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☛ Today’s News 11-11–16

TODAY’S NEWS

 

Nov. 11, 2016

 

ROSS AND MADGE LLOYD LOSE THEIR DAUGHTER

Nov. 11, 2016

The daughter of Ross and Madge Lloyd, who own 3 Bar L Transport died completely unexpectedly and they are struggling to get a grip on it.

According to Madge, ”she was found in a comma, then a stroke followed. She had an aneurysm, Never regained consciousness after surgery.

“She was so full of life and had so much to look forward to. Her first grandchild is due and she was so excited.”

The Lloyds are set up along the row with the insurance agents at every NCHA Sale and have been for years and years. She always has cookies out! They have the huge semi rig that Ross customized.

 

The Lloyds live in Mineral Wells but used to live in California years ago. They are very active in the Cowboys for Christ, giving out bibles at their booth.

 

“It’s quite a shock to a mom’s spirit,” said Madge. “Please pray for me. I feel so low, heavy and tired. I know it’s just stress but I just can’t get over it. Maybe the funeral will finalize things. I pray.”

 

CAVENDERS BUYS LUSKEY’S RYONS IN FORT WORTH

 

Press release from Luskey’s Ryon’s

Luskey’s, the popular western clothing store that has been a part of Fort Worth for nearly a century, has been sold to a larger competitor, Cavender’s.

The Luskey’s/Ryon’s Western Store at 2601 N. Main St. in the Stockyards will be closed Monday for renovations and then reopen a day or two later under the Cavender’s name. The remodeling likely will be ongoing for several weeks.

“It was a family decision, and we have been working with them for a long time,” Alan Luskey, who co-owns the store with his cousin Mike Luskey and other relatives, said Friday. He said the family approached Cavender’s about a possible merger months ago, and negotiations have taken place since February.

 

AMERICAN PAINT HORSE ASSOCIATION TO RELOCATE TO FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS

 

CURRENT PLANS ARE TO RENT OUT THE SPACE IN THE BUILDING THEY CURRENTLY OWN

 

According to a June 24-26 article in the Fort Worth Business Journal, The American Paint Horse Association plans to relocate the Fort Worth Stockyards’ Horse & Mule Bars at East Exchange Avenue.

 

Officials from the APHA said they plan to relocate their headquarters, 45-member staff and retail store in the winter of 2017 and 2018 from the organization’s home since 1999 – the Mercantile Center Business/Industrial park in Northeast Fort Worth.

 

Although the final lease agreement is still being negotiated, Billy Smith, the executive director of the 50,000-member association, said they were retooling their whole business model to become leaner and meaner by cost cutting, enhancing member services and expanding equestrian competition accessibility, affordability and variety to reboot their membership and horse ownership. They have cut headquarter staff from 150 people in 2004-2007 down to 45.

 

Smith claims they don’t need the 40,000-square-foot home space in its own 1999 contracted new building and they are planning on leasing the current headquarters and the plan is that their income from the building will cover most if not all of the Stockyards site’s leasing costs.

 

 

USDA ANNOUNCES VET MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM AWRD IN TEXAS

 

 

Press release from the Texas Animal Health Commission

 

AUSTIN, TX –  The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) awarded 48 American veterinarians the VMLRP award to help repay a portion of their veterinary school loans in return for serving in areas lacking sufficient veterinary resources.

 

One Texas veterinarian was awarded the VMLRP award this year and will be fulfilling the shortage of public practice (Type III) needs in Brazos County. Type III awards are limited to 10 percent of total nominations and available funds.

 

While the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) does not administer the VMLRP loan, each year the TAHC solicits input from a broad range of stakeholders including veterinarians, veterinary educators, livestock producers, and the public to identify which geographic areas of Texas to nominate for the VMLRP. A total of eight shortage areas in Texas were identified in 2016, of which six were Type II and two were Type III.

 

“The public veterinarian shortage situation in Brazos County comes from difficulty in recruitment and retention, with prolonged searches and even an inability to fill vacancies in the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL),” said Dr. Bruce Akey, TVMDL Director. “The trend has increasingly been to fill positions with non-veterinarians due to an inability to attract qualified or interested veterinarians, resulting in a loss of critical clinical expertise.”

 

Due to the size of the animal agriculture industries in Texas, this shortage poses a risk beyond the state borders, as animals and animal products move across state lines daily, and are traded internationally.

 

A map of veterinary service shortage areas by state is available online.

 

In its seventh year of operation, the VMLRP program helps qualified veterinarians repay up to $75,000 of debt they incurred while pursuing their veterinary medicine degrees in return for three years of veterinary service in a designated veterinary shortage area. Participants are required to serve in one of the three types of shortage situations.

 

• Type I are private practices dedicated to food animal medicine at least 80 percent of the time.

• Type II are private practices in rural areas dedicated to food animal medicine up to 30 percent of the time.

• Type III are dedicated to public practice up to 49 percent of the time.

For more information contact the VMLRP via email at vmlrp@nifa.usda.gov. Comments or questions related to the designated shortage areas may be directed to susan.culp@tahc.texas.gov.

 

 

 

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