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☛ Austin Shepard takes NCHA World Championship and Futurity titles 11-11-17

Posted by on Dec 11, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

AUSTIN SHEPARD TOPS HIS NCHA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP WITH HIS NCHA FUTURITY CHAMPIONSHIP RIDING DUAL REYISH

NON-PRO TITLE GOES TO CHAD BUSHAW RIDING BITTERSWEET

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Dec. 11, 2017

Only eight days following his NCHA World Championship title in the Watt Arena of the Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas, Austin Shepard, Summerdale, Alabama., rode Dual Relish, a stallion sired by first-time sire Hottish out of Reylena by Dual Rey, to his second winning title at the cutting industry’s biggest jewel, the NCHA World Championship Futurity. The pair claimed the estimated $192,672 first-place paycheck for first-time cutting horse owner Billy Wolf,  Whitesboro, Texas.  The stallion was bred by first-time winning breeder, Greg Smith, Mineral Wells, Texas.

Shepard, who was the first rider in the herd in the Futurity Open Finals, also placed in a tie for 12th in the 24-horse finals riding CR Dublin Tuff, sired by Woody Be Tuff out of ARC Catty Dual, owned by the Center Ranch Centerville, Texas, and earned an additional estimated $41,988 for his 216 score.

At the NCHA Finals, Shepard was riding Deluxe Checks, owned by Amanda and Rhein Standish, Baton Rouge, La., picking  up a $23,777.50 paycheck, giving him total earnings for the year $146,977.35

Scoring a whopping 228 points, Shepard bested the 23 other finalists in the NCHA Futurity, including the Reserve Champion The Animal (Cat Ichi x My Little Abra), owned by Richard and Beth Carney, Kemp, Texas, and ridden by Lee Francois to a 225.5, winning an estimated $169,404. Third place went to Special Nu Boon (Boon Too Suen x Special Nu Kitty), owned by the Rose Valley Ranch, Weatherford, Texas, and ridden by Michael Cooper to a 224, taking home an estimated $126,135.

Boon Too Suen also sired the 4th place finisher, CR Smart Boots, owned by Sarco Creek Ranch, Victoria, Texas and ridden by Ty Brown, with their 223 score taking home an estimated $111,292.

AUSTIN SHEPARD AND HOTTISH, A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH!

This was Shepard’s second Futurity Championship. He also won the 2007 NCHA Futurity on High Brow CD and was Reserve Champion in 2016 on Sir Long Legs. For his first World Championship, he rode Bet Hesa Cat.

Another offspring of the first foal crop of Hottish was Just Gettin Started, out of KR Isadora Dual. Finishing fifth in the finals, scoring a 220 for owners Lloyd and Christina Cox, Marietta, Okla., he was ridden by Jody Galyean to a 220, collecting an estimated $100,660.

In the Non Pro Finals, there were two finalists sired by Hottish, including Cool N Hot ridden by Paula Wood to fifth place and Sheza Smoking Hot Gal, owned by Ty Moore, Madill, Okla. to 10th place.

CHAD BUSHAW CLAIMS NON-PRO FUTURITY TITLE RIDING BITTERSWEET; EVENT BECOMES A FAMILY AFFAIR

It was anything but “bittersweet” for Chad Bushaw, Weatherford, Texas, when he won the Non Pro Finals of the NCHA Futurity held Friday, Dec. 8 riding Bittersweet, his daughter of Metallic Cat out of Miss Sea Rey by Dual Rey, bred by Marilyn Jo Franz, Stillwater, Okla. Bushaw picked up an estimated $61,162 for his 225 score, which was four points ahead of second-place – teenager Brandon Westfall, Los Olivos, Calif., riding Smooth Lil Cowtown by Smooth As A Cat.

But the icing on Bushaw’s cake when his 14-year-old son, Charles Russell Bushaw, was a finalist in the NCHA Futurity Unlimited Amateur Finals. Riding Snappcat (High Brow Cat x Badgers Playdough), the younger Bush scored a 214, in a three-way tie for seventh pace, earning $9,461.The division was won by Canadian Rocky Davis riding Redneck Creyzy (Dual Rey x Xqizit Cat). The pair scored a 219.5.

This year’s NCHA Futurity was the second winning title for Chad Bushaw, as he won the 2001 Non-Pro Futurity riding Jerryoes and has been a finalist eight other times

The NCHA Non-Pro Hall of Fame earner, with over $3 million in earnings, won his first Futurity championship when he was a finalist in the Amateur Division in 1991 when he was only 18.

He also won the NCHA Super Stakes in 2008 riding Cats Ruby and the 2012 NCHA Derby riding Bet On A Cat. He was Reserve  Champion in 2007 riding Mocha Cappuccino.

Reserve Champion Westfall, 17, the son of accomplished cutters Russ and Janet Westfall and the earner of over $300,000 was the reserve Champion, scoring a 221 and earned an estimated $52,105.

Westfall was also a 2016 NCHA Futurity Limited Non-Pro finalist aboard Big and Reckless by CD Royal, the stallion owned by his mother. who rode him to the Reserve title of the 2000 NCHA Non-Pro Futurity. Brandon was also Reserve Non-Pro Champion at the 2017 NCHA Super Stakes and a 2017 NCHA Derby Non Pro finalist riding offspring of CD Royal.

Third place in the Non-Pro went to Cody Hedlund, Lipan, Texas riding Iggy Reyzalea (Dual Smart Rey x Teles Bout This Cat) scoring 220 for a $41,047 paycheck. Hedlund is an NCHA Non-Pro Hall of Fame member, earning over $763,000.

For complete results, go to www.nchacutting.com.

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☛ Weis facility burns in California 12-8-17

Posted by on Dec 8, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SCOTT AND MELISSA WEIS’ FACILITY IN OJAI, CALIF., BURNED TO THE GROUND IN CALIFORNIA FIRE

Facebook post from Melissa Weis
Dec. 8, 2017

While Scott and Melissa Weis were at the NCHA Futurity in Fort Worth, their Ojai, Calif., home and horse facility was being destroyed in the California fire. Following is Melissa’s post on my Facebook page that I think everyone should see.

“On  Monday night, Scott got a phone call warning him that a small brush fire was gaining ground toward the direction of our beautiful Ojai, Calif., home. He rushed to DFW, jumped on a plane and rented the only rental car with 4WD. Most roads were closed but he navigated his way up the mountain and pulled in our driveway to be greeted with these eerie images.

“No animals were on the property as many of you know, we have been on the road showing our horses in Texas. the fire is still not completely contained so there is no telling if the devastation is over.

“My heart breaks  for Scott as he sits there sifting through the ashes looking for anything that might have escaped being completely destroyed.

“To further expand on why this is especially sad – that barn was by no means fancy but it was hand built by Scott’s father. Every nail was pounded by him. Scott only put  his favorite horses in it and the hundreds of bridles, bits and spurs that trained countless winning cutting horses were all housed there.

“There probably aren’t many cutting horses here today that Scott Weis hadn’t trained or showed a mother of, a grandmother of, or father of. He has won a major event in the Will rogers Coliseum every decade, NCHA Rider Hall of Fame, only Californian to be Equistat Rider of the Year in the Aged Events and in weekend earnings, LTE of $4 million dollars. And to have to go home, in the middle of the Futurity, to sift through ashes of all those precious memories makes me sick!”

I couldn’t reproduce the photos she posted, but if you want to see them, go to my Facebook page.

In other news from California, dozens of Thoroughbred race  horses had to be turned loose and died in the California wildfire. It’s unfathomable to think about this. The Thoroughbred facility had 500 horses and not enough time to load them all into trailers so they had to turn them loose.

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☛ Federal Mandate to affect Horse Show industry in big way 12-1-17

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

A NEW FEDERAL MANDATE TO AFFECT HORSE SHOW INDUSTRY IN BIG WAY

THE EFFECT OF THIS NEW LAW COULD MEAN THE END TO HORSE AND CATTLE EVENTS

Dec. 1, 2017

Even though most of us didn’t have any advance notice or knowledge that a mandate requiring an electronic logging device (ELD) be in your truck, would be hitting the horse and cattle transportation industry today, almost everyone who hauled horses to the NCHA Cutting Futurity in Fort Worth, Texas, or the NRHA Reining Futurity in Oklahoma City, Okla., had no advance warning.

According to an article from “Protect The Harvest,” The United States Congress enacted a bill called “Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century” that was introduced by President Obama in 2012. A part of the bill included a provision requiring the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Act (FMCSA) to develop a rule mandating the use of electronic logging devices on commercial vehicles.

Although most horse show participants wouldn’t think that a horse or cattle trailer was a commercial vehicle, horses are livestock and are specifically listed in the transportation bill language. Also families that show cattle, pigs and other livestock to stock shows and 4-H events, and travel long distances to show their animals will be impacted as well. In fact, any other type of activity or hobby that requires a large vehicle and trailer and where there is the potential to win money in competitions is included in this mandate.

There are some exemptions but you will have to look long and hard to find them. No longer will a “Not For Hire” sign on you rig protect you if it is determined that your truck and trailer fit into the commercial category or are being used for commercial purposes. Nor will it protect you if you are driving a vehicle and trailer that requires a commercial license.

This law mandates how long you can drive and how long your breaks need to be.  This means that those hauling horses will be required to stop their trip once a 14-hour threshold is reached and cannot resume travel until the mandatory 10-hour rest period has passed, If the threshold is breached, the ELD makes a record of it and you can be fined. If you haul horses owned by others, your truck and trailer are considered commercial vehicles.  If you have won money competing with your horse or a client’s horse, the Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration (FMCSA)  would consider money won at a horse show or event, a profit. They also consider hauling to an event with the intent or hopes of winning some money as pursuing a profit, which classifieds your truck and trailer as commercial. If you have sponsors (a sticker on your truck or trailer), those sponsorships qualify as “furtherance of a commercial enterprise,” putting them in the commercial category.

This new mandate was obviously created by someone who knew nothing about horses or cattle. What if you were in the middle of a snow storm in the midwest and had to stop on the road for 10 hours. You would arrive at your destination with a load of dead horses or cattle, worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Or if you were driving through South Texas in mid-July during those over 100-degree days and your time was up at 10 am  and you had to park it for 10 hours. Your horses or cattle could easily die of the heat in a crowded trailer, with no water to drink. Add to that the liability concerns as animal abuse is now a felony!

 

There are many other mandates and mountains to climb in this new law and only those who know about this horrible mandate can protest this government overreach. Protect The Harvest as well as Lucas Oil, who add money to many  major horse events, have evidently known about this upcoming mandate and have been working hard to bring these issues to light by making trips to Washington D.C. to meet with lawmakers.

You can also help by letting others know about this government overreach and get your local clubs involved too. Everyone should contact their Congressional Representative and let them know your concerns.

How The ELD Mandate Will Impact The Horse Industry

 

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☛ NCHA Futurity Sales to feature close to 800 well-bred cutting horses 11-28-17

Posted by on Nov 28, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NCHA FUTURITY SALES FEATURE CLOSE TO 800 WELL-BRED HORSES

 

SALES WILL BE  HELD DEC. 5-10 IN WATT ARENA, JOHN JUSTIN ARENA AND ROUND-UP INN

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Nov. 28, 2017

Looking for a well-bred seasoned cutting horse, a broodmare, a yearling or a 2-year-old you can get ready for next year’s Futurity? A wide array of cutting-bred horses will go on sale in three sale arenas during the 2017 NCHA Cutting Futurity, currently being held in Will Rogers Coliseum. The seven sales held during six days, Dec. 5-10, will be featuring close to 800 cutting-bred horses. The sales are all produced during the NCHA Futurity by Western Bloodstock Ltd., owned by Jeremy and Candace Barwick. Auctioneers will include Steve Friskup, Muleshoe, Texas; Justin Holmberg, Lexington, Ky. and Wade Cunningham, Jay, Okla. Pedigree information will be announced by Spence Kidney, Shawnee, Okla.; Phil Rapp, Weatherford, Texas and Jayson Jackson, Bixby, Okla.

NCHA Futurity 2-Year-Old Sale – Session 1:

The sale begin at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 5, with Session 1 including 130 head of 2-year-old cutting-bred horses going under the auctioneer’s hammer in the first of two sessions in the Watt arena, where trainers will show the horses with some already being on cattle. The youngsters will have all been nominated to next year’s NCHA Futurity.

NCHA 2-Year-Old Sale – Session 2:

A total of 110 2-year-olds will go on the auction block on Wednesday, Dec. 6, during Session 2 of the NCHA 2-Year-Old sale, starting at 9 a.m. in the Watt Arena. All of the youngsters will be started and will be nominated to the 1918 NCHA Futurity.

Select Yearling Sale & Gala:

The highlight of the sales will be a group of 50 of the best-pedigreed yearlings to be offered during the sales. The Select Yearling Sale and Gala, which will be held Wednesday evening, Dec. 6 and will include a dinner at 6 p.m. with the sale starting at 7 p.m. Both the dinner and sale will take place in the Round-Up Inn. This select sale usually holds the highest average amount paid for the horses out of all the sales.

Preferred Breeders Sale – Session 1:

The Preferred Breeders Sale has been broken down into two Sessions, with the first one, consisting of 142 top-bred cutting horses being sold Thursday, Dec. 7, starting at 10 a.m. in the John Justin Sale Arena. Most of the consignments will be yearlings; however, you could also find broodmares with embryos selling with them.

Preferred Breeders Sale – Session II:

The Preferred Breeders Session II will begin on Friday, Dec. 8 at 10 a.m. in the John Justin Sale Arena on Friday, Dec. 8. A total of 144 mostly well-bred yearlings and a few broodmares bred to top sires will be auctioned off. However, just prior to the sale, two 2018 breedings to the industry’s leading sire, High Brow Cat, consigned by Rockin 5 Ranch LLC, will be auctioned off, as will a Rockin W Syndicate share, consigned by Mariposa Farms LLP.

Preferred Breeders Sale – Session III:

The Preferred Breeders Sale – Session III, will be held Saturday, Dec. 9 iin the John Justin Sale arena, with 120 horses selling, starting at 10 a.m. The sale will include 120 head of mostly yearlings, as well as trained cutting horses.

2017 NCHA Futurity Cutting Horse Sale:

Your last chance to buy a cutting horse during the NCHA Futurity sales will take place Sunday, Dec. 10 in the Watt Arena. Preceded by the demonstration and sales of four Select Cow Dogs, which starts at 9 a.m., the Cutting Horse Sale will include 100 cutting bred horses of all ages, with most of them in training or having performance and money-earning records.This sale will be held in the Watt Arena so you can check out their cutting ability on cattle.

Don’t forget to pick up a nice thick catalog on your way into the sale and have your check book with you!!!!

Sires and No of Offspring in Futurity Sale 17>>

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☛ Dual Reyish/Austin Shepard take first go of NCHA Futurity 11-24-17

Posted by on Nov 24, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

DUAL REYISH AND AUSTIN SHEPARD OWN THE FIRST GO OF NCHA FUTURITY WITH A 442.5 ON TWO RUNS

 

IM QUINTAN CHECKS AND JOHN SANISLOW EARN A CLOSE SECOND

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Nov. 24, 2017

Austin Shepard riding Dual Reyish to first go-round win in the NCHA Open Futurity. NCHA photo.

Not since Bill Freeman, has anyone dominated the major aged events like Austin Shepard has this year, with his latest accomplishment being leading the first go-round of the Open Division of the NCHA Futurity, running Nov. 15 through Dec. 10, at the Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas.

The Summerdale, Ala., cutting horse trainer who recently passed the $7 million mark in lifetime earnings, is fourth among cutting’s all-time leading money earners and a member of the Rider Hall Of Fame, was riding Dual Reyish, owned by Billy Wolf, Whitesboro, Texas. Shepard also won the 2006 NCHA Futurity riding High Brow CD and was Reserve Champion in 2016 riding Sir Long Legs.

Sired by Hottish, a son of Spots Hot out of Stylish Play Lena by Docs Stylish Oak, Dual Reyish’s dam is  A Little Reylena (Dual Rey x Katie Little Lena by Smart Little Lena) with $126,058 in lifetime earnings. Dual Reyish was bred by Greg Smith.

Dual Reyish and Shepard scored the highest score, a 222.5, the first day of the Open and tied Matt Miller on Carolena Reyn, for the leading score the second day, with a 220.0 – for a total of 442.5, topping the first go-round of the Open  Division.

However, close on Shepard’s heels is John Sanislow riding Im Quintan Checks (Im Countin Checks x Quintan Blue) for the Circle Y Ranch, Millsap, Texas, with a 441.5 score following two go-rounds. The pair scored a 221.0 in the first go-round and a 220.5 in the second go.

Dual Reyish’s sire, Hottish, is owned by Dustin and Donna Adams, Poolville, Texas. With lifetime earnings of over $300,000, he stands at the Oswood Stallion Station in 2018 for $5,500 plus a chute fee. The 2008 stallion has two offspring in the top 10, including Reyzmehot, owned by John R. and Jana Thacker, Abilene, Texas. The pair finished 4th in the first go-round with a total score of 439, ridden by Wes Ashlock. Also Smooth Hottie, owned by Durango Performance Horses, Woodward, Okla., ridden by Josh Crumpler scored a 218.5 in the first go.

Dual Reyish is from Hottish’s first crop of foals to perform, including Reyzmehot, who scored 222 points. Altogether Hottish had 20 foals in the Futurity, with 10 advancing to the second go-round. Six scored a 218 or more points in the first go, including Hott Nu Cowboy, who tied Third Cuttin Cat with 219 points on Monday.

The only other sire with multiple offspring in the top 10 scores was Metallic Cat with three – including Taliate, owned by Bobby Ray and Mary Jo Hawkins, Seguin, Texas, ridden by Casey Green to a 437.5 for sixth place Metallic Drifter, owned by James N. Vangilder, Weatherford, Texas, ridden by Matt Gaines and Metallicious, owned by Charles Burger, Chatsworth, Ga., ridden by T. J. Good, with both scoring a 437 in a tie for seventh place.

Since 9th through 13 all scored a total of 436.5, the other sires in the top 10 scores included Im Countin Checks, Boon Too Suen with two  (439.5 and 436.5), Dual R Smokin (438), Bet Hesa Cat, Dual Smart Rey, High Brow Cat and Woody Be Tuff (436.5 tie).

The Open semifinals will be held Saturday, Dec. 9 at 3 p.m., and the Open finals will close the show on Sunday, Dec. 10.

 

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☛ Tragedy at the AQHA World Show 11-17 -17

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TRAGEDY AT THE AQHA WORLD SHOW

 

SHARIN HALL LOSES A YOUNG CONTENDER IN THE JUNIOR BARREL RACE

A news and opinion piece by Glory Ann Kurtz
Nov. 17, 2017

AQHA photo.

After winning the first go-round of the Junior Barrel Race at the AQHA World Show, barrel racer Sharin Hall, of Winning Edge Stables, Harrah, Okla., and her top barrel mare Dreaming Of Foose (Foose x Hawks Dream Glrl), nicknamed Cali, were giving it their all in the final go-round on Nov. 15. While turning the second barrel, the mare fell and broke her pelvis and lacerated an artery which caused internal bleeding so bad that she passed away before they could get her to a veterinarian.

According to a report from the AQHA, “The mare became acutely lame during her barrel racing run and was provided emergency medical care. It was quickly determined to be in the horse’s best interest to be transported to a referral hospital. She was loaded into a trailer following medication administration to ease the pain and help control inflammation, but passed away enroute,” said Dr.Dave Frisbie of Equine Sports Medicine.”

Sharin is originally from Sunbury, Ohio. She was born to love, train and ride  horses as her father, Jackson Hall, was an accomplished horseman and a barrel horse trainer. Her mother is also into horses.

Sharin is a well-known trainer and competitor in barrel racing circles, having won and placed at many major barrel racing events, including “The American. Cali, a 2013 mare, was the 2017 Summer Shootout 1D Champion, Reserve Champion at Parker Wood Memorial Slot Race. She was also the Ultimate Isabella Quarter Horse Slot Race and Futurity Champion.

WAS THIS MARE’S DEATH PREVENTABLE?

However, from all the responses on Facebook, many barrel racers felt the death of this great mare was preventable. According to her friend Lainie Whitmire, who is also an accomplished barrel racer, the ground was the culprit.

“Multiple horses slipped in the prelims,” said Lainie in a post on Facebook. “Some went completely down and were pulled up. Great horses were unable to keep their footing in order to compete. I feel like the officials should have prepared the arena better before the finals. JMO. It might not have changed the outcome. This is a horse I know very well, owned by a friend, so it’s personal to me”

This was a terrible thing that happened to this young mare but it could have just as easily killed the rider. As a result, many petitions to the AQHA were started on my Facebook page as well as others I am sure, that were signed (including one I started by accident when I just thought I was signing another one) and sent to Pete Kyle, AQHA Executive Director of Shows and Judges,  stating, “There need to be changes made to the ground at the World Show, as well as other AQHA-approved events.”

One, signed by Amanda Earles, said, “After multiple horses going down, having footing problems and even passing away at the AQHA World Show in the barrel racing event held in Oklahoma City, Okla., the third week of November 2017, there need to be changes made to the ground. AQHA needs to bring in people, such as John Jamison, to evaluate and properly prep and work the ground before and during there AQHA World Show and other AQHA-approved events (such as the show during the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo.)

“The petition is to make AQHA take responsibility for their mismanagement of the round conditions at their shows and to fix this problem and hire outside organizations and/or people that are skilled in this area. This needs to happen now!”

MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE:

When I was younger and was hauling my daughter to barrel races, I occasionally ran barrels myself, I had a scary experience at the John Justin Arena, located in the Will Rogers Complex in Fort Worth. As I rounded the third barrel, I heard my horse’s shoes hitting the cement under the dirt in the arena . Many of my friends watching said the gelding was leaving sparks as he rounded the barrel for home. Luckily, this was an older, seasoned barrel horse that was raised in Montana and he knew how to handle bad ground.

Since then, Will Rogers and the John Justin arena have done a lot to change the ground, storing different ground for different events, like the NCHA Futurity that’s going on now, with the ground being deeper in front of the chutes where they cut. There are individuals out there who specialize in ground preparation for different events. The All-American Quarter Horse Congress has had problems for years as they also try to run various events in the same arena on the same ground. However, the last time I was there, they had additional buildings where they could run the timed events on different ground from the halter, pleasure and reining horses.

But now is the time for show management of all sizes to make an assessment of the ground for their shows, especially if they have several different classes, including timed events. If they don’t, there could be some big lawsuits in the wings if someone gets hurt badly or even killed.

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