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☛ Tragedy at the AQHA World Show 11-17 -17

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TRAGEDY AT THE AQHA WORLD SHOW

 

SHARIN HALL LOSES A YOUNG CONTENDER IN THE JUNIOR BARREL RACE

A news and opinion piece by Glory Ann Kurtz
Nov. 17, 2017

AQHA photo.

After winning the first go-round of the Junior Barrel Race at the AQHA World Show, barrel racer Sharin Hall, of Winning Edge Stables, Harrah, Okla., and her top barrel mare Dreaming Of Foose (Foose x Hawks Dream Glrl), nicknamed Cali, were giving it their all in the final go-round on Nov. 15. While turning the second barrel, the mare fell and broke her pelvis and lacerated an artery which caused internal bleeding so bad that she passed away before they could get her to a veterinarian.

According to a report from the AQHA, “The mare became acutely lame during her barrel racing run and was provided emergency medical care. It was quickly determined to be in the horse’s best interest to be transported to a referral hospital. She was loaded into a trailer following medication administration to ease the pain and help control inflammation, but passed away enroute,” said Dr.Dave Frisbie of Equine Sports Medicine.”

Sharin is originally from Sunbury, Ohio. She was born to love, train and ride  horses as her father, Jackson Hall, was an accomplished horseman and a barrel horse trainer. Her mother is also into horses.

Sharin is a well-known trainer and competitor in barrel racing circles, having won and placed at many major barrel racing events, including “The American. Cali, a 2013 mare, was the 2017 Summer Shootout 1D Champion, Reserve Champion at Parker Wood Memorial Slot Race. She was also the Ultimate Isabella Quarter Horse Slot Race and Futurity Champion.

WAS THIS MARE’S DEATH PREVENTABLE?

However, from all the responses on Facebook, many barrel racers felt the death of this great mare was preventable. According to her friend Lainie Whitmire, who is also an accomplished barrel racer, the ground was the culprit.

“Multiple horses slipped in the prelims,” said Lainie in a post on Facebook. “Some went completely down and were pulled up. Great horses were unable to keep their footing in order to compete. I feel like the officials should have prepared the arena better before the finals. JMO. It might not have changed the outcome. This is a horse I know very well, owned by a friend, so it’s personal to me”

This was a terrible thing that happened to this young mare but it could have just as easily killed the rider. As a result, many petitions to the AQHA were started on my Facebook page as well as others I am sure, that were signed (including one I started by accident when I just thought I was signing another one) and sent to Pete Kyle, AQHA Executive Director of Shows and Judges,  stating, “There need to be changes made to the ground at the World Show, as well as other AQHA-approved events.”

One, signed by Amanda Earles, said, “After multiple horses going down, having footing problems and even passing away at the AQHA World Show in the barrel racing event held in Oklahoma City, Okla., the third week of November 2017, there need to be changes made to the ground. AQHA needs to bring in people, such as John Jamison, to evaluate and properly prep and work the ground before and during there AQHA World Show and other AQHA-approved events (such as the show during the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo.)

“The petition is to make AQHA take responsibility for their mismanagement of the round conditions at their shows and to fix this problem and hire outside organizations and/or people that are skilled in this area. This needs to happen now!”

MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE:

When I was younger and was hauling my daughter to barrel races, I occasionally ran barrels myself, I had a scary experience at the John Justin Arena, located in the Will Rogers Complex in Fort Worth. As I rounded the third barrel, I heard my horse’s shoes hitting the cement under the dirt in the arena . Many of my friends watching said the gelding was leaving sparks as he rounded the barrel for home. Luckily, this was an older, seasoned barrel horse that was raised in Montana and he knew how to handle bad ground.

Since then, Will Rogers and the John Justin arena have done a lot to change the ground, storing different ground for different events, like the NCHA Futurity that’s going on now, with the ground being deeper in front of the chutes where they cut. There are individuals out there who specialize in ground preparation for different events. The All-American Quarter Horse Congress has had problems for years as they also try to run various events in the same arena on the same ground. However, the last time I was there, they had additional buildings where they could run the timed events on different ground from the halter, pleasure and reining horses.

But now is the time for show management of all sizes to make an assessment of the ground for their shows, especially if they have several different classes, including timed events. If they don’t, there could be some big lawsuits in the wings if someone gets hurt badly or even killed.

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 11-17-17

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
Nov. 17, 2017

Money chosen John Justin Committeeperson of the Year

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Steven Money, who served as the rodeo director for the Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo for 34 years, has been chosen as the 2017 John Justin Committeeperson of the Year.
Money retired as the rodeo director for the Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo following the 2017 rodeo, which ran from July 20-24.
“When they first called me, my heart was joyous,” said Money, 66. “It’s such an honor to be recognized by all your other peers. I put that rodeo (Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo) as the first thing in my life. When you get an honor like this, it’s gratifying to know all the hard work you did has been recognized by other people. There are all these great people on committees and great rodeos and this is truly a great honor to receive. I really appreciate the PRCA and Justin (Boots) for putting this kind of award together.”
With help and leadership from Money, the Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo, in 2016, became the 24th rodeo to be inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame since the inaugural class in 1979. It also was the first Utah rodeo to be inducted in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.
In December of 2016, through the leadership of Money, the Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo was presented the PRCA’s annual Remuda Award. This is an award given to the rodeo committee that provides the best, most consistent pen of bucking stock, creating the best opportunities for contestants to score well.
“I am so thankful for the committee that we’ve had,” Money said. “We’ve just had excellent, excellent people on our committee who help make it so great. It’s a joy when you go to work with that committee. It’s something that I truly loved. It’s going to be very hard to be away from it, but I’m still going to be in contact with people in the rodeo business and help rodeo committees out.”
Money, a native of Spanish Fork, has been involved with the Western lifestyle his entire life.
“I rodeoed when I was younger, and I just love that passion to compete and (being a rodeo director) was a way to be associated with it,” Money said. “I think the most gratifying thing of all the awards and everything is when you see that crowd in there (at the Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo). We’ve had 48 consecutive sellouts, that’s 12 years that we sold every single ticket we had. When the crowd is there, and people are patting you on the back for a great show, nothing can describe how good that feeling is.”
Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo joined the PRCA in 1942, and is home to one of the finest venues in the sport. Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Rodeo opened its new arena in 2012. The new arena sits 8,400 people.

2. RCRCF win has Sean Santucci altering plans

YAKIMA, Wash. – Sean Santucci went to last weekend’s RAM Columbia River Circuit Finals Rodeo just looking to maybe win a little money and have some fun.
He entered the 2018 season expecting to stick around the circuit.
Those plans quickly changed.
Santucci entered the rodeo in seventh place in the Columbia River Circuit year-end standings.
The 30-year-old steer wrestler went out and won the RCRCFR average in 12.6 seconds on three head Nov. 5. Santucci went into the rodeo plenty relaxed. And that paid dividends.
“This year’s probably been less pressure than any, because I kind of came off the road and quit trying to rodeo for a living and went to work,” Santucci said. “So, I’ve just been able to enjoy rodeo again.”
Santucci took second in the first round and won the third round in 3.8 seconds. He went out fifth in that final round and then waited anxiously, watching fellow bulldoggers get their turns to top his 3.8. None did.
“I had to sit there and endure the rest of the guys going,” laughed Santucci, who took home $5,161. “There were two or three other guys that could’ve got me that I was emotionally watching carefully. It was exciting. Just like any competition. It’s fun to put yourself in position to win and see what happens.”
The win earned Santucci a qualification to the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Kissimmee, Fla., and the prospect of adding some money there. With that, Santucci’s circuit-only rodeoing plans flew out the proverbial window.
Because the money from the circuit finals and RNCFR count toward the world standings, Santucci is excited to get going on the rodeo trail. He’s also hoping that the rule continues.
“It’s just a neat fact that a guy not rodeoing full time has a chance early on,” said Santucci, who farms and ranches on his family ranch in Prineville, Ore. “It’s a great incentive for the circuit cowboy to get out of the circuit and go do some rodeoing and feel like he has a chance.”
Santucci rode his 16-year-old gelding, Chopper, who he bought more than four years ago.
“He’s been pretty key in my success,” Santucci said. “I’ve been in the Top 20 on him. He definitely still has some good in him.”
Santucci made less than $10,000 in 2017. In 2016, he finished 53rd in the world. Earlier in his career, he’d finished inside the Top 20, but never qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER.
Those recent struggles are why he originally decided not to go hard this season.
“Last year, things weren’t going as well, and I was getting tired and worn out on travel and I was trying to raise a family at home,” Santucci said. “The lack of drive was part of the measurement of success.”
His wife, Brittany, and 2-year-old son, Syd, were on hand Sunday for the win. Afterward, Brittany was more than understanding that her husband will be going back on the rodeo road when it works into their schedule, including in April, when Brittany is due with their second child.
“She’s been a trooper all the way through quite a few years at rodeoing full time,” Santucci said. “She’s used to the schedule and can roll with the punches pretty well.”
Other winners at the $147,751 rodeo were all-around cowboy Russell Cardoza ($3,110 in team roping and steer roping); bareback rider Steven Peebles (230.5 points on three head); team ropers Brooks Dahozy/Brent Falon (24.1 seconds on three head); saddle bronc rider Layton Green (243 points on three head); tie-down roper Tyson Durfey (24.7 seconds on three head); barrel racer Callahan Crossley (37.10 seconds on three head); steer roper Tom Sorey (31.2 seconds on two head) and bull rider Chase Dougherty (165.5 points on two head).

3. Cassidy claims the RWCFR

HEBER CITY, Utah – Twenty years into his ProRodeo career, steer wrestler Curtis Cassidy is off to a running start in the 2018 season by winning the RAM Wilderness Circuit Finals Rodeo at Heber City, Utah.
“Any win at any age is special, but getting the circuit finals 20 years into your career is special for sure,” Cassidy said. “It’s definitely a young man’s sport. Don’t get me wrong, but in steer wrestling for sure, if you have the horsepower under you, that is three-quarters of the battle and the rest is drawing the right steer.”
Cassidy placed third in the second round with 5.0 seconds and returned as the top bulldogger in the final round with a 3.9-second run.
“My first two runs at the circuit finals didn’t go as good as they should have, they weren’t bad, but they weren’t as good as I wanted them to be,” Cassidy said. “Then tonight was do-or-die. I basically had to try and put some pressure on the guys behind me that were ahead in the average.”
Altogether, Cassidy’s 13.5 seconds on three head turned into a $5,834 payday for the 39-year-old from Donalda, Alberta.
“Most guys don’t go as long as me,” Cassidy laughed. “At this point in my career, if I don’t have good horses to ride, I don’t feel like riding – and I have a good horse in Canada and Tom (Lewis) has a good horse here, so it gives me some interest to make a run at Vegas again.”
Cassidy rode Tom Lewis’ 12-year-old sorrel, Maverick, at the RWCFR and at the All American ProRodeo Finals at Waco, Texas, last month. At Waco, Cassidy won the second round and the semifinals, and placed second in the finals for a grand total of $10,179.
“He’s a great horse,” Cassidy said. “Basically, he does everything you could ask a horse to do – he is good in the corner, runs hard and runs great patterns.”
Cassidy knows a good horse when he sees one, having joined the PRCA in 1998 and qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER five times (2002, 2008-10, and 2014). Now he’s seeking his sixth qualification.
The Canadian bulldogger is off to a strong start in the 2018 season. He was already ranked second in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings with $12,773 before winning the RWCFR.
“I have about $18,000 going into the season, so it’s full speed ahead,” Cassidy said. “I won’t go to everything in the winter, but I will go to Florida for the (RAM National Circuit) Finals and then California in the spring. But, I like to go to the close ones in the winter and spring; and then in mid-July I like to enter everything for those six weeks through September and go to five to seven rodeos a week. There’s so many good rodeos that time of the year. Everyone talks about the winter and Fourth of July, but from mid-July through Pendleton (Ore.), you can coast along and win and get $4,000-5,000 a week.”
Cassidy ended the 2017 season ranked 26th with $60,207 thanks to winning the Drayton Valley (Alberta) Rodeo and the Dixie Roundup in St. George, Utah. He was also the co-champion at the Ellensburg (Wash.) Rodeo and the Hand Hills Lake Stampede at Craigmyle, Alberta.
“I wasn’t qualified for the (RAM National) Circuit Finals, or any of the big winter rodeos, so I had a slow start,” Cassidy said. “This year I’m definitely going to put in a good effort to get to everything I can get to.”
Up next, Cassidy is heading to the Canadian Finals Rodeo in Edmonton, Alberta, on Nov. 8-12 – which can be viewed online at prorodeotv.com. From there, he’ll hit some rodeos in Canada before taking a break for the holidays to rest up for the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo in Denver, Colo., and the Sandhills Stock Show & Rodeo in Odessa, Texas, in January.
“This time of year slows down, but I have been rodeoing every week since the end of the season so it’s good because it keeps you sharp for the Canadian Finals,” Cassidy said.
Other winners at the $174,813 rodeo were all-around cowboy Rhen Richard ($6,077 in tie-down roping and team roping); bareback riders Caleb Bennett and Kaycee Feild (251 points on three head each); team ropers Thad Ward/Olin Pulham (19.9 seconds on three head); saddle bronc rider Jake Wright (249.5 points on three head); tie-down roper Matt Shiozawa (27.2 seconds on three head); barrel racer Jennifer Barrett (48.90 seconds on three head); and bull rider Joe Frost (247 points on three head).

4. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

The National Finals Rodeo Committee announced Nov. 3 that Boyd Polhamus has been named to succeed Shawn Davis as the production manager of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER. The annual event, held at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, is scheduled for Dec.7-16 this year. Polhamus will work closely with Davis, the current NFR General Manager, as well as Las Vegas Events, NFRC and the PRCA on all aspects of rodeo production for the next three years, beginning in 2017. During Polhamus’ career that has spanned 32 years, he has been actively involved in more than 1,000 rodeos with nearly 4,500 performances across North America. “In 1959, John Van Cronkhite created the NFR to showcase the sport of rodeo with the idea of matching the best contestants against the best stock, allowing the contestants to have their complete degree of glory in the arena,” said Davis. “Following this theme has made the National Finals Rodeo the success that it is today. I feel that Boyd Polhamus has the experience, the ability and the determination to continue and enhance this original idea. I look forward to working with him and supporting him in the endeavor to take the NFR to greater heights.” In 2007-09 and 2012, Polhamus’ peers selected him as the PRCA Announcer of the Year. He also received the Lane Frost Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. “To be honest, this is very intimidating,” said Polhamus. “Shawn and his staff have set the bar very high. He has taught me so much and I’m going to use what I’ve learned. The ultimate goal is to make the Wrangler NFR even more fun and engaging for fans, sponsors, and contestants while protecting the integrity of the race for a World Championship. It’s a daunting task, but I’m determined.” … The PRCA is partnering with the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association and Northlands Coliseum to offer a livestream broadcast of the 44th Canadian Finals Rodeo on ProRodeoTV. The Nov. 8-12 CFR will be exclusively broadcasted from Edmonton, Alberta, on ProRodeoTV.com. The broadcast will be available via home computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones. There are six total performances of the CFR, with four-night performances beginning at 7:30 p.m. (MT) on Nov. 8-11. There are also 1 p.m. performances on Nov. 11-12, with the latter being the final round of the rodeo. Watching the CFR livestream is as easy as logging on to www.prorodeotv.com and signing up for a subscription. ProRodeoTV packages to stream the CFR are $29.99 (USD), which includes all six performances … Tarleton State University’s Rodeo Hall of Fame will induct Robert Anderson, Isaac Diaz and the Fambro family Nov. 11, during its eighth annual steak dinner and auction. The event, which benefits Tarleton Rodeo program’s scholarship fund, begins at 6 p.m. with an auction reception and preview mixer, followed by dinner, the Rodeo Hall of Fame induction ceremony and a live auction. Admission to the event, taking place at the City Hall venue at City Limits in Stephenville, Texas, is $50 per person and includes dinner. Tickets are available until the day of the event, or by contacting the Office of Rodeo Activities at 254.968.9344 or 254.968.9187. Anderson, a bull rider who won the average at the 1970 College National Finals Rodeo, helped create the Tarleton Rodeo Alumni Chapter where he serves as president. Diaz was a member of Tarleton’s 2010 CNFR team, winning that season’s saddle bronc riding title. After leaving Tarleton, he continued his professional career in rodeo with five Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifications (2007, 2009, 2012-13, 2015). Starting with the establishment of a scholarship in 1989, members of the Fambro family have been avid supporters of the Tarleton Rodeo program for nearly 30 years. The family’s contributions have benefited generations of students and the Tarleton Rodeo program. R.L. “Tuffy” Fambro initiated a Rodeo and Agriculture Scholarship to honor his parents, Alex Price and Ruby Fambro, who were ranchers in Erath and Stephens counties. In 2002, the family and friends began the Memorial Rodeo Scholarship in honor of R.L.’s brother, Joe Price Fambro.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “I need to worry about what I need to do. I can’t control what other guys do. I just need to give myself best opportunity I can to win.”
– Steer roper Chet Herren told ProRodeo Sports News about his mindset for the upcoming Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping, Nov. 10-11 in Mulvane, Kan. Herren enters his 12th NFSR third in the standings.

5. Next Up

Nov. 8             Canadian Finals Rodeo, Edmonton, Alberta, begins
Nov. 9             RAM Southeastern Circuit Finals Rodeo, Davie, Fla., begins
Nov. 9             RAM Great Lakes Circuit Finals Rodeo, Louisville, Ky., begins
Nov. 10             Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping, Mulvane, Kan., begins
Nov. 11           Brawley (Calif.) Cattle Call Rodeo begins

6. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Nov. 6, 2017
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$214,131
BB:
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$201,916
SW:
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$163,152
TR-1:
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$133,977
TR-2:
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$134,707
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$183,927
TD:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$190,445
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$237,152
SR:
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$84,156


7. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Nov. 6, 2017
 
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$214,131
2
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
180,487
3
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
151,990
4
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
140,876
5
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
136,430
6
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
128,764
7
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
112,795
8
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
105,470
9
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
104,200
10
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
97,022
11
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
89,284
12
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
89,029
13
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
78,241
14
Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
75,671
15
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
74,931
16
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
58,000
17
Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb.
56,733
18
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
56,048
19
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
55,618
20
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
54,641
Bareback Riding
1
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$201,916
2
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
136,657
3
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
128,153
4
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
113,312
5
Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev.
109,353
6
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
106,677
7
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
103,212
8
Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta
102,161
9
Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas
101,197
10
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
99,240
11
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
96,039
12
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
93,652
13
R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif.
89,261
14
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
89,106
15
Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah
86,114
16
Justin Miller, Billings, Mont.
83,495
17
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France
80,762
18
Jessy Davis, Power, Mont.
66,029
19
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
64,757
20
Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore.
62,612
Steer Wrestling
1
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$163,152
2
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
110,951
3
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
109,919
4
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
103,944
5
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
99,501
6
Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah
99,340
7
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
93,463
8
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
84,073
9
Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis.
82,968
10
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
80,981
11
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
79,684
12
Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis.
77,340
13
J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn.
76,442
14
Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La.
73,558
15
Chason Floyd, Buffalo, S.D.
71,192
16
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
71,105
17
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
70,545
18
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
68,915
19
Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark.
67,294
20
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
66,520
Team Roping (header)
1
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$133,977
2
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
133,633
3
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
113,094
4
Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas
111,551
5
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
98,033
6
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
96,587
7
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
85,448
8
Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz.
81,415
9
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
81,356
10
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
79,236
11
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
78,964
12
Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont.
78,288
13
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
77,437
14
Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore.
75,614
15
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
74,146
16
Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta
68,006
17
Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz.
61,983
18
Hayes Smith, Central Point, Ore.
61,949
19
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
59,915
20
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
57,576
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$134,707
2
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
133,633
3
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
117,212
4
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
110,930
5
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
103,022
6
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
99,774
7
Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
96,587
8
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
92,358
9
Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev.
81,356
10
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
81,050
11
Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas
79,374
12
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
78,387
13
Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
75,614
14
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
74,652
15
Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta
68,006
16
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
65,136
17
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
61,745
18
John Robertson, Polson, Mont.
52,238
19
Clint Summers, Lake City, Fla.
51,647
20
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
49,836
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$183,927
2
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
170,456
3
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
124,115
4
Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.
119,657
5
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
110,613
6
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
105,789
7
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
102,774
8
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
99,361
9
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
92,992
10
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
91,745
11
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
89,332
12
Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.
88,613
13
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
88,402
14
Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah
76,630
15
Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas
75,649
16
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
71,822
17
Cody Wright, Milford, Utah
69,693
18
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
66,258
19
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
61,398
20
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
54,401
Tie-down Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$190,445
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
142,194
3
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
124,498
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
121,902
5
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
107,423
6
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
101,433
7
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
97,173
8
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
96,056
9
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
93,363
10
J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah
86,299
11
Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas
85,962
12
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
85,566
13
Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas
85,460
14
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
85,438
15
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
85,210
16
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
78,317
17
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
77,288
18
Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas
76,926
19
Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas
73,367
20
Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, Texas
70,016
Steer Roping
1
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$84,156
2
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
78,934
3
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
72,976
4
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
68,084
5
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
64,266
6
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
56,868
7
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
50,109
8
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
49,347
9
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
49,309
10
John Bland, Turkey, Texas
48,184
11
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
47,061
12
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
45,082
13
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
44,217
14
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
42,848
15
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
41,913
16
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
40,615
17
J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla.
39,780
18
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
32,565
19
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
32,545
20
Roger Branch, Wellston, Okla.
31,183
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$237,152
2
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
204,239
3
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
157,077
4
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
131,423
5
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
120,963
6
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
110,471
7
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
106,188
8
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
103,619
9
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
102,855
10
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
97,121
11
Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas
94,668
12
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
92,991
13
Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta
92,660
14
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
88,063
15
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
87,288
16
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
87,014
17
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
85,957
18
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
80,183
19
Chase Dougherty, Canby, Ore.
72,754
20
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
70,593

*2017 Barrel Racing (Nov. 6, 2017)

Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas
$250,378
2
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
185,952
3
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
130,537
4
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
120,806
5
Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas
115,163
6
Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash.
111,758
7
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
98,707
8
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
97,023
9
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
96,454
10
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
92,930
11
Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M.
91,362
12
Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas
86,020
13
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
83,338
14
Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo.
78,181
15
Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas
76,294
16
Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz.
74,363
17
Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas
72,876
18
Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas
72,692
19
Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas
68,759
20
Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark.
64,894

8. 2018 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Nov. 6, 2017
All-around
1
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
$17,944
2
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
11,531
3
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
9,058
Bareback Riding
1
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
$18,028
2
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
12,353
3
Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho
9,766
4
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
9,544
5
Grant Denny, Minden, Nev.
8,692
6
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
8,510
7
Luke Creasy, Garland, Texas
8,001
8
Justin Pollmiller, Weatherford, Okla.
7,733
9
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
7,570
10
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
7,343
11
Seth Hardwick, Ranchester, Wyo.
6,716
12
Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah
6,620
13
Kyle Charley, Lukachukai, Ariz.
6,520
14
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
6,306
15
Trenten Montero, Winnemucca, Nev.
6,040
16
Blade Elliott, Centreville, Ala.
5,364
17
Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore.
5,280
18
Justin McDaniel, Parkfield, Calif.
5,004
19
Kelly Timberman, Mills, Wyo.
4,771
20
Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore.
4,734
Steer Wrestling
1
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
$18,142
2
Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla.
12,773
3
Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif.
10,866
4
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
7,952
5
Jace Melvin, Fort Pierre, S.D.
7,650
6
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
7,085
7
Cameron Morman, Glenullin, N.D.
6,840
8
Stockton Graves, Alva, Okla.
6,306
9
Josh Garner, Live Oak, Calif.
5,883
10
Beau Clark, Cheyenne, Wyo.
5,821
11
Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
5,517
12
Rhett Kennedy, Chowchilla, Calif.
5,499
13
Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La.
5,262
14
Coltin Hill, Blackfoot, Idaho
5,209
15
Sean Santucci, Prineville, Ore.
5,162
16
Dirk Tavenner, Rigby, Idaho
4,852
17
Blake Mindemann, Blanchard, Okla.
4,821
18
Jule Hazen, Ashland, Kan.
4,720
19
Blake Brown, Spanish Fork, Utah
4,619
20
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
4,376
Team Roping (header)
1
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$14,461
2
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
13,115
3
Logan Olson, Flandreau, S.D.
8,177
4
Cody Snow, Los Olivos. Calif.
8,036
5
Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss.
7,494
6
Blake Teixeira, Tres Pinos, Calif.
7,055
7
Ty Blasingame, Ramah, Colo.
6,068
8
Tanner Baldwin, Vail, Ariz.
5,895
9
Brady Payne, Gilbert, Ariz.
5,442
10
Thad Ward, Howell, Utah
5,348
11
Andrew Ward, Edmond, Okla.
5,256
12
Kelsey Parchman, Cumberland City, Tenn.
5,021
13
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
4,822
14
Joshua Torres, Ocala, Fla.
4,801
15
Steven Duby, Melba, Idaho
4,774
16
Cody Mora, San Miguel, Calif.
4,741
17
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
4,691
18
Jesse Stipes, Salina, Okla.
4,298
19
Jaguar Terrill, Blackfoot, Idaho
3,646
20
Brett Christensen, Alva, Okla.
3,603
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
$15,142
2
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
14,461
3
Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb.
9,107
4
Logan Medlin, Tatum, N.M.
7,285
5
Monty Joe Petska, Turlock, Calif.
7,055
6
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
6,665
7
Trey Yates, Pueblo, Colo.
5,950
8
Josh Fillmore, Penrose, Colo.
5,691
9
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
5,557
10
Olin Pulham, Payson, Utah
5,348
11
Reagan Ward, Edmond, Okla.
5,256
12
Joseph Shawnego, Oakdale, Calif.
5,118
13
Cody Hogan, Athens, Texas
5,021
14
Jade Nelson, Midland, S.D.
4,822
15
Jonathan Torres, Ocala, Fla.
4,801
16
Jason Duby, Klamath Falls, Ore.
4,774
17
Bronc Boehnlein, Riverside, Calif.
4,691
18
Levi Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
4,384
19
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
4,347
20
Justin Hodson, West Haven, Utah
4,133
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
$18,716
2
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
13,226
3
Leon Fountain, Socorro, N.M.
12,428
4
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
10,644
5
Chet Johnson, Douglas, Wyo.
10,225
6
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
8,294
7
J.J. Elshere, Hereford, S.D.
8,240
8
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
7,712
9
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
7,293
10
Troy Crowser, Whitewood, S.D.
6,231
11
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
6,151
12
Shade Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
6,119
13
Spencer Wright, Milford, Utah
5,313
14
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
5,284
15
Lefty Holman, Visalia, Calif.
5,214
16
Joe Lufkin, Sallisaw, Okla.
5,103
17
Ty Manke, Hermosa, S.D.
5,032
18
Nick LaDuke, Livermore, Calif.
4,905
19
Louie Brunson, New Underwood, S.D.
4,596
20
Ryan Mackenzie, Jordan Valley, Ore.
4,389
Tie-down Roping
1
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
$16,785
2
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
14,264
3
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
10,421
4
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
9,992
5
Riley Pruitt, Gering, Neb.
7,814
6
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
7,777
7
Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, Wash.
6,898
8
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
6,709
9
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
6,378
10
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
5,901
11
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
5,721
12
Jake Hannum, Plain City, Utah
5,348
13
Jess Woodward, Dupree, S.D.
5,032
14
Ty Harris, San Angelo, Texas
4,737
15
Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, Okla.
4,729
16
Joe Colletti, Pueblo, Colo.
4,478
17
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
4,367
18
Jesse Clark, Portales, N.M.
4,337
19
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
4,328
20
Clint Nyegaard, Cuero, Texas
4,260
Steer Roping
1
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
$9,551
2
Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas
8,403
3
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
5,878
4
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
5,797
5
Mike Chase, McAlester, Okla.
5,610
6
Corey Ross, Liberty Hill, Texas
5,522
7
Dee Kyler Jr., Pawhuska, Okla.
5,076
8
John E. Bland, Turkey, Texas
4,586
9
Kelton McMillen, Paden, Okla.
4,404
10
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
4,250
11
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
4,230
12
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
4,193
13
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
4,006
14
Leo Campbell, Amarillo, Texas
3,941
15
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
3,488
16
Hank Hollenbeck, Molt, Mont.
3,426
17
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
3,411
18
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
3,110
19
J.R. Olson, Whitewood, S.D.
3,106
20
Buck Mekelburg, Yuma, Colo.
3,015
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$21,530
2
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
18,152
3
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
13,462
4
Bayle Worden, Cooper, Texas
12,549
5
Joseph Vazquez, Alamogordo, N.M.
8,882
6
Jeff Bertus, Avon, S.D.
8,813
7
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
8,484
8
Cordell Curtis, Monte Vista, Colo.
8,284
9
Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla.
8,059
10
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
7,807
11
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
7,779
12
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
7,050
13
Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M.
6,838
14
Tate Smith, Litchville, N.D.
6,752
15
Preston Preece, Troy, Texas
6,119
16
Scottie Knapp, Edgewood, N.M.
5,926
17
Corey Maier, Timber Lake, S.D.
5,557
18
Dillon Tyner, Eaton, Colo.
5,473
19
Beau Nordahl, Bozeman, Mont.
5,197
20
Christopher Byrd, Compton, Calif.
5,064

2018 Barrel Racing (Nov. 6, 2017)

Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
$17,928
2
Kelly Bruner, Millsap, Texas
14,960
3
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
13,984
4
Nikki Hansen, Dickinson, N.D.
11,880
5
Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas
8,326
6
Lori Todd, Willcox, Ariz.
7,709
7
Kristen Spratt, Huntsville, Texas
7,617
8
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
7,357
9
Alex Lang, Harper, Texas
7,316
10
Ericka Nelson, Century, Fla.
7,156
11
Jennifer Barrett, Buhl, Idaho
6,974
12
Carmel Wright, Roy, Mont.
6,773
13
Trula Churchill, Valentine, Neb.
6,557
14
Shali Lord, Lamar, Colo.
6,535
15
Callahan Crossley, Herminston, Ore.
5,971
16
Kylie Weast, Comanche, Okla.
5,572
17
Jessica Routier, Buffalo, S.D.
5,460
18
Tillar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas
5,411
19
Sami Jo Morisoli, Paso Robles, Calif.
5,321
20
Nicole Riggle, Scottsdale, Ariz.
5,294
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☛ Shiney Outlaw breaks records at AQHA World Show 11-15 -17

Posted by on Nov 15, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SHINEY OUTLAW BREAKS RECORDS AT AQHA WORLD SHOW

 

STALLION SHATTERS PREVIOUS AQHA JUNOR WORKING COW HORSE SCORES

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Nov. 15, 2017

Shiney Outlaw, ridden by Sarah Dawson and owned by Michelle Cannon, broke previous AQHA Junior Working Cow Horse Scores at AQHA World Show.
AQHA photo

A beautiful 5-year-old buckskin stallion named Shiney Outlaw was the talk of the AQHA World Show, when ridden by Sarah Dawson, Aubrey, Texas, at the AQHA Junior Working Cow Horse Finals, outscoring a field of 16 top working cow horses out of 44 entries vying for a $30,921.45 total purse. The pair scored a whopping 455, 5 1/2 points higher than the previous all-time score of 449.5.  The total score included a 225 in the reined work and a 230 in down-the-fence.

Owned and bred by Michelle Cannon of Cannon Quarter Horses, Waxahachie, Texas, the score was 11 1/2 points higher than the second-place horse, Bet Lucky 13, ridden by Todd Crawford, Blanchard, Okla., and owned by Robert & Allysn Light, Oxford, N.C., who scored a total of 433.5 points. Third place went to Dual N Tomcat, owned by McKenna Paige Ivey, Hamilton, Ohio, and ridden by Wade Meador, Marietta, Okla. Dual N Tomcat and Ivey were also named Level 2 Champions.

Reserve in the Level 2 went to Scootin Jule Lee, owned and shown by Kaleigh Christina King, Overbrook, Okla., while third went to Maliblu Barbie, owned by K&L Phillips LLC, Corona, Del Mar, Calif.

Shiney Outlaw and Sarah had just come off a win at the 2017 NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity, where they won the Open Hackamore title.  According to the Dawson’s web site, Sarah Dawson is co-owner of Dawson Performance Horses with her husband Chris. She is the daughter of Richard and Cheryl Winters, who put a strong equine training foundation on Sarah. She later went on to work with professionals such as Doug Williamson, Carol Rose, Bill Smith and Sandy Collier. She rode Shinen Smarter to 5th place in the Open at the 2015 NRCHA Futurity, was Reserve Champion in the Intermediate Open and Champion in the Limited Open. Since then, Sarah and Shinen Smarter have made the finals at every Derby this year.

After high school, Chris became an assistant trainer for Todd Crawford. He also learned from Harold Farren and worked for Carol Rose. He had mentors in the reined cow horse industry like Ron Ralls, Don Murphy and Jim Paul.

The Cannons took home a stash of awards, including a custom-designed gold trophy and a Montana Silversmith sterling-silver buckle with 14-karat-gold overlay, both courtesy of Lucas Oil World Show, as well as a specially designed jacket with a world champion patch, courtesy of Cripple Creek Outerwear; 100 pounds of Nutrena feed and a neck wreath.

Shiney Outlaw is sired by Shiners Nickel, a buckskin stallion by Shining Spark who was out of Shesa Lota Nic by Reminic. Shiners Nickel was the 2009 NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity Co-Reserve Champion and has earnings of $108,790. However his untimely death at the NRBC was a huge blow to the Cannons as he was due to begin his first breeding season at the ranch so only a  limited number of offspring were sired by him. Shiney

Outlaw’s dam is Mereyda, a daughter of Dual Rey out of Merada Missy by Freckles Merada. Shiney Outlaw was her first offspring, with a full sibling Shemerriedfornickles being born in 2014. Her 2013 foal was Ladiestartyourendgine, a daughter of Hydrive Cat and in 2016 Metallic Missy, a daughter of Metallic Cat was born.

Shiney Outlaw was trained by Zane Davis and as a 3-year-old qualified for the 2015 Snaffle Bit Futurity Finals; however, they had to scratch due to an injury that was sustained during the competition.

Cannon Quarter Horses is owned by Bill and Michelle Cannon and consists of a fabulous array of offspring competing in the cutting, reining and reined cow horse industry – which all consist of like bloodlines.

According to the  Cannon’s web site, their broodmare band consists of some of the best in the industry, including performers with impressive show records, with much of the money won in the cutting pen.  Tootsie Rey, a daughter of Dual Rey out of Hickorys Toodie Lena by Docs Hickory,  has NCHA earnings of over $210,000 and Lil Lena Long Legs (Smart Little Lena x Lil Lucy Long Legs by Dual Pep) has over $190,000 in NCHA earnings. She was the only mare who had two offspring compete and place in the 2014 NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity. Her offspring earnings are now over $450,000. They also own Cat Belue, with one of her first foals being well on his way to $200,000 in NCHA earnings. Another mare, Shady Little Cat’s (by High Brow Cat) first foals have earned over $180,000 in the reined cow horse and cutting pens.

According to Equi-Stat, the Cannons were the No. 1 owners of reined cow horses from 2009-2014. The couple have big plans for their future and their horses, including building  a new facility complete with a covered arena with stalls and breeding and rehab facilities, as well as a ranch home.

The AQHA World Show, held Nov. 2-18, with 4,800 entries from nine countries, including the United States Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Switzerland and the United Kingdom competing for 99 world championships and 90 Adequan® Level 2.championships at this year’s event. You can tune in to the free live webcast, presented by Bank of America, to watch all the action from the Jim Norick and Performance arenas at www.aqha.com/worldshow. You’ll also find the best coverage of the show, results and more!

AQHA photo.

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☛ A lesson in horse buying 11-14 -17

Posted by on Nov 14, 2017 in COW HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

A LESSON IN HORSE BUYING

By Rick Dennis
Nov. 14, 2017

by Richard E. Dennis

In 2012, I authored and released a book entitled, “The American Horse Industry, Avoiding The Pitfalls.” The book was written from my professional viewpoint and spanned over my twenty years as a professional trainer, breeder, exhibitor and owner.

Initially, the book was designed to help individuals entering the industry, as first-time buyers or investors, to avoid the inherent risks associated with the horse industry during horse ownership, buying, boarding, training, exhibiting and sales.

However, as soon as the book was released and put in production, I learned my book was also being highly regarded and purchased by individuals already in the horse industry as the model and guide to successful horse ownership and equine business operations. The book has never received less than a 5-Star Rating and has been sold in National and International Markets.

The book is unique in a fashion, as it provides the basic knowledge anyone would desire to avoid the pitfalls in the American Horse Industry. The book is comprised of eleven chapters:

1) Horse Operation – Business or Hobby?
2) Equine Warning Law.
3) Selecting A Horse.
4) Equine Drug Testing.
5) Selecting A Horse Boarding Facility.
6) Selecting A Horse Trainer.
7) Non-profit Horse Organizations.
8) Equipment and Applications.
9) Farrier Service.
10) Health and Care of the Horse.
11) Horse Safety.

As previously stated, initially the book was designed as a primer to newcomers in the industry but over time its reading audience has expanded to also include equestrians with many years in the industry.  For many, it has become the “go-to book” for common-sense knowledge to guide them through to become successful equine business operations and horse  owners. Perhaps the best attribute of the book is teaching individuals the steps to take to avoid the court room in costly civil disputes.

COMMON-SENSE HORSE BUYING:
Of late, there seems to be a lot of civil litigation going on involving horses in one fashion or another as well as for other reasons. In assisting individuals in buying a horse, I urge all of my clients to use basic common-sense approaches in the transaction, especially the “TRUST BUT VERIFY” motto. As a whole, I do believe there are more equestrians with honesty than dishonesty in the industry.  However, the industry has its share of bad actors whose intentions aren’t so honorable. Therein lies the pitfalls outlined in my book and how to avoid them.  It really doesn’t matter what breed of horse or what its intended purpose is supposed to be the following rules of horse buying can be applied to them all:

Rules To Avoid The Pitfalls:

1) If your not quite sure of what your looking for or how to go about acquiring it the best approach is to enlist the aid of an experienced reputable trainer who will act as your agent. The agent will locate several prospective animals for  the buyer to evaluate including having the agent ride the horse first to ensure the horse is of the type, kind and performance capability the buyer desires.

2) The agent will also make sure the horse is safe before the buyer ever steps up on the horse. A rule of thumb, so-to-speak, is for the buyer to spend as much time as he or she can with the horse before plunking down that hard-earned money on a horse purchase.

3) Normally an agent will have a contract to sign beforehand and the buyer should take the time to scrutinize it in its entirety to make sure there are no legal loopholes, including attorney evaluation.

4) Normally, the “seller” will also have a contract for the buyer to sign; however, if the “Sellers” contract has stipulations such as “Sold As Is,” “No Warranty,” or “Non-Returnable,” simply walk away from the horse and find another. Every reputable “seller” should guarantee their product.

5) In the event the buyer wishes to represent his or herself, the cardinal rule is to never purchase a horse “Sight-Unseen” or without riding the horse to all of the horse’s performance capabilities prior to making a final selection.

Pre-purchase Vet Exams:

1) Never purchase a horse without a pre-purchase vet exam, including x-rays.

2) Never use the same veterinarian for the pre-purchase exam as the seller. The buyer always wants an independent medical examination and evaluation separate and apart from the seller’s.

3) Have an attorney-at-law draw up a release between “seller” and “buyer” to disclose “ALL” of the medical records for the horse located anywhere and of any type or kind to evaluate and fully disclose any pre-existing conditions, injuries or treatments the horse may have had prior to the sale. In the event the horse has had multiple owners along the way attempt to contact as many as the buyer can to determine the health of the horse.

4) During the pre-purchase veterinarian examination, have the veterinarian draw urine and blood for a drug-test evaluation to see what’s floating around in the horse’s system. In the pre-purchase contract, it should be stipulated that if any drugs of the tranquilizer or sedative type are found in the horse’ s system, the “seller” is responsible for the veterinarian’s bill and the sale is null and void. For the record, I also have a CBC and a liver-function test performed during the pre-purchase.

5) Have an attorney at law draw up a purchase contract whereby the “seller” guarantees the health of the horse as well as its performance capabilities with a guaranteed warranty of performance and health. If the “seller” won’t sign the contract, walk away and find another horse. Most reputable private-treaty sellers wouldn’t have an issue with this type of business transaction. After all, exercise the old motto, “It’s Just Business”.

6) The buyer should document all advertisements the “seller” may have provided to “buyer” due to the fact that in some circumstances these may be required later to demonstrate an “implied” or “expressed warranty” by “seller” or “seller’s agent” in a civil lawsuit for damages. Further, the buyer should fully document electronic messages between “seller” and “buyer” or “seller” as well as any provided videos which can also be used to determine “warranty status” if the need arises.

7) The main purpose of a pre-purchase vet exam is to determine whether or not the horse has any pre-existing or current medical conditions which would prevent the horse from fulfilling the performance capability the buyer has chosen to engage in. Bear in mind that it’s not uncommon for a horse to have some bumps and bruises acquired during training or exhibition. If the horse is a true performance horse, this is expected and common.  It’s the nature of the beast “so to speak”. However, my rule is to buy a horse with bumps and bruises I can live with and not purchase a horse with the types of bumps and bruises I can’t.

Deceptive Trade Practices Laws:

There are laws on the books governing horse sales to prevent or prosecute those unscrupulous individuals engaged in deceptive trade practices from taking advantage of an unsuspecting buyer during a horse sale:

1) Federal Trade Commission.
2) Uniformed Commercial Code.
3) Deceptive Trade Practices Act.
4) Attorney Generals Office of the state of residence.
5) The local law enforcement agency can file fraud or theft charges.

Each of these agencies are capable of investigating and, where appropriate, instituting or referring criminal charges as well as civil litigation to the offender for violations found during an unscrupulous horse sale as well as recovering assets for the victim from a bad horse sale including court-ordered restitution.

Auctions/Sale Barns:

In all probability there’s a lot of good horses bought and sold in a sale barn. However, this is not my “cup of tea” so to speak. I’d much prefer buying from a reputable breeder or owner when I’m in need of a horse. Unless the sale barn offers demonstrations ahead of time, don’t buy a horse at this location. The prospective buyer is just rolling the dice or gambling on whether or not the horse lives up to the hype in the sale catalog. Also, beware of the sale barn whose contract stipulates a “hold harmless or indemnification clause” which essentially means you are buying the horse from the “seller” and not from the sale barn. Therefore, if you buy a horse, the sale barn isn’t responsible for the condition or performance capability of the horse at the time of sale. This is a risky buy.

Again, “Trust, But Verify”. Remember not all horse sellers are reputable individuals and the sale barn isn’t responsible if the “seller” lies on the disclosure contract with the auction house. Another important fact to remember is that in some states, Texas for example, it’s unlawful for the purchaser to stop payment on a check after a horse sale. In other words, this deals out criminal penalties to the party stopping payment on a check.

So if and when you get your horse home and it has pre-existing abnormalities or conditions that weren’t disclosed ahead of the sale and make the horse unsuitable for your intended purpose and the “seller” won’t warranty the horse, the only remedies the “buyer” may have are:

1) Expensive litigation in court, or
2) Filing a complaint with one of the agencies herein mentioned above.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between the Bridle!”

Wind River Company LLC
Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Office/Mobile: (985) 630-3500
Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com
Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com
Stock Horse Web Site: http://www.windriverstockhorses,com

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☛ Snedecor wins 3rd steer roping title 11-13-17

Posted by on Nov 13, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SNEDECOR CAPTURES THIRD STEER ROPING GOLD BUCKLE

Press release from PRCA
Nov. 13, 2017
Consistency paid ultimate dividends for veteran steer roper Scott Snedecor.
The Fredericksburg, Texas, cowboy won the average with 104.1-second time on nine head which vaulted him to his third world championship at the 2017 Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping at the Kansas Star Arena in Mulvane, Kansas.
Snedecor, who won world titles in 2005 and 2008, finished with $136,419 in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings to edge six-time steer roping world champ Trevor Brazile, who placed second with $126,538.
“This is a great feeling,” said Snedecor, 42. “Anytime you can get one of them gold buckles added to your list again, that’s awesome. I’m toward the end of my career, I guess, and man it’s good to know I still got it. It’s good to see a shiny gold buckle again.”
Snedecor clinched the world championship and the average title when JoJo LeMond, the 10th roper in Round 10, clocked a 14.2-second time. LeMond finished second in the average with a 109.5-second time on nine head. Snedecor and LeMond were the only contestants to rope nine steers. Brazile placed third in the average with an 85.0-second time on eight head.
“I heard everybody congratulating me after JoJo roped, and you want to know what’s going on in the back of your head, but I tried to just worry about roping (in Round 10),” Snedecor said.
With both the world and average titles in hand, Snedecor, the last roper out in the final round, recorded his only no-time of the NFSR.
“It didn’t matter if I got a time in Round 10, but I sure wanted to tie that last one down,” he said. “But, I felt like I roped good (both days) and my horse worked outstanding.”
This also is Snedecor’s third NFSR average crown, as he won the average in 2005 and 2011.
“That average title is the second-best thing in the world,” said Snedecor, who earned $27,347 for his latest average victory. “Now, I have three gold buckles and three average championships and that’s a great feeling.”
Snedecor came to his 16th NFSR in fourth place, but was able to move to the top of the standings, thanks to earning $68,336, the most of any contestant this year’s NFSR. Brazile was second to Snedecor in NFSR earnings with $63,273.
“I practiced a little more for it (the NFSR) this time,” Snedecor said. “The last few years I had not worked on it liked I used to and you get out of it what you put into it.”
Snedecor’s NFSR money total was second all-time behind Cody Lee’s $70,651 in earnings a year ago.
During the entire 2017 NFSR, Snedecor rode Possum, a 9-year-old horse that is owned by Stephen Stransky. Possum was making his NFSR debut.
“That horse has been good since Day 1,” Snedecor said. “Stephen brought him to my house and he (Possum) couldn’t hardly back out of the trailer. Stephen has raised a bunch of horses and he and I have been good friends all of our lives. I was fortunate to have Stephen in my corner and for him let me take that horse and ride him when I need him.”
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☛ Don Taylor killed in tragic accident 11-12 -17

Posted by on Nov 12, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

DON TAYLOR KILLED IN TRAGIC ACCIDENT

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Nov. 12, 2017

Don Taylor, 89, Minco, Okla., a rancher, cattleman, horseman and a past NCHA Director, was killed in a tragic truck/semi-truck accident north of Union City, Okla., on Thursday, Nov. 9.

According to news reports, Don was pulling out of the Love’s parking to head north when a semi caring a 70,000-load came barreling toward him. According to the police report, the semi was unable to slow down fast enough to miss hitting Taylor.

Reports say it was the seventh major accident at the intersection since 2015  but the first since August when the speed limit dropped from 70 miles per hour to 55. The police said they believed Tylor’s view was obscured by a semi turning westbound onto SW 59th from SB Hwy 81 in the southbound lane. Taylor’s pickup was then struck by a semi trailing southbound in the inside lane and pronounced dead at the scene.

Don and his wife Sylvia were active in the NCHA years ago when they owned the popular Clark’s Doc Bar and he was a director with the NCHA. Chuck Smith said on the NCHA website that Don was a highly respected  horseman.

According to the NCHA website, funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. Monday at the Methodist Church in Minco.

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