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☛ Modine Smith passes at age 94 7-24-17

Posted by on Jul 24, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

MODINE SMITH, A GREAT LOSS TO THE CUTTING HORSE INDUSTRY

 

MATRIARCH OF THE SPORT PASSES AWAY AT AGE 94

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 24, 2017

Modine Smith, an Icon in the cutting horse industry, passed away on July 22 at the age of 94. NCHA photo

She promoted cutting through the NCHA for five decades serving on the Executive Committee of both the NCHA and PCCHA, was inducted into the Halls of Fame of both organizations and had the Modine Smith Humanitarian Award named in her honor. Modine Smith, Grass Valley, Calif, was 94 when she passed away on July 22, 2017. She will be missed by many. Ironically she died during one of the NCHA Triple Crown Events  – the NCHA Summer Spectacular, which was going on in the Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth.

 

According to an article by Elaina Ross on the NCHA website, Modine, along with her late husband Ed Smith, held PCCHA shows at their ranch in Escalon, Calif., where Ed mentored many riders. After Ed passed away in 1979, Modine continued to champion cutting on the local and national level. She was also a recipient of the PCCHA Ed Smith Memorial Sportsmanship Award. and created   She also helped create some of the standards cutting, that we take advantage of today, including the dedicated practice pen, adjusted monitor system for judges, pre-settling of cattle and the PCCHA Gelding Incentive program.

She had a very optimistic attitude and everyone was soon drawn to her.

Modine is survived by her children: John Michael Biggs, Patricia (Biggs) Leach and Laura (Smith) Vaughn; sons-in-law Steve Leach and Frank Vaughn, as well as eight grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren and three great-great grandchildren.

Celebrations of Modine’s life are being planned for the PCCHA Futurity held Oct. 6-13 in LasVegas, Nev. and the NCHA Futurity, Nov. 15-Dec 10 in Fort Worth. In lieu of flowers, the family request donations on Modine’s behalf go to the PCCHA Youth Scholarship Program or the NCHA Foundation.

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☛ Tommy Manion on camera shooting stallion with BB pistol 7-20-17

Posted by on Jul 20, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 13 comments

TOMMY MANION CAUGHT ON CAMERA SHOOTING AN UNRULY STALLION WITH A BB PISTOL AT AN NCHA-SANCTIONED SHOW

 

BESIDES NCHA SANCTIONING, COULD HE AND/OR NCHA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS BE GUILTY OF STATE OR FEDERAL LAWS VIOLATIONS?

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 20, 2017

I have now heard from a credible witness, that they knew the well-known Non-Pro who was at an NCHA Cutting in Whitesboro, Texas, on Saturday, July 15, and shot a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol. Another witness had taken a video of the event and it was soon in the hands of the NCHA. The witness assured me that the Non-Pro  in question was NCHA Non-Pro Tommy Manion, who at one time had the pistol under a jacket draped over his hand and dropped it on the ground and bent over to pick it up – all of which is on the video.

After receiving and confirming the reported horse abuse by Manion, I reached out to Rick Dennis, a Threat Assessment/Risk Analyst who is also a former Drug Enforcement Agent, for clarification of penalties resulting from Manion’s actions – for Manion, those who witnessed the event and the NCHA. Essentially, Rick informed me there are two laws in play here, one Federal, the other state, as well as two NCHA rule infractions.

There is a little-known Federal Law entitled 18 USC 4 – Misprision Of A Felony, which specifically states:  “Whoever having knowledge of the actual commission of a felony cognizable by a court of the United States, conceals and does not as soon as possible make known the same to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.” Animal abuse is now a Federal Felony with hefty fines and prison sentences.

Click for Misprision Of A Felony>>

Also, the State of Texas Animal Cruelty Law, which rates animal abuse as a Felony, states those prosecuted could be punishable by two years in a state jail and/or a $10,000 fine.

Click for Texas Animal Cruelty laws>>

Therefore, since the NCHA has already been notified of the animal cruelty case, along with being supplied with a video of the act, Manion has placed the association in a precarious spot, as whoever doesn’t report this gross violation to law enforcement in accordance with the provisions set forth in the USC 4 Code -Misprision of a Felony – is in direct violation of the federal law and could be subjected to arrest and prosecution at a later date. This includes Russell McCord, who received the phone call, as well as the Executive Director and the entire Executive Committee who met last night after being informed of the incident and determined their association’s punishment for the offense – and possibly even the lawyer who was informed of the infraction and gave the Executive Committee advice, as well as show management.

Difference of penalties between NCHA and governmental agencies:

The other curious nature of Manion’s act is the two violations in the NCHA Rulebook pertaining to animal abuse and cruelty and how they differ from Federal and State laws.

More specifically, the NCHA Rulebook states “if show management or a judge at any NCHA-approved or sponsored event discovers inhumane treatment or abuse of a horse, they may immediately bar the responsible party and contestant’s horse from further competition in the event and the judge will give a score of zero. The Executive Director must be notified within seven (7) days of the closing date of the show involved and the complaint will be referred to the appropriate NCHA Committee for investigation and consideration. Note: the Federal law says “as soon as possible It must be made known to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States and (the person) is to be fined or  imprisoned for not more than three years.”

Click for NCHA Standing Rule 35>>

While the NCHA disciplines animal cruelty by offense with a fine ($1,000 to $10,000), probation and/or suspension, the State of Texas Animal Cruelty Laws say that the perpetrator could be punished by two years in a state jail and/or a $10,000 fine.

Also, the NCHA should make sure that the abused animal is made available as soon as possible to a licensed veterinarian for any damage that has been done, especially since the person who described the incident to me said the when the BBs hit the stallion, he crouched and his body shook in fear.

On May 15, 2015, Rick Dennis wrote an article addressing this very problem called “Horse Abuse Part IV.” There are many good and devoted trainers in this industry; however, unfortunately we do have our share of abusive Open and Non-Pro trainers that should be removed. Click here for a copy of this article.

What’s the  hurry?

Why did the NCHA Executive Committee jump on this animal abuse case so quickly. I feel it is because they just tried to strengthen their animal abuse penalties due to the fact that PETA might come down on them and the sport of cutting if they waited. A smart move!

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☛ From the Editor 7-20-17

Posted by on Jul 20, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 20, 2017

Yesterday I sent out a notice in “Latest News” that a “well-known horse owner shot a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol at an NCHA cutting in Whitesboro, Texas. An update to that information is that the show was held on Saturday, July 15, rather than July 8. Also, that well-known horse owner is a top non-pro. NCHA’s Director of Judges Russell McCord was called and told what was going on and he told the caller to do whatever it took to stop it and make the person shooting the horse leave, which he did.

A bystander did take a video of the shooting which is now in the hands of the NCHA, and I understand that they have initiated the process against the person that did the shooting, as it is definitely against’ the NCHA’s highly advertised zero tolerance “horse-cruelty” policy. Still no mention of that person’s name but I do know that that person is a Non-Pro and a large advertiser in the Cutting Horse Chatter, giving the NCHA some hard choices.

I was given the name of the perpetrator; however, that person who told me about the shooting was not at the show and heard the information from someone who was. I would like to hear it from anyone who was present at this cutting who knew who the shooter was. I will not reveal your name. Call me at 940-433-5232 or 940-393-1865 or e-mail me at glory.kurtz@gmail.com. Since the NCHA has taken action, If that person’s name is not revealed sooner, I’m sure the perpetrator’s name will show up eventually in the Chatter under “Suspensions,” or possibly (but hopefully not) under “Probations.”

NCHA SUMMER SPECTACULAR NEWS:

The second go-round of the Open Classic/Challenge was completed yesterday, with those 26 scoring a 435.0 and above, advancing to the finals. Jon Burgess, riding Littlemak (Starlights Gypsy x Just a Swinging), owned by Anderson Cattle Co., Victoria, Texas, topped the two go-rounds with a 440.5 total score.

Grant Setnicka, not only finished a close second by scoring a 440.0 riding Ichis My Choice (Cat Ichi x My Little Abra), owned by J Five Horse Ranch Mgmt, LLC, Weatherford, Texas, but was the only rider to qualify three horses for the Finals. Also tying for second with a total score of 440.0 was Ed Flynn, riding Play Miss Boonsmal (Peptoboonsmal x Play Miss) for Danny R. Jones of Canada. The Open Classic/Challenge Finals is scheduled for Saturday,July 22, following six sets of the NCHA Derby Amateur and UnlimitedAmateur first go-round.

The Non-Pro and Limited Non-Pro in the Classic/Challenge  go-round is being held today. Also, don’t forget that the Western Bloodstock Summer Spectacular Sale,with 145 consignments, will be held Saturday, July 22, in the Watt Arena, starting at 9 a.m.

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☛ Where have I been lately? HOT news! 7-18-17

Posted by on Jul 19, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

FROM THE EDITOR

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 19, 2017

I have had several individuals question whether or not I am continuing with my website www.allaboutcutting.com, as lately my news has been rather scarce and for that I am sorry.

My answer is “Yes,” I am continuing with my website; however, lately I have had several distractions which have cut back on my time to write articles. These include the following:

1) I was in the process of selling my horse operation since my husband passed away 9 years ago and I am unable to physically and financially keep this facility going. I recently solved that problem as I have sold my Boyd facility and purchased a much smaller place in Grandview, Texas. I will be moving the end of August but in the meantime I have to pack over 30 years of possessions and memorabilia.

2) Many of you old timers may remember Lee Dale, who created the pedigrees for sale catalogs, including the NCHA sales. Some 20 years ago she had a stroke and has been paralyzed on one side of her body and bedridden in nursing facilities ever since. Over the years all of her relatives have passed away and just before her sister died, I  agreed to take on her medical power of attorney. However, lately, Lee has gone downhill and though she has been in a nursing home for years, during the last few weeks she has been in the Wise Regional Hospital in ICU and currently is in Hospice at Senior Care in Decatur. Her mind is still pretty good and she remembers all you old-time cutters and all the stories that go with them!!!

3) On July 4, fireworks were going off in the middle of the highway in front of my place. The one horse I have left, Cougarand, a 31-year-old champagne son of Peppy San Badger out of a daughter of Doc Bar, is used to highway noises and even fireworks, but one must have come into his pasture and probably even hit him, which in the dark sent him into a pipe fence covered with wire where he fell with a leg getting stuck under the sucker rod at the bottom of the wire. I found him there the next morning and got him up; however, he had obviously injured the hind leg that was under the fence and was lame.

Even though I haven’t had a need to call a vet for some time, I called three different vets in the area – only one called me back; however, he didn’t show up. After doctoring Cougarand myself for a couple of weeks, I remembered my old friend and miracle worker – an equine kinesiologist and chiropractor named Laird Burke. He came and looked at Cougar and couldn’t believe what good shape he was in at 31 years of age – but most of all, he was surprised he hadn’t died lying under that fence all night.

After working on him for about 20 minutes, he said, Turn him loose and he will be just fine tomorrow.”Today is tomorrow – and like Laird promised – Cougarand is just fine, walking normal! In fact, when Laird got done working on him, I took his halter off. He usually runs off when he discovers he is loose; however, this time he followed me until I got out the gate. I guess he thought I had fixed his pain!

Laird has been a friend of Bob and me for many years and has “fixed” many horses that have had accidents or in some way had disturbed their skeletal frame or muscles. We had a baby colt one time who missed the gate when the horses, including his mother, headed out to the pasture. The colt jumped the fence and landed on his back. When he got up, he could walk, but it was like a car with a bent frame – he would walk toward you but he looked like he was actually going another way. We took him to vets and they said there was nothing they could do. About 3 months later, Laird came and stayed with us and he suggested we put the colt in the barn while he worked on him several times over the following week. His magic worked and the colt was soon walking normal and remained that way as long as we owned him. I became a lifetime fan!

Bob and I  met Laird years ago when he was working with and helping horses performing at the All American Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, Ohio. He eventually came and stayed with us for several months when he suddenly found himself with a lot of business in Texas, and he and his lovely wife Brenda soon moved to North Texas and have been helping horses over the past few years all over the country at major shows and ranches.

So that’s are my story and I’m sticking to it. I’m sure that in the short term, I will not be posting as often as I did before for awhile as I have this huge move in front of me. I have lived here for 38 years and imagine the “stuff” I have accumulated. They include Quarter Horse Journals back to the 1970s – that I am trying to give away to someone who would like to study the history of the wonderful Quarter Horse.

THE LATEST NEWS:

The latest news came from an e-mail last night wondering if I would like to expose wrong doing at the highest level in the cutting industry. The person said, “There is a Red Hot current situation about a well-known horse owner shooting a tied-up unruly stallion multiple times with a BB pistol at a horse show in Whitesboro, Texas, Saturday, July 8, with witnesses, one of which took a video.”  They felt someone needed to pursue this in order to hold the NCHA accountable with their highly advertised zero tolerance “horse-cruelty” policy.

The caller said Russell McCord from the NCHA was called and told what was going on. He told the caller to do whatever it took to stop it and make the person shooting the horse leave, which he did.

I’m looking for someone who was there and watched the incident so I can report more about it. If you know such a person who is willing to talk with me, my phone no. is 940-433-5232 or cell 940-393-1865. I need to know who the person calling is but I do not have to give their name in my article – however, I would like for them to confirm the name of the perpetrator. I’m waiting by my phone(s).

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☛ Bobby Pidgeon passes at age 84 – 7-18-17

Posted by on Jul 18, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

BOBBY PIDGEON, OWNER OF BAR H RANCHE, DUAL PEP AND CD OLENA, PASSES AT AGE 84

July 18, 2017

George Robert “Bobby” Pidgeon Sr. of Moscow, TN died at 84 years old on July 14, 2017.

Bobby, a passionate horseman, owned Bar H Ranche in Weatherford, Texas, a leading breeder of cutting horses and winner of the 1991 and 1992 Non Pro Futurity. He was inducted into the 2005 National Cutting Horse Association Non-Pro Rider Hall of Fame. His horse, Dual Pep, became one of the leading industry stallions. He also owned CD Olena, the 1994 NCHA Open Futurity Champion and the 1995 NCHA Horse Of The Year.

Besides being a competitor, Bobby produced multiple Western Cutting competitions in Steamboat Springs, Colo., which were renowned for the excellent quality of horse competitions as well as a relaxed and enjoyable atmosphere for the competitors.They were very popular as it gave cutters a chance to enjoy the cool weather and beautiful scenery of Colorado.

He lived his life with an independent spirit, a feisty attitude and dry humor. As a husband, father, grandfather and friend, he embodied strength and compassion – plus a sense of fun and adventure. He took life by the horns, and those around him learned to expect the unexpected.

After graduating from Christian Brothers High School and Memphis State University, he went to work for the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Memphis, the third generation in his family to work there. In 1966, He became President and CEO until the company was sold more than 20 years later.

Bobby loved helping people. Both through his business and in his personal life he donated to many charities, always anonymously. He developed a legacy program for the American Cancer Society and was actively involved with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, the Rameses II Exhibit, Church Health Center and many others. In 1989, Dr. Scott Morris, CEO of Church Health, said he was told a homeless man wanted to see him. It was Bobby Pidgeon dressed in old clothes, who handed him a large check and said, “If anyone ever learns I gave you this, I will never give you another dime.” Dr. Morris wouldn’t tell the story until now.

Bobby was an avid sportsman and passionate outdoorsman, former member of the Five Lakes Club and lifetime member of the Memphis Gun Club. He was a founding board member of the Liberty Bowl, former board member of the Mid-South Fair, a founder of the National Football Stadium Association and avidly supported the Memphis Park Commission. Bobby played a major role in bringing professional soccer to Memphis and owned the Memphis Blues AA Baseball Team a New York Mets farm team, who won the pennant in 1969. He also developed The Shelby Showplace Arena and was the original underwriter for the Merry Christmas Memphis Parade.

Bobby was married to Corinna (Renny) Fortune Pidgeon, for 61 years. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his son, George Robert Pidgeon, Jr., and three daughters, Corinna Pidgeon Harmon, Louise Ruth Pidgeon, Mary Pidgeon Coffman, grandchildren, Christopher Harmon, Mark Harmon, Corinna Pidgeon, Bobby Pidgeon III, Lily Pidgeon, Tee Pidgeon, Robin Coffman III and Alex Coffman, his sister, Helen Pidgeon Viar, and an eclectic group of friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, James Everett Pidgeon and Ruth Burton Pidgeon, and his daughter, Leslie Pidgeon, and his brother J. Everett Pidgeon Jr., his sisters Ruth Mary Pidgeon Demere, Nell Smythe Pidgeon.

Services were held at St. Louis Catholic Church, 203 S. White Station Road, with a visitation Monday, July 17 from 4 – 5:30 p.m. in the Clunan Center at St. Louis Church, and a funeral Mass Tuesday, July 18 at 1:30 p.m. followed by a private family burial in Calvary Cemetery.

The family asks that any donations in his memory be made to the Church Health Center or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Published in The Commercial Appeal on July 16, 2017

 

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☛ Two horses “back from the brink” 7-17-17

Posted by on Jul 17, 2017 in COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

DIARY OF AN INTERCEPT:

 

BACK FROM THE BRINK

 

By Robin Fowler
July 17, 2017

A mare and her companion, a red roan gelding who came to be known as Buddy during an intercept at the Mexico border, were saved from slaughter at the last minute by a horse rescue group that raised more than $2,000 on Facebook. The photo was taken after the two tired horses were returned to Oklahoma.

 

CREDIT: Photos courtesy of Caring and Sharing

It was the end of March when a Facebook administrator for an Oklahoma horse rescue group, Caring and Sharing the Oklahoma Feed Lot & Auction Horse, discovered that a mare targeted for rescue from an Oklahoma kill pen had instead been shipped by the kill buyer to Mexico for slaughter. Supporters were frustrated, but within hours the mood had become hopeful.

The mare was at the Mexico border but the truck she was on had not yet crossed the international boundary.

“If we can call and intercept, who is willing to help,” asked Shereen Jackson on the group’s Facebook page. The mare still might be saved through a last-ditch fund-raising effort, and the donations started rolling in: $5, $10, $30, $100, $150.

But quite a few more donations would be needed – and quickly. The kill buyer could expect only an average of about 65 cents per pound, perhaps $650, at the Mexico slaughterhouse, with the mare’s flesh likely destined for dinner plates in Europe or Asia. But the kill buyer demanded $1,100 from the rescue group.

All About Cutting happened across the Facebook page just as the effort got under way to save the mare and her companion, a handsome red roan gelding. Hours passed, filled with desperate, wrenching exhortations for help, but eventually a well-timed donation of $500 put the mare’s rescue over the top. Then Facebook denizens learned of the mare’s gelding friend, also bound for slaughter. And a frantic race began anew to save the gelding, also priced at $1,100.

“Payment has been sent to bail out the mare. Please, we need to get her buddy, the roan, now! She was screaming when they separated them at the lot,” posted administrator and animal advocate Cie Sadeghy. “Buddy is sitting at the border in a truck and he is not safe.”

The donations started flowing anew: $10, $20, $100, another $100. “So close,” posted Justine Kesselring. “Please save Buddy!”

A gelding who became known as Buddy first found himself in a very bad place – a kill pen – but then was at the right place at the right time to be saved as the friend of a rescued mare.
CREDIT: Photos courtesy of Caring and Sharing

Wrote another poster, “Prayers for Buddy, he kept his friend the mare calm in a tough situation, a strenuous journey to a terrible end. The story is in revision, the hope is there.”

And finally, a bigger donation, $400 this time. The gelding also was safe.

It didn’t go off without a hitch. Some well-meaning posters caused confusion by trying to expand the conversation to the plight of other equally deserving horses. As a result, some donors seemed unsure where their money was going. A few newcomers to the Facebook page wanted to be brought up to speed without bothering to read previous posts – although, in their defense, there were more than 500 of them, some from as far away as the United Kingdom. There even were posts from followers, presumably youngsters, who wanted to discuss names for the two horses if they could be rescued.

But some of the posts were tearfully poignant. “The devil was not expecting this,” wrote Mary Trostle. “He was sure in darkness she and her buddy would ship (across the border to Mexico for slaughter).”

One post by Nicki Wickline summed it up for latecomers who joined the emotionally draining 24-hour race to save the two horses. “LOL, she shipped. But the girls (from the rescue) accomplished a first. They bought her off the truck before crossing the border. Long story (short), she and her buddy are on the way back from their near death.”

Wrote Deborah Hardzog in praise of fellow Facebook followers, “I am both amazed and proud to be a part of this group, from those who work tirelessly on the front lines to those who rescue, those who share and those who send whatever they can to save a horse. This world is truly a better place with all of you in it.”

For more information on the rescue group and the horses that followers currently are trying to save, visit Caring and Sharing the Oklahoma Feed Lot & Auction Horse on Facebook.

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