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☛ Avoiding pitfalls of cell-phone fraud 8-27-17

Posted by on Aug 27, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AVOIDING THE PITFALLS OF CELL-PHONE FRAUD

 

By Rick Dennis
Aug. 27, 2017

INTERNET SALES AND FRAUD
As with any industry, bad actors seem to gravitate to the cell-phone industry, aspiring to make an easy buck off of unsuspecting buyers and sellers on the Internet. Such is the same in the cell-phone market. Recently, I decided to switch carriers and sell my Iphone 7 on the open market, via, Ebay. After registering with this Internet buying-and-selling giant for the first time, I acquired an ID number, listed my sale item and provided the Internet marketer with my PayPal code or PayPal.me/windrivercompanyllc.

 

Once I received my confirmation from Ebay, I started receiving a host of bids on my cell phone. Immediately recognizing a problem, I contacted Ebay customer service and informed them my cell phone wasn’t listed as a bidding item but instead was listed as a fixed-price item. When I went back into my account, I could clearly see my item was listed as a fixed-price item and not a bidding item. I again contacted Ebay and informed them of their computer error. For the record, Ebay assured me this malfunction would be immediately corrected. After a period of time, I decided to explore one of the bidder’s outrageous price offers to see what would happen.

 

My cell phone was listed for a fixed price and the bidder was offering me twice the fixed-price amount. In fact, the bidder’s price was more than the price of a new Iphone 7 of the same type and kind. The curious nature of the affair is that the bidder immediately asked me to “private message” her at a specific telephone number. Once contacted, the bidder requested me to provide her with my PayPal payment email address instead of using my direct link I previously provided to Ebay.

 

Finding this odd, I provided the bidder with my current PayPal email address that would link directly into my PayPal account. For the record, I use my PayPal account for a myriad of selling options to include, but not limited to, book sales, used horse training equipment sales, etc. Therefore, I’m perfectly familiar with the ins and outs of how PayPal operates, including transferring funds directly into my business bank account.

 

After providing this bidder with the payment information, I received an authentic-looking email from what I thought was Ebay/PayPal,, stating the bidder had actually deposited funds into my PayPal account, except the alleged email stated “a hold was on my funds until after receiving shipment confirmation.” The email even contained a link to contact the bidder and provide the tracking number of my Iphone.

 

As a professional Risk Analyst and Risk Manager, there are several factors in this saga which brought my suspicion to the point that this was a fraudulent sale, such as:

 

1)         The bidders offering price for the cell phone was more than I paid for it and more than the bidder could purchase a new one for.

 

2)         In all of the sales I performed through PayPal, I’ve never had any of my funds restricted.

 

3)         The “bidder/payee’s name” and “ship to/recipient’s name” were different, as well as being located in two different states.

 

4)         The payee’s shipping instructions were immediate or the same morning of the email contact.

 

To verify my suspicions, I contacted PayPal Corporate Security and informed them of the facts of the impending sale along with furnishing them a copy of the email, which contained the exact authentic information and logos PayPal uses. After a period of time, PayPal contacted me and informed me the email was bogus or a fraud and it had been generated from a fraudulent web site. PayPal thanked me for providing them with this information. Afterwards, I contacted Ebay and informed them of my findings; however, the customer service representative wasn’t as respectful or cooperative.

 Click for Pay Pal document>>

 

Essentially, after checking my Ebay page, she informed me that I would be responsible for the listed-price payout percentage as well as the percentage associated with the final value price of the item sold. In fact, the fraudulent bidder had marked my item “sold,” when in reality the item wasn’t sold. Afterwards, an exchange of philosophy transpired between Ebay and myself. For the record, I informed Ebay of the built-in flaws of their system in protecting unsuspecting sellers of this lurking fraud.

 

I also explained to Ebay that “in my opinion,” Ebay was subject to culpable liability in this matter simply due to the manner in which their system was set up, allowing buyer and seller to have mutual contact through the Ebay site; thereby, enabling an individual to perpetuate a fraud. Also, “in my opinion,” Ebay should have a system setup whereby the entire sale – from initiation and conclusion – should be controlled by Ebay. The irony of this entire situation is:

 

1)         I received an email from Ebay informing me my sale item was sold when in fact it wasn’t, including the price paid being beyond my asking price.

 

2)         After the fact, another email from Ebay informed me not to do business with a certain individual and my account may have been compromised.

 

3)         Still another email from Ebay, informed me the proposed buyer is suspect, hasn’t registered with Ebay and will no longer be allowed to buy items on Ebay. Imagine that.

 

To top it off, I received a computer-generated bill from Ebay detailing my costs for the sale of my Iphone – which never transpired. All in all, I never suspected I would be performing a Risk Analysis on Internet selling as well as the inherent risks involved in selling items on the Internet. Lesson learned: Again, “in my opinion,” the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation should open investigations on “Crimes Against Persons,” involving the massive fraud obviously inherent in Internet selling.

 

In conclusion, an Internet-selling company found with inadequate security should be prosecuted and fined. One can only imagine the amount of property and funds that are stolen each year by individuals making a living trolling Internet selling sites, looking for quick deals from unsuspecting sellers. I would bet the amount of stolen property would mount in the millions of dollars. The fact is, it’s very easy for an individual operating in another country, or perhaps living in a tent in the desert, to initiate a scam operation.

 

Therefore, educate yourself before you engage in Internet selling. One noted fact is: “The safety and security of Internet selling begins with companies such as Ebay and Amazon, period.”

Click for Ebay response1>>

Click for Ebay scan 2>>

Click for Ebay scan 3>>

INTERNET SELLING PRECAUTIONS
If your intent is to sell items on the Internet, familiarize yourself with the rules and regulations of the Internet-selling provider. If an individual tries to isolate you off of the Internet selling site – don’t do it. And don’t provide any information to an individual who is not listed on the seller’s site. Check with seller. If an individual posing as a buyer attempts to isolate you and requests personal or other information, immediately contact the seller site’s customer service department.

 

In this matter, it ended on a somewhat happy note: I still have my Iphone; however, I did lose a sale due to an attempted fraudulent transaction. On a good note, I acquired enough information to hopefully enlighten and educate the reading audience of www.allaboutcutting.com, with information that will prevent an individual from being a victim and losing their property.

 

“Until Next Time, Keep ‘Em Between The Bridle!”

 

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis

Managing Member

Office/Mopbile: (985) 630-3500

Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com

Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com

 

 

 

 

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 8-22-17

Posted by on Aug 22, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
Aug. 22, 2017

Mize rides to narrow victory in Caldwell

CALDWELL, Idaho – Bull rider Tristan Mize was rather jubilant following his win at the fabled Caldwell (Idaho) Night Rodeo, but he knows the end-goal is in sight. He has his eyes on a bigger prize.

Despite Cole Melancon posting a 90-point bull ride earlier in the evening, Mize managed to notch a clutch 90.5-point ride during Saturday night’s final round, scoring the 20-year-old cowboy $7,501 for his winning efforts.

“I’m feeling really good,” Mize said. “I had a really good week, and I really needed to win at Caldwell. I had a good bull and I knew that if I rode him I’d probably get the win, so it worked out.”

Mize drew Powder River Rodeo’s Savage Mood in the concluding performance at Caldwell, and according to the Texan rookie, he put up a heck of a fight.

“He was a really good bull,” Mize said. “He turned back right and then a little left, and he had me out of position after the first jump, but I was able to get back in position. After that, it worked out well. He was a fun bull.”

After such a narrow win in a crowded crop of talented bull riders, Mize understood the task in front of him. Even so, he knew the opportunity that Savage Mood presented couldn’t be for naught.

“I knew it was going to be a tough bull riding field, but I knew that I had a bull to beat 90 on,” Mize said.

Mize, who entered the week ranked second among bull riders in the PRCA Resistol Rookie Standings, has had his fair share of impressive wins early in his career. While being named champion at the Livermore (Calif.) Rodeo earlier this season, Mize had not yet recorded a bull ride equivalent to 90 points or more. At Caldwell, he wanted that to change.

“It’s kind of funny, because I’d been talking about how I was going to beat 90 all week for the first time,” he said. “Luckily, I was 90.5 for the first time.”

Hailing from Bryan, Texas, Mize has constantly displayed an advanced prowess for a first-timer. Currently slotted 21st in the Aug. 21 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings with $58,343, Mize is thrilled for the stretch run as the year comes to a close.

“I’m excited,” Mize said. “I’m ready to be at the NFR at the end of the year, that’s for sure. I’ve always dreamed about going to the NFR. It’s all I ever think about. I want it so bad.”

With his first qualification certainly not out of reach, expect the young gun to unholster the chance.

“I can’t wait to be there. Hopefully I win a couple more big ones.”

Other winners at the $292,843 rodeo were bareback rider Clayton Biglow (172 points on two head), steer wrestler Rowdy Parrot (11.3 seconds on two head), team ropers Clay Smith/Paul Eaves and Tyler Wade/Billie Jack Saebens (15.5 seconds on two head each), saddle bronc rider Jacobs Crawley (173.5 points on two head), tie-down roper Jake Pratt (26.8 seconds on three head), and barrel racer Stevi Hillman (50.69 seconds on three runs).

  • Hansen moves atop leaderboard: Bull rider Jordan Hansen had a 92-point ride on Kesler Rodeo’s Excessive Force to win the Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo Aug. 19 in Kalispell, Mont. Hansen’s ride put him atop the PRCA’s season leaderboard. Hansen earned $2,558 for his performance. Tanner Girletz was second at Kalispell with a 90-point ride. Kesler Rodeo’s Excessive Force, the bull Hansen rode for 92 last weekend, is the only bull to make two 90-plus-point rides this season; he took Zane Lambert on a 90-point ride in Dawson Creek, British Columbia, at the beginning of this month.
  • More bull riding tidbits: Only four rodeos have had more than one 90-point ride this season: San Antonio had three, while Caldwell, Idaho; Wapello, Iowa; and Kalispell, Mont., each had two. Two riders have made four 90-point rides: Sage Kimzey and Ty Wallace. Roscoe Jarboe has three; Brennon Eldred and Cole Melancon have two each.
  • Steer roper Garr has huge performance: Brian Garr had a memorable outing at the Badlands Circuit Finals Steer Roping in Deadwood, S.D., (Aug. 19). Garr won four of the five rounds in Deadwood, as well as the average. The Belle Fourche, S.D., cowboy earned $5,796.
  • Cowboys make push: As the regular season winds down, cowboys are frantically going to rodeos to try and earn money to finish in the Top 15 in the regular-season standings and qualify for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER. This past week, there were 30 rodeos with $1.78 million up for grabs.

2. AGCO announces Sowing Good Deeds initiative

DULUTH, Ga. – AGCO Corporation has announced the launch of Sowing Good Deeds – an initiative to raise awareness of the efforts of rodeo committees throughout North America and the positive impact they have in their local communities.

AGCO, a proud sponsor of the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association (PRCA) through its Hesston® and Massey Ferguson® brands, will award one Massey Ferguson tractor valued at more than $35,000 to a deserving rodeo committee at PRCA’s Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER in Las Vegas, Nev., this December.

“Throughout North America, there are rodeo committees that work tirelessly in their local communities for good,” said Meghann McNally, AGCO’s director of marketing in North America. “By creating the Sowing Good Deeds initiative, we want to highlight the great work that they do and assist their efforts by providing a piece of equipment that is crucial to their year-round success – at both their local rodeos as well as in their fields. The rodeo is an iconic event that unites communities across North America, and at AGCO, we are proud to be a part of that local fabric.”

“Our 600-plus PRCA rodeos raise millions of dollars for their local charities across the country,” said PRCA Commissioner Karl Stressman. “The AGCO Sowing Good Deeds program allows us to recognize and reward committees for their charitable efforts. We’re proud of the PRCA rodeo committees, volunteers and rodeo athletes who all contribute to make a difference for local communities and their citizens.”

The application deadline for the Sowing Good Deeds initiative is Sept. 15, at 11:59 p.m. (ET).

Interested rodeo committees can submit their application online by visiting www.hesston.com/sowinggooddeeds. There is a limit of one application per rodeo committee.

A committee of judges selected by Hesston, Massey Ferguson and the PRCA will evaluate the applicants based on three key criteria: community impact, innovation and adversity. These criteria highlight work that improves the local community, exemplifies the spirit of entrepreneurship within the nonprofit sector and has initiated change or responded to significant challenges to build a stronger, more sustainable organization.

The winning rodeo committee will be recognized at the PRCA Awards Banquet on Dec. 6 and on Hesston night at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER on Dec. 9.

For more information, visit www.hesston.com/sowinggooddeeds.

3. News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com and Rural Rodeo will simulcast the announcing at the Gem State Stampede Xtreme Bulls Division 2 event at 6:30 p.m. (MT) in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, Aug. 24 and at the Gem State Stampede Aug. 25-27. The rodeo begins at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 25-26, and at 12:30 p.m. Aug. 27… “Floating Horses: the life of Casey Tibbs,” a documentary about the late rodeo legend and Ramona (Calif.) resident, was among films shown during the Oceanside (Calif.) Film Festival. Many people who knew Tibbs were panel guests at the film’s California premiere on Aug. 12 at the Sunshine Brooks Theater. Sandra Tibbs – Casey’s widow – and Dave Osborne, who was a ranch hand for him during his San Diego Country Estates years, both were on the panel, which also included Casey Tibbs’ daughter, Beth Donley, Western actor Joel McCrea’s grandson Wyatt McCrea, and film composer Ryan Waczek. “I’m glad that the people on the West Coast can see it,” Sandra Tibbs said of the California premiere of the 94-minute full feature documentary in an Aug. 14 article in The San Diego Union-Tribune. Executive producer Justin Koehler was unable to attend the Oceanside International Film Festival due to the Aug. 7 birth of his daughter, but wanted to submit “Floating Horses” to a film festival close to Ramona. Casey Tibbs passed on Jan. 28, 1990, at the age of 60. Tibbs was inducted into the inaugural class of the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1979 in Colorado Springs, Colo., after winning nine world championships (saddle bronc riding, 1949, 1951-54, 1959; bareback riding, 1951; all-around, 1951, 1955). A statue of Tibbs stands outside the ProRodeo Hall of Fame … William Lee (Bill) Lake, a former PRCA calf roper, steer wrestler, team roper, and judge, passed away on July 22 in Phoenix, Ariz. He was 74. Lake joined the Rodeo Cowboys Association in 1965. He was mentored not only by his father, Harold, but also by Oral Zumwalt – who partnered with Harold in the Zumwalt and Lake Rodeo Company – and Bill Lawrence who later became a partner in the rodeo company. Lake never forgot the role those three men played in his success as a horseman and rodeo contestant … The Umatilla County Fair (Aug. 8-12) and Farm-City Pro Rodeo (Aug. 9-12) were held earlier this month in Hermiston, Ore., and fans were able to see the new venue at the facility. At the fair’s kickoff dinner, Rep. Greg Smith announced a personal $10,000 donation. Rodeo board member Dennis Barnett said in an Aug. 17 article in the East Oregonian there have been a few additional donations to the nonprofit Friends of the Fair and Rodeo, prompted by people seeing the Eastern Oregon Trade and Event Center for themselves at the fair and rodeo. Barnett said donations to the Friends of the Fair and Rodeo, which is a separate entity from EOTEC, can be used with EOTEC’s blessing for fair and rodeo-related improvements like adding irrigation and grass to the overflow parking area to keep down the dust next year. Barnett said donors can specify if they want the money to go toward the Umatilla County Fair or Farm-City Pro Rodeo, or they can leave it up to a joint committee to determine where the money is most needed … The National Western Stock Show in Denver brought the rodeo to Children’s Hospital Colorado on Aug. 17 in Aurora. Activities included the stick horse rodeo and barrel racing, as well as meeting rodeo queens and Howdy, the National Western Stock Show mascot.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I always knew I was going to rodeo, basically for a living, since I kind of started … It ain’t gonna be easy, but there’s plenty of guys that do it.”

– Tie-down roper Bo Pickett, the 20-year-old nephew of ProRodeo Hall of Famer Dee Pickett, told the Idaho Statesmen Aug. 18 about pursuing a ProRodeo career.

4. Next Up

Aug. 21           Days of ’76 Stand Alone Steer Roping, Deadwood, S.D., continues

Aug. 22           Eastern Montana Fair Rodeo, Miles City, Mont., begins

Aug. 22           Horse Heaven Round-Up, Kennewick, Wash., begins

Aug. 23           Kitsap Stampede Xtreme Bulls Division 2, Bremerton, Wash.

Aug. 23           Doxa Extreme Rodeo, Alex, Okla., begins

Aug. 23           Will Rogers Memorial Rodeo, Vinita, Okla., begins

Aug. 24           Gem State Stampede Xtreme Bulls Division 2, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Aug. 24           Great Plains Stampede Rodeo, Altus, Okla., begins

Aug. 24           Kitsap Stampede, Bremerton, Wash., begins

Aug. 24           Range Days Rodeo, Rapid City, S.D., begins

Aug. 24           Golden Spike Rodeo, Tremonton, Utah, begins

Aug. 25           Cattleman Days Rodeo, Ashland, Mo., begins

Aug. 25           Salmon (Idaho) Stampede PRCA Rodeo, begins

Aug. 25           Gem State Stampede, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, begins

Aug. 25           Oregon Trail Rodeo, Hastings, Neb., begins

Aug. 25           Okotoks (Alberta) ProRodeo begins

Aug. 25           Colorado State Fair & Rodeo, Pueblo, Colo., begins

Aug. 26           Painted Pony Championship Rodeo, Lake Luzerne, N.Y.

Aug. 26           Mesquite (Texas) ProRodeo Series begins

Aug. 26           Cowtown Rodeo, Woodstown Pilesgrove, N.J.

Aug. 26           Rancho Mission Viejo Rodeo, San Juan Capistrano, Calif.

5. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Aug. 21, 2017

AA: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $176, 624
BB: Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $174,659
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $144,520
TR-1: Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. $115,014
TR-2: Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil $115,014
SB: Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $166,512
TD: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $156,853
BR: Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Texas $212,241
SR: Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas $78,706

6. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Aug. 21, 2017

 

All-around
1 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $176,624
2 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 135,040
3 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 132,547
4 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 125,145
5 Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudent, Brazil 121,692
6 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. 110,936
7 Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. 110,422
8 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 107,313
9 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 98,802
10 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 97,022
11 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 81,544
12 Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah 77,038
13 Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla. 75,671
14 Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla. 66,050
15 Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta 54,803
16 Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah 54,763
17 Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb. 52,360
18 Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M. 48,258
19 Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif. 48,120
20 Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. 46,711
Bareback Riding
1 Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $174,659
2 Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. 124,766
3 Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev. 104,098
4 Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif. 103,792
5 J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo. 96,729
6 Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah 91,122
7 Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas 88,078
8 Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas 85,333
9 Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas 82,644
10 R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif. 77,641
11 Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta 75,205
12 Evan Jayne, Marseille, France 72,736
13 Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba 71,843
14 Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D. 70,001
15 Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. 68,060
16 Justin Miller, Billings, Mont. 66,153
17 Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah 63,804
18 Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore. 58,494
19 Tanner Phipps, Dalton, Ga. 57,523
20 Jessy Davis, Power, Mont. 55,499
Steer Wrestling
1 Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont. $144,520
2 Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. 104,716
3 Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La. 100,556
4 Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho 90,142
5 Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. 84,672
6 Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta 84,036
7 Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah 80,199
8 Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. 74,632
9 Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta 71,325
10 Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. 70,703
11 Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala. 65,301
12 Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis. 62,897
13 J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn. 62,829
14 Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas 60,669
15 Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. 59,284
16 Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La. 56,631
17 Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas 55,565
18 Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. 54,151
19 Will Lummus, West Point, Miss. 54,145
20 Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev. 52,996
Team Roping (header)
1 Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga. $115,014
2 Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz. 107,739
3 Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas 94,014
4 Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla. 92,883
5 Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla. 79,064
6 Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 76,540
7 Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif. 75,025
8 Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D. 74,691
9 Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore. 72,523
10 Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont. 69,351
11 Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz. 65,823
12 Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore. 65,573
13 Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta 63,120
14 Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla. 62,230
15 Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont. 59,964
16 Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn. 58,279
17 Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss. 56,054
18 Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas 53,197
19 Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz. 50,762
20 Hayes Smith, Central Point, Ore. 50,066
Team Roping (heeler)
1 Junior Nogueira, Presidente Pruden, Brazile $115,014
2 Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz. 107,739
3 Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo. 97,872
4 Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. 95,200
5 Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla. 87,205
6 Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan. 85,485
7 Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas 77,238
8 Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 76,540
9 Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas 76,021
10 Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash. 72,523
11 Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla. 69,814
12 Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. 66,970
13 Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan. 64,212
14 Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta 63,120
15 Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev. 59,964
16 Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas 59,445
17 Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif. 49,447
18 John Robertson, Polson, Mont. 46,066
19 Cody Doescher, Oklahoma CIty, Okla. 45,975
20 Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont. 42,599
Saddle Bronc Riding
1 Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas $166,512
2 Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta 144,551
3 Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La. 106,369
4 Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta 102,619
5 Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla. 87,335
6 CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah 84,230
7 Jake Wright, Milford, Utah 83,613
8 Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas 75,946
9 Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta 73,282
10 Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M. 72,686
11 Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La. 71,581
12 Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah 70,351
13 Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo. 70,204
14 Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah 65,766
15 Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas 65,497
16 Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb. 55,112
17 Cody Wright, Milford, Utah 53,160
18 Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah 52,432
19 Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas 50,044
20 Tyrell J. Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont. 49,718
Tie-down Roping
1 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas $156,853
2 Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas 121,499
3 Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La. 102,148
4 Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas 97,322
5 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 89,624
6 Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas 87,382
7 Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas 85,297
8 Randall Carlisle, Athens, La. 80,052
9 Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan. 79,228
10 J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah 76,965
11 Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla. 76,055
12 Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas 74,293
13 Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho 69,569
14 Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla. 68,234
15 Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas 67,665
16 Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas 67,198
17 Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas 67,094
18 Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan. 65,647
19 Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas 64,906
20 Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas 57,707
Steer Roping
1 Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas $78,706
2 Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas 72,815
3 Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. 70,530
4 Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas 66,097
5 J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas 49,084
6 John Bland, Turkey, Texas 47,827
7 Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas 46,468
8 JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas 45,432
9 Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. 42,307
10 Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas 41,023
11 Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. 40,287
12 Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas 39,959
13 Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas 39,314
14 Shay Good, Midland, Texas 36,787
15 Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo. 35,937
16 J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla. 35,544
17 Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D. 31,754
18 Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas 31,171
19 Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas 30,845
20 Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M. 25,620
Bull Riding
1 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $212,241
2 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 170,986
3 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. 126,644
4 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 96,808
5 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 95,736
6 Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah 94,766
7 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 87,643
8 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 85,281
9 Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas 84,480
10 Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif. 84,027
11 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 79,764
12 Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta 78,336
13 Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla. 74,017
14 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 73,363
15 Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas 71,522
16 Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas 66,142
17 Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 63,051
18 Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah 60,230
19 Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla. 60,190
20 Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash. 58,435

*2017 Barrel Racing (Aug. 21, 2017)

Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.

1 Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas $246,482
2 Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas 166,132
3 Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore. 115,832
4 Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas 115,201
5 Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif. 113,705
6 Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash. 106,721
7 Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas 94,279
8 Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas 90,030
9 Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D. 89,759
10 Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas 82,763
11 Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas 79,803
12 Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas 73,935
13 Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas 69,960
14 Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M. 67,982
15 Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo. 61,266
16 Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas 58,551
17 Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark. 58,234
18 Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas 56,303
19 Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz. 55,542
20 Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas 54,975
7. 2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings

     Unofficial through Aug. 21, 2017

 

1 Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $58,153
2 Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo. 40,596
3 Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. 31,170
4 Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho 26,855
5 Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho 22,440
6 Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla. 20,609
7 Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas 20,167
8 Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho 19,279
9 Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa 18,503
10 Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas 18,231
11 Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas 16,992
12 Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas 16,567
13 Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas 16,287
14 Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla. 16,269
15 Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah 15,204
16 Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas 14,142
17 Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas 13,433
18 Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah 12,820
19 Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla. 12,079
20 Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas 11,734
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☛ Kountz pleads guilty for animal cruelty 8-18-17

Posted by on Aug 18, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE LAWSUITS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

DAYLE KOUNTZ  PLEADS GUILTY FOR ANIMAL CRUELTY CASE

 

OWNER OF BOZEMAN, MONTANA’S  KOUNTZ ARENA CHANGES PLEA

Aug. 18, 2017

Dayle Kountz, right, owner of Kountz Arena, appearing in Gallatin County Court. Photo by Bozeman Chronicle.

According to a Aug. 17 article in the Bozeman Chronicle, Dayle Kountz, the owner of Kountz Arena in Bozeman, Montana, is set to change his plea of animal cruelty to a felony  charge of animal cruelty for failing to provide appropriate medical care for his stallion Young Doc Bar. Kountz and his lawyer are deciding whether he will plead guilty or no contest to the charge but he will be entering a plea next Wednesday, Aug. 23, in Gallatin County District Court before Butte-Silver Bow Judge Brad Newman, whois overseeing the case.

The plea comes as part of an agreement with the Gallatin County Attorney’s Office, which will dismiss the additional counts of aggravated animal cruelty and felony animal cruelty that Kountz has been charged with. The state will recommend Kountz receive a two-year suspended sentence to the Montana Department of Corrections and serve no jail time. However, his lawyer said they will be asking for a deferred sentence.

Kountz, who had previously been convicted of a misdemeanor cruelty to animals in Gallatin County in 1999, was charged at a March 2015 horse show at his Kountz Arena in Bozeman  when it was reported that a horse was missing a foot, lying in his own feces and suffering in a small stall. The Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office responded, finding the horse named Young Doc Bar – as well as a calf suffering from seizures

Kountz told investigators that the horse was injured in December 2014 when the horse accidentally got his leg caught in a corral panel. He said he sought medical advice and followed treatment recommended by a vet. The animals were euthanized and the sheriff’s office closed the case with a warning; however, several witnesses who were at the arena on the day of the horse show came forward and provided photographs and information the sheriffs officer further investigation.

Therefore, about two months after the show, the county attorney’s office charged Kountz, who sought to have his upcoming trial moved out of Gallatin County, claiming that “inflammatory” editorial and social media attention to the case made it so Kountz would not receive a fair trial. Several news outlets, multiple TV stations, a Facebook page called “Justice for Young Doc Bar” was created and a petition Change.org lobbied for Kountz to be prosecuted; however, Judge Newman denied the request, saying that while news and social media accounts of the case had been “extensive,” it didn’t show widespread community prejudice against Kountz.

However, a felony charge is a very serious crime. A person who commits a felony, upon conviction in a court of law, is known as a convicted felon or a convict. In a move seen as a big win for animal rights activists, the FBI has added animal cruelty to its list of Class A felonies, alongside homicide and arson.

Cases of animal cruelty fall into four categories — neglect; intentional abuse and torture; organized abuse, such as cock and dog fighting; and sexual abuse of animals — and the FBi is now monitoring them as it does other serious crimes. Also, starting Jan. 1, 2016, data is being entered into the National Incident-Based Reporting System or NIBRS, the public database the FBI uses to keep a record of national crimes.

It is felt that the FBI’s decision will not only be a way to stop cases of animal abuse but also can help to identify people who might commit violent acts. According to the Christian Science Monitor, psychological studies show that nearly 70 percent of violent criminals began by abusing animals and keeping statistics on such cases can help law enforcement track down high-risk demographics and areas.

In some states, those committing multiple felonies can be double billed or double-sentenced and can receive 20-40 years in prison.

Some of the information in this article came from the Bozeman Chronicle.

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☛ A cheaper way to talk 8-18-17

Posted by on Aug 18, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 5 comments

A CHEAPER WAY TO TALK!

 

ALL CELL PHONES ARE NOT THE SAME

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
August 18, 2017

As a businessman, the most important tools of my primary trade are: 1) my vehicle, 2) my computer and 3) my cell phone. The same goes for horse owners and trainers. Over time cell phone communication has evolved from objects that looked like bricks to the phones we use today, which are easily placed in our shirt pockets.

However, along with evolution also evolved the costs of these mobile devices as well as the cost for their service capability with a cell carrier’s ever-increasing costs. Cell phone bills have graduated over time to eliminate cost-per-minute values, roaming charges, including connection fees and opting instead for monthly charges comprised of packages or bundled costs.

Today, cell phones basically are either Android or Apple I-phones. These phones come in different sizes – from small to large – and have enough functions and storage to be considered a handheld computer that can talk. As the old adage goes, “There’s an app for that.”

Then there are the basic models that only allow texting and talking. However, the most advanced models can be used to type and send an email or a complete letter using the correct word processor app.

Whether your using the voice control to find directions to a local eating place or directions for an over-the-country trip, the modern cell phone will do it all.  However, along with modern advances also comes advances in pricing.  The cell phone industry has evolved into a comfortable multi-billion dollar industry.  Today, cell phones are used to talk on, take photographs and video, wake up to, remind us when to go to sleep, keep track of important meetings, conduct business with clients, count our steps, stay in touch with our families, contact emergency facilities in case we need them as well as ordering and purchasing items over the internet.

In fact, “do-it-all” cell phones have virtually replaced our land-line phones, our cameras, our video recorders and in some cases our computers. Technological engineering advances have produced cell phones with state-of-the-art video recording devices and photographic documentation that rivals the best-known cameras. Essentially, cell phones have become indispensable in our daily lives.

THE TECHNOLOGY:

Today, there are four main cell phone carriers operating in the United States: Verizon Wireless, AT&T Communications, Sprint and T-Mobile. The first three companies are American owned with T-Mobile being owned by Deutsche Telekom.

However, the leading cell phone systems in use today are: Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), a channel-access method used by various radio communications technologies.  CDMA is an example of multiple access, where several transmitters can send information simultaneously over a single communication channel. This allows several users to share a band of frequencies (bandwidth). To permit this without undue interference between the users, CDMA employs spread-spectrum technology and a special coding scheme, where each transmitter is assigned a code.  CDMA is used as the access method in many mobile phone standards.  IS95 also called “CDMAONE”, and its 3G evolution CDMA2000 are often referred to as CDMA, which is also used to control the speed of data transmission. Verizon Wireless and Sprint use the CDMA cell-phone technology.

Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) is the second technology in use today by cell phone carriers in the United States.  GSM is a digital mobile telephony system that is widely used in Europe and other parts of the world. GSM uses a variation of time division multiple access (TDMA) and is the most widely used of the three digital wireless telephony technologies (TDMA), (GSM), and (CDMA). AT&T and T-Mobile utilize this technology.

In my research I determined that unless you purchase an unlocked version of your favorite phone it will not work on a dual basis, e.g., each specific carrier has the cell phone manufacturer engineers design a phone that works on either the (CDMA) of (GSM) system.

However, unlocked cell phones are generally designed to work on either system which negates having to purchase a new cell phone when you change a carrier for better pricing or reception requirements. A cell phone that I’ve used and is designed to work on either cellular concept, from inception, is Motorola. In fact the cell phone provider advertises their unlocked phones will work on AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile. I Interviewed representatives from AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile and determined there were two specific reasons major carries sold cell phones locked and specific to their carrier brand.

1) It provides the carrier with a market base that’s hard to get rid of unless the owner of the cell phone decides to take an enormous loss in trading in or selling their existing cell phone, which guarantees the carrier recurring revenue and 2) the carrier maintains control of the cell phone and its owner if the phone is financed by the carrier for a specific amount of time. Essentially, you’re being punished for moving your service. The main drawback to some cell phone users is: Unlocked cell phones require a cash purchase versus purchasing a cell phone from a major carrier using the locked-and financed-basis, which is essentially signing a contract with the carrier until the phone is paid off.

Recently, I ran into an issue with my cell carrier whom I’ve been with since cell phones were invented and marketed.  After a long debate, I decided to shop my existing phone on the open carrier market. To my surprise, my phone would only work on AT&T and perhaps T-Mobile and Straight Talk Wireless which is sold at Walmart.  I also learned my existing cell phone I purchased on December 4, 2016 for $769 from AT&T was only worth $375 in August 2017.

After counseling with several cell phone retailers and wholesalers, I learned the cell phone is one of the fastest depreciating electronic devices you can purchase.  My (I-Phone 7) 128 GB (gigabyte) phone actually depreciated $53 per month to date. Therefore, in order to leave my carrier I would take a huge loss on my cell phone and perhaps the coverages at T-Mobile and Straight Talk which is exclusive to Walmart and utilizes the TracFone System that wouldn’t provide me with adequate coverage since I’m a national and international traveler.

ON THE HUNT FOR A CHEAPER ALTERNATIVE

So off to Walmart I went in search of a cheaper alternative.  Upon arrival I was enlightened by the vast array of cell phones carried by this marketing giant.

In the electronics department was a vast assortment of cell phones, represented by a myriad of cell phone carriers.  One item in particular brought my attention.  Walmart has joined forces with Verizon in their pre-paid division. A pre-paid phone is one whereby the monthly bill is paid in advance using either a pre-paid card or a direct withdrawal from your bank account.

I needed some phones and services to experiment with so I purchased an I-Phone 5S 16 GB on the Walmart-Verizon Network and an LG Model on the Straight Talk Network. The curious nature of this affair is that I learned the Walmart Straight Talk System buys air time from all of the major carriers and sells it to the consumer at a reduced cost, along with matching phones.

A number of newer unlocked phones, such as the Moto G (4th Gen) are universal and; therefore, compatible with all major U.S. carriers in addition to most overseas carriers. You can choose almost any carrier or plan and all you need is a SIM card. Common U.S. carriers include: Verizon, Sprint, AT&T, T-Mobile, Cricket Wireless, AT&T Go-Phone and TracFone

THE EXPERIMENT BEGINS

After arriving home, I began the process of installing each phone’s SIM (Subscriber Identity Module)  card and charging the phone. Once the phone was completely charged I followed the activation directions and acquired my telephone numbers. The I-Phone 5S cost me $49.95 and the LG Model cost $79.00.  Afterwards, I carried both cell phones in addition to my $769 I-Phone on the AT&T Network.

For the record, the I-Phone 5S was on the Verizon-Walmart circuit or the (CDMA) system and the LG was on the AT&T-Walmart System or the (GSM).  For three weeks now I’ve been carrying the phones to compare how well they functioned against each other. The following is the outcome of the cell phone trials.

1) The Verizon Walmart I-Phone 5S functioned flawlessly.  If my AT&T I-Phone 7 had one bar of coverage, my I-Phone 5S had three (3) to four (4) bars. The camera is excellent in this little phone. The video worked excellent. Reception was outstanding with no dead zones and data speeds were lighting fast.  If I kept this phone it would cost me $40 per month for a 3 + 1 GB of data, exclusively at Walmart.  In some cases this phone had service when the AT&T I-Phone didn’t.  All of the individuals I spoke with on this phone said the sound was excellent.

2) The Walmart LG Straight Talk phone functioned flawlessly.  It’s comparable to the AT&T I-Phone 7, except when the former didn’t have coverage the LG did.  This little phone’s camera and video functioned flawlessly and there were no dead zones during testing.  If I kept this phone my cell bill would be $45 per month for unlimited talk, text and data.

FINAL ANALYSIS

In the end, if you’re not looking for the latest cell phone, there are cheaper alternatives out there besides the ones mentioned in this article. If you’re like me and you use your cell phone for your business, one of these models may suit you perfectly. That way, if you break it or lose it, you won’t be out a month’s mortgage payment on your house.

Along with this analysis, I also performed an analysis of my insurance for my phone through AT&T.  I was very unhappy to discover the replacement cost would be a $225 out-of-pocket deductible expense.  For that amount I can buy 5 I-Phone 5S’s from Walmart.  As with all I-Phones, this little model comes with fully functioning I-Cloud storage.  The same picture storage is available for either phone free of charge from Google Photos.

In my final analysis, I learned that cell coverage is predicated on cell-tower availability. I also learned the main cause of malfunctions with cell carriers is horrible customer service.

So if you’re in the horse business and you constantly are in need of a replaced, broken or wore-out phone, there are cheaper alternatives out there that function fine.

Since then I have returned to Walmart and purchased their Verizon-Walmart I-Phone 32 GB SE to use as a spare phone until I can sell my AT&T I-Phone 7.  Porting your existing cell number is easy – except if your phone is locked due to owing the carrier money.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle”

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis

Managing Member

 

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☛ QHN parent company selling 11 newspapers-8-15-17

Posted by on Aug 15, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

QUARTER HORSE NEWS PARENT COMPANY SELLING 11 PAPERS TO GATEHOUSE MEDIA

 

QUARTER HORSE NEWS NOT LISTED AS SELLING

Press release from Morris Communications
Aug. 15, 2017

In a press release dated Aug. 9, 2017, Morris Communications, the parent company of Quarter Horse News, announced they were selling 11 of its daily and non-daily newspaper holdings including its Lubbock, Texas-based commercial printing operation (West Texas Printing) and other related publications to GateHouse Media, Inc. The sale is expected to be finalized on Oct. 2, 2017. The company will focus on lifestyle and niche publications, broadband operations, property development and new business. Quarter Horse News is not listed as a publication they will be selling.

The daily newspapers they are offerings theFlorida Times-Union in Jacksonville, Fla.; the St.Augustine (Fla.) Record; The Savanah (Ga.) Morning News; TheAugusta (Ga.) Chronicle; The Athens (Ga.) Banner-Herald; Lubbock (Texas) Avalanche-Journal; Amarillo (Texas Globe-News; the Topeka (Kan.) Capital Journal; Log Cabin Democrat (Conway, Ark.); Juneau (Alaska) Empire Peninsula Clarion (Kenai, Alaska) and Homer (Alaska) News.

William S. “Billy” Morris III,Chairman of Morris Communications, will remain as publisher of the Augusta Chronicle and will oversee editorial-page policy for the three Morris newspapers in Georgia.

Morris said, “Every newspaper company in America is battling trends and redirected advertising dollars necessary for newspapers to be part of a large newspaper group to build and maintain the necessary resources to compete.”

William S.Morris IV, president and CEO of Morris Communications said, “As the company transitions to the third generation of leadership, we are enthusiastic about our plans to diversify our business holdings with print and digital communications, broadband and real estate development.

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☛ PRCA Rodeo News 8-15-17

Posted by on Aug 15, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA RODEO NEWS

Courtesy PRCA
Aug. 15, 2017

Reeves finds success in Lovington

LOVINGTON, N.M. – Matt Reeves is no stranger to winning the Lea County Fair & PRCA Rodeo.
The veteran steer wrestler most recently won it in 2009 when he split the title with Lee Graves.
He was victorious again Aug. 12 when he won the crown outright with a 7.9-second time in the two-head average.
“I had to come home and regroup because we were having trouble getting them lined out,” Reeves said. “A guy named Quinn Campbell – I talked to him about going to the Northwest (as his hazer) – and he came over (Aug. 8) and by the end of practice things were going good.”
With Campbell hazing for him, Reeves placed third in the first round with a 4.1-second time and earned $1,250 in Lawton, Okla., early last week.
Things went even better for Reeves in Lovington. The Cross Plains, Texas, cowboy placed third in the first round with a 3.8-second run and followed that up with a 4.1-second effort in the second round to clinch the average. Reeves made both of his runs on Aug. 10.
“Quinn served two more of them up at Lovington,” Reeves said. “I got three looks – all the same (at Lawton and Lovington), and I don’t remember the last time that happened for me. I had one that was running too far and I blew the barrier out and was 3.8 and my second one I was aggressive and made a good run (at 4.1 seconds). Having a guy on my team like Quinn was good because he gave me consistent looks.”
When Reeves departed Jake McClure Arena in Lovington, he earned $3,666. That visit to the pay window was key for Reeves. He was 14th in the Aug. 9 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings with $53,688, and now has he’s moved up to 13th with $58,604.
“It feels really good to win this rodeo again,” Reeves said.
This season, Reeves has been using a new full-time horse, 9-year-old Roy.
“I rode him some here and there last year, and at Jackson (Miss., in February) I just decided I was going to ride him and win on him,” Reeves said. “I finished second there and he has gotten better and better and better. I’ve been happy with how he has done.”
Reeves is a six-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2007, 2009-2010, 2012-13, 2016). A year ago, he tied his career-best season, placing second in the world standings – something he also did in 2013.
With the end of the 2017 season looming, Reeves has a simple plan to get back to Las Vegas for the seventh time.
“Win baby, and keep it going,” Reeves said. “You have to keep running them.”
Although Reeves is 39, he has no plans of leaving the rodeo arena any time soon.
“I still like getting in the pickup (truck),” he said. “When I don’t want to get in the pickup anymore I will do something else. It pays the bills and I enjoy it. I love rodeo.”
Other winners at the $212,147 rodeo were bareback rider Orin Larsen (90 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Scarlets Web), team ropers Jake Orman/Will Woodfin (10.0 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Heith DeMoss (84.5 points on Big Rafter Rodeo’s Who Knows), tie-down roper Cory Solomon (16.3 seconds on two head), barrel racer Taci Bettis (17.28 seconds), steer roper Rocky Patterson (33.2 seconds on three head) and bull rider Koby Radley (87 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Half Nuts).
  • Evans takes over steer roping lead: Steer roper Jason Evans is the new leader atop the Aug. 14 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings with $67,798. He has a $1,613 lead over last week’s leader Chet Herren, and a $2,337 edge over Vin Fisher, who is third in the standings.
  • Sherwood/Woodard win un Missoula: Matt Sherwood/Walt Woodard won the Missoula (Mont.) Stampede Aug. 12 with a 3.6-second time, which tied them for the third-fastest run of the season with Jake Orman/Tyler Domingue. Sherwood and Woodard, who have won two world championships in their careers with different partners, earned $2,641 for their performance. Sherwood moved up to 17th in the latest header world standings and Woodard is 23rd in the heeler standings.
  • Jarrett moves up: Tie-down roper Ryan Jarrett won $7,402 this past week, highlighted by winning two rodeos. He’s 12th in the latest world standings with $68,125. Jarrett moved from 17th to 12th thanks to winning the Sand & Sage Roundup in Lamar, Colo., for $1,486, and winning the Dick Stull Memorial Rodeo in Sterling, Colo., for $1,404; he also picked up $4,038 at the Lea County Fair & PRCA Rodeo in Lovington, N.M., and $474 at the Yuma (Colo.) County Fair & Rodeo.

2. Will Smith scores Sikeston victory

SIKESTON, Mo. – Saddle bronc rider Will Smith was psyched to win the Sikeston (Mo.) Jaycee Bootheel Rodeo, as he nailed an 85.5-point ride on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s Spade on Aug. 12, good for a $4,385 boost for both the WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings as well as the RAM Great Lakes Circuit Standings.
“I’d been on that horse four or five times and I used to be scared of him because he bucked me off harder than most,” Smith said, adding that he finally made a successful ride on Spade a couple of years ago at the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo.
“I got more confidence on him this time,” the 28-year-old cowboy said. “That horse is scary in the chute – sometimes he’ll rear at the post, but then he just jumps and kicks down the pen and he’s the one you want to have. I was telling my travel partner, Hardy Braden, that I’d take some Spade, and he called the next day and said, ‘you got him,’ and I was excited.”
Before winning Sikeston, the South Carolina-native-turned-Missouri cowboy was 10th in the Great Lakes Circuit with $3,670 – not too far behind the current leader, Wade Sundell’s $8,659. Now, he’s No. 2 and only $3,986 away from the top.
“I’ve been coming here since 2009, and had never won it and it’s exciting – my friend, Ty Atchison, always wore the buckle from it,” Smith said.
Smith was 50th in the world standings prior to winning Sikeston thanks to picking up $8,960 for placing second in the average at the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo in Denver on Jan. 22; then $2,285 for placing second at the Heart of the North Rodeo in Spooner, Wis., on July 8. Now he’s sitting at 41st.
Sikeston marks Smith’s second win of the 2017 season, having split the win with Ross Griffin at the 41st Annual Isanti (Minn.) Firefighters Rodeo on July 8.
“The Fourth went all right – I got $5,000, and that’s good for me,” Smith said.
The 2017 season has been a difficult one outside of the arena for Smith as his grandfather fell ill and then passed away recently. Smith had taken some time off from rodeoing to spend time with his grandpa and family. The Sikeston rodeo was his first time competing since then.
“I’m going to get my circuit count in and get set up for next year so I can get to those big indoor rodeos,” Smith said, adding that he’s aiming for a shot at the San Antonio rodeo.
“I’m going to circuit bust and just stay here in the Great Lakes and try to beat that old boy (Wade) Sundell in the circuit,” Smith said.
Other winners at the $157,152 rodeo were all-around cowboy Ryle Smith ($3,465 in tie-down roping and steer wrestling), bareback rider Clayton Biglow (87 points on Pickett Rodeo’s First Place), steer wrestler Sean Mulligan (8.9 seconds on two head), team ropers Jacob Dragenhart/Zack Mabry (10.7 seconds on two head), tie-down ropers Cade Swor and Cimarron Boardman (16.4 seconds on two head each), barrel racer Lacinda Rose (16.27 seconds), and bull rider Clayton Foltyn (87 points on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s News Flash).

3. Foss is boss at Hermiston

HERMISTON, Ore. – Bareback rider Austin Foss impressed in front of his fellow Oregonians, as the 25-year-old managed to take advantage of his one and only ride at the Farm-City Pro Rodeo.
Foss, on top of Calgary Stampede’s Special Delivery, scored a sterling 89 points, notching the Redmond, Ore., native a win and a bounty of $5,534.
“It’s great to be close to home and be able to get on that good of a horse,” Foss said. “It’s more of a confidence booster, especially in a guy’s backyard.”
Foss outlasted fellow bareback riders such as Orin Larsen and Kaycee Feild en route to his first win at the Farm-City Pro Rodeo. Having drawn a quality bucking horse like Special Delivery, Foss had an idea he would have a chance to score some points in the one-go format.
“(Special Delivery) was pretty good,” Foss said. “I’ve been on that horse about two or three different times, and I’ve always done really good on him. He’s definitely one to have if the right guy gets him.”
The 2012 Bareback Riding Rookie of the Year, Foss is eyeing his fourth career Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER qualification. Having trekked to Las Vegas three times in the past four years, Foss, currently ranked 19th in the WEATHER GUARD™ PRCA World Standings, fully understands the ramifications of bringing home more than $5,500 at this time of the year.
“It’s really important,” he said. “Everybody is making that final push. We’ve only got 50-something days left, and everything is an opportunity for a guy to capitalize on. So, you got to really take advantage.
“When you can draw that good and put together a good ride, it’s all a blessing. I’m really happy.”
With his focus on the Thomas & Mack Center, Foss is committed to ensuring that his December plans include a road trip to Sin City.
“That’s everything. That’s the ultimate goal every year,” he said. “You don’t want what you’re doing to be in vain, so to say. You want to make the NFR every year, and really try as long as you can.
“It’s not over yet. There’s still a lot of rodeoing to go, so anything can happen.”
Other winners at the $194,425 rodeo were all-around cowboyClayton Hass ($1,760 in steer wrestling and team roping), steer wrestler Chason Floyd (7.5 seconds on two head), team ropers Hayes Smith/Justin Davis (9.6 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Jake Wright (88.5 points on Calgary Stampede’s Weekend Departure), tie-down roper Tyler Milligan (16.7 seconds on two head), barrel racer Kimmie Wall (17.20 seconds) and bull rider Toby Collins (87 points on Kesler Rodeo’s Goosebumps).
Wright set an arena record at the Farm-City Rodeo in Hermiston, Ore., with his 88.5-point ride on Calgary Stampede’s Weekend Departure.

4. Two-time world champion Garrison passes away 

HERMISTON, Ore. – Junior James Garrison, who won a pair of PRCA tie-down world championships in 1966 and 1970, passed away Aug. 12. He was 79.
Garrison, who was a native of Marlow, Okla., qualified for the National Finals Rodeo 10 times (1964-71, 1975 and 1977). He was the NFR average winner in 1968 and placed second in the average in 1966 and 1977.
Garrison edged ProRodeo Hall of Famer Dean Oliver by $96 for the 1966 world championship. Oliver broke ropes on his last two calves and Garrison helped his own cause by winning Round 7 with a 10.8-second time. Garrison finished the season with $24,304.
“I was lucky…awful lucky, Dean’s the greatest,” Garrison said after he won the ’66 title.
In 1970, Garrison earned $24,311 to earn his 1970 gold buckle.
“If you’re doing something you really like, then you’re always on vacation,” Garrison said. “If you’re on vacation, you don’t want it to end,” Garrison said in a March 22, 1995, issue of the ProRodeo Sports News.
In 1967, Garrison tied a calf in 7.5 seconds in Evergreen, Colo., which was the record for several years.
When Garrison was 17, he was driving a bread truck and didn’t know the slightest thing about rodeo.
Garrison’s high school girlfriend invited him to family get-togethers where they would hold goat ropings. Inspired to prove his friends wrong, Garrison began roping goats.
“I guess it was the laughing (by his friends) that started it all,” Garrison said in 1977 PRCA media guide. “I said I’d show them and learn.”
Learning to rope proved to be a wise decision for Garrison. By age 26, he qualified for his first NFR.
After his rodeo career, Garrison trained and sold roping horses and Thoroughbreds.
Garrison is survived by two daughters, Jeana and Jamie Kay.

5. Stock contractor Art Alsbaugh passes away

HERMISTON, Ore. – Art Alsbaugh, longtime PRCA stock contractor and husband of Linda Alsbaugh, 2015 PRCA Secretary of the Year, passed away Aug. 13 in Pueblo, Colo., of cancer. He was 76.
Alsbaugh was the son of ProRodeo Hall of Fame stock contractor Walt Alsbaugh. Walt was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1990 and passed away in September of 1992 at age 73.
Art and Linda were married 49 years. Art and his dad owned Alsbaugh Rodeo from 1972-94, and he and Linda started Cross Triangle Rodeo, which they owned from 1973-94. They sold them both in 1994.
The last rodeo Art and Linda worked together was the Alamosa (Colo.) Round-Up June 22-23. He was a judge at that rodeo. Art bought his Rodeo Cowboys Association card in 1965, then in 1972 went into partnership with his father. He completed in calf roping and steer wrestling.
Art worked as a pickup man, timed-event chute boss, flank man, judge and stock contractor in the rodeo world.
Art and Linda were the 2012 recipients of the Donita Barnes Lifetime Achievement Award. Information about a celebration of Art’s life is pending and will be posted on www.prorodeo.com when it is confirmed. Cards for Linda may be mailed to 14107 County Road 6 South, Alamosa CO 81101.
6. News & Notes from the rodeo trail
ProRodeoLive.com will be broadcasting the Gooding (Idaho) ProRodeo at 8 p.m. (MT) Aug. 17-19 The Wrangler NFR National Anthem Contest sign-up form is now available at www.nfrsocialarena.com/national_anthem.The final day to submit entries is Aug. 25. This year, there is only one open category, available to all age groups … The Steamboat Springs (Colo.) ProRodeo Series concluded Aug. 12. The champions of the 2017 summer series were all-around cowboy Cole Dorenkamp, bareback rider Ben Hall, saddle bronc rider Tyler Turco, bull rider Brett Custer, permit bull rider Cordell Curtis, tie-down roper Cy Eames, steer wrestler Beau Clark, team roping header Clayton Van Aken, team roping heeler Cullen Teller and barrel racer Stacey Smallwood.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “He loved rodeo and I know he would want to be remembered for his infectious smile, and loud, booming voice.”
– Lee Ann Alsbaugh-LeSueuer told the ProRodeo Sports News about her father Art Alsbaugh.

7. Next Up

Aug. 14           Wyoming State Fair & Rodeo, Douglas, Wyo.
Aug. 14           Dacotah Stampede, Aberdeen, S.D., begins
Aug. 15           Lynden (Wash.) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 15           Caldwell (Idaho) Night Rodeo begins
Aug. 15           Canby (Ore.) Rodeo begins
Aug. 16           Juneau County Fair Pro Rodeo, Mauston, Wis.
Aug. 16           Inter-State Rodeo, Coffeyville, Kan., begins
Aug. 16           Jasper (Alberta) Heritage Rodeo begins
Aug. 17           McCone County Fair PRCA Rodeo, Circle, Mont., begins
Aug. 17           Yellowstone River Roundup, Billings, Mont., begins
Aug. 17           Cassia County Fair & Rodeo, Burley, Idaho, begins
Aug. 17           Gooding (Idaho) ProRodeo begins
Aug. 17           Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo, Kalispell, Mont., begins
Aug. 17           Moses Lake (Wash.) Round-Up begins
Aug. 17           5J Exposete, Sete Lagoas, Brazil, begins
Aug. 18           Brown County Fair ProRodeo, De Pere, Wis., begins
Aug. 18           Eureka (Kan.) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Imboden (Alberta) PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Seward County PRCA Rodeo, Liberal, Kan., begins
Aug. 18           Annual World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo begins, Payson, Ariz.
Aug. 18           Tehachapi (Calif.) Mountain PRCA Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Cranbook (British Columbia) ProRodeo begins
Aug. 18           North Texas State Fair & Rodeo, Denton, Texas, begins
Aug. 18           Norco (Calif.) Mounted Posse Rodeo begins
Aug. 18           Pincher Creek (Alberta) ProRodeo begins
Aug. 19           Badlands Circuit Finals Steer Roping, Deadwood, S.D., begins
Aug. 19           Painted Pony Championship Rodeo, Lake Luzerne, N.Y., begins
Aug. 19           Mesquite (Texas) ProRodeo Series begins
Aug. 19           Cowtown Rodeo, Woodstown Pilesgrove, N.J., begins
Aug. 19           Fallon County Fair & Rodeo, Baker, Mont., begins
Aug. 20           Days of ’76 Stand Alone Steer Roping begins, Deadwood, S.D.

8. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Aug. 14, 2017
AA:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$173, 702
BB:
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$174,658
SW:
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$141,452
TR-1:
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$112, 808
TR-2:
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$112,808
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$157,869
TD:
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$153,931
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Texas
$209,973
SR:
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$67,798


9. 2017 WEATHER GUARD® PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Aug. 14, 2017
All-around
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$173,702
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
129,299
3
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
123,735
4
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
123,349
5
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
109,601
6
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
102,395
7
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
92,263
8
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
86,183
9
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
75,058
10
Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
73,789
11
Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah
68,368
12
Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Okla.
57,562
13
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
55,929
14
Curtis Cassidy, Canada
53,175
15
Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif.
47,564
16
Kyle Whitaker, Chambers, Neb.
46,112
17
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
45,900
18
Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D.
44,966
19
Morgan Grant, Didsbury, Alberta
38,583
20
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
36,812
Bareback Riding
1
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
$174,659
2
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
120,211
3
Wyatt Denny, Minden, Nev.
101,845
4
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
92,075
5
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
88,391
6
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
88,078
7
J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo.
87,644
8
Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, Texas
81,327
9
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
77,854
10
R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, Calif.
76,524
11
Jake Vold, Ponoka, Alberta
73,831
12
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France,
72,178
13
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
68,171
14
Justin Miller, Billings, Mont.
66,153
15
Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba
66,115
16
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
62,313
17
Mason Clements, Santaquin, Utah
61,800
18
Tanner Phipps, Dalton, Ga.
57,523
19
Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore.
56,575
20
Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho
52,402
Steer Wrestling
1
Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont.
$141,452
2
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
99,769
3
Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss.
96,849
4
Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho
87,831
5
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
84,484
6
Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah
80,199
7
Scott Guenthner, Provost, Alberta
78,807
8
Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev.
72,652
9
Tanner Milan, Cochrane, Alberta
69,317
10
Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis.
66,976
11
Jon Ragatz, Beetown, Wis.
60,272
12
J.D. Struxness, Appleton, Minn.
60,245
13
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
58,604
14
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
55,935
15
Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo.
54,348
16
Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark.
54,151
17
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
53,211
18
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
53,120
19
Will Lummus, West Point, Miss.
52,243
20
Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev.
52,058
Team Roping (header)
1
Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga.
$112,808
2
Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz.
107,739
3
Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas
86,528
4
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
80,310
5
Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla.
77,554
6
Cody Snow, Los Olivos, Calif.
74,538
7
Jr. Dees, Aurora, S.D.
71,993
8
Garrett Rogers, Baker City, Ore.
70,549
9
Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,248
10
Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore.
65,573
11
Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Mont.
65,479
12
Tom Richards, Humboldt, Ariz.
62,475
13
Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, Fla.
62,230
14
Levi Simpson, Ponoka, Alberta
60,423
15
Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont.
51,446
16
Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, Miss.
49,618
17
Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz.
48,943
18
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
48,482
19
Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn.
47,659
20
Nelson Wyatt, Clanton, Ala.
47,203
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, Brazil
$112,808
2
Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz.
107,739
3
Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore.
91,512
4
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
85,299
5
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
77,999
6
Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla.
77,358
7
Tyler McKnight, Wells, Texas
77,238
8
Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, Texas
75,534
9
Jake Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,549
10
Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash.
70,248
11
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
69,814
12
Jeremy Buhler, Arrowwood, Alberta
60,422
13
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
60,003
14
Kory Koontz, Stephenville, Texas
59,445
15
Travis Graves, Jay, Okla.
56,350
16
Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev.
51,446
17
Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif.
46,736
18
John Robertson, Polson, Mont.
42,872
19
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
40,932
20
Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont.
40,914
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$157,869
2
Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta
141,395
3
Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La.
102,493
4
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
101,362
5
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
84,186
6
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
83,613
7
CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, Utah
80,450
8
Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta
73,282
9
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
71,768
10
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
68,477
11
Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah
67,726
12
Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La.
67,402
13
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
67,009
14
Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah
65,766
15
Audy Reed, Spearman, Texas
62,820
16
Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah
51,716
17
Cody Wright, Milford, Utah
49,017
18
Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb.
48,656
19
Tyrell J. Smith, Sand Coulee, Mont.
48,367
20
Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah
48,208
Tie-down Roping
1
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
$153,931
2
Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas
118,251
3
Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La.
100,203
4
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
90,749
5
Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas
85,297
6
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
82,134
7
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
79,673
8
Cooper Martin, Alma, Kan.
77,319
9
Randall Carlisle, Athens, La.
77,226
10
J.C. Malone, Plain City, Utah
72,161
11
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
69,120
12
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
68,125
13
Bryson Sechrist, Apache, Okla.
66,679
14
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
66,203
15
Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas
64,937
16
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
64,906
17
Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas
64,867
18
Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas
64,540
19
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
61,937
20
Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas
57,289
Steer Roping
1
Jason Evans, Glen Rose, Texas
$67,798
2
Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla.
66,185
3
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
65,461
4
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
60,505
5
John Bland, Turkey, Texas
44,998
6
J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas
44,526
7
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
38,777
8
Tony Reina, Wharton, Texas
37,818
9
Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo.
37,730
10
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
37,095
11
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
36,029
12
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
35,786
13
Bryce Davis, Ovalo, Texas
35,187
14
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
32,064
15
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
31,325
16
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
29,755
17
J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla.
29,497
18
Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, Texas
28,495
19
Garrett Hale, Snyder, Texas
26,163
20
Brent Lewis, Pinon, N.M.
21,084
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$209,973
2
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
165,647
3
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
123,618
4
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
94,766
5
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
94,380
6
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
90,847
7
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
83,923
8
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
81,340
9
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
80,883
10
Jordan Spears, Redding, Calif.
78,975
11
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
78,867
12
Jordan Hansen, Okotoks, Alberta
74,293
13
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
72,841
14
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
71,716
15
Dustin Bowen, Waller, Texas
69,009
16
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
63,490
17
Josh Frost, Randlett, Utah
60,170
18
Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
59,824
19
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
57,671
20
Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash.
57,631
*2017 Barrel Racing (Aug. 14, 2017)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Tiany Schuster, Krum, Texas
$244,742
2
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
157,476
3
Kassie Mowry, Dublin, Texas
115,201
4
Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, Calif.
113,505
5
Amberleigh Moore, Salem, Ore.
111,309
6
Kathy Grimes, Medical Lake, Wash.
104,027
7
Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas
94,279
8
Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D.
87,867
9
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
80,514
10
Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, Texas
80,306
11
Tilar Murray, Fort Worth, Texas
79,110
12
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
70,954
13
Emily Miller, Weatherford, Texas
69,042
14
Kimmie Wall, Roosevelt, Texas
58,551
15
Ivy Conrado, Hudson, Colo.
58,284
16
Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M.
56,621
17
Ari-Anna Flynn, Charleston, Ark.
55,594
18
Jackie Ganter, Abilene, Texas
54,317
19
Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas
51,714
20
Jana Bean, Ft. Hancock, Texas
49,530
10. 2017 PRCA Xtreme Bulls Standings
     Unofficial through Aug. 14, 2017
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$58,153
2
Ty Wallace, Collbran, Colo.
40,596
3
Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla.
31,170
4
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
26,855
5
Brady Portenier, Caldwell, Idaho
22,440
6
Trevor Kastner, Sulphur, Okla.
20,609
7
Bayle Worden, Charleston, Texas
20,167
8
Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, Idaho
19,279
9
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
18,503
10
Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, Texas
18,231
11
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
16,992
12
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
16,567
13
Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, Texas
16,287
14
Garrett Tribble, Bristow, Okla.
16,269
15
Tim Bingham, Honeyville, Utah
15,204
16
Cole Melancon, Liberty, Texas
14,142
17
Justin Hendrix, Belton, Texas
13,433
18
Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah
12,820
19
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
12,079
20
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
11,734
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