses may have had brief daily contact with each of the various handlers that feed, clean, lope and train them but may not bond with any of them.

“Too valuable to risk injury at play, some have not been turned out with other horses since they were yearlings,” May says.

“Sometimes when we turn them out here, they really don’t know what to do. They just stand in a corner,” adds his wife, Amanda, who is also a director for the nonprofit,

May has the advantage of having handled the shoeing needs of several of the horses, both during their show careers and later in retirement.

“Their disposition changes so much here,” he says, pointing to one that didn’t like people much when he was a show horse. “Now he’s a totally different horse.”

Cutting Edge is situated on 23 acres in Springtown and has the use of another 20 acres owned by family friends five minutes away. Horses that are new to the facility are carefully placed with compatible companions on ground that best serves their needs. For example, arthritic horses occupy level pastures and geldings that need more exercise are assigned to hilly terrain.

“Horses are grouped according to what their needs are,” May says. “Lower-maintenance horses occupy the 20-acre pasture down the road, while horses that need more attention live a few steps from our May residence.”

May can take 20 to 30 horses at a time and notes that he must turn away just as many due to lack of space. One recent arrival had been on a waiting list for three years.

Cutting Edge is a godsend to owners who have professional trainers but no horse facilities of their own where they can keep injured retirees. And with some resident equines requiring special shoes costing $300 to $400, May’s foundation allows owners to concentrate their finances on their healthy limited-age event horses. But many of his customers also become major financial supporters of the nonprofit.

“We get a lot of support from my customers., says May, noting that recent donations have included a much-needed grain silo and financial gifts that paid for eight new loafing sheds. In addition, supplements, wormers and equipment often are donated. Brazos Valley Equine Hospital provides veterinary care, and other area veterinarians have been supportive. Dennis Moreland Tack recently designed a sling for horses with stifle injuries to keep them comfortable during shoeing.

“We haven’t paid for hay in at least three years,” May says, “It’s remarkable how much help we’ve had. There’s a need for it.”

The Foundation also recently received a breeding to High Brow Cat, which May hopes to auction during the NCHA Futurity this December. But its biggest accomplishment is the future carefree, and hopefully pain-free, days in the pasture due these appreciated former athletes.

Noteworthy is that horses that are or have been residents include Dualin Jewels, Spookys Catmando, Widows Peek, Hick Of A Mate and Very Special Bet, among others.

“They just get to be horses – that’s what they’re here for,” May says. “If we can find them a good home on top of that. We do that as well,” .

Those who are adopted out continue to be shod or at least monitored by May or other farriers who work with him. The nonprofit’s contract requires that if adopters can no longer keep their horse, it must be returned to the foundation. Adoption fees average $500, more if the horse can be ridden and less if not. None is capable of continued competition.

As to those who adopt the Foundation’s horses, “It’s been pretty cool to see how much these people fall in love with them,” says May, who has been shoeing horses for 20 years this summer. “That’s something many of these horses don’t experience in their lifetime. Ninety percent of these guys have never had anyone give them a treat.”

Cutting Edge incorporated four years ago and filed as a Texas nonprofit in 2012. It initially operated under the umbrella of another nonprofit but recently received its own 501(c)3 approval.

For more information: Look for Cutting Edge Retirement Foundation on Facebook, call 940-390-9209 or email cuttingedgeretirement@live.com.

 

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