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☛ To slaughter or not to slaughter 1-26-18

Posted by on Jan 26, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 15 comments

TO SLAUGHTER OR NOT TO SLAUGHTER

 

 

A QUESTION FOR THE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT TO ANSWER

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Jan. 25, 2018

The year is 2018, we have a new President, our country’s compass is pointed in a new direction, and yet our government hasn’t advanced very far in fulfilling their legal obligation outlined in the “1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act,” which mandates protection and management of these animals on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service.

“Eighty four percent of Donald Trump’s voters oppose the slaughter of wild horses and a very narrow band of people are for it because they profit from it,” said “Chris Minakowski, a lobbyist and policy analyst.

To date, our government is still rounding up wild mustangs and burros – by barbaric methods, e.g., helicopter or aerial herding which causes a significant amount of animals to be injured or killed. They’re still confining approximately 45,000 animals in holding pens and tax payer dollars are still being wasted paying landowners to house, feed and care for wild horses and burros which would ordinarily care for themselves on the open range where they were born.

The main culprit for this travesty are government-subsidized ranchers using taxpayer dollars that contribute to 2 percent or less of the annual beef production of the United States of America. Annually, these government-subsidized ranchers encroach more and more on public grazing lands with cattle insertion, which increasingly diminishes the grazing lands available for the natural wildlife inhabitants, such as wild horses and burros, among other wildlife species of the herbivore or carnivore type.

How does this happen?  Cattle grazers complain to the BLM that wildlife (wild horses and burros) are encroaching on available grazing lands and request for the natural occupants to be removed to reduce the competition for available food.  However, statistics prove when wild horses and burros are removed, they are simply replaced with commercial cows and sheep.

Carnivores (meat eaters) such as bears, bobcats, coyotes, wolves and mountain lions are removed because they feed on cattle belonging to the government taxpayer-subsidized ranchers. In my opinion, this costly action accomplishes an imbalance of nature on public lands which incidentally belong to American citizens – not the cattle ranchers.

In one of my studies, I discovered, through BLM-supplied statistics, that the BLM makes more money each year from recreational vehicle slot rentals than it does on grassland grazing fees paid by government taxpayer-subsidized cattle ranchers.

In 2015, I authored an article entitled, “Horse Slaughter – Fact and Fiction”, which precisely details the acquired BLM statistics, as well as other related facts pertaining to the waste of taxpayer dollars. One of the organizations promoting the removal of wild horses and burros is identified in this article as “Protect The Harvest,” an organization owned by Forrest Lucas of Lucas Oil. Today, Mr. Lucas is promoting his business with every major 501(c) 3 horse organization by adding piles of cash to payouts. In fact, I’ve been told that “Protect The Harvest” has booths at the major equine events in order to promote Lucas’s organization. However, what Mr. Lucas fails to inform the general public is that there’s a vast majority of cattle ranchers using public grazing land that are millionaires and the vast majority of the rest are being subsidized by our tax dollars.

The real story that’s not being told is how the wild horses and burros suffer after being removed from their home rangeland and confined to holding pens and all because a minority in the cattle business dictates what happens at the BLM.  For the record, I applied to be on the board of the decision makers who decide on matters such as these and I was turned down due to my law enforcement background. Imagine that!

Click for Horse Slaughter article>>

 

HISTORY OF THE BLM:

With historical roots dating back to the earliest days of the nation, the BLM administers the lands that remain from America’s original “public domain.”  Created in 1946 through a government reorganization during the Truman Administration, the BLM is the successor to the General Land Office (established in 1812) and the U.S. Grazing Service (originally called the Division of Grazing and renamed in 1939). The Taylor Grazing Act of 1934 established the United States Grazing Service to manage the public rangelands by establishment of advisory boards that set grazing fees. In 1946 the Grazing Service was merged with the General Land Office to form the Bureau of Land Management.

Fast forward: This year, (2018) the BLM is commemorating two milestone events: It is the 72nd anniversary as an Interior Department agency, and the 42nd anniversary of the principle law defining its mission: the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 commonly referred to by its acronym FLPMA.  As the manager of more land (2.45 million acres) or one-tenth of America’s land base and more subsurface mineral estate (700 million acres) than any other government agency, the BLM carries out a dual mandate under FLPMA: that of managing public land for multiple uses (such as energy development, livestock grazing, mining, timber harvesting and outdoor recreation) while conserving natural, historical and cultural resources, such as wilderness areas, wild horses and wildlife habitat, artifacts and dinosaur fossils.  In the language of FLPMA, the BLM’s responsibility is to administer public lands “on the basis of multiple use and sustained yield” of resources.”

What this means, on a practical level, is that the BLM – except in areas specifically set aside for conservation purposes – must multitask to fulfill its duties.  Nevertheless, consistent with the BLM’s goal of good stewardship of public land resources, “multiple use” does not mean every use on every acre.

ABC NEWS ARTICLE:

A leading headline on ABC News states, “Wild horses facing slaughter after US Government proposes new regulations.”  The BLM controls one-eighth of the country’s landmass but leases over 60 percent of it to cattle ranchers. Since their livestock rely on the same resources as the wild horses do, some ranchers want the wild horses pushed off of the land entirely. There are over 45,000 wild horses in holding areas, costing taxpayers about $50 million annually.  It’s an expense that the U.S. Department of Interior sought to address in its 2018 budget by lifting regulations that prevent slaughtering wild horses. If slaughtering wild horses becomes legal, some animal rights activists are concerned that these horses will become extinct.

“The BLM, the very agency in charge of protecting them, is asking Congress for permission to kill them.”  Netherlands said. “They’ve stockpiled wild horses in holding pens….and so now what are they going to do with all the horses that they’ve stockpiled? The adoption rates are not high enough so they can’t adopt them all out. So now we have a bunch of wild horses, that the taxpayers are paying for, in holding facilities and their solution is to kill them.”

Two of the most ridiculous bureaucratic statements come from Lisa Reid of the BLM.  “There’s three things that wild hoses need: food, water, and obviously space.”

[1] “As you can see, we do have millions of acres out here but not every acre is producing viable forage for the horses. So you know, just as with any type of species, they have to be managed just so they don’t become overpopulated and diseased.”

[2] “The agency’s goal is to always have healthy rangelands, which is aided by controlling their population. They no longer have many natural predators in the wild.”

What makes these statements so ridiculous are the facts: 1), no mention as to the number of commercial cows and sheep that are grazing on the grasslands – only the estimated number of horses. 2) There is no mention of limiting the number of commercial cows and sheep, and 3) there are no predators, which upsets the balance of nature, simply due to the fact that BLM has wasted millions of taxpayer dollars to remove them!

Click for Wild Horses article>>

“A wild mustang charging across an open plain is a symbol of the untamed majesty of nature.  But the predators chasing these majestic beasts are anything but natural.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle”

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Office/Mobile: (985) 630-3500
Email: windrivercompany@gmal.com
Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com

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☛ Cloning and genetic engineering – 1-24-18

Posted by on Jan 24, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, FEATURE ARTICLES, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHAT | 0 comments

CLONING AND GENETIC ENGINEERING OF HORSES

WILL IT AFFECT FUTURE OLYMPICS?

 

From the Editor
Jan. 24, 2018

Following is a link to an article I received that I thought was very interesting and thought provoking. It was written for readers who are interested in horses competing in the Olympics, but it is also a general article on cloning and genetic engineering of horses that I feel you may be interested in reading.

There is  a lot of agreement regarding this among horse lovers, as well as opposition, to cloning and genetic engineering. However, this article is an in-depth article regarding horses going to the Olympics in jumping and other events.

Cloning and Genetic Engineering: Will It Affect Future Olympic Teams?

 

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☛ Trainers support Horse Training Integrity Act 1-24-18

Posted by on Jan 24, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

RACE HORSE TRAINERS SUPPORT “HORSE TRAINING INTEGRITY ACT”

 

Press release sponsored by Darby  Dan Farms
Jan. 24, 2018

According to a press release sponsored by Darby Dan Farms, leading North American trainer H. Graham Motion has joined the Water Hay Oats Alliance (WHOA) as the latest member in a growing list of trainers who support efforts for passage of The Horseracing Integrity Act.  To date, 65 trainers are represented on WHOA’s roster, including Hall of Famers Roger Attfield, Michael Dickinson, Neil Drysdale, and Jonathan Sheppard, as well as leading international trainers Ian Balding, John Gosden, Alec Head, Criquette Head-Maarek and Gai Waterhouse.

In a statement to WHOA, Motion shared the following:

From what I have seen WHOA is the only group that is making a serious effort to form a national governing body with uniform rules and penalties covering all 38 racing jurisdictions and in sync with international rules of racing (IFHA) bringing transparency and integrity to US racing.

I have held off joining WHOA up until now, but frustration with the lack of a governing body continues to become more apparent as shown by the problems that several horsemen including myself have experienced in the last few years.

There is a lack of understanding as to how complicated the medication rules have become from state to state and there seems to be a desire from the powers that be to trip us up rather than guide us through these issues.

We cannot compare ourselves to other countries when it comes to medication infractions. In the US we are allowed certain medications within a closer time frame to race day and in my mind herein lies the problem.

There is only one solution and that is a governing body with guidelines similar to other countries where common sense and uniform rules are used. Despite the sensitivity of testing, little has changed with regards to the environment in which our samples are handled.  This also would be better addressed by a group that would oversee all testing protocols. Without change we will continue to give our industry a black eye.

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☛ Sex offenders and background checks 1-19-18

Posted by on Jan 19, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 7 comments

SEX OFFENDERS AND BACKGROUND CHECKS

 

DO YOU KNOW ALL THERE IS TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR ASSOCIATION’S OFFICERS OR HALL OF FAME MEMBERS?

By Glory Ann Kurtz
Jan. 19, 2018

Now is the time when horse organizations accept suggestions from their membership so they can honor some of their members to be in their respective Halls of Fame. Usually suggestions are made by members, with transcripts that include their great accomplishments in their particular industry. But do they really know all the information about the person they are suggesting be given the honors?

That’s kind of how our members of Congress are chosen and we know how that turned out. Or maybe it’s about the businessmen or women or film stars who have been highly successful, in great demand and are very wealthy. A group gets together and decides which of them should be honored … whether it be in film, music or business.  Or maybe it’s the news media who decides which businessmen have accomplishments worthy of some recognition. We also know how that all turned out.

That leads to the big question: “What DON’T we know about these individuals?” That’s been a lesson learned the hard way recently when several members of the U.S. Congress, as well as the top echelon of ownership and management of U.S. companies, who had to step down when they were accused of sexual harassment and assault. A majority of them didn’t even deny the allegations; they simply resigned to “being unmasked” as their female victims had finally came forward, saying  the sexual harassment had been going on for years. That includes the doctor at the Olympics who recently  had to face  his victims in court, with the parent of one of them revealing how her daughter had committed suicide after the sexual assault.

Sexual harassment and assault has also been going on in the horse industry for years – but in a much smaller scale than in the business or movie world as there are not many media outlets trying to seek out the perpetrators and unmask them to the industry. It’s easier to prove horse abuse than it is women or child abuse as usually there isn’t a lot of physical or court evidence available. It’s simply a woman’s or child’s word against the perpetrator’s and usually they are too ashamed or scared to report it in the first place. Personally, I know of instances where young girls have been abused for years and were too frightened of the perpetrator to report it.

However, the web site “RateMyHorsePro.com,” recently unmasked a National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) long-time member who is a trainer, clinician and a member of their Hall of Fame, who has a conviction for “rape by force or threat.” The site published a state of California rap sheet of him, including a photo and his offenses that took place in 1963. The website, that also does background checks on individuals, stated that the information “was obtained through the public domain and in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act.”

As a result, Les Vogt, 75, of Paso Robles, Calif., was exposed as a convicted felon through California’s Offense Code 261.3 Rape of Drugged Victim in 2002.

Click for Megan’s Law sex offender law in California>>

Recently California passed SB384, which is a new bill regarding sex offenders. However Vogt is still under the rules of the old bill as his offense was in 1963.

SB 384: California’s new 3-tiered sex offender registration system>>

According to his website, Vogt is “one of the horse world’s premier trainers, teachers and innovators, having won 15 World Champion Reining and Working Cow Horse titles, as well as countless other championships. He has been a member of the NRCHA Hall of Fame since 2004! Two years following his conviction for being a sex offender.

Les Vogt | NRCHA Hall of fame

Vogt’s website states, “As a teacher and clinician, Les lectures extensively in the United States, South America and Western Europe. His clinics welcome both professional and  non-pro students and every clinic is tailored for the participants.”

Vogt’s site emphasizes that his clinics focus on various aspects of the Western performance spectrum with special sessions available for reining, showmanship, working cow horse and young horses/young riders.  Vogt has 13 clinics planned for 2018 due to his success in the National Reined Cow Horse Association.

Vogt was also included in the film “Down The Fence,” regarding the reined cow horse that is promoted by the NRCHA and is now available on Netflix or can be purchased on Amazon.

WHAT CAN BE DONE PRIOR TO AN ASSOCIATION MEMBER’S NEW POSITION?

While there’s not much an association’s Board of Directors can do to make sure all their fellow members are not sex offenders, it is possible to assure that the members of the board and/or individuals who are honored or voted in as officers or Hall of Fame members and who are role models for their members – especially the youth – are not sex offenders or have any felony  convictions on their record. A conviction of being a sex offender is a felony. As of yesterday, I checked with Megan’s List in California and Vogt is definitely still on the list and is, therefore, a sex offender and a felon.

Click for Sex Offender Registry FBI>>

An association’s Board can make it mandatory that anyone running for an office or the board of directors or are nominated for a Hall of Famhttps://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/sex-offender-registrye or another honorary position at a equine association, have a “background check” before they are moved into that position. If you don’t control who your officers and Hall of Fame members are, and you know that they have a felony on their rap sheet, the Association could be liable for the actions of these honorary members of that association as the honors given to them by the association usually signifies they are trustworthy as clinicians.

However, Jay Winborn, the Executive Director of the NRCHA  was given a copy of this article prior to it being published, and after consulting with the Board of Directors of the NRCHA, he made the following statement: “NRCHA is an equine association that promotes and produces reined cow horse events and does not comment on situations involving the personal lives of our members.” He also asked that several statements be eliminated that he had previously made.

It is interesting to note that to be an AQHA Professional Horseman in the Trainers Directory, the individuals have to go through a background check.

Also, the NRCHA, along with several other horse organizations, including the NCHA and APHA receive city, state and federal money for their events held at the Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas. There is a possibility if there were a lawsuit filed by a victim of a sexual assault at one of these events, that the facility, city, state or federal government could also be included in the lawsuit. That could be the tipping point to get a background check on the board and officers of each of those associations. At the very least, if it was discovered that some of the individuals on these association’s board of directors had felony convictions for sex offenses, these governmental departments may not want to participate – as well the event’s sponsors.

According to the NRCHA, as of Oct. 23, 2017, nominations were being accepted for the next election cycle for the NRCHA Board of Directors for positions for nomination currently held by Sandy Collier, Brad Barkemeyer, Amanda Gardiner and Dan Roeser. Positions remaining in office for 2018 include Todd Bergen, Paul Bailey, Jake Telford, Joe Carter, Jim Lane, Trey Neal, Diane Edwards and Jon Roeser.

Attached is a copy of the NRCHA 2018 Election Notice, which interestingly includes in disclosure and eligibility requirements: (iv) full disclosure of any felony convictions on record and signing the NRCHA Code of Conduct and Confidentiality agreement.

Click for NRCHA 2018 Election Notice>>

However, there is no known check or penalties in place to make sure those signing it are being truthful, other than, “If discovered, they will be immediately suspended from the ballot or later from the board.” No mention of the loss of their membership in the NRCHA.

WHO ELSE SHOULD HAVE BACKGROUND CHECKS?

Also, another group of members of horse associations who have access to women and children are the horse trainers who have clinics on a regular basis, teaching, among others, such as women and children, how to ride and show horses. The NCHA, AQHA, APHA and NRCHA all have a Trainer’s Directory, so it would be easy to make a background check one of the requirements to be in the Trainer’s Directory, especially if they are training the riders. The cost of the background check could be up to the trainer, or part of their membership fee to be included in the association’s Trainer Directory. Several trainers are having their clinics at their own facilities.

However, according to my legal sources, if you’re not the trainer putting on the clinic, individuals or associations who are putting on clinics should check with the Sex Offender National Registry or the Sex Offender Registry in the state the clinician is living in to see if they are on the sex-offender list. If they fail to do that, the person or people, including associations, putting on the clinic could be involved in a lawsuit if the trainer they hired is accused of a sex offense during the clinic, should there be a complaint regarding sexual harassment or assault.

Also, if you are a horse facility owner and employ a trainer, if you do a background check on them, you can be assured that they are not sex offenders before they have the run of your facility and customers. If the trainer is coming from out of state, that state’s sex-offender registry should be checked if you don’t find them on the National Sex Offender chart. This could also help to alleviate any legal action against you.

Click for National Sex Offender chart>>

By today’s heightened awareness of sexual predation in our society, it seems prudent for 501 C 3 nonprofit organizations to design standards of care and rule adoptions to insure the safety and well being of its members and is especially prudent when an individual is a role model for new and upcoming generations. It would also be relevant for associations to have a hotline where victims can call into the association without being exposed as to who they are.

If you have any further questions regarding this problem, it is covered in Rick Dennis’ book “The American Horse Industry – Avoiding the Pitfalls,” available from Dennis at WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC, Richard E. Dennis, Managing Member

Phone: (985) 630-3500, Email: windrivercompany@gmail.com, Email – Personal: windrivercompany.rd@gmail.com, Web Site: http://www.windrivercompanyllc.com, or from online sources such as Amazon.com.

WHERE TO GO FOR BACKGROUND CHECKS:

The first question most people ask is, “Where do I go to find someone to do a legitimate background check on upcoming officers or members of the Hall of Fame?” You can do a lot of research yourself by Googling “background checks” for a variety of choices. If you would rather have an outside service do the checking for you, Rate My Horse Pro, who did the background check on Vogt, does background checks as well as do most private investigators. It may be one of the best investments your company, facility or association can make.

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☛ UHC announces “Operation Chip” 1-11-18

Posted by on Jan 11, 2018 in BREAKING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

UHC ANNOUNCES NEW PROGRAM “OPERATION CHIP”

 

PROGRAM WILL BE AN ADDITION TO OPERATION GELDING

Jan. 11, 2018
Press release from Unwanted Horse Coalition

(Washington, DC)- Starting in 2018, the Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC) will be offering a new service to its popular Operation Gelding program called “Operation Chip.”

“The industry as a whole is moving towards microchipping as the preferred method of identification,” said UHC Director Ashley Furst. “Initially, organizations hosting Operation Gelding clinics will be eligible to apply for microchips for Operation Chip. Eventually we hope to expand the program to be able to offer rescue organizations the opportunity to apply for just the chips to be inserted into the horses in their care. Microchipping horses in rescue organizations is one of the best ways to be able to track them through the system, as well as give the industry the ability to reunite them with their owner in the case of a natural disaster.”

The UHC has partnered with MicrochipID Equine to provide the microchips for the program. The chips provided will come with a chip syringe, as well as a pre-paid registration card, and the veterinarian providing the gelding services at the clinic will be responsible for inserting the chips. “In order to ensure the horses are getting registered, the UHC will also be covering the cost of registration for each chip that is put into a horse,” said Furst. “A survey of rescues that have participated in Operation Gelding showed that only 50% of rescues are scanning horses for chips upon intake. The cost of scanners can be prohibitive for rescues, so as a result the UHC will also be providing eligible 501c3 rescues with an opportunity to apply for a deeply discounted scanner.”

The UHC is able to provide the scanners and chips to participants due to the generosity of The Right Horse Initiative. “The Right Horse Initiative is proud to support the UHC in its efforts to provide a more robust identification system in equine welfare,” said Christy Counts, President of The Right Horse. “Lack of identification is a major barrier to safe transitions for horses in this country. Providing easy access to microchipping for horse owners and horse rescues is a relatively easy and inexpensive solution to achieving our collaborative goal of providing opportunities for at-risk horses.”

Information about Operation Chip and how to apply can be found on the UHC website here: http://www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org/operation-chip/. For any questions, please contact UHC Director Ashley Furst at 202-846-1607 or afurst@horsecouncil.org

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☛ PRCA News 1-9-18

Posted by on Jan 9, 2018 in INDUSTRY NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA NEWS

Courtesy Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association
Jan. 9, 2018

ProRodeo Hall of Famer Plaugher passes away

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Wilbur Plaugher, one of rodeo’s most unique characters and a ProRodeo Hall of Famer, passed away Jan. 2 in Sanger, Calif. He was 95.
Plaugher turned to rodeo to make more money as a young adult and that trail eventually led to his induction into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1990. It was a long road to that honor, as he excelled as both a contestant and clown. He also co-founded the Fellowship of Christian Cowboys.
“It’s been a great life, and I still have a great life,” he said in a May 9, 2016, issue of the ProRodeo Sports News. “Life on this Earth is short, and it all went by too quickly. I’ve just now gotten the hang of stuff, and I’d like to stick around another 30 years.”
Plaugher first made his name in rodeo in 1946 when he was crowned all-around champion at the prestigious Madison Square Garden rodeo in New York City. He finished fourth in the steer wrestling world standings that year and experienced a life-changing moment when he filled in as a bullfighter at a rodeo.
That led to him also becoming a rodeo clown, like his fellow bronc rider and friend Slim Pickens, who joined Plaugher in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2005.
“Slim wanted to be a clown and I said, ‘Why do you want to do a stupid thing like that?'” Plaugher said with a laugh. “When I started doing the bullfighting just to help save the guys, they wanted me to be a clown, too.
“I put the makeup on and thought of some funny things to do. I couldn’t believe people were laughing at me. I guess that bug bit me right there. From then on, it was all I could think about. I did everything from playing Liberace to Michael Jackson, all of ’em. I had trained goats, chimpanzees, dogs, roosters, mules. I loved every bit of it.”
He did it so well that in 1982, at the age of 60, he was named PRCA Clown of the Year.
As a contestant, Plaugher finished second in the world standings in 1958 – $420 behind gold buckle winner Jim Bynum – despite going to fewer rodeos than his fellow bulldoggers.
“I could only work one rodeo a week, wherever I was clowning, while most of those guys were going to two or three a week,” Plaugher said. “I made money competing and I had a contract for being a clown; that’s how I got ahead.”
He was seventh in the world standings in 1953, fourth in ’55, third in ’57 and ninth in ’59.
Plaugher was born March 13, 1922, in Lima, Ohio, but his family moved to California when he was 4.
With the money he earned at Madison Square Garden in 1946, Plaugher went back to California and bought a ranch.
“That rodeo lasted a month, and I made enough money at Madison Square Garden that year to come home and pay for over half of my 550-acre ranch,” he said in the PSN article. “Of course, land was a lot cheaper back then. Everything I’ve got today came from rodeo.”
Plaugher’s life intersected with many famous people. He worked for ProRodeo Hall of Famer Harry Rowell and for world champion roper Vern Castro. He enlisted in the Air Force during World War II and worked in the shipyards. On weekends, he’d wear his uniform and hitchhike to rodeos to compete.
He met television actor Fess Parker at a rodeo and became friends. He appeared with Parker, the star of Daniel Boone, in several episodes.

Hall of Famer Robinson passes away

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Bob A. Robinson of Hagerman, Idaho, a ProRodeo Hall of Fame steer wrestler, passed away Dec. 16 at St. Luke’s Magic Valley Medical Center in Twin Falls, Idaho. He was 84.
Robinson has been a big influence in the sport of rodeo. He joined the PRCA in 1958 and competed at both ends of the arena as a steer wrestler and a saddle bronc rider. He competed in saddle bronc riding at the National Finals Rodeo in 1959 and in 1960 he competed in both saddle bronc riding and steer wrestling, winning the world steer wrestling title in 1960 and finishing runner-up in the all-around category that same year, behind Harry Thompkins.
Robinson was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2006.
Robinson competed professionally for 14 years, and in 1980, became one of the first pro officials for the PRCA. In September 1982, he became the PRCA’s director of rodeo administration, and he and his wife, Emma, moved from Idaho to Colorado Springs.
During that time, his responsibilities included negotiating prize money with rodeo committees, overseeing the eligibility of cowboys, interpreting and enforcing PRCA rules and coordinating rodeo listings and approvals. He was also instrumental in moving the NFR from Oklahoma City, Okla., to its current location in Las Vegas in 1985. His son, Jade, followed in his footsteps by serving as a ProRodeo official for more than 19 years, working every NFR during that time.

Brown doubles at RTCFR

WACO, Texas – Fresh off his strong effort at the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER – and winning $58,654 – bareback rider Jake Brown kept his momentum rolling Dec. 30.
With a score of 254.5 points, Brown won the three-head average at the RAM Texas Circuit Finals Rodeo, and also snared the Texas Circuit Finals year-end title – two firsts in his career at the Extraco Events Center.
“This feels great,” said Brown, 27. “I drew good horses all weekend and I rode really well. Bill (Tutor) and I were a point apart in the average and it was awesome to win. Winning the year-end title also was a goal of mine, and I was happy to accomplish that goal. I’ve made the (Texas) Circuit Finals so many times and I’ve always wanted to win it and to finally get this done means so much to me.”
Brown clinched his inaugural RTCFR average championship with an 86.5-point ride on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Night Bells in the third round.
“I was really happy when I drew that horse,” Brown said. “I knew I had a really good chance (to do well) if I just did my job. Bill (Tutor) went out right before me and he made a good ride and was 86.5 (points). When I got on Night Bells, he exploded out of the bucking chute and was leaping high and was angling off to the left. I knew I made a good ride so when I hit the ground I was happy, and then when they called out my score (86.5 points), I just smiled.”
Brown has qualified for the WNFR three consecutive times, and the Cleveland, Texas, cowboy finished 12th in the 2017 PRCA World Standings with $161,866.
“Of course, you want to be a world champion, but this is second best, winning the average at the Texas Circuit Finals,” Brown said. “The Texas Circuit Finals are so tough because we have so many NFR guys who compete in this circuit.”
Brown earned $10,589 at the RTCFR – $3,025 coming from winning the average.
Brown was at his best throughout, taking the first-round win with an 85-point ride on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Raging Angel. Then he tied Tutor for the second-round victory with an 83-point ride on Stace Smith Pro Rodeos’ JBC Bent Rail Sourdough.
“I felt like I had a good NFR, the best one I had yet, and coming home I was ready for the (Texas) Circuit Finals,” he said. “We didn’t have much time off. We got to relax for Christmas one weekend and then it was rodeo time again. I was confident and ready to go at the Texas Circuit Finals, and it paid off.”
Brown’s effort in Waco is especially important since all money won at the 12 circuit finals rodeos, All American ProRodeo Finals and the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo counts toward the 2018 PRCA World Standings.
“I think it’s awesome that this money counts in the standings,” Brown said. “I had a good weekend here (in Waco) and I’m excited to go down to the RNCFR and try and win some more money.”
The 2018 RNCFR is scheduled for April 5-8 in Kissimmee, Fla.
Other winners at the $198,394 rodeo were all-around cowboy Tuf Cooper ($6,505 in tie-down roping and steer roping), steer wrestler Cade Staton (13.2 seconds on three head), team ropers Clay Smith/Paul Eaves (14.7 seconds on three head), saddle bronc rider Jacobs Crawley (259.5 points on three head), tie-down roper Sterling Smith (26.1 seconds on three head), steer roper Cody Lee (36.0 seconds on three head), barrel racer Tiany Schuster (47.78 seconds on three runs) and bull rider Sage Kimzey (244 points on three head).

News & Notes from the rodeo trail

ProRodeoLive.com will broadcast the RAM First Frontier Circuit Finals Rodeo Jan. 11-13 in Harrisburg, Pa., beginning at 7 p.m. (ET) on Jan. 11-12, and at 5 p.m. on Jan. 13. ProRodeoLive.com will also broadcast the Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event Jan. 16-17 in Fort Worth, Texas, beginning at 7:30 p.m. (CT) each day … Pendleton (Ore.) Round-Up Director and Association of Rodeo Committees President Randy Bracher will participate in a delegation including representatives of Travel Oregon and Travel Portland visiting Utrecht, Holland, to encourage Dutch tourists to enjoy the Round-Up, Happy Canyon and city of Pendleton. The trip, scheduled for Jan. 8-14, is a follow up to the hugely popular Dutch TV game show, Wie is de Mol (Who is the Mole), which filmed episodes at the Pendleton Round-Up grounds as well as at local ranches and on a Round-Up wagon train excursion in the Blue Mountains. The Dutch celebrity contestants and production crew also stayed at the Bracher Ranch near Pendleton and filmed an episode there. Bracher will stage daily roping demonstrations at the tourism convention. “Europeans love the American West. As a representative of the Association of Rodeo Committees, I think that it is important to encourage foreign visitors to experience the sport of rodeo and the Western lifestyle the Northwest offers,” Bracher said in a press release.  “It is one of the most truly American, fun and exciting events that tourists from abroad can enjoy.” Bracher will be chronicling his trip to Holland on Pendleton Round-Up social media at www.facebook.com/pendletonroundup, @roundup_hc on Instagram and @PendletonRUP on Twitter … Tickets for the 86th annual San Angelo (Texas) Livestock Show and Rodeo went on sale Jan. 8. Tickets are available at www.sanangleorodeo.comand start at $12.50. For the first time, fans can select which seat they want when buying tickets online. The first performance of this year’s rodeo will take place Feb. 2 at 7:30 pm. (CT) … The Reno (Nev.) Rodeo Foundation is accepting online applications for its annual college scholarship program in support of high school students graduating in northern Nevada. Since 1986, the foundation has endeavored to promote educational opportunities to all eligible northern Nevada high school graduates. The number of scholarship recipients will vary based on the number of qualified applications received and the funding designated by the Reno Rodeo Foundation Board of Trustees. New this year, the Reno Rodeo Foundation is offering a Western Arts & Culture Scholarship to create further awareness and appreciation of Western arts, culture and heritage in college-age Nevadans through recognition of outstanding potential, contributions and skill in the creative arts. The Reno Rodeo Foundation scholarship application deadline is Feb.14. Visit www.renorodeofoundation.org for more information, to review the scholarship guidelines or to apply. For questions or additional information, contact the foundation at info@renorodeofoundation.org.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
 “He walked taller than other men. He was compared to John Wayne all his life. He was in every sense a true cowboy, rancher.”
– Shelly Cotter about her father,Wilbur Plaugher, Jan. 3 in the Fresno Bee

Next Up

Jan. 8               Sandhills Stock Show & Rodeo continues, Odessa, Texas
Jan. 11             RAM First Frontier Circuit Finals Rodeo, Harrisburg, Pa., begins
Jan. 11             Mid Winter Fair & Rodeo, Lafayette, La., begins
Jan. 11             National Western Stock Show and Rodeo, Denver, Colo., begins
Jan. 12             RAM Montana Circuit Finals Rodeo, Great Falls, Mont., begins
Jan. 16             Xtreme Bulls Division 1 event, Fort Worth, Texas, begins

2018 PRCA World Standings Leaders

Unofficial through Jan. 8, 2017
AA:
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
$17,994
BB:
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
$19,663
SW:
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
$18,142
TR-1:
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$20,763
TR-2:
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$20,763
SB:
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$19,215
TD:
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
$16,785
BR:
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$29,345
SR:
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
$9,551

 2018 PRCA World Standings

Unofficial through Jan. 8, 2018
All-around
1
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
$17,944
2
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
13,680
3
Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss.
13,367
4
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
10,611
5
Chant DeForest, Wheatland, Calif.
9,340
Bareback Riding
1
Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas
$19,663
2
Jake Brown, Cleveland, Texas
18,114
3
Shane O’Connell, Rapid City, S.D.
18,028
4
Blade Elliott, Centreville, Ala.
15,152
5
Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La.
10,406
6
Clint Laye, Pocatello, Idaho
9,766
7
Tanner Phipps, Dalton, Ga.
8,702
8
Grant Denny, Minden, Nev.
8,692
9
Ty Breuer, Mandan, N.D.
8,510
10
Luke Creasy, Hobbs, N.M.
8,001
11
Justin Pollmiller, Weatherford, Okla.
7,733
12
Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif.
7,570
13
Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah
7,343
14
Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa
7,275
15
Trenten Montero, Winnemucca, Nev.
6,788
16
Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn.
6,736
17
Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah
6,620
18
Evan Jayne, Marseille, France,
6,614
19
Kyle Charley, Lukachukai, Ariz.
6,520
20
Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb.
6,306
Steer Wrestling
1
Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta
$18,142
2
Jacob Talley, Keatchie, La.
13,691
3
Riley Duvall, Checotah, Okla.
12,773
4
Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif.
11,148
5
Rowdy Parrott, Mamou, La.
10,834
6
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
7,952
7
Justin Shaffer, Hallsville, Texas
7,912
8
Jace Melvin, Bluff Dale, Texas
7,650
9
Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, La.
7,344
10
Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas
7,085
11
Rhett Kennedy, Chowchilla, Calif.
6,852
12
Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, N.D.
6,840
13
Stockton Graves, Alva, Okla.
6,306
14
Fenton Nelson, Marshall, Mo.
5,928
15
Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala.
5,890
16
Josh Garner, Live Oak, Calif.
5,883
17
Beau Clark, Cheyenne, Wyo.
5,821
18
Cade Staton, Bastrop, Texas
5,798
19
Clayton Hass, Weatherford, Texas
5,752
20
Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
5,517
Team Roping (header)
1
Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla.
$20,763
2
Lane Ivy, Adrian, Texas
13,115
3
Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss.
8,584
4
Logan Olson, Flandreau, S.D.
8,177
5
Cody Snow, Los Olivos. Calif.
8,036
6
John Alley, Adams, Tenn.
7,218
7
Tanner Baldwin, Vail, Ariz.
7,147
8
Ty Blasingame, Ramah, Colo.
7,142
9
Blake Teixeira, Tres Pinos, Calif.
7,055
10
Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn.
6,990
11
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
6,971
12
Kelsey Parchman, Cumberland City, Tenn.
6,785
13
Cody Graham, Everton, Mo.
5,928
14
Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C.
5,708
15
Travis Dorman, Dade City, Fla.
5,675
16
Brady Payne, Gilbert, Ariz.
5,442
17
Thad Ward, Howell, Utah
5,348
18
Andrew Ward, Edmond, Okla.
5,256
19
Payden Emmett, Ponca, Ark.
4,893
20
Manny Egusquiza Jr., Refugio, Texas
4,848
Team Roping (heeler)
1
Paul Eaves, Lonedell, Mo.
$20,763
2
Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan.
15,142
3
Matt Kasner, Cody, Neb.
9,107
4
Trace Porter, Leesville, La.
7,317
5
Logan Medlin, Tatum, N.M.
7,285
6
Clark Adcock, Smithville, Tenn.
7,218
7
Monty Joe Petska, Turlock, Calif.
7,055
8
Trey Yates, Pueblo, Colo.
7,025
9
Brad Culpepper, Sylvester, Ga.
6,990
10
Cody Hogan, Benton, La.
6,785
11
Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, Okla.
6,665
12
Josh Fillmore, Penrose, Colo.
6,228
13
Jason Stroup, Cape Girardeau, Mo.
5,928
14
Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.
5,708
15
Bradley Massey, Perry, Fla.
5,675
16
Joe Day, Greenwood, Wis.
5,658
17
Levi Lord, Sturgis, S.D.
5,458
18
Olin Pulham, Payson, Utah
5,348
19
Reagan Ward, Edmond, Okla.
5,256
20
Joseph Shawnego, Oakdale, Calif.
5,118
Saddle Bronc Riding
1
Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas
$19,215
2
Brody Cress, Hillsdale, Wyo.
18,716
3
Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas
16,503
4
Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa
13,873
5
Leon Fountain, Socorro, N.M.
12,692
6
Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, Texas
12,594
7
Joey Sonnier, New Iberia, La.
11,603
8
Chet Johnson, Douglas, Wyo.
10,225
9
Tyler Baeza, Lake Charles, La.
8,511
10
Hardy Braden, Welch, Okla.
8,294
11
J.J. Elshere, Hereford, S.D.
8,240
12
Bradley Harter, Loranger, La.
8,081
13
Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M.
7,892
14
Layton Green, Meeting Creek, Alberta
7,712
15
Jake Wright, Milford, Utah
7,293
16
Logan Allen, Crescent, Iowa
6,285
17
Troy Crowser, Whitewood, S.D.
6,231
18
Shade Etbauer, Goodwell, Okla.
6,119
19
Spencer Wright, Milford, Utah
5,313
20
Curtis Garton, Lake Charles, La.
5,256
Tie-down Roping
1
Marcos Costa, Childress, Texas
$16,785
2
Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla.
14,264
3
Jesse Clark, Portales, N.M.
11,262
4
Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, Texas
10,421
5
Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif.
9,992
6
Reno Gonzales, Scott, La.
8,294
7
Riley Pruitt, Gering, Neb.
7,814
8
Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho
7,777
9
Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas
7,630
10
Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas
6,981
11
Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, Wash.
6,898
12
Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, Okla.
6,709
13
Seth Hall, Albuquerque, N.M.
6,378
14
Trent Creager, Stillwater, Okla.
6,345
15
Ty Harris, San Angelo, Texas
6,250
16
Cody Quaney, Cheney, Kan.
5,901
17
Hadley DeShazo, Ash Flat, Ark.
5,865
18
Sterling Smith, Stephenville, Texas
5,798
19
Braxton Laughlin, Sulphur, La.
5,711
20
Ike Fontenot, Ville Platte, La.
5,423
Steer Roping
1
Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
$9,551
2
Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas
8,403
3
Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas
8,367
4
Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas
7,396
5
Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas
6,662
6
Chris Glover, Keenesburg, Colo.
5,878
7
Brian Garr, Belle Fourche, S.D.
5,797
8
JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
5,768
9
Mike Chase, McAlester, Okla.
5,610
10
Corey Ross, Liberty Hill, Texas
5,522
11
Dee Kyler Jr., Pawhuska, Okla.
5,076
12
Shay Good, Midland, Texas
5,006
13
John E. Bland, Turkey, Texas
4,586
14
Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas
4,526
15
Kelton McMillen, Paden, Okla.
4,404
16
Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan.
4,230
17
Leo Campbell, Amarillo, Texas
3,941
18
Hank Hollenbeck, Molt, Mont.
3,426
19
J.R. Olson, Whitewood, S.D.
3,106
20
Buck Mekelburg, Yuma, Colo.
3,015
Bull Riding
1
Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla.
$29,345
2
Clayton Sellars, Fruitland Park, Fla.
19,769
3
Tristan Mize, Bryan, Texas
14,975
4
Michael Riggs Jr., Claxton, Ga.
13,392
5
Bayle Worden, Cooper, Texas
12,709
6
Jimy Marten, Donahue, Iowa
12,664
7
Joseph Vazquez, Alamogordo, N.M.
8,882
8
Jeff Bertus, Avon, S.D.
8,813
9
Garrett Smith, Rexburg, Idaho
8,484
10
Cordell Curtis, Monte Vista, Colo.
8,284
11
Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla.
8,059
12
Trey Benton III, Rock Island, Texas
8,004
13
Cole Melancon, Batson, Texas
7,971
14
Guthrie Murray, Miami, Okla.
7,807
15
Eli Vastbinder, Athens, Texas
7,779
16
Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah
7,050
17
Trevor Reiste, Linden, Iowa
6,985
18
Lon Danley, Tularosa, N.M.
6,838
19
Tate Smith, Litchville, N.D.
6,752
20
Preston Preece, Troy, Texas
6,244
*2018 Barrel Racing (Jan. 8, 2018)
Barrel racing standings, provided by the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA), are unofficial, subject to audit and may change. Unofficial WPRA Standings are published by the PRCA as a courtesy. The PRCA is not responsible for the verification or updating of WPRA standings.
1
Kellie Collier, Hereford, Texas
$17,928
2
Kelly Bruner, Millsap, Texas
14,960
3
Taci Bettis, Round Top, Texas
13,984
4
Nikki Hansen, Dickinson, N.D.
11,880
5
Lacinda Rose, Willard, Mo.
11,008
6
Ericka Nelson, Century, Fla.
10,675
7
Lori Todd, Willcox, Ariz.
9,035
8
Wendy Culberson, Okeechobee, Fla.
8,568
9
Carley Richardson, Pampa, Texas
8,326
10
Kaley Bass, Kissimmee, Fla.
7,791
11
Kristen Spratt, Huntsville, Texas
7,617
12
Stevi Hillman, Weatherford, Texas
7,357
13
Alex Lang, Harper, Texas
7,316
14
Jennifer Barrett, Buhl, Idaho
6,974
15
Carmel Wright, Roy, Mont.
6,773
16
Trula Churchill, Valentine, Neb.
6,557
17
Shali Lord, Lamar, Colo.
6,535
18
Callahan Crossley, Herminston, Ore.
5,971
19
Kylie Weast, Comanche, Okla.
5,572
20
Jessica Routier, Buffalo, S.D.
5,460
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