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☛ NCHA planning class restructure 5-11-18

NCHA CLASS RESTRUCTURING ON THE AGENDA FOR THE 2018 NCHA CONVENTION

 

COMMMITEES COMPLETE TWO PROPOSALS TO BE DISCUSSED AT JUNE 1-3 NCHA CONVENTION BUT NOT VOTED ON

 

By Glory Ann Kurtz
May 11, 2018

In an effort to boost membership, the NCHA has published an NCHA CLASS RESTRUCTURE on their website from the 2018 Class Restructure Subcommittee.

 

The website explains that the reasons for the restructuring of classes are several, including the fact that NCHA membership has dropped from 20,372 in 2010 to 10,569 as of March 15, 2018. This is a decline of 9,083 or 48 percent.

 

Also show entries have declined 61,716 or 33.3 percent – from 185,511 in 2007 to 123,795 in 2017.

 

Two drafts of a “Class Restructure” will be presented at the 2018 NCHA Convention, scheduled for Friday June 1 – June 3 at Hilton DFW Lakes Executive Conference Center, Grapevine, Texas. Two drafts will be presented as proposals to committee members; however, they will be discussed at the convention BUT NOT VOTED ON. The linked proposals will be for discussion purposes only.

 

THE OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the NCHA is to grow the membership base with new members and increase show entries from current members by simplifying rider eligibility and maintaining current payouts

 

THE OBSTACLES:

There are no entry level classes, more than likely due to the exception rules. There is no level playing field. Current members are not showing because they feel like they ARE the added money. Also, rider eligibility rules are confusing and complicated.

 

THE PROPOSALS:

Mandates a protected entry-level class for EACH division. Mandates a level playing field within EACH division. Simplifiesrider eligibility rules and encourages (not requires) competitors to ride up in levels and divisions.

 

DIVISIONS AND LEVELS:

OPEN DIVISION:
Open – $750,000 or more in lifetime earnings;
Intermediate Open$200,001 – $749,999 in lifetime earnings
Limited Open$0 – $200,000 in lifetime earnings

 

NON-PRO DIVISION:
Non-Pro$500,000 or more in lifetime earnings
Intermediate Non-Pro– $100,001 – $499,999 in lifetime earnings
Limited Non-Pro$0 – $100,000 in lifetime earnings

 

AMATEUR DIVISION:
Amateur– $100,000 or more in lifetime earnings
Intermediate Amateur– $25,001 – $99,999 in lifetime earnings
Limited Amateur– $0 – $25,000 in lifetime earnings

 

A rider can compete in the Open, Non-Pro or Amateur Division based on their eligibility as established within the NCHA Rule book.

 

The Total Lifetime Earnings of a rider determines WHICH LEVEL they are eligible to compete in. In addition to the level that a rider is eligible to compete in, they can also enter, if they chose, higher levels and divisions.

 

LIMITED LEVEL:

Limited Open– $0 – $200,000
Limited Non-Pro– $0 – $100,000
Limited Amateur– $0 – $25,000

This level is deemed to be the entry level for a rider and as such is a “protected” level within each division. NO rider with lifetime earnings in excess of the amount designated can compete in a Limited class. No exceptions!

 

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS:

SENIORS:

Once a rider turns 60, the rider is eligible to compete in the senior divisions. (This is currently offered and will not change)

REVOLVING DOOR:

A rider can drop down to the Intermediate level if they have not won a certain amount within a set time frame.  The limits for each division are as follows:

Open:$75,000 in one year

Non-Pro:$50,000 in one year

Amateur:$25,000 in one year

 

LIMITED AGED EVENTS:

The Open, Non-Pro and Amateur classes would run just like they currently do. Each entry would designate what Level or Levelsthat a rider is competing in. Show producers would determine number of go-rounds, number of horses to finals, working finals and non-working finals. Senior, Gelding and Novice classes will not change. These designations will remain a class within its respective division.

 

A graduated entry fee schedule would be implemented whereby the Limited Level entry fee is the lowest and the top level is the highest in each division.

 

To encourage riders to enter in multiple levels and divisions, a discounted fee would be offered if a rider chooses to enter multiple levels.

 

To ensure the top levels pay the highest, added money would be concentrated in the top level. The intermediate can be allocated some added money; however, added money in the limited level is strictly prohibited.

 

There will be limited aged event pilot studies at the 2017 Super Stakes, 2017 Summer Spectacular, 2017 Breeders Invitational, 2018 Augusta Futurity, 2017 West Texas Futurity, 2018 The Ike Futurity, 2018 Arbuckle Futurity, 2017 Brazos Bash and 2017 PCCHA Holy Cow Futurity.

 

WEEKEND SHOW STRUCTURE:

The weekend Show Class Structure will include:

OPEN – with INTERMEDIATE & LIMITED options.

NON-PRO – with INTERMEDIATE & LIMITED options.

AMATEUR –  with INTERMEDIATE & LIMITED options.
$25,000 NOVICE HORSE

$25,000 NOVICE HORSE NON-PRO

$50,000 NON-PRO

$25,000 AMATEUR

$5,000 NOVICE HORSE

$5,000 NOVICE HORSE NON-PRO

$2,000 LIMITED RIDER

YOUTH

 

For weekend shows, a rider will enter the division that they are eligible to compete in. If they are eligible for the Intermediate or Limited class within that division, they can, if they choose, pay an additional entry fee to enter the Intermediate and/or Limited class. The Intermediate and Limited Class is a class-within-a-class just like the current senior class.

 

Senior classes will not change. If a rider meets the eligibility requirements for the senior class, they can, if they choose, pay an additional fee to enter the Senior class.

 

To ensure the top levels pay the highest, added money would be concentrated in the top level. The intermediate can be allocated some added money; however, added money in the limited level is strictly prohibited.

 

WHY DOES NCHA THINK LEVELING WILL WORK?

Due to declining entries in 2011, the NRCHA implemented a leveling system within their Non Pro Division. Since then the Non-Pro entries are up over 40 percent. As a result of this success, in 2013, they created an entry-level Open class (Level 1 Ltd Open) and have seen an increase of 25% in total Open entries.

NCHA Ltd Age Event Class Structure Second Draft

NCHA Proposed Class restrucure 5-18

 

In 2014, I published an article by Rick Dennis, warning about the future of the horse industry. That article received more comments than any other article that I have published, and is even more relevant today. It’s very relevant to what is happening today, if changes were not made.

Click for a copy of that article.

 

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7 Comments

  1. If they want a level playing field, they should put in non-pro no.1 for trainers children and wife’s and non pro riders who have won over 300,000 dollars in competition and a non-pro for the rest of us who have to earn a living and cut on weekends, but that will never happened, N.C.H.A. might close down but the trainers are the winners.We need trainers but their family who rides all week and cuts on weekends isn`t fair

  2. Honestly this is an easy fix. Since 2005 the NCHA hierarchy has catered to the Open riders or pros. Take a good look at the situation. Who is paying the bills, who is buying the horse and what do the pros do. They take more and more of the prize money, if they buy you a horse both sides of the sale get a commission, they charge ridiculous prices for hauling your horse and 75% of all the prize money goes to them. And last but not least we seen a large percentage of pros showing their own horses. Now a question. If a pro is riding his horse what chance is there that your horse is being ridden and trained to get ahead of the pro horse. Come on non pros and amateurs are finally waking up.

    That is the reason people like me have dropped out. Let the pros have it. Let them buy, train, feed and work horses on their money. 80 percent of these pros could not have another job. They treat their clients like they are idiots. They get all the goody out of a horse for 9 months and then tell the client the horse is no good.

    Now really is this that hard to understand. Just for the record the prizes keep going up and up and the rich get richer.

    Sorry I went off. I bet if you did a survey of non pros who are no longer members they would tell you the same thing.

    Thank you for writing this column. I encourage you to tell like it is.

    Bill

  3. I live in a town called Buellton which is just north of Santa Barbara Calif. Used to have 2 clubs relatively near but one closed and the other went NCHA some years ago and now is about shut down having only 1 show last year, CCCHA. However 4 to 6 hours north there are 4 clubs and 4 hours south there is 1 club. Some shows have had as much as 150 plus entries in 1 day.
    Some classes give cash and year end awards such as saddles and other classes just points for yearend awards. Very popular having more works than the NCHA events. All NCHA has to do is examine why the clubs have become so popular and follow their model. Not rocket science. I believe they are trying to cover this with the NCHA challenger series but most show producers don’t offer this as the producers are in it for the money whereas the clubs are in it for the rider.
    Jim

  4. Thank you for another well-written column. Yes, re-structure is a very good idea but I’m thinking it’s too little too late – as usual . Too many people have soured on the system and the NCHA in general for those and other reasons. And of course it doesn’t address trainers wives and families dominating the non-pro which is the root of the crazy system that we have now ( one example- a 50 AM rider with up to 400K in earnings still in the class!)
    And the new revolving door amounts will put everyone in the intermediate. Not many riders earn that much in a year.

    Best regards,

    Mike

  5. I may even go to this convention. There is hope yet!!

    Kelly

  6. Nothing will bring back cutters until the NCHA changes catering to trainers allowing their children compete in non pro and adding large amounts of money to their classes and their children and customers not total answer but a start. No place for beginners and weekend cutters
    Charles Gennaro NCHA 8065

  7. I am preparing to propose an additional idea during the 2018 NCHA convention to add to the restructuring proposal. It is designed to help rebuild membership and solve one of the issues that has for years discouraged many to the point of “Quitting” NCHA activity. That is the disproportionate distribution of added money in the classes-beyond the Open classes. To address this issue the proposal is as follows: Make the entry fee equal for all classes. “Provide exactly the same structure for all classes, ie. one or two go-arounds plus a finals for each division held. Pro-Rata all added money to each class based upon the number of entree’s in each class. This will insure that all event entries are treated equally eligible to compete for any added money and is 100 percent fair to all players. All of these players pay the same amount to buy, feed,shoe, vet, train, etc their horses and accordingly deserve equal opportunity to compete for added monies.”
    Gloria, you may print this if you like. I already proposed it at our recent BI board meeting for next years event and it was very well received and is strongly being considered. It is essential that NCHA take every step possible to rebuild and this issue has needed a solution for many years !!
    Harland Radomske

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