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☛ Lee Dale dies at age 82 8-16-18

Posted by on Aug 16, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

JOY LEE DALE PASSES AWAY AT AGE 82

 

LEE WAS ONE OF THE ORIGINAL SALE CATALOG PUBLISHERS AND CO-OWNED A SALE COMPANY

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Aug. 16, 2018
Corrected Aug. 17, 2018

 

It was a sad day for me today when I got the phone call that Joy Lee Dale had passed away at the Senior Care home in Decatur, Texas. She was 82 and would have been 83 on Sept. 25 when it would have been her birthday. She had been paralyzed and in a nursing home for the past 20-plus years following a stroke.

 

I know there are a lot of ole’ timers who love cutting and also knew and loved Lee that would want to know that she passed away this morning. If you have any personal, fun stories about Lee, please send them to me and I will post them.

 

I met Lee when I was editor of Quarter Horse News and she was involved in the sale horse business. She and her husband, Dub Dale, both loved and rode cutting horses and had been in the sale horse business; however, when he left and the sale closed down, she decided to publish sale horse catalogs – which she had been doing all along for their sales.

 

She was one of only a very few people who were producing horse sale catalogs with pages with full pedigrees at the time – and she did it using a small, old computer, gathering information from cutting horse events. She sent me the information and I typed the cutting horse pedigree sheets for her.

 

After she suffered a stroke that left her with her entire left side paralyzed, she was in a nursing home in Justin. However, after her sister, Susie, died and they gave me her power of attorney, I moved her to Senior Care in Decatur, which was much newer, nicer and next to the hospital. I could then see her more often as I went to the hospital for water aerobics three days a week.

 

Lee and her best friend, Ann Neely, were top sales ladies at a Windy Ryon’s Western store on Fort Worth’s Northside (now called Cavenders). They were top sales women because they had so much personality and knew so many people.  However, Ann also passed away several years ago while sleeping in a chair in her home.

 

I was fortunate to know Lee for years and had her medical power of attorney. However, I was devastated today when I received the news that she had passed away this morning. I am in Colorado for the summer and am making arrangements from here.

 

Since Lee has no living relatives, I’m the only one left to make a decision, I have made arrangements to have her cremated and I will be putting half her ashes on her sister’s grave and sprinkling the rest on my horse pasture in Grandview. She always loved horses and I’ll feel good that I still have her close. I think she would be okay with that decision. I hope I’m right!

 

 

 

 

 

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News – 8-14-18

Posted by on Aug 14, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy of PRCA
Aug. 14, 2018
PRCA Stat of the Week
As of Aug. 13, there have been 501 rodeos during the 2018 season paying out a total of $31,033,828.
1. Hall of Fame clown/bullfighter Henson passes away
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – ProRodeo Hall of Fame rodeo clown/bullfighter Chuck Henson passed away Aug. 11 in Tucson, Ariz. He was 87.
Henson was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs in 1995.
Henson was born with rodeo blood in his veins on Feb. 4, 1931, in Arcadia, Fla., where his parents – Charlie and Margie – were competing at a rodeo. Margie was one of the famous “Riding Greenoughs.”
Henson competed in five events but considered bull riding his forte. In the mid-1950s, he traded his boots and hat for baggy pants and a red wig, and his clown/bullfighter career took off.
Henson made people laugh and saved cowboys from disaster until the 1980s. Henson worked the 1967 and 1971 National Finals Rodeo. He served on the PRCA’s Board of Directors as contract member director from 1974-77. He was PRCA Clown of the Year in 1977.
“The big rodeos were a little bit tougher to work because you were out in the middle of this big arena,” Henson said in a 2009 article in The Ketchpen. “I like the small rodeos, where the crowd was right up next to me and I could play with them. I always like to hear the little kids giggle.”
When Henson hung up his rodeo clothes, he took on Hollywood as a stuntman double.
Of his rodeo career he said, “It made me feel mighty good when some kid who had drawn a bad bull would say, ‘Boy, I’m glad to see you here.'”
Henson compared bullfighting to football.
“You fake a bull quite a bit, use your hands to grab hold or to push off,” Henson said in the March 19, 1980, issue of ProRodeo Sports News. “You just always keep moving. If you are standing still and he hits you, it’s like breaking an egg. If you are moving, he just boosts you along a little faster or tosses you in the air a little. Sometimes a little has become a lot. I’ve been in orbit a couple of times.”
Henson is survived by his wife of 59 years, Nancy; daughters Nancy Jane (Jerry) Dorenkamp and Leigh Ann (Eric) Billingsley; and granddaughters Kaylee and Rayna Billingsley.
A celebration of life will take place at 2 p.m., Aug. 22, at the Tucson (Ariz.) Rodeo Parade Museum, 4823 S. 6th Ave.
2. Cody Devers claims Lovington crown
LOVINGTON, N.M. – Rodeo has its share of up and downs.
Steer wrestler Cody Devers has been a passenger on that roller-coaster ride since the last week of July.
The Alva, Okla., cowboy tore the medial collateral ligament in his right knee at Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days.
After doctoring out of several rodeos, Devers not only fought through the pain, but also captured the title at the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour Rodeo’s Lea County Fair & PRCA Rodeo, which ended Aug. 11.
Devers won the average with a 7.6-second time on two head.
“This is the first time I have ever won this rodeo,” said Devers, who made his inaugural appearance in Lovington last year and didn’t have much luck. “I’m super excited. This is one of the top wins of my career.”
Devers set the pace for his victory with a solid, 4.0-second run in the first round and then came back with a quick, 3.6-second effort in round two, which tied for first in the round and secured the average.
“It had rained like three inches in 30 minutes right before the rodeo started,” said Devers, who made his runs Aug. 10. “I knew I had a pretty good steer in the first round and I just had to blow the barrier out. Then, to get that 3.6 (in the second round) was so exciting. The rodeo committee worked hard on things (because of the rain) and we were able to still be competitive there.”
For his performance, Devers earned $4,829, which came at a great time. As of Aug. 13, Devers was 32nd in the 2018 PRCA | RAM World Standings with $33,041.
“This win was really good for me and a big confidence booster,” Devers said. “I tore my MCL over there at Cheyenne, and I had to doctor release quite a few rodeos. So, to be able to know that I can compete with all these guys feels good. I’ve been taping my knee and putting a brace on it and it is healing. I am feeling better every day.”
During his victory runs, Devers was riding Django, a horse owned by his traveling partner, Blake Mindemann, who also hazed for him.
“Everything came together for me and that horse worked great,” Devers said.
Devers not only won nearly $5,000 toward his spot in the world standings, but also earned first-place points in the Wrangler Tour standings. This is his second Wrangler ProRodeo Tour victory this season, as he also won in Corpus Christi, Texas.
The Wrangler Tour consists of 22 of the PRCA’s biggest rodeos and culminates with the Justin Finale in Puyallup, Wash., Sept. 6-9. The top 24 competitors in the Tour standings in each event will earn a spot at the Justin Finale, as cowboys make a final push toward the all-important Top 15 in the world standings.
“That’s one of my big goals this year,” Devers said. “I should be in the top six in the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour standings after this win. It would be great to get to go up to Puyallup and try to win a chunk of money toward the end of the season.”
Other winners at the $222,817 rodeo were all-around cowboy Marcus Theriot ($6,374 in steer wrestling and team roping); bareback rider Bill Tutor (87 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Good Time Charlie); team ropers Marcus Theriot/Cody Doescher (10.5 seconds on two head); saddle bronc rider Taos Muncy (86 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Drama Queen); tie-down roper Hudson Wallace (17.7 seconds on two head); barrel racer Andrea Busby (17.61 seconds); steer roper Bryce Davis (44.4 seconds on three head) and bull rider J.W. Harris (88 points on Pete Pro Rodeo’s Cat Skat).
3. Hermiston win ‘bigggest’ of Wyatt Covington’s career
HERMISTON, Ore. – In two years on his permit, Wyatt Covington has two PRCA rodeo wins to his name. The second one was a big one and his first solo title.
Covington rode Corey & Lange Rodeo’s Hunky Dorie for 86.5 points and the victory at the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour’s Farm-City Pro Rodeo in Hermiston, Ore., Aug. 11.
Not a bad place to pull down win No. 2.
“It’s pretty awesome, because that’s a big rodeo up here in the Northwest,” said Covington, 19.
Winning in the Northwest means a little extra for Covington, who lives in Omak, Wash.
Covington took a month off this summer to recover from a groin injury. His second rodeo since the injury turned out to be Hermiston.
“It means a lot,” said Covington, who took home $5,161. “It being that big of a rodeo gets my name out there more and gets me recognized a little more. I know I’ve got the talent, it’s just when I put it all together and do it right, everything felt perfect for me. It’s just a matter of being consistent with it.”
Covington sounds like he has a plan for his rodeo future.
“I figured why not go another year, use up my permit, give me a little time to mature,” Covington said. “Hopefully next year will be my rookie year and I’ll try and win Rookie of the Year and make the NFR. That’s the plan.”
With the win, Covington is inside the Top 50 in the Wrangler Tour Standings. The top 24 cowboys in each event at the conclusion of the 22 Tour rodeos qualify for the Justin Finale in Puyallup, Wash., Sept. 6-9.
Covington has tried to go as much as possible this season. Injuries have limited his rodeo count.
“I worked on a ranch in the fall and winter,” he said. “But come the new year, I started rodeoing. I’ve been going to quite a few. I also had to turn out of a few due to doctor’s releases, so not as many as I’d like to get to.”
Covington’s first win was a co-championship with Jordan Spears at the Sisters (Ore.) Rodeo Xtreme Bulls Division 2, June 6.
“This is by far the biggest rodeo I’ve ever won,” Covington said about Hermiston. “I’m pretty excited about it.”
With a little momentum, Covington will be staying busy. In the next several days he’ll be in Lynden, Wash.; Canby, Ore.; Moses Lake, Wash., and Caldwell, Idaho.
“I’ve got a busy week ahead of me,” he said.
Other winners at the $194,619 rodeo were all-around cowboy Steven Dent ($6,144 in bareback riding and saddle bronc riding); bareback rider Orin Larsen (88.5 points on Calgary Stampede’s Special Delivery); steer wrestler Blake Knowles (7.4 seconds on two head); team ropers Lane Ivy/Blaine Vick (9.1 seconds on two head); saddle bronc rider Chase Brooks (87.5 points on Calgary Stampede’s Yesterdays Delivery); tie-down roper Cimarron Boardman (17.8 seconds on two head); and barrel racer Jennifer Barrett (16.83 seconds).
4. Tim Pharr wins Sikeston rodeo for second time
SIKESTON, Mo. – Summer was not an easy road for tie-down roper Tim Pharr. And maybe the horrible steak he had in Spanish Fork, Utah, on his 40th birthday July 20 was the capper of a terrible stretch.
But all that bad luck flew out the window when Pharr wrapped up his second career win at the Wrangler ProRodeo Tour’s Sikeston (Mo.) Jaycee Bootheel Rodeo, Aug. 11.
Pharr took second place in the first round in 8.6 seconds before winning the average in 17.7 seconds on two head. He took home $3,875.
“There’s never a bad time for a win, and none is really more special than the next,” said Pharr, who also won Sikeston in 2001.
In Spanish Fork, Pharr had a steak that was so bad (it tasted like “shoe leather,” he said) he had to send it back. Between June 20 and July 25, Pharr ran 22 calves without placing. He placed in Deadwood, S.D., then went six more calves without placing. Then came Sikeston.
“It was the worst summer on record,” Pharr said. “The longest streak I’ve ever been on – twenty-two calves in a row with no money. Then I placed in Deadwood, then I went another six calves with no money. Then, BAM, I win Sikeston. Long overdue.”
The reason for the streak was easy to explain.
“Just bad luck,” he said. “Some of the craziest things I’ve ever had happen in my career.”
Turning a streak like that around isn’t easy.
“When you go that long, there’s no other way to say it than it’s extremely stressful,” Pharr said. “You read books, read the Bible, you try to put things in perspective and know it will turn around eventually. You’ve got to know that when you show up, you’ve got to get your head right and make sure you do the basics because it can turn and go the other way just as fast as it can go south.”
Pharr was riding Zanna, his 9-year-old mare that he raised, when he won Sikeston.
“Honest to God, I’ve trained a whole bunch and this is the best one I’ve ever been across,” Pharr said. “She stands in the box great. She runs harder than any horse I’ve been on. She stops and backs up better than any horse I’ve been on, which is really her signature – her stop and backup.”
Normally, Pharr calls it a season after Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days. He heads back to Resaca, Ga., to help his wife, Shae, get their sons Conner, 8, and Sterling, 5, ready for school. But this year he stopped at Sikeston since it’s relatively close to home.
It proved to be a wise decision.
“Every one of them (wins) is extremely fulfilling, and to have one at Sikeston, it’s a Tour rodeo and a big stop,” said Pharr, who has won more than $20,000 on the season. “It seems to be a little more special than most because it’s one of the top 20 rodeos of the year.”
The win placed Pharr into the Tour standings. The top 24 cowboys in each event in the Wrangler Tour will advance to the Justin Finale in Puyallup, Wash., Sept. 6-9.
Pharr will add a few circuit rodeos to close out the 2018 season.
“It wouldn’t hurt my feelings to get a few more circuit rodeos in and solidify the circuit finals for me,” said Pharr, who raises and trains horses, in addition to being a farrier and working on the family ranch. “Basically, I’m going to stay right here and be a circuit cowboy.”
Other winners at the $169,021 rodeo were all-around cowboy Paul David Tierney ($5,845 in tie-down roping and team roping); bareback rider Tim O’Connell (89 points on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s Pony Soldier); steer wrestlers Tanner Brunner and Dru Melvin (9.3 seconds on two head each); team ropers Paul David Tierney/Tanner Braden (9.5 seconds on two head); saddle bronc rider J.J. Elshere (85 points on Pickett Rodeo’s Real Fancy); barrel racer Kylie Weast (16.32 seconds) and bull rider John Mincey (89 points on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s No. 3109).
5. What to Watch For
ProRodeo TV
Wrangler ProRodeo Tour’s Caldwell (Idaho) Night Rodeo, Aug. 17-18, 8 p.m. (MT)
ProRodeo Live with Steve Kenyon
Division 2 Xtreme Bulls in Gooding, Idaho, 8 p.m. (MT)
Gooding (Idaho) Pro Rodeo, Aug. 16-18, 8 p.m. (MT)
5. News & Notes from the rodeo trail
The second annual Sowing Good Deeds Initiative is underway and open to all PRCA-sanctioned rodeo committees. One PRCA rodeo committee will be chosen to win a Massey Ferguson® tractor valued at $35,000for the good work they do. Congratulations to the inaugural AGCO/PRCA Sowing Good Deeds award winner, Clovis (Calif.) Rodeo.Enter today, and your rodeo committee could be the winner of a Massey Ferguson tractor in 2018.As a proud sponsor of the PRCA, AGCO® Corporation through its brands Hesston® and Massey Ferguson, recognize that PRCA-sanctioned rodeos contribute significant support for local, regional and national charities and organizations. These charitable efforts by rodeo committees are making a positive impact on members of the various communities. Hesston and Massey Ferguson, through its Sowing Good Deeds initiative, want to raise awareness of these many local efforts and reward one PRCA committee each year whose impact goes above and beyond.For more information or to apply please visit www.hesston.com/sowinggooddeeds
That Famous Preston (Idaho) Night Rodeo is a marquee event each July – the latest one was July 26-28 – in the small, southeast Idaho town with a population of 5,000. This year, the rodeo is drawing on its supporters to help fund its next step: a new arena with more capacity, more comfortable seats, and more ADA-compliant seating so every fan can have a place at next year’s event. Through crowd-sourcing and support from local businesses, the rodeo is on its way to its $1.4 million goal. In a town like Preston, the arena serves as the heart of the community, and local rodeo fans are showing just how much this event means to them. To donate, visit www.prestonrodeo.com/donate.html
The Wrangler ProRodeo Tour’s Caldwell (Idaho) Night Rodeo takes place Aug. 14-18. During the rodeo there will be some special nights – “Man Up Crusade” Family Night is Aug. 15, wear purple and take a stand against domestic violence.”Power of Pink” Night is Aug. 16, wear pink and support breast cancer awareness. A portion of the proceeds from the night will benefit the Power of Pink Program with Saint Alphonsus Medical Center and West Valley Medical Center to provide free mammogram screenings for women who are uninsured, underinsured or underserved in the Treasure Valley; and “Patriot Night” is Aug. 17. Wear your red, white and blue and salute the military and their families. A portion of the proceeds go toward CNR’s Military Relief Fund, which supports the needs of wounded or fallen service members/veterans and their families in the Treasure Valley.
The next PRCA Rodeo Camp will be Sept. 1 in Palestine, Ill. The camp will run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT). Registration is required at www.prorodeo.com/prorodeo/rodeo/youth-rodeo.
6. Next Up
Aug. 13           Dacotah Stampede Rodeo, Aberdeen, S.D., begins
Aug. 14           Lynden (Wash.) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 14           Wrangler Tour ProRodeo’s Caldwell (Idaho) Night Rodeo begins
Aug. 14           Canby (Ore.) Rodeo begins
Aug. 15           Wyoming State Fair & Rodeo, Douglas, Wyo., begins
Aug. 15           Gooding (Idaho) Xtreme Bulls begins
Aug. 15           Juneau County Fair Pro Rodeo, Mauston, Wis., begins
Aug. 16           McCone County Fair PRCA Rodeo, Circle, Mont., begins
Aug. 16           Inter-State Rodeo, Coffeyville, Kan., begins
Aug. 16           Yellowstone River Round-Up, Billings, Mont., begins
Aug. 16           Cassia County Fair & Rodeo, Burley, Idaho, begins
Aug. 16           Gooding (Idaho) Pro Rodeo begins
Aug. 16           Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo, Kalispell, Mont., begins
Aug. 16           Moses Lake (Wash.) Round-Up Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           Division 2 Xtreme Bulls, Baker, Mont., begins
Aug. 17           Brown County Fair Pro Rodeo, Depere, Wis., begins
Aug. 17           Eureka (Kan.) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           Imboden (Ark.) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           Seward County PRCA Rodeo, Liberal, Kan., begins
Aug. 17           Annual World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo, Payson, Ariz., begins
Aug. 17           Tehachapi (Calif.) Pro Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           Cranbrook (British Columbia) Pro Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           North Texas State Fair & Rodeo, Denton, Texas, begins
Aug. 17           Norco (Calif.) Mounted Posse PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           Pincher Creek (Alberta) Pro Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Painted Pony Championship Rodeo, Lake Luzerne, N.Y.
Aug. 18           Mesquite (Texas) Championship Rodeo
Aug. 18           Cowtown Rodeo, Woodstown Pilesgrove, N.J., begins
Aug. 18           Fallon County Fair & Rodeo, Baker, Mont., begins
Aug. 19           Badlands Circuit Steer Roping Finals, Deadwood, S.D.
Aug. 20           Days of ’76 Stand Alone Steer Roping, Deadwood, S.D.
7. 2018 PRCA | RAM World Standings Leaders
Unofficial through Aug. 13, 2018
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$163,932
BB:
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
$143,708
SW:
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
$96,567
TR-1:
Kaleb Driggers, Hoboken, Ga.
$92,445
TR-2:
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$92,445
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$122,790
TD:
Tyson Durfey, Decatur, Texas
$103,354
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$224,892
SR:
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$75,408
8. 2018 PRCA | RAM World Standings
Unofficial through Aug. 13, 2018
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$163,932
2
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
142,749
3
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
109,918
4
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
102,238
5
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
94,445
6
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
91,834
7
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
65,199
8
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
62,574
9
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
60,037
10
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
59,984
11
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
55,324
12
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
49,731
13
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
45,946
14
Tanner Green, Cotulla, Texas
45,329
15
Chance Oftedahl, Pemberton, Minn.
41,432
16
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
38,238
17
Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
34,334
18
Wesley Brunson, Terry, Miss.
33,921
19
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
33,160
20
Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
33,063
Bareback Riding
1
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
$143,708
2
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
143,073
3
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
104,460
4
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
99,991
5
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
88,608
6
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
86,440
7
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
83,451
8
Mason Clements, Springville, Utah
81,321
9
Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas
81,036
10
Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah
78,462
11
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
75,678
12
Tilden Hooper, Carthage, Texas
72,445
13
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
70,937
14
Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev.
64,728
15
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
62,200
16
Clint Laye, Cadogan, Alberta
53,143
17
Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas
48,809
18
Seth Hardwick, Ranchester, Wyo.
47,191
19
Luke Creasy, Hobbs, N.M.
46,338
20
Ty Taypotat, Regina, Saskatchewan
45,334
Steer Wrestling
1
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
$96,567
2
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
82,185
3
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
79,249
4
Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, Mont.
74,583
5
Blake Mindemann, Blanchard, Okla.
68,641
6
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
67,601
7
Cole Edge, Durant, Okla.
64,825
8
Tanner Brunner, Ramona, Kan.
63,130
9
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
62,925
10
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
61,208
11
Blake Knowles, Heppner, Ore.
60,561
12
Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla.
57,773
13
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
56,950
14
Hunter Cure, Holliday, Texas
56,094
15
Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, N.D.
53,159
16
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
52,984
17
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
51,950
18
Chason Floyd, Buffalo, S.D.
48,115
19
Josh Garner, Live Oak, Calif.
47,596
20
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
47,443
Team Roping (header)
1
Kaleb Driggers, Hoboken, Ga.
$92,445
2
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
87,840
3
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
85,087
4
Aaron Tsinigine, Tuba City, Ariz.
77,573
5
Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, Okla.
73,259
6
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
72,388
7
Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C.
68,293
8
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
63,475
9
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
62,131
10
Logan Olson, Flandreau, S.D.
54,875
11
Tyler Wade, Terrell, Texas
52,076
12
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
51,482
13
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
49,842
14
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
48,187
15
Cory Kidd V, Statesville, N.C.
48,081
16
Spencer Mitchell, Orange Cove, Calif.
47,799
17
Andrew Ward, Edmond, Okla.
47,573
18
Joshua Torres, Ocala, Fla.
47,486
19
Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz.
46,818
20
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
45,662
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$92,445
2
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
87,840
3
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
85,087
4
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
79,026
5
Trey Yates, Pueblo, Colo.
77,101
6
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
68,699
7
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
68,293
8
Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
62,282
9
Clint Summers, Lake City, Fla.
61,926
10
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
60,761
11
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
58,274
12
Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont.
56,101
13
Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb.
55,806
14
Cole Davison, Stephenville, Texas
55,164
15
Reagan Ward, Edmond, Okla.
47,573
16
Jonathan Torres, Ocala, Fla.
47,486
17
Logan Medlin, Tatum, N.M.
46,919
18
Cody Cowden, Atwater, Calif.
46,236
19
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
45,732
20
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
44,331
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$122,790
2
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
111,588
3
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
103,656
4
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
95,995
5
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
95,912
6
Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah
95,137
7
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
94,329
8
Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa
90,884
9
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
81,382
10
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
80,839
11
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
71,806
12
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
68,309
13
Chase Brooks, Deer Lodge, Mont.
66,205
14
Joey Sonnier III, New Iberia, La.
64,768
15
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
61,223
16
J.J. Elshere, Hereford, S.D.
56,147
17
Spencer Wright, Milford, Utah
55,974
18
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
55,321
19
Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.
46,698
20
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
45,324
Tie-down Roping
1
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
$103,354
2
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
96,592
3
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
89,057
4
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
85,732
5
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
79,880
6
Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, Wash.
78,105
7
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
75,024
8
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
73,373
9
Sterling Smith, Stephenville, Texas
73,261
10
Reese Riemer, Stinnett, Texas
72,965
11
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
68,703
12
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
67,518
13
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
65,585
14
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
62,607
15
Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas
61,056
16
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
55,043
17
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
52,363
18
Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, Okla.
51,725
19
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
49,142
20
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
46,904
Steer Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
$75,408
2
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
58,856
3
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
58,230
4
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
41,709
5
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
41,251
6
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
40,194
7
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
39,766
8
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
37,028
9
Brodie Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla.
36,488
10
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
34,180
11
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
33,989
12
Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas
33,985
13
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
32,342
14
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
31,860
15
Will Gasperson, Decatur, Texas
31,741
16
Jim Locke, Miami, Texas
30,133
17
Roger Branch, Wellston, Okla.
28,948
18
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
22,805
19
Corey Ross, Liberty Hill, Texas
21,987
20
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
17,804
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$224,892
2
Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont.
146,217
3
Dustin Boquet, Bourg, La.
96,636
4
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
93,657
5
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
82,756
6
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
80,739
7
Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla.
80,475
8
Jeff Askey, Athens, Texas
80,283
9
Chase Dougherty, Canby, Ore.
79,415
10
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
77,620
11
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
77,435
12
Cole Melancon, Batson, Texas
75,970
13
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
74,532
14
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
71,093
15
J.W. Harris, Goldthwaite, Texas
71,036
16
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
70,887
17
Koby Radley, Montpelier, La.
70,520
18
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
66,997
19
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
65,630
20
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
61,212
*2018 Barrel Racing (Aug. 13, 2018)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
$182,843
2
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
141,551
3
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
110,127
4
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
102,975
5
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
100,724
6
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
99,780
7
Kylie Weast, Comanche, Okla.
94,341
8
Jessica Routier, Buffalo, S.D.
90,095
9
Kelly Bruner, Millsap, Texas
85,355
10
Carman Pozzobon, Aldergrove, British Columbia
84,726
11
Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo.
76,830
12
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
74,927
13
Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas
70,501
14
Jessica Telford, Caldwell, Idaho
69,256
15
Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas
68,938
16
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
68,023
17
Tracy Nowlin, Nowata, Okla.
67,758
18
Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas
64,435
19
Lacinda Rose, Willard, Mo.
56,807
20
Nikki Hansen, Dickinson, N.D.
56,389
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☛ The ABCs of hiring a professional horse trainer 8-12-18

Posted by on Aug 12, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 5 comments

THE ABC’S OF HIRING A PROFESSIONAL HORSE TRAINER

 

DON’T BE A FOOL WITH YOUR MONEY!

 

 

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Aug. 12, 2018

 

So, you’ve made the decision to enter the horse industry. Your reasoning may include a myriad of ideological thought processes, including for an investment purpose, just to enjoy the equestrian life, a reenactment with the Old West lifestyle, or simply your love of horses and the ability to engage with one of the most marvelous animals on planet earth.

 

Regardless of what your reasoning is, one of the most important investment decisions the equestrian will make, besides the horse, is locating and retaining the right professional horse trainer. However, and for the record, the horse industry, unlike other professions requiring either a college degree or a degree from a vo-tech school, professional horse trainers occupy a unique niche in our society: “a niche that’s virtually unregulated and likened to the unregulated society of the Wild West.”

 

In a sense, horse trainers are unique in that they learn their trade on a generational basis, i.e., the training techniques are passed down from generation-to-generation. However, and contrary to popular belief, horse trainers aren’t Gods and they can’t walk on water! In some cases they think they are lawyers but a majority percentage dictates they aren’t one of those either.

 

Another satirical moment in history has taught us that some horse trainers think they can run a multi-million-dollar 501(c)3 nonprofit but they can’t do that either.

 

However and for the record, there are a lot of really good horse trainers out there; however, the corrupt, immoral, fraudulent and imbecilic individuals operating within the industry, as well as the ones causing the abhorrent abuses and fraudulent activities, are unfairly stigmatizing the honorable ones. For the record, not all horse trainers are created equally or share the same moralistic values of trust, duty of loyalty, honor and country.

 

Therefore, there aren’t any degrees to obtain, either from an accredited college or a vo-tech school, to vouch for their training. And there aren’t any governmental or 501(c)3 non-profit horse organization licensing requirements that I’m aware of, except the Thoroughbred racing industry, which is designed to regulate a horse trainer within a specific industry, as well as the AQHA Professional Horseman group. Unfortunately, in today’s society and especially in the performance horse industry, the only requirements for an individual desiring to be a professional horse trainer is to hang out his or her shingle and proclaim, “Today, I’m a professional horse trainer.”

 

In an abundance of caution, the investor or newcomer to the industry should also be aware that there’s absolutely no way for an individual to know whether or not an horse trainer has a prior criminal history or an existing criminal record of wrong doing, unless you ask, or the trainer agrees to a background check. Don’t rely on the 501(c)3 nonprofit to assist you in this matter because, to my knowledge, there’s no rule in their rule books to address pre-existing criminal record exclusions, except for “horse abuse.”

 

In my line of work, as a security consultant and risk analyst, I have to undergo an annual background check, including a urine drug screen, fingerprints check and a financial checkup, just to stay within my licensing requirements.  Therefore, my question is, “If I have to undergo those checks to operate within my jurisdiction, why shouldn’t horse trainers have to be subjected to the same scrutiny, especially in lieu of the fact that in some cases, horse trainers operate using millions of dollars of other peoples’ money?”

 

WHAT IS NOT REQUIRED OF TRAINERS?

Individual background checks are essential in maintaining safety standards within certain industries of our society; however, unfortunately it’s not a requirement with performance horse trainers in the reining, cutting or cow horse industry. Equally, it’s also not a requirement for an individual to be subjected to pre-access, random, probable-cause, or post-accident individual drug and alcohol screening requirements.

 

WHAT IS REQUIRED OF TRAINERS?

However, there are governmental licensing and taxing requirements for the individual proclaiming to be a professional horse trainer. More specifically, the professional horse trainer has to adhere to the taxing requirementsof the state he or she operates in, as well as the federal government taxing requirements for both the individual and the business name he or she is operating under. For example, in the event the professional horse trainer’s name is John Doe and he is operating a (dba) “doing business as” or “an assumed name” business, i.e., John Doe Cutting Horses, then, he or she has to register his or her business with the secretary of state that he or she is operating in, as well as the county the business is located in. This is also the same for partnerships.

 

In the absence of legal registration requirements, the owner of the (dba) or “an assumed name” doesn’t have the legal protections provided by the legal requirements or have the state’s authority to operate a business in the state of the domicile; nor does the owner or operator have the legal authority to engage in contracts or enforce contracts while being unregistered, such as filing or maintaining lawsuits within a specific legal jurisdiction. Furthermore, the individual operating an unregistered or non-legal business has to absorb all of the liability for operating an unregistered business, by his or herself.

 

Each state and county has their own licensing requirements, so the best avenue for obtaining this information is through either the Secretary of State’s office or the County Clerk’s office of your county.

 

RESEARCH:

Therefore, your only available option is left up to you to conduct your own research.  For the record, an individual’s failure to register a (dba) “or an assumed name” when required to do so, could result in fines and penalties to the trainer, which also can include incarceration, prosecution and imprisonment upon a guilty verdict.

 

One essential element, which appears to have escaped most 501(c)3 nonprofits, is the absence of enforcement rules to govern the moral behavior of certain individuals in the industry. This has also contributed to the withdrawal of existing members and is perhaps stymying new investors and members. Therefore, this analytical reasoning can be deduced as one of the “direct causes” to the rapid decline of participants and members in the specific performance horse groups.

 

Your Research:

The due-diligence doesn’t end after you locate a prospective training facility and horse trainer. The next step is to gather as much background or intelligence information as you can on the training facility itself, as well as the trainer. This can be done by:

 

  1. Ask for references. An excellent place to start is talking to prior or existing customers to find out what their experiences with a specific trainer have been. This can be done by asking the professional horse trainer for a list of references.

 

  1. Check with the Better Business Bureau. If any complaints were filed against an individual or his or her company over the years, this information will be located with this agency.

 

  1. Check with your state, county or parish licensing agencies for a particular business license requirement. Ascertain whether or not this particular individual’s business is currently registered and up-to-date, if required.

 

  1. Check with the local sheriff’s office or the SPCA to ascertain whether or not your potential trainer has ever had an animal abuse complaint filed against him or her. If so, obtain the judicial disposition of the case.

 

  1. There are two ways to research an individual’s background.1) Do it yourself or hire someone to do it after you obtain a signed release from the trainer, or 2) simply go to the local civil records section of the court house yourself and ask the clerk of court in the civil records section for all public arrest and filed lawsuit records for a specific individual. After all, arrest and lawsuit records are public documents.

 

B – Business Contracts and Insurance Policies

 

         The Business Contract:

 

  1. One of the most vital aspects of any business arrangement in today’s society is reducing the business arrangements to legal and notarized writings. A competent attorney at law should be used to draw-up the particulars for you.

 

  1. NEVERexecute or sign a “hand-written” contractual document with anyone. This type of scribed document is suspect in the first place. You may be signing a scheme to defraud, which has been proven factual in certain filed legal documents and circumstances. After all, you need all the legal protection you can muster-up in the event a dispute arises and you require an attorney at law to enforce a specific performance clause in the contract.

 

  1. A contract keeps everything clean and neat.If a trainer won’t sign a contract, this is a “red flag,” simply walk away and find someone who will.

 

         Business Insurance:

 

  1. Unfortunately in today’s marketplace, we all need insurance to protect our valuable assets. This is especially true with a horse.As my old veterinarian use to say, “A horse is just an accident looking for somewhere to happen.”  Therefore, common sense tells us “We all need to insure our horses while they’re in training.”

 

  1. Common sense also tells us, that the training facility, where the horse is boarded, as well as the trainer, should also have a liability insurance policy in the unlikely event that an incident happens and client damages can be recouped for injury, illness, or even death to a particular horse, while under trainer care, custody and control.

 

  1. As a Risk Manager, I feel two of the most important aspects of any insurance liability policy are: a) having the client named as “additionally insured” on the trainer’s liability policy and b) an “error and omissions” clause. Still another important aspect, is to have the insurance company notify the client in the event of policy cancellation and/or at least (30) days in advance of the cancellation date. This provision can be included in the business contract between the parties.

 

C – Maintaining Contact With Your Horse While It Is In Training:

 

As a Risk Manager, I believe in the practice of, “seeing what you getand what you’re paying for.”  Since, you’re paying the bills, it’s a good practice to make regular trips to see your horse while it’s in training. That way, you can see for yourself exactly how the horse is being trained and how the horse is progressing during training with the trainer. If you aren’t satisfied with the horse’s progression, it’s a good idea to speak to the trainer about it.

 

NEVER, get caught in the trap of being a victim or a life donator to a trainer’s 401 K retirement plan, especially with a horse that’s never going to make it in a specific performance horse discipline in the first place. It is a fact of life that not all horses are destined to become “superstars” no matter what the breeding sheet tells you and no matter how long they are in training. Therefore, your only reliance on this fact is in the opinion of your horse trainer’s credibility. That is, unless you’re an experienced horseman yourself, as well as being a good judge of horseflesh and training methods. So live by this rule: “Trust But Verify.”

 

Making regular visits to the horse-training facility will allow you to judge that for yourself. If your horse trainer objects to your regular visits to ascertain how your horse is being treated and trained, simply find another horse trainer. The plain truth is: Your trainer is going to know in very short order whether your horse is a worthy candidate or not for a specific horse discipline or event in the performance horse industry. It’s not going to take a year or longer.

 

D – Money Earnings Split:

 

NEVER engage in a practice where a horse trainer is allowed to have a winning’s check issued in his or her name and NEVER opt for a deal with the trainer to maintain control of your share of earnings and apply it to your bill balance. The “pitfall” of this accounting method is that you’re relying on the horse trainer to act as your accountant. This is exactly how financial disputes arise in the first place. Be smarter than that!  Essentially, the horse trainer is your “contract laborer,” not an agent for your accountant.  The proper way to handle the “money/split” is for the client to receive the earnings’ check, pay the trainer his or her portion and issue the trainer an IRS form 1099 form at the end of the year for the tax filing purposes of both parties.

 

The client should always pay their board, training and entry fees separate and apart from money-earning check payouts. At the end of the year, it’s the client’s responsibility to issue the IRS form1099 to the trainer, which includes what you paid him or her – not, vice-versa.

 

E – Fraudulent Acts:

 

If at anytime you determine your trainer is “padding” invoices, i.e., adding expenses that aren’t usual and customary, this is a red flag! Immediately address this with your trainer and refuse to pay the bill until it is rectified. If this practice persists after the initial finding, fire the trainer and find someone else. Beware, of a facility that desires to provide you with multiple months’ billing all at once – or even on a quarterly, semi-annual, bi-annual or annual basis. This should raise a serious red flag to the client as it relates to the accuracies of the contents identified as billable services.

 

Another avenue available to the individual, who has been the victim of a fraudulent act, is to consult with law enforcement, rather than a lawyer, for asset recovery. In my opinion, those identified as operating fraudulent business practices should be evicted from the business on a permanent basis.

 

F – Money-back Guarantee:

 

If the trainer you pick is the really “fire-bang wizard” he or she proclaims, then speak to them about a “Money-Back Guarantee” on their training. At my company, I offer a “Money-Back-Guarantee” on all of my business products and services, including horse training. The guarantee states: “If a Client isn’t completely satisfied with my products or services, they’re entitled to a full refund, or a “money-back guarantee.”  If the trainer balks, you might want to find another trainer. To date, I haven’t returned anyone’s money and I’ve trained a lot of horses in my time. This separates the really confident trainers from the wanna-be’s, “so-to-speak.”

 

Overall, the bad trainers in the industry are making the good trainers and the industry suffer. That’s a sad commentary for the industry. In recent years I’ve seen highly publicized increases in animal abuse cases among trainers, as well as an increase in lawsuits, because of business dealings that have gone bad or have been fraudulent.

 

One trainer to avoid is the one who always wants you to engage in some sort of partnership with him or her. This is just another way for them to use your money. From what I can tell, most of those partnerships don’t have happy endings. Therefore, be frugal with your money, diligent in your research and prudent in your business practices and you’ll more than likely be happy in the industry.

 

Another option for guidance is to purchase my book: “THE AMERICAN HORSE INDUSTRY, Avoiding the Pitfalls.”  This book was written to address the many “Pitfalls” the equine enthusiast may encounter in the industry, as well as the ways to avoid them, including the ones in this article.

 

Until Next Time, Keep ‘Em Between the Bridle!

 

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Professional Reined Cow Horse Trainer.
Freelance Writer and Author
Office/Mobile: (985) 630-3500
Email: windrivercompany.rd@gmail.com
Web Site: http://www.richardedennis.net

DIVISIONS:
Wind River Security, Personal Protection, Risk Management, and Analysis.
Wind River Employee Drug and Alcohol Testing Consortium Services.
Wind River Stock Horses – Breeding Training Exhibition and Sales.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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☛ A letter to readers of allaboutcutting.net 8-11-18

Posted by on Aug 11, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, TO THE EDITOR, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 19 comments

August 6, 2018

To: Readers of Allaboutcutting.net

Let me start by saying thank you to Executive Committee for addressing the concerns that my colleagues and I have raised in the past. The changes in personnel that you have made were very positive and much needed. However, the way the Dufurrena fiasco has been handled has been an unbelievable disgrace to the image of the NCHA and horse industry in general!

 

I spent MANY days at the Summer Spectacular visiting with many people, and the talk of trainers, owners, and spectators is how lenient the penalty was for the Dufurrena family! As we all know, the non-pro ownership rules are considered to be some of the most sacred rules of our association, and are not meant to be bent, much less broken. And if broken, the penalty in the past has meant lifetime suspensions. In some of my conversations with fellow directors and committee members, I found it appalling to learn about how our president, Phil Rapp, was strongly lobbying for no sanctions to be brought against the Dufurrenas, and Committee member Kathy Daughn suggested only a 30 day suspension!?!?

REALLY?!?! Thankfully, Frank Diehl was not complicit in this attempt at a miscarriage of justice, and stood his ground for appropriate sanctions. Furthermore, in stead of feeling lucky for the light punishment they received, Ed brazenly ignored the suspension rules by being an “Agent” of horses showing at the Spectacular, and also violated suspension rules by trying to work horses in the practice pen and flag, two separate times, even to the point that required the police asking him to leave!…However, he did get his horse worked…by our president, Phil Rapp. Now, ask yourselves, “How Stupid does that look?”

 

We are in a time where the association desperately needs to convince its members and the public that there is a new commitment to establishing credibility, fairness, and professionalism. Instead, we look like a group of mentally challenged cowboys! But wait, there’s more!…On the website, allaboutcutting.net, our president elect, Ron Pietrafeso, comments that there were no suspension violations involving Ed, and it was no big deal, when in fact, there was a formal complaint filed and signed by a prominent member.

 

These infractions can NOT be ignored or swept under the rug!! If the penalty is not assessed as prescribed in the suspension order, this will be looked upon as a new all-time low, and carry with it a protracted campaign to make our entire membership aware of the many nuances that are at play here. With our president receiving free breedings from the Dufurrenas to Stevie Ray Vaughn, lobbying for no sanctions, maintaining that Brandon and Rieta knew nothing of the fraudulaent ownership (before there were even any hearings), working Ed’s horse for him, and our president elect’s claim that there were no suspension violations when there has been a signed formal complaint in front of witnesses, leads to utter discust in how our association is being run.

 

The above, when taken in totality, clearly demonstrates the effort being made to protect the Dufurennas. It also raises the question as to what Ed Duffurenna has over our governing body. Nonetheless, everyone whom I spoke with, is demanding that the cover up by our “leaders” is stopped, the NCHA enforces their own rules, and the ship is righted! In all my years in the Cutting horse business and as a Director, I never thought I would see our principals crushed, our reputation marred, and our integrity questioned. I am sad to say that I am embarrassed right now to be a member of our association, and I am sickened about our state of affairs. Can someone help?…This is an emergency!!

Name withheld due to retaliation against those who speak the truth!

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☛ Tommy Doty dies in freak auto accident 8-10-18

Posted by on Aug 10, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TOMMY DOTY DIES IN FREAK AUTO ACCIDENT 

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Aug. 10, 2018

It’s always hard to write obituaries; however, it’s extra hard when it is an obituary about a long-time friend. Even though I had moved out of Wise County, I still remember all of Bob and my old friends who still live there.

 

Tommy Doty, Cottondale, Texas, was one of those old friends that are included in my memories of my friends in Wise County. Tommy, at age 65, died in a freak accident on Wednesday, Aug. 8 in Decatur, Texas.

 

According to his friends, he had driven to Decatur to visit a realtor, when he drove down the wrong driveway and over the edge of the road into a pond. Friends pulled him out and tried to give him CPR; however, they couldn’t get any water out of his lungs. When the EMTs arrived, they could not revive him either. An autopsy report is pending on what the actual cause of death was since he had a heart attack a short time ago and went through triple by-pass surgery.

 

Tommy was born on Feb. 8, 1953 to Finis Earl and Louise Estelle (Hicks) Doty in Cleburne, Texas. He worked at Jerry’s Chevrolet for over 10 years in auto sales. He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Cottondale, Texas.

 

He was a longtime member of the National Rifle Association and loved being outdoors hunting and fishing. He also loved to play shuffleboard. He also enjoyed horses, a love that he shared with my husband and me.

 

Tommy was preceded in death by his father Finis Earl Doty. He leaves behind his daughters Jenifer Miller, Northlake, Texas; Stephanie Rowe and husband John of Haslet; his grandchildren Victoria Miller, Hannah Miller and Parker Rowe; his sister Becky Ivey of Burleson; his mother Louise Estelle Doty of Joshua; numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of friends.

 

Tommy’s family will receive friends from 5-7 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 11, at Hawkins Funeral Home at 405 E. Main St., Decatur, Texas. Rev. Charles Pugh will officiate. Pallbearers include Asa Johnson Jr., Richard Kimball, Marshall Hicks, Matt Reynolds, Gary Howell, Marshall Hicks Jr., and John Rowe.

 

Tommy’s funeral will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, 2018 at the First Baptist Church of Cottondale.

 

 

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☛ When is a gift really a gift? 8-7-18

Posted by on Aug 7, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 5 comments

WHEN’S YOUR GIFT, REALLY A GIFT?

 

Which Gifts Are Taxable and What Can Be Excluded?

 

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Aug. 7, 2018

 

Have you given or received a large gift? Do you know what the tax consequences are? You may be subject to the 40% Federal Gift Tax.

 

According to the IRS, a gift is “Any transfer to an individual, either directly or indirectly, where full consideration (measured in money or money’s worth) is not received in return.”

 

The gift tax is the responsibility of the person who gives a gift (i.e., the donor), and the amount of tax due is based on the value of their gift. The person who receives a gift (i.e., the donee) is generally not responsible for paying the gift tax. However, if the donor does not pay the gift tax, the donee may have to pay the tax instead.

 

The gift tax was implemented in order to stop people from dodging the Estate Tax by giving away all of their money before death. While most individuals don’t need to worry about having to pay the gift tax, there are a lot of people who neglect to file the proper paperwork.

 

Seven things you should know about the Federal gift tax:

 

  1. Gifts to Family Members Count. The gift tax and exclusion limit (below) apply whether you are making the gift to a complete stranger, a nephew or your own children. The only person you can give a gift to that is exempt from the gift tax is your spouse. Gifts to your spouse qualify for the marital deduction.

 

  1. There Is an Annual Gift Tax Exclusion.You do not have to pay tax on gifts that are less than the annual exclusion limit, which generally changes every year. Currently, the annual exclusion for 2018 is $15,000 per recipient, up from the previous $14,000 exclusion limit. In other words, you can give up to $15,000 to each of your children this year without having to pay any gift tax. However, anything of value given as a gift and the amount exceeding the exclusion limit is taxable.

 

  1. There Are Also: Educational and Medical Exclusions. Payments that you make on someone’s behalf for qualified tuition or medical expenses do not count toward the annual limit for gift tax purposes. However, your payment(s) must be made directly to a qualifying educational organization or medical care provider in order to qualify for the exclusion. You can also place funds directly into a 529-education savings plan to avoid the gift tax — but note that certain rules apply.

 

  1. You May Need to File a Gift Tax Return (Form 709). In general, you must file a Federal gift tax return (IRS Form 709) if you gave someone more than $15,000 during the 2018 calendar year. In some cases, you are required to file Form 709 even if your gift was below the $15,000 annual exclusion. Note that only individuals are responsible for filing gift tax returns — corporations or trusts that make gifts will pass the filing and payment responsibilities onto their individual stockholders or beneficiaries. Additionally, a married couple cannot file a joint gift tax return.

 

Form 709 is an annual return that is due by April 15 of the year after the gift was made. While this is the same deadline as the individual income tax return (Form 1040), the gift tax return must be filed separately. You can request a 6-month filing extension for your gift tax return with Form 8892 (Application for Extension of Time to File Form 709 and/or Payment of Gift/Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax). Furthermore, if you use Form 4868 (Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return) to obtain a tax extension for your 1040 return, you will automatically receive an extension for Form 709.

 

  1. Married Couples Can Give Twice As Much.Spouses can each give up to $15,000 to the same recipient and still stay within the annual exclusion threshold. Together, a married couple can give $30,000 to each donee without incurring the gift tax. Most tax professionals recommend that married couples give money in the form of two separate checks, and each signed by one of the spouses, to avoid any confusion.

 

  1. Each Donor Has a Lifetime Exemption.This refers to the total amount that an individual can give away during their entire lifetime. If your gift exceeds the $15,000 annual threshold, it must be reported as a taxable gift on Form 709 — however, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll have to pay the gift tax. Instead, you can apply the gift toward your lifetime exclusion from the Federal estate tax.

 

The “basic exclusion” (also known as the “unified credit”) represents both the lifetime gift tax exemption and the estate tax exclusion, signified as a total amount of $5.34 million. The current law allows individuals to give away up to $5.34 million over their lifetime without having to pay gift or estate taxes.

 

But keep in mind; any portion that’s used to avoid the gift tax reduces the amount that will be exempt from estate tax. For example, if you used $2 million of the exemptions to make taxable gifts during your lifetime, you will only be able to exclude $3.34 million from the estate tax. If you surpass the $5.34 million limit, you (or your heirs) will have to pay up to 40% tax.

 

You can give someone $15,000 per year and it won’t affect your lifetime exemption (because gifts below the annual threshold are not considered taxable). If you exceed the $15,000 annual gift tax threshold, you must file Form 709 and report the amount that counts against your lifetime exemption. You should also hold onto any relevant paperwork so your heirs can properly compute the estate tax later.

 

  1. Promotional Gifts Aren’t Considered “Gifts.”If you receive a gift as part of a promotion — for example, a car is given away to every member of the studio audience — then it does not count as a “gift” by IRS standards because the giver is getting something in return, namely self-promotion. This means that the tax burden for a promotional gift falls on the recipient (because it increases their wealth) and is not eligible for the annual gift tax exclusion. Example, if you give a horse as a gift for promotional purposes it may be disqualified under the gift tax law and may not be considered a gift at all, e.g., if the horse is excluded from showing under certain circumstances, and providing it as a gift is your alternative to allow promotion to continue, it may not qualify as a gift under IRS tax law.  Check with your CPA or the IRS.

 

By the same token, if your providing a gift to someone for a “self-serving purpose,e.g., a house – in the event an individual has IRS tax issues, then this may be considered tax evasion and the one who knowingly receive such a gift under this circumstance to avoid a tax lien or seizure may be considered a co-conspirator.  Therefore, its imperative for the recipients of a large gift to be fully cognizant of any and/or all prior motives the donor may have in providing the gift.  It’s especially important for the recipient to have a fully executed and notarized IRS form 709 in his or her possession, and upon taking possession of the gift.  IRS requires a form 709 to be filled out for each gift whose fair market value exceeds the $15,000 exclusion.

 

In closing, please be advised that it’s always prudent business practices to have a thorough understanding what your getting yourself into before you do it.  Always, “Trust, But Verify.”

 

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle”

 

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Richard E. “Rick” Dennis CPP
Managing Member
Freelance writer and author
Office/Mobile: (985) 630-3500
Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com
Web Site: http://www.richardedennis.net

 

Divisions:

 

Wind River Security, Personal Protection, Risk Management and Analysis.

Wind River Employee Drug and Alcohol Testing Consortium Services.Wind River Stock Horses – Breeding, Training, Exhibition, and Sales.

 

 

 

 

 

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