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Counterfeit bills circulating in Parker & Palo Pinto county areas in Texas

Posted by on Apr 29, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HEALTH AND WEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHAT, WHERE, WHO, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

COUNTERFEIT BILLS CIRCULATING IN PARKER & PALO PINTO COUNTY AREAS IN TEXAS

 

Reprint from Parker County News
April 29, 2019

 

The Parker County Sheriff’s Office is issuing a public service announcement regarding counterfeit bills circulating in the Parker and Palo Pinto County areas of Texas.

.Sheriff Larry Fowler said business owners should alert their employees about people attempting to pass counterfeit bills during the course of daily business.

“Residents should also stay alert to the possibility of counterfeit money when conducting business transactions as well,” said Sheriff Fowler.

Some of the bills collected recently include advertising notes that appear to look like $5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 bills. The note(s) clearly state they are for “Motion Picture Purposes,” but employees are not paying close enough attention to the markings. The counterfeit bills otherwise look genuine.

Sheriff’s investigators are currently working with local banking institutions to be aware of counterfeit funds before transactions are made.

“Be aware, those attempting to pass counterfeit bills will frequently use the fake bills at a range of stores and businesses including department stores, convenience stores, specialty stores and gas stations,” said Sheriff Fowler. “Investing in counterfeit detection markers would be a wise decision. They are inexpensive and may be an effective tool in loss prevention.”

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THE ART OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS

Posted by on Apr 27, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FEATURE ARTICLES, HEALTH AND WEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

THE ART OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
For all about cutting.net

 

WHAT IS RISK MANAGEMENT

Risk management is the ongoing analytical review and evaluation, by a Risk Analyst, of client-provided documents, practices or processes to determine a safety and risk factor to same.  It’s also the analytical process of assigning a numerical Risk Factor designation to any perceived or identified Risk or Safety risk or threat occurrences. Equally, it’s also the practice of continually reviewing and changing established, in-place, Risk Management Practices to counter future risks to thwart incidences of occurrence.  

Other examples of an ongoing and continuing Risk Management program include: Onsite facility security and safety surveys which includes a review of: barrier prevention access (i.e.) fencing, door and window locking systems and devices, closed circuit tv cameras and recording devices, computer, financial, IT and banking security as well as lighting, entry and exit points safety and security.  The Risk Analysis also includes a review of safety and security protocols to include employee hiring and termination practices.

During my tenure in the private security sector as a Risk Manager and Analyst, I’ve authored a myriad of Corporate Employee and Contractor Drug and Alcohol Prevention programs for:  Exxon Company USA, Atlantic Richfield, ARCO oil and Gas, KerrMcGee Corporation, as well as companies in the oil and gas exploration, aviation, maritime, construction, mining and construction industries.  These program models are in full compliance with the Federal Workplace Drug and Alcohol testing programs defined by 49, CFR, Part 40. Long ago, it was determined that the on-the-job use of impairment prescription drugs as well as illegal drugs and alcohol use and abuse were detrimental to safety, productivity and welfare of the workforce.

Risk Analysis comes in various forms to meet specific industry requirements: Security, Financial and Banking, etc.  Risks can come from various sources including uncertainty in financial markets, threats from project failures (at any phase in design, development, production, or sustainment life-cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters, deliberate attack from an adversary or events of uncertain or unpredictable root-cause.

There are two types of events i.e. negative events can be classified as risks while positive events are classified as opportunities. Several risk management standards have been developed including the Project Management Institute, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, actuarial societies and ISO standards. Methods, definitions and goals vary widely according to whether the risk management method is in the context of project management, security, engineering, industrial processes, financial portfolios, actuarial assessments or public health and safety.

Strategies to manage threats (uncertainties with negative consequences) typically include avoiding the threat, reducing the negative effect or probability of the threat, transferring all or part of the threat to another party and even retaining some or all of the potential or actual consequences of a particular threat as well as the opposites for opportunities (uncertain future states with benefits).

In ideal risk management, a prioritization process is followed whereby the risks with the greatest loss (or impact) and the greatest probability of occurring are handled first and risks with lower probability of occurrence and lower loss are handled in descending order. In practice, the process of assessing overall risks can be difficult and balancing resources used to mitigate between risks with a high probability of occurrence but lower loss versus a risk with high loss but lower probability of occurrence can often be mishandled. 

Risk Management also includes the use of mathematical algorithms whereby a set of standards of incident occurrence are included in the algorithm to project a certain number of probabilities of occurrence or happening within a certain time frame.

Intangible risk management identifies a new type of a risk that has a 100 percent  probability of occurring but is ignored by the organization due to a lack of identification ability. For example, when deficient knowledge is applied to a situation, a knowledge risk materializes. Relationship risk appears when ineffective collaboration occurs. Process-engagement risk may be an issue when ineffective operational procedures are applied. These risks directly reduce the productivity of knowledgable workers, decrease cost-effectiveness, profitability, service, quality, reputation, brand value, and earnings quality. Intangible risk management allows risk management to create immediate value from the identification and reduction of risks that reduce productivity.

Risk management also faces difficulties in allocating resources. This is the idea of opportunity cost. Resources spent on risk management could have been spent on more profitable activities. Again, ideal risk management minimizes spending (or manpower or other resources) and also minimizes the negative effects of risks.

RISK ASSESSMENT

Broadly speaking, a risk assessment is the combined effort of 1. identifying and analyzing potential (future) events that may negatively impact individuals, assets, and/or the environment (i.e., risk analysis); and 2. making judgments “on the tolerability of the risk on the basis of a risk analysis” while considering influencing factors (i.e., risk evaluation). Put in simpler terms, a risk assessment analyzes what can go wrong, how likely it is to happen, what the potential consequences are and how tolerable the identified risk is. As part of this process, the resulting determination of risk may be expressed in a quantitative or qualitative fashion. The risk assessment is an inherent part of an overall risk management strategy, which attempts to, after a risk assessment, “introduce control measures to eliminate or reduce” any potential risk-related consequences.

METHODS

For the most part, these methods consist of the following elements, performed, more or less in the following order:

Identify the threats, characterize the threat or risk, assess the vulnerability of critical assets to specific threats, determine the risk (i.e, the expected likelihood and consequences the risk or threat poses to the project or object of the Risk Analysis as well as specific assets), identify ways to reduce the threat or Risk and develop and prioritize counter measures to the identified or perceived Risk or Threat.

MONITORING

After the identified Risk or Threat has been eliminated, the Risk Manager and Analyst develop a system whereby the in-place Risk Vulnerability Threat Assessment System is constantly monitoring the system to prevent future occurrences.

WHAT IS RISK ANALYSIS?

Risk analysis is the process of identifying and analyzing information to determine potential issues that could negatively impact an individual, key business initiatives or critical projects in order to help organizations avoid or mitigate those risks.

Performing a risk analysis includes considering the probability of adverse events caused by either natural processes, like severe storms, earthquakes or floods or adverse events caused by malicious or inadvertent human activities. An important part of risk analysis is identifying the potential for harm from these events, as well as the likelihood that they will occur.  An analytical Risk Analysis will also identify any current risks to the client.

WHO USES RISK MANAGEMENT & RISK ANALYSIS

Individuals, business enterprises and other organizations use risk analysis to:

Anticipate and reduce the effect of harmful results from adverse events;

Evaluate whether the potential risks of a project are balanced by its benefits to aid in the decision process when evaluating whether to move forward with the project,

Plan responses for technology or equipment failure or loss from adverse events, both natural and human-caused, and identify the impact of and prepare for changes in the enterprise environment, including the likelihood of new competitors entering the market or changes to government regulatory policy.

Essentially, Risk Management and Risk Analysis are used daily to prevent economic or other losses in a particular business or personal environment.  Furthermore, Risk Management and Risk Analysis are used effectively by the oil & gas, maritime, aviation, manufacturing, insurance, telecommunications, and trucking industries, to name a few, as well as the United States Government and the US Department of Defense.  Private individuals utilize the services of a Risk Analyst to produce a Risk Analysis Report pertaining to individual safety as well as threats to their safety and as a protection of assets.

WHO IS A RISK ANALYST?

A Risk Analyst is an individual who uses his or her analytical skills to evaluate client-provided documents such as banking or other documents, or processes included in an onsite Security Survey such as. banking practices, use of computer devices, safety practices, etc., to determine a Risk Category, usually on a scale of 1 through 5, to determine a specific threat or risk to the client.  The analyst also devises a plan for implementation of a Risk Management Program, to counter any identified or perceived threats in order to protect client assets.  For the record, a Risk Analysis isn’t an investigation of any type and the Risk Analyst isn’t a private investigator but simply an analytical review artist who is well versed in law, finances, security and safety processes including an analysis of client-provided documents to determine a specific risk to the client and counter same by applying the appropriate counter measures.

Furthermore, a Risk Analyst is usually an individual with an intricate and extensive background in law enforcement, counter intelligence, security, finances, or generally required business safety requirements and practices. But he or she is also well versed in the rule of law. If the Risk Analyst requires the need of a private investigator, he or she hires an outside licensed individual to conduct any investigations.  The same is applied for forensic audits.  If during a Risk Analysis, the Risk Analyst requires the need of a forensic audit of accounting records, the Risk Analyst outsources this requirement to a duly licensed Forensic Accountant to complete the audit and turn his or her findings over to the Risk Analyst for transmittal to the client. However, if a Risk Analyst determines that a violation of the law has occurred, he or she is compelled, by law, to inform the client of the occurrence in order for the client to adhere to the Misprision of A Felony law.  

THE VALUE OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM & A RISK ANALYST

Overtime, the savings to a business or individual is realized when the money saved far outweigh the investment.  For example, some of the Risk Analysis cases I’ve conducted have realized a savings for my clients due to the recovery of assets totaling millions of dollars and in some instances have dramatically changed the way a company conducts business.

EVERYDAY EXAMPLES OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

Normally, individuals don’t realize he or she is executing a Risk Management program in their daily lives. More specifically, if you have your vehicle on a regular maintenance program to change the oil, or if you have an in-place practice of securing your passwords for on-line internet activities, or if you own a livestock ranch and you check the fencing daily to ensure the escape of your livestock is minimized, you are conducting an in-house Risk Management Program.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!”

Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Freelance Writer and Author
Phone: (985) 630-3500
Email: richardedennis@outlook.com

Web Site: http://www.richardedennis.net

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HORSES TEST POSITIVE FOR EHV-1 AT NRCHA STALLION STAKES

Posted by on Apr 17, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TWO HORSES TEST POSITIVE FOR EHV-1 THAT WERE RECENTLY AT THE NRCHA STALLION STAKES 

ONE HORSE WAS FROM CALIFORNIA, ANOTHER FROM CLARK COUNTY IN NEVADA

April 17, 2019

It’s every horse show’s nightmare when horses at their show test positive for EHV-1, the non-neurologic form of equine herpesvirus – type 1.

That recently happened at the National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) Stallion Stakes, held March 24-31 at the South Point Hotel and Casino horse arena in Las Vegas, Nev., when two horses that attended the recent Stallion Stakes tested positive for the disease. Officials said “All horses that were at the event had have been exposed and that their owners should use extreme caution when traveling with their equines or competing.” 

Also, the state of Nevada had reported a total of six EHV-1 positive cases in recent weeks

However, Michael and Paula Gaughn’s great horse facility was ready! With the state of Nevada reporting those six EHV-1 positive cases on March 15, officials placed the facility under quarantine when a horse tested positive for EHV-1 following the High School Rodeo Association event. Two more facilities located in Clark County were also placed under quarantine days later after two more horses tested positive.

When Nevada State Veterinarian Dr. J.J. Goicoechea urged all horse events for the weekend of March 23-24 be cancelled in order to minimize the potential for more exposures, the South Point complied, canceling a team roping that weekend in order to restrict horse movement and take extra biosecurity measures at the facility in advance of the NRCHA Stakes.

NRCHA Executive Director Jay Winborn said that the officials didn’t foresee the spread of the disease at the Stakes because they were out of the incubation period for the previous cases in Nevada and they knew of the strict cleaning procedures used at the South Point. He said they will continue to monitor the results of the tests and if necessary, would continue the cleaning protocols

Steve Stallworth, the South Point Equestrian Center’s General Manager said the Las Vegas facility has stringent protocols for the sanitation and disinfection of stalls and public areas after each of its events, saying, “Michael and Paula Gaughan, have a passion for running a clean, safe facility. The facility will continue its cleaning protocols for horses at the AQHA Level 1 World Championships, scheduled for April 17-20. The horses’ temperatures will be checked as they come into the facility and each horse will have a temperature chart and will ask the owners to take the temperatures of the horses in the morning and at night.

“We feel good that our protocols at the South Point facility are in place to not only be preventative but also in case anything does happen. If we get a feverish horse during our show, we will isolate them until the proper veterinarians look at them and determine if they’re safe to still compete.”

As editor of this article, I can assure you that I attended many events at the South Point and was there right after they implemented the preventive measures.

The NRCHA has the NRCHA Derby scheduled for June 9-16 in Paso Robles, Calif. and Winborn said the NRCHA will continue to monitor the situation and, if necessary, consider implementing additional biosecurity measures at the Derby.

According to Dr. Joe Carter, the NRCHA Veterinarian and the Animal Welfare Committee Chairman, “The respiratory, non-neurological form of EHV-1 that the horses tested positive for after the Stakes is very similar to the flu.”

He continued that EHV-1 is more common than most people realize and keeping your horse up to date on vaccines is the best line of defense, and help with many other viruses horses battle regularly.

Also, according to Stallworth, the South Point will institute temperature checks for all horses as they come in for the AQHA Level 1 World Championships, set for April 17-20 at the South Point facility, saying, “Each horse will have a temperature chart and the owners will be asked to take its temperature in the morning and night.” 

Temperature checks will also be done during the upcoming National Breeders Classic in Katy, Texas. That decision was made earlier this week following the Texas Animal Health Commission announcement that a reining horse in the state had tested positive for Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM), the neurologic disease linked to EHV-1, after the horse had attended an Oklahoma show.

Severe cases of EHV-1 can result in death of the horse and include nasal discharge, incoordination, hind limb weakness, loss of tail tone, lethargy, urine dribbling, head tilt and the inability to rise. They may lean against a fence or wall to maintain their balance.

  • Some of the quotes and information in this article were taken from an online article by Quarter Horse News.  

Click Here for Results

 

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ANIMAL ACTIVISTS HAVE A MESSAGE FOR KENTUCKY HORSE RACING!

Posted by on Apr 11, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

ANIMAL ACTIVISTS HAVE A MESSAGE FOR KENTUCKY HORSE RACING: THEY ARE WATCHING!

 

April 11, 2019

“PETA is putting Kentucky on notice,” warned a statement from Kathy Guillermo, senior vice president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, which has been protesting at Santa Anita in the wake of 23 horse deaths related to the track.

Now, PETA is turning its attention to the Bluegrass state in the wake of the death of a horse Saturday at Keeneland.

“No horses died during Santa Anita Derby weekend, which seems to show that the track’s new rules — while not as strong as PETA would have liked — are a lifesaving step. Now, all eyes will be on Kentucky, where Churchill Downs — home of the Kentucky Derby — has the second-worst death rate for horses in the country,” Guillermo said in the statement. She said PETA would attend the Churchill Downs Inc. annual shareholders meeting later this month “to question the company’s executives.”

In California, The Stronach Group, which owns Santa Anita as well as Pimlico, where the second jewel of the Triple Crown is run, announced a set of new rules including limiting the use of furosemide (known as Lasix) and the use of whips. Protesters demonstrated outside Santa Anita on Saturday.

“At nearby Keeneland, Thoroughbred Cathedral Reader broke a leg and was euthanized on Saturday, and today, 2-year-old horses will be made to run faster than they ever will for the rest of their lives, risking injury and death to fetch a high price at the Keeneland April Sale,” Guillermo said. “Change is overdue, and for the sake of the horses, it needs to come now.”

The April 2-Year-Olds In Training Sale is taking place this week at Keeneland, which is also the world’s largest Thoroughbred auction house. Horses ran timed sprints Monday and will be offered for sale Tuesday.

Meanwhile, the Association of Racing Commissioners International issued a statement clarifying that horses treated with bisphosphonates, a controversial osteoporosis drug, may be denied entry into races while the organization formulates a policy to recommend to states.

The drugs have come under increased scrutiny by veterinary and racing organizations as deaths mount. Last year, Kentucky saw an unprecendented 80 percent increase in equine fatalities during racing. Bisphosphonates, which are recommended for navicular bone disease in older horses, are suspected of interfering with proper bone formation. Racing and sales officials have called on the industry to stop using them in horses under the age of 4.

Bimeda, the maker of Tildren, one of the medications, said in a statement to the Herald-Leader that they “welcome the recent partial bans proposed by racing organizations in the United States and Canada, regarding bisphosphonate use in young horses, and we are committed to research which will provide a better understanding of these important equine pharmaceuticals.”

Dechra, which makes the other drug, Osphos, pointed to another potential concern in an email: “There are two generations of bisphosphonates, non-nitrogenous (non-nitrogen containing) or nitrogenous (nitrogen-containing). Osphos is a first-generation non-nitrogenous bisphosphonate. This is the least potent class of bisphosphonate.

“There has been evidence of the non-approved and FEI-banned nitrogenous bisphosphonate zoledronate being compounded and used in horses. The nitrogenous bisphosphonates are not approved for use in the horse and work on a more complex pathway with a myriad of side effects as seen and documented in human medicine literature.”

The racing commissioners said that “bisphosphonate use in a racing environment is already prohibited and, if found, the trainer is subject to significant fine and suspension and the horse will be excluded from competition for at least 30 days to one year. The extra label use in any horse younger than 4 years of age of any bisphosphonate is prohibited.”

The racing commissioners, who recommend model rules for states to adopt, is considering a policy that would “disallow any horse from being entered in a race that has been treated with bisphosphonates prior to age 4 or for reasons not specifically cited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as appropriate use. Owners and potential buyers of young horses are advised to insist on complete disclosure of any bisphosphonate treatments administered to horses they are considering for purchase.”

Keeneland, Fasig-Tipton and Ocala Breeders’ Sales last month announced a ban on the use of bisphosphonates in young horses. The sales companies said that buyers will be allowed to request horses be tested and that the sales could be rescinded.

However, it is unclear if current testing would be able to detect the use of the drugs after more than three months

Editor’s Message: Allaboutcutting.net warned about using drugs on race horses previously in the attached article:  The Mechanical Horse,” written by Rick Dennis.

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EIA CASES CONFIRMED IN TEXAS

Posted by on Apr 10, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

EIA CASES CONFIRMED IN TEXAS

April 10, 2019

According to  an article by Erica Larson in The Horse, EIA cases have been confirmed in Smith and Van Zandt counties in Texas.

In each county, a Quarter Horse was tested positive for EIA in March and both affected horses have been euthanized, according to the Equine Disease Communication Center (EDCC).

According to the EDCC, “Each animal’s home premises will remain under quarantine until requirements for release have been met. TAHC staff is working closely with owners and veterinarians to monitor potentially exposed horses and implement biosecurity measures.”

Equine infectious anemia is a viral disease that attacks horses’ immune systems. The virus is transmitted through the exchange of body fluids from an infected to an uninfected animal often by blood-feeding insects such as horseflies.  It can also be transmitted through th use of blood-contaminated instruments or needles. A Coggins tot screens horses’ blood for antibodies that are indicative of the presence of the EIA virus. 

Click for full article>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

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IT’S TIME FOR CONGRESS TO APPROVE US-MEXICO-CANADA AGREEMENT

Posted by on Apr 5, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

US AG GETS A GREAT DEAL WITH USMCA

IT’S TIME FOR CONGRESS TO APPROVE US-MEXICO-CANADA AGREEMENT

By American Farm Bureau Federation

April 5, 2019

Farmers know a good deal when we see one. We watch every penny and stretch every dollar as far as it can go. We fix up our tractors and repair our old pickup trucks year after year, hoping to get yet another season out of them.

At the same time, we always have our eye on the latest technology and tools that will make our farms and ranches more productive and more efficient. I don’t know a farmer or rancher who would pass up a good deal that could make their business better. The same is true when it comes to trade deals. When NAFTA was signed more than 25 years ago, it was the best trade deal U.S. agriculture had ever seen. But now there’s a new deal on offer—the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA. We have a chance to trade in a great agreement for an even better one.

WITHOUT USMCA, OUR MOST CRITICAL MARKETS HANG IN THE BALANCE 

Since NAFTA went into effect in 1994, U.S. ag exports to Canada and Mexico have more than quadrupled, making these our number 1 and number 2 markets respectively. In 2018 alone, we exported $20.7 billion in ag products to Canada and $19 billion to Mexico.

These markets have only grown in value for U.S. farmers and ranchers. Over the last decade, ag exports have increased 27 percent to Canada and 23 percent to Mexico.

But as good as NAFTA has been, it’s time for an upgrade: it’s time for Congress to approve USMCA.

Without USMCA, our most critical markets hang in the balance. Both Canada and Mexico have already signed another deal that does not include the United States. The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership replaces the TPP agreement that the U.S. agreed to but then backed out of in 2017. The CPTPP gives Canada and Mexico preferential trade terms with nine other countries and gives those countries better access to Canada’s and Mexico’s markets―all while the ongoing trade war hangs overhead, with tariffs hurting U.S. agricultural exports. 

Just this week, Japan is following through on its promises under the CPTPP and reducing its tariffs and raising its quotas for ag products from CPTPP partners. This is all the more reason why we must bring the USMCA across the finish line and secure our valuable trade partnership with our nearest neighbors.

The USMCA is also important in setting the stage for other modern trade agreements for U.S. agriculture. NAFTA needed to be modernized, and the USMCA has bells and whistles that we don’t have under our existing trade agreements. Let’s look under the hood. For the U.S., it’s the first trade agreement to deal with approval of and trade in products of biotechnology. This groundwork will be critical in agreements we pursue with other countries, especially in the EU, the UK and Japan. The new agreement broadens access for U.S. dairy and finally brings an end to Canada’s unfair class 7 pricing scheme. These are wins we didn’t see even under TPP. 

Finally, USMCA will bring greater access for poultry, improve wheat grading standards, and make much-needed improvements to animal and plant health protection standards.

Finally, ratifying the USMCA will show our top trading partners and other countries that the United States and the trade negotiators who represent us mean business. It would prove that our word and handshake can be trusted when we strike a deal.

Right now, it’s important for each of us to call on our lawmakers in Washington and tell them how important the USMCA is to agriculture. Farmers and ranchers are resilient, but our businesses—not to mention the jobs and rural communities that depend on us—cannot survive without our top markets. Let’s get this deal done, so we can move forward with opening and expanding more markets around the globe.

Zippy-Duvall-_-farm-headshot.jpg

Zippy Duvall

President

Vincent “Zippy” Duvall, a poultry, cattle and hay producer from Greene County, Georgia, is the 12th president of the American Farm Bureau Federation. You can follow him on Twitter @ZippyDuvall.

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