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☛ C. T. Babcock Celebration of Life scheduled 3-24-17

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

C. T. BABCOCK CELEBRATION OF LIFE SCHEDULED

March 24, 2017

The family and friends of Clayton Thomas (CT) Babcock is inviting everyone to attend a Celebration of Life. A memorial has been set for 2:30 pm Sunday, March 26, 2017, in Sanger, TX at the Babcock Ranch, located at 2300 S. Stemmons (on W. side of I-35 between the school and ball park).

In lieu of flowers a trust account has been set up for C.T.’s three children: daughters, Riley Evelyn (17), Ryan Lane (15) of Aubrey, Texas and son, Jaxon Burdette (4) of Gainesville, Texas at the First State Bank of Gainesville. The account is listed as C.T. Babcock Benefit Account, FBO Riley Evelyn, Ryan Lane, and Jaxon Burdette Babcock.

There have been many items donated also for a benefit auction for C.T.’s children as well. They are hoping to be able to coordinated the auction with the Memorial. Please join them for a time of sharing cherished memories from his many treasured friends. There will be  further postings regarding any additional auction information.

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☛ 5 horses/horsemen inducted into AQHA Hall of Fame 3-23-17

Posted by on Mar 23, 2017 in HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

FIVE HORSES AND FIVE HORSEMEN INDUCTED INTO AQHA HALL OF FAME

INDUCTIONS WERE DURING AQHA CONVENTION

Press release from AQHA

March 22, 2017

“Induction into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame is the highest honor possible in our Association, and we welcome these deserving individuals into the Hall of Fame,” said Craig Huffhines, executive vice president of the American Quarter Horse Association.

The horses inducted into the Hall of Fame are the stallions Strawfly Special and Zips Chocolate Chip; the gelding Majestic Scotch; and the mares Casey’s Ladylove and Dashing Phoebe.

The horsemen are AQHA Past President Peter J. Cofrancesco III of Sparta, New Jersey; AQHA executive committee member, the late Dick Monahan of Walla Walla, Washington; Bobby D. Cox of Fort Worth, Texas; the late Marvin Barnes of Ada, Oklahoma; and trainer and horsewoman Sandra Vaughn of Hernando, Florida.

Casey’s Ladylove
The 1961 mare Casey’s Ladylove was the foundation of a barrel racing dynasty. James and Frances Loiseau of Flandreau, South Dakota, bought the mare as a 2-year-old for $720, looking for a horse their children could ride. Later, they started breeding her, selling the colts and keeping the fillies for their broodmare band that led to such barrel racing and rodeo champions as French Flash Hawk, known to barrel racers as “Bozo,” and Frenchmans Guy, a leading sire of barrel-racing horses.

Dashing Phoebe
Dashing Phoebe was a fast runner and the mother of fast runners. The 1983 sorrel mare by Dash For Cash won or placed in 15 of 20 career starts, earning $609,553 on the racetrack. She was a two-time AQHA racing champion filly, earning that honor in 1985 and 1986. She earned her AQHA Supreme Racehorse title in 1987. In 2008, she was named an AQHA Dam of Distinction after producing 15 winners, five stakes winners and the earners of nearly $2.4 million. She was bred by San Jose Cattle Co. of Rockport, Texas. She was euthanized in 2013 and buried on owner Kirk Goodfellow’s Dreams Come True Ranch near Nacogdoches, Texas.

Majestic Scotch
Majestic Scotch was born to lope in a show ring. The 1994 sorrel gelding won 10 world championships in western riding and western pleasure and seven reserve world championships in those classes plus showmanship. Majestic Scotch was bred by Donald and Jean Bangasser of Ackley, Iowa, and was owned by Sharnai Thompson of Pilot Point, Texas. He was shown in classes from halter to hunt seat equitation to trail. He earned a youth AQHA Supreme Champion award and 13 Superiors. He retired from competition in 2012. He was euthanized in 2013, the same year he was inducted into the National Snaffle Bit Association Hall of Fame.

Strawfly Special
Racing stallion Strawfly Special sired two winners of the All American Futurity, Streakin Flyer and Ausual Suspect. The 1987 stallion by Special Effort was bred by Dan and Jolene Urschel of Canadian, Texas, and was owned by Double Bar S Ranch of Moreno Valley, California. Strawfly Special’s offspring earned more than $25 million on the racetrack, and his gelded son, Tailor Fit, was racing world champion in 1999 and 2001. Strawfly Special died in 2004.

Zips Chocolate Chip
Zips Chocolate Chip was a leading sire of award-winning western pleasure horses. The 1985 bay stallion was by Zippo Pine Bar and out of the Custus Jaguar mare Fancy Blue Chip. After a short career in the show ring, earning $18,000 in western pleasure futurities, Zips Chocolate Chip moved to the breeding barn. He was a sire of AQHA and National Snaffle Bit Association champions. He was a model for a Breyer horse. After his breeding career was over, he retired to owner-breeder Ann Myers’ farm. He was euthanized in 2015 due to complications of old age.

Marvin Barnes
The late Marvin Barnes of Ada, Oklahoma, was the owner and trainer of Mr Master Bug, a Supreme racehorse and winner of the All American Futurity, and FL Lady Bug, an American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame inductee. The 50-year cumulative breeder and his late wife, Lela, were fixtures in Oklahoma Quarter Horse racing for more than 50 years. Marvin bred the earners of more than $3.9 million on the track and two world champion horses who earned seven world championships.

Peter J. Cofrancesco III 
Peter J. Cofrancesco III of Sparta, New Jersey, was the first president of the American Quarter Horse Youth Association to become president of AQHA. Cofrancesco grew up showing horses with his family in many aspects of AQHA competition, later specializing in halter. He was elected to the AQHA Executive Committee in 2008 and served as president in 2011-12, focusing on youth involvement.

Bobby D. Cox
An owner and 30-year breeder of American Quarter Horse racehorses, Bobby D. Cox of Fort Worth, Texas, bought his first racehorse in 1976. His homebred mare, All About Ease, won the Ruidoso Futurity in 2004, the same year his homebred stallion, Brimmerton, won the Rainbow Derby and the All American Derby. In 2007, Cox’s homebred Dont Let Down won the All American Derby. In all, horses Cox bred have earned $20 million on the track. Horses Cox has owned have earned $16 million on the racetrack.

Dick Monahan
Racehorse owner and breeder Dick Monahan of Walla Walla, Washington, bought his first race-bred yearlings in 1969. He and his wife, Brenda, raised and raced American Quarter Horses for more than 30 years. He was elected as an AQHA director in 1985. At the time of his death in 2009, Monahan was serving on the AQHA Executive Committee.

Sandra Vaughn
Judge, breeder and AQHA Professional Horsewoman Sandra Vaughn of Hernando, Florida, became a professional trainer at age 19. She has trained horses to multiple champion titles and has ridden horses to seven world championships and 11 reserve world championships. In 2003, she was part of the team that helped Movin Artfully become the Farnam Superhorse. In 1995, the first year the award was given, Vaughn was named the Professional Horsewoman of the Year. She served as an AQHA director from 2006 to 2013.

About the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame
The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum beautifully showcases the hundreds of horses and people who have earned the distinction of becoming part of the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame. To be a part of the Hall of Fame, horses and people must have been outstanding over a period of years in a variety of categories. Inductees are those who have brought exceptional visibility and/or contribution to the American Quarter Horse. Hall of Fame inductees are chosen each year by a selection committee and honored at the annual AQHA Convention.

For more information on the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum, visit www.aqha.com/museum.FIVE

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☛ AQHA Executive Committee named 3-23-17

Posted by on Mar 23, 2017 in EQUI-VOICE, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AQHA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE NAMED 

Release from AQHA
March 22, 2017

AQHA Executive Committee for 2017-2018

The American Quarter Horse Association Executive Committee was elected at the 2017 AQHA Convention in San Antonio. Though AQHA operates primarily upon the decisions of its members through the board of directors, the five-person Executive Committee is responsible for implementing these important decisions and governing AQHA between the annual meetings of the membership and the board.

The AQHA Executive Committee – consisting of a president, first vice president, second vice president and two additional members – is elected each year by the board at the convention. Each member serves a term of one year until the selection of his/her successor. The Executive Committee convenes quarterly at AQHA Headquarters in Amarillo to conduct business and consider all disciplinary matters.

President Ralph Seekins 

Ralph Seekins of Fairbanks, Alaska, has been an AQHA director since 2006 for Washington/Alaska and was elevated to director emeritus in 2016. Seekins has served on the AQHA Marketing and Membership Committee, the Foundation Council and the AQHA Public Policy Committee. Seekins has owned American Quarter Horses since 1995, when his daughters convinced him and his wife, Connie, that they really needed horses. His early horse years were spent in Wyoming and Montana and included ranch work and sprint racing. The family’s first two American Quarter Horses were home-trained and went on to earn AQHA Open Champion titles, Youth Champion titles, Youth Supreme Champion titles and one Youth Versatility award. Over the years, the Seekins family has raised and trained horses that have earned nine AQHA Champion titles, three AQHA Supreme Champion titles and two versatility awards. For more than 15 years, the Seekins family has used their American Quarter Horses in the Helping Hooves therapeutic riding program for riders with disabilities. Ralph and Connie have four children – two sons and two daughters. All the children and their families live in Fairbanks. Aaron Seekins has four sons – Austin, Brandon, Gabe and Zachary – along with one daughter, Shelby. Ben Seekins and his wife, Tamie, have sons Christian and Caleb and daughter Larissa. Daughter Andrea and her husband, Ryan Reinheller, have twin boys, Jakan and Logan, as well as three daughters, Rebecca, Tricia and Sarah. Daughter Beth and her husband, Paul Austin, have three daughters – Emma, Leah and Madison – and son Isaac.

First Vice President Dr. Jim Heird

Dr. Jim Heird was an AQHA director for Colorado in 2009 and became a director for Texas in 2011. He has served on the judges, international and show committees, and on the show council and AQHA Animal Welfare Commission. Dr. Heird was the chairman of the judges committee, 1989-1991; show committee, 2008-2010; international committee, 2013-2015; show council, 2008-2011; and the Animal Welfare Commission, 2011-2015. He was the former extension horse specialist at North Carolina State University, a former instructor/professor at Texas Tech University in Lubbock and held various dean/director positions at Colorado State University for the colleges of agricultural sciences and business and equine sciences program. Dr. Heird is currently executive professor and coordinator of equine initiatives at Texas A&M University. He also holds the Dr. Glenn Blodgett Equine Chair at Texas A&M. Dr. Heird was on the executive committee of the National Western Stock Show and is an ex-officio director of the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo. Dr. Heird is an honorary vice president of the Uruguayan and Argentine Quarter Horse associations. He was an AQHA judge from 1977 to 2015 and has judged 13 AQHA World Championship shows, multiple international championships and two National Reining Horse Association futurities.

He obtained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Tennessee and has a Ph.D. from Texas Tech University. He and his wife, Dr. Eleanor Green, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M, live in College Station.

Second Vice President Stan Weaver
Stan Weaver of Big Sandy, Montana, has been an AQHA director since 2011. He is a former member of the studbook and registration, public policy and Hall of Fame selection committees; Foundation, marketing and ranching councils; and served as chairman of the ranching council. He was also instrumental in developing the AQHA Ranching Heritage Breeders program.

Weaver has bred American Quarter Horses for more than 30 years and has registered more than 1,500 foals with AQHA during that time.

Weaver and his wife, Nancy, began a Quarter Horse production sale in 1996 under Weaver Quarter Horses. Through the production sale, horses from the Weaver Ranch have sold to all 50 states, seven Canadian provinces, South Africa, Australia, Germany and Mexico. Weaver has shown his own horses in cutting, reined cow horse and working cow horse. Weaver is involved with the Montana Quarter Horse Association (past president), Montana Cowboy Hall of Fame, Montana Land & Mineral Owners Association, National Cattleman’s Beef Association, Montana Stockgrowers and the Chouteau County Livestock Protection Association.

Weaver has owned and operated Weaver Cattle Co., a cattle and farming enterprise in North Central Montana for the past 40 years. He also owns and operates Weaver Order Buying, a cattle brokerage firm. Stan and Nancy raised three children on the ranch. All three children and their families continue to work on the ranch, but have also expanded their own ranching and farming interests in the area. KellyAnne and husband Casey Terry have two children, Wyatt and Avery, and live in Lewistown, Montana; David Weaver and wife Stacey live in Bozeman, Montana, with their two children, Hailey and Wesley; and Daniel Weaver, who also lives in Big Sandy, is engaged to Dr. Danielle Lindland. The Weavers received the 1997 Montana Quarter Horse Association Ranch of the Year Award, and Weaver Cattle Co. was recognized as the 2014 Montana State University Family Business of the Year in the business category for operations in existence at least 50 years.

 

Member Butch Wise 

Butch Wise of El Reno, Oklahoma, was named an honorary AQHA vice president in 2015. He was an AQHA director from 2001 to 2015.

He currently serves as the Executive Committee representative on the racing council. Wise is a former member of the studbook and registration, nominations and credentials, and racing committees, and the racing council. He was the chairman of the Hall of Fame committee from 2013 to 2015 and also served as chairman of the racing council. In 2014, he was a member of the AQHA Governance Task Force.

In 2004, Wise received the Oklahoma State University Animal Science School Graduate of Distinction award, and in 2007, he received the AQHA Racing Council Special Recognition Award.

He is a member of the Oklahoma Quarter Horse and Florida Quarter Horse racing associations. Wise owns Stone Chase Stables LLC and is the bloodstock agent and president of Wise Sales Co. Inc. His former career experience includes employment with AQHA, Ridgeleigh Farms Inc., Mel Hatley Farms and Cox Manufacturing. He is currently the manager of the Lazy E Ranch LLC in Guthrie, Oklahoma.

Butch and his wife, Nancy, have two sons and two daughters. Their sons are Clay and Parker Wise, and daughters are Mallory Wise and Ashlie Blair. Blair and her husband, Shawn, have two children, Derek and Lacie.

Member Norm Luba
Norm Luba of Louisville, Kentucky, has been an AQHA life member since 1995 and an AQHA director since 2011. He has served on the AQHA Stud Book and Registration Committee for the past three years. Luba has served on the AQHA Public Policy Committee and the affiliate council.

Luba graduated with his master’s degree in reproductive physiology from the University of Maryland. The former executive director of the Kentucky Horse Council is currently the executive director of the North American Equine Ranching Information Council, president of the Equine Breeding Research and Development Council, and the treasurer of the Animal Welfare Council Inc.

He is the recipient of the Don Henneke Education Impact Award and the American Youth Horse Council Distinguished Service Award.

Luba is an avid competitor with numerous qualifications in trail for the AQHA Select World Championship Show, presented by Adequan® (polysulfated glycosaminoglycan), and the Lucas Oil AQHA World Championship Show, as well as a Superior trail horse achievement. He is a member of the National Snaffle Bit Association, Equine Science Society, Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Managers Club and the Kentucky Quarter Horse Association, where he also served as president.

Norm and his wife, Dr. Lorraine Luba, a veterinarian, have two sons – Christopher and Colin, a former AQHYA president who is married to Catherine.

Read more convention coverage, brought to you by The American Quarter Horse Journal, at www.aqha.com/convention.

 

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 3-21-17

Posted by on Mar 21, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
March 21, 2017

Rodeo world remembers Harry Vold

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The Duke of the Chutes was remembered in grand fashion Monday.

A standing-room only crowd paid tribute to ProRodeo Hall of Fame stock contractor Harry Vold during an emotional memorial service at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame’s courtyard. The memorial service was emceed by veteran ProRodeo announcer Boyd Polhamus.

Vold passed away March 13 at the age of 93 in his sleep at his home in Avondale, Colo.

“This was a great tribute to what a good person he was and that he was a great friend to other people,” said Kirsten Vold, Harry’s daughter, who will continue to run her father’s rodeo company. “This was wonderful. I also think how great it is that all these people get to see each other who normally don’t get to see each other for many years.”

Harry Vold is one of only two stock contractors to provide animals for every National Finals Rodeo, which has been held annually since 1959.

Vold, while operating the Harry Vold Rodeo Company, was chosen PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year 11 times (1982, 1987-96), which is tied for the most selections with Stace Smith ProRodeos.

Jerry Nelson, who runs Frontier Rodeo Company and has been selected PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year the past two years, took a moment Monday to talk about Vold.

“I think we’re all going to miss him,” Nelson said. “We’re going to miss his point of view and miss his tips and just miss talking to him. I loved calling him on the phone and saying, ‘Hey, Harry, what do you think about this? Or what do you think about that?’ I wouldn’t be in the rodeo business if it wasn’t for him selling me those mares like he did years ago; I would call him all the time and talk to him. I’m going to miss him, and there will not be another Harry Vold.”

Jake Vold wins Montgomery with a 90.5

MONTGOMERY, Ala, – Jake Vold nailed the fourth-best bareback ride of the 2017 season and won the Southeastern Livestock Exposition in Montgomery, Ala., with his 90.5-point ride on Frontier Rodeo’s Short Night.

“I try to win every rodeo, but I’ve got a lot of ground to make up now that everything counts, so I need to keep winning,” Vold said. “It’s going to take quite a bit of money this year – every win is key.”

Vold was No. 27 in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings prior to his $4,893 win on Saturday night. He moved up to 17th in the March 20 world standings.

“It feels good, but it’s early in the season you know, so I’m picking away where I can,” Vold said. “But any time you win a rodeo, it’s a good feeling.”

Competition was stiff, but Vold set the bar high with his 90.5 ride, leaving Kaycee Feild in second with an 89.5 and Caleb Bennett in third with an 88.

“They had some rank horses and I drew a good one and just ended up being lucky tonight, I guess,” Vold said.

Vold placed second in the 2016 world standings and tied for second in the average at the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER. He kicked off the new year with an early split-win and an 86.5-point ride at the Dixie National Rodeo in Jackson, Miss., in early February.

Since then, Vold’s been cooling off from his win in the South by taking some time off at his home in Alberta, Canada.

“I come down and rodeo here and there – can’t rodeo 365 days a year – I’m just getting started” Vold said. “We got a little buffalo set up there, and some cows, just ranching around up there and keeping myself busy.”

Up next, the 30-year-old bronc rider is heading to Rodeo Austin (Texas) which is underway until March 25.

“I’m just going to keep doing what I do, enter the big ones and get on the good ones,” Vold said.

Other winners at the $102,018 rodeo were all-around cowboy Nelson Wyatt ($2,038 in tie-down roping and team roping), steer wrestler Matthew Mosseau (3.3 seconds), team ropers Keven Daniel/Justin Yost (4.5 seconds), saddle bronc riders Audy Reed on Frontier Rodeo’s Medicine Woman, Clay Elliott on Frontier Rodeo’s Cross Fire, and Zeke Thurston on Frontier Rodeo’s Popsicle (87.5 points each), tie-down ropers Tyler Milligan and Shane Hanchey (7.8 seconds each), barrel racer Carlee Pierce (15.84 seconds), and bull riders Dustin Bowen on Frontier Rodeo’s Highway Man and Kolby Radley on Frontier Rodeo’s Footloose (89 points each).

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

Longtime Casper (Wyo.) College rodeo coach Tom Parker passed away March 15 of cancer. He was 69. Memorial services for Parker will be held at 1:30 p.m., March 28, 2017, at Highland Park Community Church in the Sanctuary in Casper. Parker was in charge of the Thunderbirds men’s and women’s rodeo teams for more than 25 years. During his time at Casper College, Parker led three women’s teams to the season-ending College National Finals Rodeo. In recent years, however, it was the men’s team that garnered national attention as the red-vested T-Birds won three Central Rocky Mountain Region titles (2011-12, 2015) and qualified for the CNFR at the Casper Events Center five of the past six years.

Juanita (Nita) Mary Humphrey Clark of Redmond, Ore., joined her beloved husband, Gene Clark in Heaven on March 12, 2017. She was 89. On the rodeo circuit, she served as a timer for Beutler Brothers and Beutler & Son. After Gene retired from the PRCA, they produced kids’ rodeos where she was business manager of the Gene Clark Junior Rodeo Association.

The PRCA continues to receive a jolt in mainstream media, thanks to journalist John Branch. The renowned New York Times writer wrote a story for his newspaper on rodeo and the Wright family. The six-page piece ran in The New York Times on March 15, 2015, on PRCA’s world championship saddle bronc riding family. That story was selected for the 2016 Best American Sports Writing anthology and Branch has plans on extending the story on the Wrights into a book. In a Facebook post March 15, Branch said the following: “With luck, the book (still untitled) will be out in a year,” Branch said. “Proud to know the Wrights, an incredible family with a timeless story.” Branch joined The New York Times in 2005 as a sports reporter. He won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2013 for “Snow Fall,” a story about a deadly avalanche in Washington State.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Tom wanted to make sure his kids became good citizens and good contestants. That’s what he strived for. He’ll leave a lasting impression on a lot of kids.”

– University of Wyoming rodeo coach George Howard on Casper College rodeo coach Tom Parker, who passed away March 15. 

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through March 20, 2017

AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville,Texas $50,328
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $66,874
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $46,209
SB: CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah $55,940
TD: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $42,584
BR: Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $48,865
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX   $41,752

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through March 20, 2017

All-around
1 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $50,328
2 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 50,177
3 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 41,852
4 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 40,868
5 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 27,562
6 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 26,572
7 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,232
8 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 23,877
9 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 18,642
10 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 17,521
11 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
12 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 13,557
13 McCoy Profili, Okeechobee, Fla. 12,187
14 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 12,086
15 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
16 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 9,555
17 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 9,298
18 Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta 8,517
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
2 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 42,716
3 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 42,274
4 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
5 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 34,554
6 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 30,469
7 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
8 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 25,150
9 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 24,092
10 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 23,452
11 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 23,380
12 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 19,992
13 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 17,635
14 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 17,351
15 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 16,861
16 Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. 15,661
17 Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta 14,918
18 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 14,792
19 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 14,420
20 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 13,535
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $66,874
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 49,280
3 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 29,272
4 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 26,770
5 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 26,449
6 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 25,785
7 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 22,957
8 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 20,902
9 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 20,153
10 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 19,482
11 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 17,676
12 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 17,581
13 Shane Frey, Duncan, Okla. 17,220
14 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 16,116
15 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 15,904
16 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 15,535
17 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 15,409
18 Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta 14,441
19 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 14,172
20 Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb. 14,105
Team Roping (header)
1 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
2 Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas 39,368
3 Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. 36,378
4 Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. 31,505
5 Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. 25,766
6
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☛ What about wild horses under Trump presidency? 3-19-17

Posted by on Mar 19, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

WHAT DOES TRUMP PRESIDENCY MEAN FOR THE FUTURE OF WILD HORSES?

March 19, 2017

The White House is responding to an I-Team investigation into wild horses. They are protected under federal law as “living symbols” of the nation’s pioneer spirit. But now advocates are worried what the Donald Trump presidency could mean for the future of the mustangs. Dan notes has a long history reporting on this issue and he’s back with the latest at ABC  News (KGO-TV). Click for link to article:

http://abc7news.com/news/i-team-investigates-wild-horse-program-what-does-trump-presidency-mean-for-their-future-/1749188/

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 3-19-17

Posted by on Mar 19, 2017 in RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
March 19, 2017

Harry Vold, Jan. 29, 1924 – March 13, 2017

The rodeo world lost its “Duke of the Chutes.”

ProRodeo Hall of Fame stock contractor Harry Vold passed away March 13. He was 93.

The legendary Vold passed away in his sleep at his home in Avondale, Colo.

“My dad enjoyed rodeo more than anyone I know,” said Kirsten Vold, Harry’s daughter. “The PRCA meant a lot to him. He dedicated his life to the sport of rodeo and he believed in everything those four letters (PRCA) stood for. He passed away in his sleep like every good cowboy should.”

A memorial service will take place at 1 p.m. (MT) March 20 at the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colo., 101 Pro Rodeo Drive.

Vold, while operating the Harry Vold Rodeo Company, was chosen PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year 11 times (1982, 1987-96), which is tied for the most selections with Stace Smith ProRodeos.

Vold is one of only two stock contractors to provide animals for every National Finals Rodeo, which has been held annually since 1959.

“He’s made a lot of friends and done a lot of things in rodeo,” Kirsten said. “I would say he had no regrets with how he spent his life because there’s nothing he would have rather have done than spend it in a rodeo arena on the back of a black horse, and he got to do that for many, many years.”

Vold was born Jan. 29, 1924, in Edmonton, Alberta. Vold tried his hand at bareback and saddle bronc riding, but he never had any ambition to be a full-time rodeo cowboy.

His interest was in the horse business and auctioneering, then in rodeo. His early exposure to stock contracting came with some of the greatest names in the business – Leo Cremer, Lynn Beutler and Harry Knight.

Vold’s breeding program, primarily with bucking horses, has led to seven animals being voted top bucking stock of the year – two of which have been repeat winners. Over the years, Vold stock has appeared at every major rodeo in the United States, and several in Canada.

“My philosophy is to put on the very best quality rodeo with top stock and top cowboys –  wholesome family entertainment,” Harry once said.

Vold was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1994 and was named Legend of ProRodeo in 2009.

“I would hope people would remember that he was a true, loyal and honest friend,” said Kirsten, who will continue to run her father’s rodeo company.

Frost heats up in Florida

ARCADIA, Fla. – Joe Frost traveled 2,285 miles to compete at the Arcadia All-Fla Championship Rodeo, and it was worth the long flight.

The 24-year-old Randlett, Utah, bull rider covered Frontier Rodeo’s Back Down for 86 points to win the title and earn a check for $4,258.

“I try to never think about the expenses or traveling, because that’s just part of the job we do,” Frost said. “In my mind, it doesn’t matter if I’m rodeoing in my back yard or getting on a plane for four hours – I make it just about bull riding and not stress about money, because that doesn’t do you any good.”

He didn’t need to stress about his performance in Arcadia. In fact, the ride he made on Back Down not only led to a big check, but also a bit of revenge.

“I got bucked off that bull in Spanish Fork (Utah) last year, and he bucked my brother Josh off at a college rodeo,” Frost said. “So, that was a good one to have again and get him rode – I got some revenge for the family.

“He’s a bull who’s better out of the right-hand delivery, and he’s really fast and a guy has to be moving and hustling or he’ll get ahead of you in a hurry. Winning this makes me feel better that I wasted a chance at $4-5,000 the first time I saw that bull.”

This was Frost’s second trip to Arcadia, as he earned a sixth-place check at the rodeo last year.

“I really like that rodeo – they have a good crowd and (eight-time World Champion) Donnie Gay is helping announce, and he always adds a little flavor to it,” Frost said. “It’s exciting when you make a good ride with him rambling in the background.”

Surprisingly, this is Frost’s first victory of the 2017 season. Still, he entered the weekend sixth in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings on the strength of plenty of second- and third-place finishes.

“It’s about consistency and being able to ride every different kind of bull you face,” he said. “I’d rather be second at three rodeos than first at one and buck off at the other two. The name of the game is winning as much money as you can, but it’s nice to get a win now and then.”

Frost, who has qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER the past three years, missed three months of action last April through June with a blood clot. He’s finished in the top six of the world each of the past three seasons, and is now hoping to have a season full of health.

“I’d like to think the sky is the limit, but I’ve never been able to go a full year, and have always had injuries,” he said. “But my goal is to be the world champion, and to stay fresh and go to as many rodeos as I can.”

Other winners at the $100,266 rodeo were all-around cowboy Nelson Wyatt ($2,759 in tie-down roping and team roping), bareback rider Orin Larsen (87 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Times Up), steer wrestler Kyle Irwin (4.2 seconds), team ropers Nelson Wyatt/Brad Culpepper (5.5 seconds), saddle bronc rider Clay Elliott (87.5 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Memphis King), tie-down roper Zeb Chapman (9.8 seconds) and barrel racer Taylor Carver (17.31 seconds).

  • Steer wrestler Damian Padilla put himself atop the PRCA season leader board with his 2.9-second winning run at the Parada del Sol rodeo in Scottsdale, Ariz. (March 101-2). The steer wrestling world record – with a barrier – is 2.4 seconds shared by four men. Padilla did establish a new Parada del Sol rodeo record, shattering the time of 3.5 seconds shared by Rodney Towe, (1978); Les Shepperson (2009) and Dean Gorsuch (2010)
  • .The biggest movement in the season leaderboard came in steer roping. Bryce Davis stopped the clock at 8.4 seconds in the fourth round of the M.M. Fisher Jr. Memorial Steer Roping (March 11-12) in Andrews, Texas, which was the second fastest time recorded in 2017. Trevor Brazile had an 8.5-second time in the fourth round at the same event, leaving him No. 3 on the leaderboard. Brazile also won the first round at the M.M. Fisher Jr. Memorial Steer Roping with a 9.1-second run, which is tied for fifth-best this season with Rocky Patterson’s 9.1-second time in Bellville, Texas on Oct. 15 at the Austin County Fair & Rodeo.

Mize captures his inaugural Xtreme Bulls Division 1 win

FORT MOHAVE, Ariz. – Fear obviously wasn’t a factor for rookie Tristan Mize Saturday night.

Competing against a talented field, Mize came out a champion with a score of 173 points in the two-head average at the Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event.

It was Mize’s first career Xtreme Bulls win, in only his second attempt.

“This feels really good,” said Mize, 20. “There were a lot of very good riders here (March 11), and this is my biggest win so far in my PRCA career. I get nervous now and then, and if you don’t get nervous, I don’t think you’re human, but I was able to relax and do what I needed to do.”

Mize was especially happy about the $10,381 he earned for his performance.

“That money will help me out a lot,” Mize said. “This is a big win for me and gives me a good confidence boost.”

Mize, of Bryan, Texas, set the stage for his victory with an 85-point ride on Bar T Rodeo’s Starfish.

“That was a nice bull, and it felt great to get one rode in the long round,” Mize said.

Mize’s ride left him in a tie for second place with Kurtis Turner, and just one point behind Jeffrey Ramagos, who registered his 86-point score on Championship Pro Rodeo’s Glory.

In the finals, things clicked again for Mize as he had an 88-point trip on Honeycutt Rodeo’s Bragging Rights.

Mize just edged reigning PRCA/Resistol Rookie of the Year Roscoe Jarboe by 1.5 points to win the average.

Jarboe qualified for the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER, finishing ninth in the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings.

He won the short round in Fort Mohave with a 90.5-point ride on Bar T Rodeo’s Broken Arrow. That tied him for the third-highest scored bull ride this season with Brennon Eldred’s 90.5-point ride on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Muley Madness in Tucson, Ariz.

“I just wanted to stay calm and have fun and get my job done,” Mize said. “I had never seen that bull (Bragging Rights) before, and I didn’t know much about him, but he ended up being really good. He went around to the left and kicked real hard and bucked good. When I made the whistle, I was pretty excited because I knew I was going to get a decent score.”

Although Mize is only a rookie, he’s not lacking any confidence.

“I don’t think there’s any reason of doing anything unless you’re the best at it,” he said. “I ride bulls because I love doing this, and I want to be the best. I love the thrill and the rush of riding bulls, and being able to ride something that weighs that much more than you do, and that moves so fast.”

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com will be broadcasting the Southeastern Livestock Exposition from Montgomery, Ala., March 16-18. The rodeo begins at 7 p.m. (CT) March 16 and March 17, and there are two performances March 18, at 2 and 7 p.m.

The Reno (Nev.) Rodeo Foundation is warning the public about scammers using its name to ask for donations. Clara Andriola, executive director of the Reno Rodeo Foundation, spoke to the PRCA media department about the issue March 9. “It’s come to our attention that there may be scammers using the Reno Rodeo Foundation name to fraudulently solicit donations,” Andriola said. “We want the community to know that the Foundation does not, and will not, make calls asking for donations. We do appreciate donations, and the money that’s donated goes to the kids in our community, but to be secure about making a donation we use a secure website, or they can contact me by phone or email.” The secure website address is www.renorodeofoundation.org. To get in touch with Andriola by phone, call 775.322.9875 or contact her via email at info@renorodeofoundation.org .

This past weekend’s Arcadia All-Fla Championship Rodeo was the last in its historic facility, as construction is underway for a new $7 million, 7,796-seat covered arena. This is the third time the 89-year-old Arcadia rodeo has moved since it began. “We have outgrown our current location,” said Don Hall, president of the Arcadia Rodeo Committee. “It’s a good problem to have.” The new arena can fit about 1,600 more spectators than the current one and will have two barns with 100 stalls. The long-term plan is to expand to 300 stalls, Hall said. In addition to more seating, the individual seats will be twice as wide. Before, seats were nine inches wide, and the new bleachers will allow for 18 inches of space per person.

A pair of Fort Hays (Kan.) State University (FHSU) students have been awarded scholarships courtesy of the Phillipsburg Rodeo Association. Kaitlyn Dinges, Ness City, Kan., and Wyatt Livingston, Oxford, Neb., are recipients of $500 scholarships towards their education at Fort Hays State … Officials are deciding whether to replace the nearly century-old rodeo arena grandstands at the Roundup Grounds Sports Complex in Belle Fourche, S.D., and how to pay for such a project. Mayor Gloria Landphere says work began on a master plan for the complex earlier this year. She says initial talks should focus on the financial aspects of the $1.2 million projected cost of replacing the grandstands at the city-owned complex. Landphere told the city council during a meeting last month that officials need to talk about replacing the bleachers because of the insurance liability, the Black Hills Pioneer reported. “We’re going to have to address some type of a plan because of the age of these (grandstands),” Landphere said. Council members discussed the possibility of using the city’s hospitality tax to fund the project.

Councilwoman Jessica Carmichael noted that other projects also need attention within the complex. The complex consists of soccer and baseball fields that require repair and maintenance, in addition to the rodeo arena. The mayor said she would put together a list of projects on the plan to discuss at a later meeting. The 98th annual Black Hills Roundup will take place in Belle Fourche, S.D., June 30-July 4.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Harry just had a way with people. He was spectacular to be around. He was humble, and great to talk to, and he was a unique man. It’s a big loss to our rodeo industry”

– Seven-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier Josh Peek on his good friend Harry Vold who passed away Monday.

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through March 13, 2017

AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville,Texas $50,328
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $64,453
TR-1: Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. $46,209
TR-2: Corey Petska, Marana, Ariz. $46,209
SB: CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah $55,545
TD: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $42,584
BR: Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. $48,865
SR: Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX   $41,752

2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through March 13, 2017

All-around
1 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas $50,328
2 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 50,177
3 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 41,852
4 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 40,868
5 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 27,562
6 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 26,572
7 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 24,232
8 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 23,711
9 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 17,011
10 John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, Pa. 16,644
11 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 14,458
12 Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. 14,286
13 Justin Thigpen, Waycross, Ga. 13,348
14 Cash Myers, Athens, Texas 11,654
15 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 9,555
16 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 9,298
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $56,846
2 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 42,274
3 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 40,720
4 Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho 36,850
5 Chad Rutherford, Lake Charles, La. 34,554
6 Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. 28,819
7 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 28,186
8 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 25,150
9 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 23,452
10 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 22,891
11 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 22,377
12 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 19,992
13 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 17,635
14 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 17,351
15 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 16,861
16 Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. 14,843
17 Wyatt Bloom, Bend, Ore. 13,535
18 Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho 13,111
19 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 12,952
20 Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. 12,649
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $64,453
2 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 48,707
3 Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif. 29,272
4 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 26,770
5 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 26,449
6 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 25,785
7 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 22,957
8 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 20,902
9 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 20,153
10 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 19,482
11 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 17,676
12 Chance Howard, Cedarville, Ark. 17,476
13 Shane Frey, Duncan, Okla. 17,220
14 Blaine Jones, Templeton, Calif. 15,904
15 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 15,167
16 Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La. 14,761
17 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 14,567
18 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 14,172
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