Pages Navigation Menu

ON-LINE MAGAZINE & WEB SITE - SCROLL DOWN FOR NEWS

☛ Reined Cow Horse industry to have 3 major futurities 7-14-17

Posted by on Jul 14, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

REINED COW HORSE ENTHUSIASTS TO HAVE THREE MAJOR FUTURITIES IN 2015

 

EVENTS TO BE HELD 1,640 MILES APART

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
July 13, 2017

There’s a new kid on the block that is holding a reined cow horse futurity and sale within the industry’s list of reined cow horse futurities.

 

At first there was one: the National Reined Cow Horse Association Futurity in Reno Nev. Then a branch of members broke off and started the National Stock Horse Association, which holds an annual Futurity in Paso Robles, Calif. And now a new group, headed by Smoky Pritchett, has formed the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity, which will take place in Reno, Nev., since the NRCHA Futurity that had been held in Reno, has moved to Fort Worth, Texas.

 

THE NEW EVENT – RENO SBF:

This year, the NRCHA announced that they were moving their Reno event over 1,600 miles from Reno to Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas, where they would receive state and city money for the event. That left Reno without a Reined Cow Horse Futurity.

 

That didn’t sit well with several California owners and riders of snaffle bit horses. In an open letter on the Internet, Smoky Pritchett wrote, “You are all aware of the move of the Snaffle Bit Futurity from Reno to Texas. California lost the Hackamore Classic along with the Bridle Spectacular several years ago. Now we are losing our largest show and sale (The NRCHA Futurity and Sale).”

 

With the help of Lucas Oil and Save The Harvest, who have been sponsoring a lot of horse events lately, there will now be a new Snaffle Bit Futurity, Horse Show and Sale called the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity & Sale, scheduled to be held Sept. 8-17 in Reno, Nev., taking the place of the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity. The new group advertised that there will be a whole day dedicated to the Amateur riders on Sunday, Sept. 17.

 

They need your support so as not to lose more California cow Horse events, especially in Northern California. We have entry forms available if you cannot download one from their web page: https://www.renosnafflebitfuturity.com.

 

So this year, there will be three snaffle bit futurities, starting with the National Stock Horse Association’s event, scheduled for Aug. 22-27 in Paso Robles, Calif. Next will be the new snaffle bit futurity event in Reno Sept. 8-17, with $200,000 in added money, and the final event will be the NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity in Fort Worth, Texas, with added money of over $606,000..

 

Editor’s Note: A call was made to Shawn Martin of the NSHA regarding the added money for their Futurity; however, my call was not returned. Martin can be reached at 623-217-3879

 

Read More

☛ House Committee votes to reopen horse slaughter plants 7-14-17

Posted by on Jul 14, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

American horses are held in export pens in Texas and New Mexico before transported to slaughter in Mexico. Photo by Kathy Milani/The HSUS

The same lawmakers who voted July 12 to reopen U.S. horse slaughter plants are blocking a different bill backed by The HSUS that would forbid the transport of horses for slaughter for human consumption to other countries.

Can the bill be amended or defunded before it reaches the President’s desk?

The following is a press release from Wayne Parcelles,the President and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States.

July 12, the Appropriations Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives voted narrowly to give the green light for the reopening of horse slaughter plants in the United States. There were 27 members of Congress who voted against the bipartisan amendment offered by Reps. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., and Charlie Dent, R-Pa., to bar horse slaughter operations in the United States, and 25 who supported it. All but one Democrat on the committee voted to oppose this dreadful idea, while 26 of 30 Republicans favored it.

The vote on the amendment was as unimaginable as the rhetoric from the horse slaughter crowd was hypocritical.

Unimaginable because American horses deserve a better fate than to be gathered up by a disreputable “kill buyer” who outbids a rescuer at an auction, loaded onto an overcrowded truck, and then stunned, hoisted up by a leg, and pulled apart piece by piece – which is exactly what the 27 lawmakers who voted against the Roybal-Allard/Dent amendment are trying to sanction. We don’t do this to dogs or cats when we don’t have homes for them, and it should be unthinkable to do this to the domesticated animal that helped settle the nation. I pity the people who don’t see the majesty of these American icons and who are numb to their suffering.

Hypocritical because the lawmakers who spoke out against the amendment to ban horse slaughter – again, these are the Representatives who want to allow horse slaughter – actually feigned an interest in protecting horses. A couple of them lamented the long-distance transport of American horses to Canada and Mexico for slaughter for human consumption, and said that we might as well slaughter horses here in the United States so they don’t have to be transported.

That logic would make a little sense until you realize that these same lawmakers are blocking a different bill backed by The HSUS that would forbid the transport of horses for slaughter for human consumption to other countries. Only one of the lawmakers who voted to reopen horse slaughter plants in the United States is a cosponsor of that broader anti-slaughter bill, the Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act, H.R. 113, which is led by four animal welfare champions — Reps. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Janice Schakowsky, D-Ill., Ed Royce, R-Calif., and Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M.

How can you lament the long-distance transport of horses for slaughter to Canada or Mexico and then fight the bill that addresses that very thing? You can do so only if you say one thing and do another.

The defeat of the amendment to bar U.S.-based horse slaughter plants from operating is an ugly start for the House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J. The newly anointed chairman represents a suburban district in New Jersey, and his constituents favor our position in droves. He defied their wishes on this vote, just as he defied their wishes earlier in the year in voting to overturn a Fish and Wildlife Service rule to stop the aerial tracking, landing, and shooting of grizzly bears, and to stop the shooting of wolves and other predators during their denning seasons on national wildlife refuges.

What kind of person wants to kill grizzly bears on wildlife refuges and slaughter American horses on U.S. soil?

Reps. Robert Aderholdt, R-Ala., Tom Cole, R-Okla., and Mark Amodei, R-Nev. also favored horse slaughter in the debate today. To their credit, Reps. Roybal-Allard, Dent, Sanford Bishop, D-Ga., Barbara Lee, D-Calif, and Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., spoke in favor of the ban on U.S. horse slaughter.

“As a lifelong Republican, I’m deeply saddened and quite ashamed to see my fellow conservatives go to such great lengths to promote the slaughter of American equines,” said Marty Irby, who heads the HSUS equine campaign. “I hope the members who profess to be fiscal conservatives will reflect upon this vote that would have saved millions of taxpayer dollars annually – and begin to practice what they preach.”

As Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., noted in a public statement, this battle is not over. If House leaders bring the agriculture spending bill to the floor, our congressional allies may be able to offer the amendment there and win when all House lawmakers have a chance to vote on the issue. And if even that doesn’t happen, we expect to win a horse slaughter defund amendment in the Senate, which would give us a chance to prevail when the final bill is negotiated and sent to President Trump.

This is how lawmakers voted on the amendment to protect horses:

YES (25)

Peter Aguilar, D-Calif.-31, Sanford Bishop, D-Ga.-2, Matt Cartwright, D-Pa.-17, Katherine Clark, D-Mass.-5, Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn.-3, Charlie Dent, R- Pa.-15, David Joyce, R-Ohio-14, Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio-9, Derek Kilmer, D-Wash.-6, Barbara Lee, D-Calif.-13, Nita Lowey, D-N.Y.-17, Betty McCollum, D-Minn.-4, Grace Meng, D-N.Y.-6, Chellie Pingree, D-Maine-1, Mark Pocan, D-Wis.-2, David Price, D-N.C.-4, Mike Quigley, D-Ill.-5, Tom Rooney, R-Fla.-17, Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif.-40, Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md.-2, Tim Ryan, D-Ohio-13, José Serrano, D-N.Y.-15, Peter Visclosky, D-Ind.-1, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla.-23, and Kevin Yoder, R-Kan.-3

NO (27)

Robert Aderhold, R-Ala.-4, Mark Amodie, R-Nev.-2, Ken Calvert, R-Calif.-42, John Carter, R-Texas-31, Tom Cole, R-Okla.-4, Henry Cuellar, D-Texas-28, John Abney Culberson, R-Texas-7, Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla.-25, Chuck Fleischmann, R-Tenn.-3, Jeff Fortenberry, R-Nev.-1, Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J.-11, Kay Granger, R-Texas-12, Tom Graves, R-Ga.-14, Andy Harris, R-Md.-1, Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash.-3, Evan Jenkins, R-W.Va.-3, John Moolenaar, R-Mich.-4, Dan Newhouse, R-Wash.-4, Steven Palazzo, R-Miss.-4, Martha Roby, R-Ala.-2, Harold Rogers, R-Ky.-5, Michael Simpson, R-Idaho-2, Chris Stewart, R-Utah-2, Scott Taylor, R-Va.-2, David Valadao, R-Calif.-21, Steve Womack, R-Ark.-3, and David Young, R-Iowa-3

Read More

☛ Association News 7-13-17

Posted by on Jul 13, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

ASSOCIATION NEWS:

 

July 13, 2017

Kurt Crawford, the former senior sale executive at the National Cutting Horse Association, has joined the AMERICAN PAINT HORSE ASSOCIATION (APHA), where he will be director of business development, which includes their sales and sponsorship program.

 

Crawford was also previously the Executive Director of the Pacific Coast Cutting Horse Association, director of operations at M3 Companies, and director of sale and marketing at Rancharrah.

 

Crawford is a native of Pennsylvania; however, he earned two degrees at Western Kentucky University. His history in the performance horse industry included competing in reining, cutting and cow horse events.   You can contact him at (817) 222-6445 or e-mail him at kcrawford@apha.com.

 

The AMERICAN QUARTER HORSE ASSOCIATION (AQHA) has added to their staff with Tex Ann Kraft becoming the new senior director of business development. Having numerous marketing awards under her belt, she will be responsible for AQHA’s corporate partnerships and will help provide guidance for the association’s publication and digital media assets. She has previously held executive positions with Turn-Key Marketing & Promotions, Sprint, AMC Theaters and Hallmark Cards.

 

Also, Jazlyn Rice was promoted to business development manager and will direct the management of all advertising accounts. She joined the AQHA in 2016 as an account executive coming from being a territory sale manager for Ariat International.

 

The NATIONAL CUTTING HORSE ASSOCIATION will be holding their Summer Spectacular beginning Monday, July 17, going through Sunday, Aug. 6 at the Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas.

 

The NCHA Summer Spectacular, held over 20 days, is the final leg of the NCHA Triple Crown of Cutting and features the NCHA Derby for 4-year-olds, and the NCHA Classic Challenge for 5/6-year-olds and offers a purse of over $2 million.

 

According to the NCHA, as the third jewel in the NCHA Triple Crown, the NCHA Derby has seen just three Open horses, and one Non-Pro horse claim the Triple Crown title.

 

Also, the NYCHA Convention and Scholarship Cutting are held in conjunction with the Spectacular which brings the youth to the forefront of the competition. Go to www.nchacutting.com and click on Triple Crown events for a schedule and results of the show.

 

During the Calgary Stampede in Calgary, Canada, the NCHA held a high-paying Mercuria cutting with David and Stacie McDavid, Fort Worth, Texas, taking home the largest paycheck of $13,330 for a 225 score by Clint Allen riding their 9-year-old QB Cat (High Brow Cat x Quintan Blue) in the Open Division. The pair is also ranked fifth in this year’s NCHA World Championship Open Standings. The Reserve title went to Kevin and Sandy Knight’s Eazee E, ridden by Tatum Rice to a close 224, and colleting a $9,553.33 paycheck for the Weatherford, Texas couple.

 

In the Non-Pro division, Shannon Lamb, Boerne, Texas, riding Rue Du Ichi took home the top paycheck of $9,646.67 for a 220.5 score. The Reserve title went to Kaila Stewart, Crossfield, Alberta, Canada, riding Clays Little CD to a 220, taking home 47,352.67.

 

Read More

☛ Think animal abuse law is really a felony? 6-18–17

Posted by on Jun 18, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, Uncategorized, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

THINK THE ANIMAL ABUSE LAW IS REALLY A FELONY?

30-YEAR-OLD SENTENCED TO 99 YEARS

June 18, 2017

If you think that the Animal Abuse law passed in 2014, making animal abuse a felony, doesn’t have teeth in it, think again – especially if you live in Alabama.

According to WSFA of Alex City, Ala., Nick Patterson, a 30-year-old from Alex City was sentenced to 99 years in prison after pleading guilty to aggravated animal cruelty charges,

Patterson, in a plea deal, pled guilty to nine counts of animal abuse plus three counts of financial transaction card fraud.

After finding 14 living but malnourished dogs in outdoor enclosures where Patterson lived last June, with only dirty water to drink, fed sporadically and neglected for months, police also found the remains of six other collies on the property. Patterson was sentenced to 10 years on each of the nine animal cruelty and abuse counts and three years on each fraud charge. All sentences will run concurrently.

Patterson also tried to flee from police, all the while fraudulently using credit cards and stolen checks. He turned himself in to authorities in Council Bluffs, Iowa on July 24.

,

He may be eligible for parole after he serves a  minimum of 18 years and is not allowed to ever own an animal again.

Read More

☛ Tragedy strikes Joe Suiter 6-8-17

Posted by on Jun 8, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

TRAGEDY SRIKES JOE SUITER

Reprinted from articles on Facebook
June 8, 2017

 

Joe Suiter loses everything – even his dog!

Tragedy struck at the home of 1990 Futurity Champion Joe Suiter this last week of April. Joe not only lost irreplaceable possessions, all of his clothing, a roof over his head, but most importantly one of his pet chihuahuas “Joey”.

We are seeking funds to rebuild or purchase a small manufactured home for Joe. He is also in need of clothing so any type of assistance & donation is appreciated. Items can be dropped off at his residence in Litchfield Park, AZ.

$1, $5, $10, $20 donations can go a long way during a time of need. Please help us help Joe by donating on GoFundMe!!!! Thank you to all who have donated!!! We are also seeking building materials to be delivered to Joe Suiter 4620 N. Perryville Rd.,

Litchfield Park, AZ 85340.

Read More

☛ Are bad breeding practices animal abuse? 5-26-17

Posted by on May 26, 2017 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE LAWSUITS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 11 comments

BAD BREEDING PRACTICES

 

IS THIS ANIMAL ABUSE?

 

By Rick Dennis
May 26, 2017

As an AQHA breeder, my requirements are to breed an animal that is genetically correct with excellent conformation, the right temperament, enough athleticism to perform multiple events, enough cow instinct to perform in cow horse or cutting, free of genetic defects and with enough bone and stamina to withstand the rigors of the show pen for many years.

 

My article entitled, “AQHA Genetic Pool Shrinks,” dated Jan. 10, 2015, delineated an ongoing problem within the Quarter Horse industry in that the genetic pool is shrinking. Undesirable genetic traits and diseases are being passed from generation to generation. The following articles were the proto types of my article that would later play out in a courtroom in Texas in 2017 involving HERDA.

 

ARTICLE EXCERPTS:
Recent articles in the American Quarter Horse Journal entitled “The Changing Landscape of Quarter Horse Genetics, Part 1 and Part 2,” really caught my eye because of two reasons: 1) I’m an American Quarter Horse breeder specializing in multiple-event reined cow horses and 2) I’m a Life Member of AQHA.

Part 1’s first paragraph essentially sets the stage for the present state of the breed in that it’s becoming more and more inbred, stating, “Talk to an equine geneticist long enough and you are bound to hear two assertions made about the American Quarter Horse breed that sound like opposites: First, it is one of the most genetically diverse equine breeds in the world and second, it’s becoming increasingly inbred.

 

The second and third paragraphs of Part 1 outline the history of the breed and a factor causing this shrinking of genetics, stating, “Beginning in colonial America, the breed began from a diverse genetic base of largely Thoroughbred and Spanish blood that was added to and developed for roughly 200 years, focusing on producing quickness and durability.

 

But fast-forward to the modern era of specialized American Quarter Horse performers, especially at the highest levels, and you find specialization in the horse-breeding herd too: specific groups of individual classes of horses used to produce those top performers. If you’re breeding for a specific category of horse (i.e.) reining, cutting, cow horse, etc., the gene pool is further narrowed within this subgroup.

 

That suggests there are narrowed gene pools in those subgroups and now a genetic study clearly shows it. A research team from the University of Minnesota has published its findings in an issue of the Journal of Heredity, “The American Quarter Horse: Population structure and relationship to the Thoroughbred.” The 2012-2013 study was partially funded by the American Quarter Horse Foundation.

 

“In the pedigree analysis, some groups shared no common sires, such as halter and racing, but other groups did, such as reining and working cow horse. Although popular sires within one group were rarely shared with another group, all the pedigrees reflected the common roots of the Quarter Horse.

“Additionally, pedigree analysis showed that the most common 15 sires across the groups were all direct tail-male descendants of Three Bars (TB), with several of those stallions showing more than one cross to the Thoroughbred in the first four generations.

“Inbreeding” refers to the mating of relatives and results in an “inbred” individual horse. The amount an individual horse is “inbred” can be estimated from its pedigree or genetic data. In a pedigree analysis, determining an individual’s “co-ancestry coefficient” gives an idea of how closely related individuals are on a pedigree page. Two individuals can be highly related without either of them being inbred, but if you breed two individuals with a high co-ancestry coefficient, their offspring will be inbred.

“Diversity quantifies the amount of genetic variation there is in a population. Typically, a highly inbred population has low genetic diversity. In this study the lowest genetic diversity within a sub-population was in the cutting and racing groups. The highest average inbreeding was found in cutting.”

 

Also, a recent statement from Nena J. Winand, DVM, PhD and a specialist on HERDA that was a witness for the Plaintiffs in a recent lawsuit regarding HERDA mentioned later in this article, said, “I’d point out from a medical perspective, ANY shared ancestry, no matter how remote (far back) is considered inbreeding, because it provides a chance for an individual to inherit the same gene derived from the common ancestor from both parents.”

 

ANALYZING QUARTER HORSE BREEDING RULES:
From this study, it’s clear that the present American Quarter Horse breeding rules require scrutiny to determine: 1) their contribution to this shrinking genetic pool and 2) the adverse affect each adopted breeding rule may or may not have on the breed itself. I wonder if the executives paid six figures at the AQHA and the Executive Committee members, especially the Stud Book and Registration Committee, had any forethought in the ramifications their expansive breeding rule adoptions would have on the Quarter Horse breed and industry over time?

As a private sector Risk Analyst, I’m commonly faced with the task of analyzing practices and concepts to determine either the detriment or usefulness an existing concept or practice has on an organization. In order to shed light on the topic, I examined two specific breeding rules adopted by AQHA: Multiple Embryo Transfer and Frozen Semen. I also examined the impact each adopted breeding rule may have on the breeding populous as well as a correlation of each one’s compliance with AQHA’s Mission Statement.

 

BAD BREEDING PRACTICES:
A horse’s conformation affects his ability to perform certain tasks. Read more about this interesting concept in AQHA’s Form to Function report.
Click for “Form To Function” report>>

“Longstanding breeding practices likely contribute to that. Habits such as “popular sire syndrome,” which is the tendency for many breeders to breed to a top-performing stallion, or the use of assisted reproductive techniques such as frozen semen and embryo transfers can greatly amplify one horse’s genetic impact. Even the practice of always breeding the ‘best to the best’ can contribute to increased inbreeding in a sub-population.

“Any time we take a single individual and increase its ability to generate offspring, that is going to decrease the genetic pool that is reproducing.

“Additionally, when you increase inbreeding and reduce diversity, you increase the incidence of undesirable genes making an appearance.

“A good example is the incidence of HERDA (hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia) in cutting horses. It’s very frequent within this sub-population, which might be the result of decreasing diversity and/or the ‘popular-sire’ effect. A previous study revealed that 28.3 percent of cutting-bred individuals carried the recessive gene for HERDA.”

Click following for AQHAGenetic Pool Shrinks>>

 

FIRST LAWSUIT ENTERS COURT OVER HERDA:
In a lawsuit entitled, “Minshall Vs Hartman Equine, Dos Cat Partners, Shauna and Ed Dufurrena” was tried in a Texas courtroom in 2017. The basis of the lawsuit encompassed fraud with the AQHA stallion Auspicious Cat. The owners of the horse advertised the stallion as being HERDA Negative when in fact the horse was designated N/Hr (a carrier of the HERDA gene) by the American Quarter Horse Association.

 

Prior to this lawsuit, the AQHA required genetic testing of breeding stallions on a graduated scale based on the number of mares bred until Jan. 1, 2016. After this date, each breeding stallion was required to have genetic testing which included a 5-Panel group of designated tests that were designed by AQHA and performed by UC Davis.

 

Up until the filing of this lawsuit, AQHA reserved the right NOT TO RELEASE the 5-Panel test results, except to the owners of the specific horse. This nondisclosure prevented anyone breeding to a specific stallion from obtaining the 5-Panel status of the stallion; therefore, running the risk of passing on a defect to the impending foal.

 

After the filing of the above-captioned lawsuit, AQHA has changed its posture to include releasing the 5-Panel test results to anyone who contacts them and asks for it. It’s also planned that the test results will be on the horse’s pedigree when their new computer database is online. Further, AQHA intends to embed the horses’ 5-Panel test results directly onto the stallions’ registration papers as a permanent record.

 

However, the curious nature of AQHA’s testing requirements does not include breeding mares, which, in my opinion should be a requirement as well. After all, mares carry the same number of genetic chromosomes as stallions do, which includes the mares’ lineage as well.

 

This is exactly what happened in this case as two N/Hr (HERDA carrier) horses were bred together, producing a HERDA affected foal. The Plaintiff’s had simply relied on the honesty and integrity of the stallion owner. Does AQHA have any culpable liability in the matter from their previous posture of not releasing stallion specific genetic testing results?

 

The other curious nature of this saga is that my article AQHA Genetic Pool Shrinks, along with its predetermined scientific facts and warnings about inbreeding, ended up in this courtroom drama two years later.

 

WHAT HAPPENS TO THE FOALS OF THESE MISGUIDED BREEDINGS?
Just about every cutter I’ve talked to wants a High Brow Cat-bred horse because of their winning nature. In fact, some even breed for horses carrying the HERDA gene due to this phenomenon, which is exactly what happened in this lawsuit. The Plaintiffs desired to breed to a High Brow Cat stallion that carried the AQHA N/N designation and ended up breeding to an N/Hr horse. Since their mare carried the N/Hr designation, two N/Hr horses produced a HERDA-affected foal that required an enormous amount of money to maintain.

 

So at the end of the day, what happens to the foals that wash out due to genetic deficiencies: euthanasia, the horse slaughter pipeline, retired and crippled at two or three years of age perhaps? Has our industry become so callous and money hungry that they throw caution to the wind when breeding? What about the poor horse that suffers due to this selfish act? This is an arduous fact to quantify simply due to non-reported statistical data. In my opinion just breeding to a particular line of horses just because they’re winning is a very poor excuse, especially in lieu of the fact that a known line is capable of producing undesirable genetic traits in the American Quarter Horse. We experienced this in the HYPP line of horses!

Also, it’s my opinion that AQHA being the breed registry for the American Quarter Horse should live up to its own Mission Statement and step in to prevent this well-known and established HERDA gene from permeating the American Quarter Horse breed. After all, they are the rule makers and some of their established and unorthodox   breeding rules have and continue to contribute to the shrinking genetic pool of the American Quarter Horse, thus causing direct harm to the breed. Only AQHA can stop or control the insertion of bad genetics into the American Quarter Horse Gene Pool!

 

BREEDING PREREQUISITES 101:

1)         Mare owners should have their horses genetically tested by the AQHA 5-panel prior to breeding.

2)         Mare owners should perform due-diligent research into the genetic test results of the impending desired stallion prior to breeding.

3)         Prior to breeding, consult with a geneticist to determine whether the match up would produce any undesirable traits in the produced foal, especially if a shared lineage or line of horses is in the background of both horses.

 

GENETIC DEFICIENCIES IN THE THOROUGHBRED LINE:
Unfortunately, bad breeding practices and catastrophic results aren’t limited to the American Quarter Horse Industry. In a later article I’ll discuss and delineate the bad breeding practices in the Thoroughbred Industry.

 

“Until Next Time, Keep ‘Em Between The Bridle”

 

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Office/Mobile: (985) 630-3500
Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com
Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com

 

 

 

 

 

Read More