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HORSES TEST POSITIVE FOR EHV-1 AT NRCHA STALLION STAKES

Posted by on Apr 17, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TWO HORSES TEST POSITIVE FOR EHV-1 THAT WERE RECENTLY AT THE NRCHA STALLION STAKES 

ONE HORSE WAS FROM CALIFORNIA, ANOTHER FROM CLARK COUNTY IN NEVADA

April 17, 2019

It’s every horse show’s nightmare when horses at their show test positive for EHV-1, the non-neurologic form of equine herpesvirus – type 1.

That recently happened at the National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) Stallion Stakes, held March 24-31 at the South Point Hotel and Casino horse arena in Las Vegas, Nev., when two horses that attended the recent Stallion Stakes tested positive for the disease. Officials said “All horses that were at the event had have been exposed and that their owners should use extreme caution when traveling with their equines or competing.” 

Also, the state of Nevada had reported a total of six EHV-1 positive cases in recent weeks

However, Michael and Paula Gaughn’s great horse facility was ready! With the state of Nevada reporting those six EHV-1 positive cases on March 15, officials placed the facility under quarantine when a horse tested positive for EHV-1 following the High School Rodeo Association event. Two more facilities located in Clark County were also placed under quarantine days later after two more horses tested positive.

When Nevada State Veterinarian Dr. J.J. Goicoechea urged all horse events for the weekend of March 23-24 be cancelled in order to minimize the potential for more exposures, the South Point complied, canceling a team roping that weekend in order to restrict horse movement and take extra biosecurity measures at the facility in advance of the NRCHA Stakes.

NRCHA Executive Director Jay Winborn said that the officials didn’t foresee the spread of the disease at the Stakes because they were out of the incubation period for the previous cases in Nevada and they knew of the strict cleaning procedures used at the South Point. He said they will continue to monitor the results of the tests and if necessary, would continue the cleaning protocols

Steve Stallworth, the South Point Equestrian Center’s General Manager said the Las Vegas facility has stringent protocols for the sanitation and disinfection of stalls and public areas after each of its events, saying, “Michael and Paula Gaughan, have a passion for running a clean, safe facility. The facility will continue its cleaning protocols for horses at the AQHA Level 1 World Championships, scheduled for April 17-20. The horses’ temperatures will be checked as they come into the facility and each horse will have a temperature chart and will ask the owners to take the temperatures of the horses in the morning and at night.

“We feel good that our protocols at the South Point facility are in place to not only be preventative but also in case anything does happen. If we get a feverish horse during our show, we will isolate them until the proper veterinarians look at them and determine if they’re safe to still compete.”

As editor of this article, I can assure you that I attended many events at the South Point and was there right after they implemented the preventive measures.

The NRCHA has the NRCHA Derby scheduled for June 9-16 in Paso Robles, Calif. and Winborn said the NRCHA will continue to monitor the situation and, if necessary, consider implementing additional biosecurity measures at the Derby.

According to Dr. Joe Carter, the NRCHA Veterinarian and the Animal Welfare Committee Chairman, “The respiratory, non-neurological form of EHV-1 that the horses tested positive for after the Stakes is very similar to the flu.”

He continued that EHV-1 is more common than most people realize and keeping your horse up to date on vaccines is the best line of defense, and help with many other viruses horses battle regularly.

Also, according to Stallworth, the South Point will institute temperature checks for all horses as they come in for the AQHA Level 1 World Championships, set for April 17-20 at the South Point facility, saying, “Each horse will have a temperature chart and the owners will be asked to take its temperature in the morning and night.” 

Temperature checks will also be done during the upcoming National Breeders Classic in Katy, Texas. That decision was made earlier this week following the Texas Animal Health Commission announcement that a reining horse in the state had tested positive for Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM), the neurologic disease linked to EHV-1, after the horse had attended an Oklahoma show.

Severe cases of EHV-1 can result in death of the horse and include nasal discharge, incoordination, hind limb weakness, loss of tail tone, lethargy, urine dribbling, head tilt and the inability to rise. They may lean against a fence or wall to maintain their balance.

  • Some of the quotes and information in this article were taken from an online article by Quarter Horse News.  

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Rodeo News 4-16-19

Posted by on Apr 16, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

RODEO NEWS
From the PRCA
April 16, 2019
TAZ OLSON WINS LOGANDALE
LOGANDALE, Nev. – Steer wrestler Taz Olson knew that the next few weeks were going to present a break in rodeoing for him.
Olson is heading home to Prairie City, S.D., to help his grandfather and father on the family ranch. He can go home with a big smile on his face.
The 26-year-old posted a 4.0-second run in the final round of the Clark County Fair & Rodeo in Logandale, Nev., Sunday night, to clock an average time of 14.5 seconds on three head to win the ProRodeo Tour event.
Olson earned $5,635 after finishing third in the first round, tying for first in the final round and winning the average.
In his fourth trip to Logandale, this was the first time he took home any kind of check, let alone the title and more than $5,500.
“That’s the first time I’ve won money there,” he said. “It’s pretty cool. It was sure a good time. I’ve always enjoyed that rodeo, the fresh steers.”
Olson was 37th in the PRCA | RAM World Standings heading into Logandale with $13,480. The win launched him up to 24th in the world standings. It will also put him right in the mix of the ProRodeo Tour Standings.
Olson was on Tanner Brunner’s horse Bert for the first time, but quickly found he was as good as he looked.
“That was the first time I ever rode him,” Olson said. “I wouldn’t mind (getting on him again). He gave some pretty good goes.”
He’ll head back on the rodeo road for Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo the first weekend of May.
“I’ll be home until Guymon,” he said. “I have to go home for lambing right now.”
Other winners at the $246,318 rodeo were all-around cowboy Stetson Wright ($5,734, saddle bronc riding and bull riding), bareback rider Austin Foss (172 points on two head); team ropers Garrett Rogers/Jake Minor (15.9 seconds on three head); saddle bronc rider Isaac Diaz (174 points on two head); tie-down roper Tuf Cooper (27.6 seconds on three head); barrel racer Leia Pluemer (35.01 seconds on two runs); and bull rider Wright (174 points on two head).
AARON WILLIAMS GETS REDEMPTION AT OAKDALE
OAKDALE, Calif. – In his second year of PRCA competition, bull rider Aaron Williams was out for redemption at the Oakdale (Calif.) Saddle Club Rodeo.
The Pismo Beach, Calif., cowboy took a re-ride during his rookie year in 2018 but didn’t get a qualified ride.
“They got me for a slap right at the whistle (last year), so it was good to go this year and redeem myself,” Williams said.
One year later, Williams cruised into the winner’s circle with an 89-point ride on Big Stone Rodeo Inc.’s War Car.
“I had a good bull, and Oakdale is pretty historic, so I’m excited to add that buckle to my collection and keep it growing right on into Red Bluff (Calif.) this weekend,” Williams said.
Williams had a good idea of what he was in for with War Car after talking to Chance Schott, his friend and fellow bull rider.
“He gave me the rundown and said he’s a good little bull, a little hot-acting at first, but once you get down on him he’s awesome,” Williams said, adding that Schott predicted Williams would score in the high 80s.
Williams’ ride was worth $3,440, which should give him a healthy boost in the 2019 PRCA | RAM World Standings. Before winning Oakdale, the 22-year-old cowboy was ranked 17th in the world standings with $30,541.
“The year is still young, and I’m going to keep rodeoing and riding bulls,” Williams said. “They’ll let me know where I stand at the end of the year. It’s kind of out of my hands as far as where I get placed. I can only do so much, so I keep it simple and have fun riding and let the rest of the chips fall where they may.”
In true California style, Williams has a laid-back and relaxed mindset when it comes to competing.
“I just try to keep it as easy as possible and put the rest out of my mind,” Williams said. “It’s just bull riding – show up and have fun.”
His easygoing attitude has paid off at major rodeos before, as he won the 2018 Ellensburg (Wash.) Rodeo in September. He went on to finish second in the 2018 PRCA | Resistol Rookie Standings for bull riding with $67,066.
Williams took what he learned from his successful rookie year and is applying it to the 2019 season, getting started earlier than before.
“Last year, I didn’t get going until February or March, so it was nice to get those winter rodeos and go to San Antonio and Houston,” Williams said.
Other winners at the $124,875 rodeo were all-around cowboy Doyle Hoskins ($568, tie-down roping and team roping); bareback rider Devan Reilly (85.5 points on Four Star Rodeo’s Black Ice); steer wrestler Hunter Cure (8.4 seconds on two head); team ropers Luke Brown/Jade Corkill (13.5 seconds on two head); saddle bronc rider Jesse Wright (88 points on C5 Rodeo’s Bad Intentions); tie-down roper Westyn Hughes (18.1 seconds on two head) and barrel racer Megan Champion (17.20 seconds).
J.R. VEZAIN MAKING PROGRESS AFTER SEVERE INJURY
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Veteran bareback rider J.R. Vezain continues to make progress after suffering a broken back while competing at the Pasadena (Texas) Livestock Show & Rodeo when he was riding Frontier Rodeo Company’s Brazos Bash, Sept. 22.
The injury required surgery and has left him with mobility issues from the waist down. Vezain addressed his rehab in an interview with ProRodeo Sports News Friday.
“I was rehabbing at Neuroworx in Sandy, Utah, since November,” said Vezain, 27. “They have upgraded me to taking steps with bodyweight support. My wife (Shelby) is getting ready to have a baby boy (the couple’s first child) May 14, so the closer that (date) came the more we were wanting to be at home. I talked to the therapist, and we did some new testing. They set me up with an at-home program to come to do some strength training for the next six to eight weeks until after the baby comes. Then we will touch base and make a new game plan after that. My in-laws turned the garage into a gym, and we have a bunch of equipment set up.”
Vezain, a six-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2012-14 and 2016-18), returned home to Melstone, Mont., from Sandy, Utah, April 5.
“I have been back rehabbing, and I elicit my own steps,” Vezain said. “My hip flexor is firing, my quads are firing, my glutes are firing, and those muscles are flexing. I can elicit my own steps, but my leg muscles are still so weak that I can’t hold myself up yet without assistance. I’m making progress daily.”
Vezain said his faith and the outpouring of support is helping him deal with his plight.
“Ever since the beginning when this happened, I could have laid in bed and wondered why it happened to me and wonder if I was going to get out of it, or you can get dressed, get out of bed and make the most of it, and that’s what I have been trying to do,” Vezain said. “I’m relying on the support system I have and my faith. I don’t know what the outcome is going to be, but I dang-sure know who holds tomorrow, and I’m going to keep working hard and keep on swinging.”
Vezain got on a horse for the first time since his injury April 6.
“I rode a horse around the place here (in Melstone), and that sure was great,” Vezain said. “I also got a four-wheeler rigged up with a hand-shifter, so I can go tag cows and help out around the ranch.”
Recently, Vezain also started doing leatherwork again.
“I used to do leatherwork growing up,” Vezain said. “I always had aspirations to set up my own saddle shop, and I got married and got busy with life and rodeoing,” Vezain said. “I had not done much leatherwork for three years or so, and then when I went to Utah, Kent Mertin raffled off a leather bag that he made and some spurs. Through small talk, I told him I used to do leatherwork. He told me if I got bored to come over (to West Jordan, Utah), which was 10 minutes away and do some leatherwork. I spent every day there after rehab doing leatherwork. I’ve been making a bunch of Navajo purse bags. Kent told me to show some of my purse bags on the internet, and I’ve been blessed. I got a bunch of orders of purses and some belts.”
WHAT TO WATCH FOR:
Wranglernetwork.com
Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up, April 20, 2:30 p.m. (PT); April 21, 1:30 p.m. (PT)
ProRodeoTV.com
Rodeo Corpus Christi (Texas) ProRodeo Tour Rodeo, April 25-27, 7 p.m. (PT); April 28, 3 p.m., CT.
George Paul Memorial Division 1 Xtreme Bulls, Del Rio, Texas, April 26-27, 8 p.m., CT
ProRodeo Live with Steve Kenyon
Central Ark PRCA Rodeo, El Paso, Ark., April 19-20, 7:30 p.m. (CT)
NEWS & NOTES FROM THE RODEO TRAIL
Bull riding is all Cody Rostockyj has known. However, after a serious injury scare recently, Rostockyj, who qualified for the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, is retiring from bull riding at the age of 29. “I was riding at the Waxahachie, Texas, rodeo a couple of weeks ago and I got hit in the head with a horn to the face,” said Rostockyj, who started his two-year term as bull riding representative on the PRCA Executive Council, April 1.
“It didn’t look like a bad wreck at all, but it kind of stunned me and paralyzed me for two minutes. I came back to after a couple of minutes and was able to move my body again, but it was tingling from my neck to my toes. The tingling went away except for my arms and my hands. I went to the ER that night and I didn’t have a broken neck or back, but they wanted me to go see a neurologist, so I did. They did an MRI and told me I bruised my spine.
“The way they explained it was that it was kind of like a concussion, once you get one, they can come more frequently and easier. The same thing with my back, that I might get hit again and nothing could happen or it could bruise it easier or I could get paralyzed.” That latter possibility was what led to Rostockyj walking away from the sport. Rostockyj joined the PRCA in October 2009 and earned $363,734. He was 45th in the April 8 PRCA | RAM World Standings with $11,486. Rostockyj will continue to keep close tabs on bull riding after being elected to serve as the bull riding representative on the PRCA Executive Council. “I wanted to do it and I was still going, and it would make it a lot easier,” Rostockyj said. “But now with me being retired, I can pay more attention to things and do an even better job.”
Next Up
April 19          Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up begins
April 19          Central Ark PRCA Rodeo, El Paso, Ark., begins
April 19          Jesse Andrus & Mike Hillman Memorial, Roswell, N.M., begins
April 20          Ron Ross Permit Steer Roping, Liberty, Texas, begins
April 20          Ron Ross Steer Roping, Liberty, begins
2019 PRCA | RAM World Standings Leaders
Unofficial through April 15, 2019
AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas, $83,412
BB: Kaycee Feild, Genola, Utah, $115,965
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena , Mont., $96,274
TR-1: Ty Blasingame, Casper, Wyo., $71,832
TR-2: Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif., 75,435
SB: Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah, $122,272
TD: Michael Otero, Weatherford, Texas, $81,435
SR: Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas, $25,778
BR: Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla., $84,960
2019 PRCA | RAM World Standings
Please see prorodeo.com for the latest standings update. All standings are unofficial.
2019 PRCA Rodeo Results
About The PRCA
The PRCA, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colo., is recognized as the unsurpassed leader in sanctioning the sport of professional rodeo. The PRCA’s mission is to unify membership in providing an innovative fan experience, to grow the sport of professional rodeo and provide new expanded opportunities for our membership and sponsors. Since 1986, the PRCA has paid out more than $1 billion in prize money to its contestants. The PRCA offers the best cowboys and the best rodeos; delivering the best fan experience while positively impacting our communities and embracing the spirit of the West. A membership-based organization, the PRCA sanctioned 650 rodeos in 2018, and there are more than 40 million rodeo fans in the U.S. The PRCA televises the sport’s premier events, with the world-renowned Wrangler National Finals Rodeo on CBS Sports Net and streaming on ProRodeoTV.com. The PRORODEO® Tour and RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo also air on CBS Sports Net, and ProRodeoTV.com. PRCA-sanctioned rodeos donate more than $40 million to local and national charities every year. For comprehensive coverage of the cowboy sport, read the ProRodeo Sports News, the official publication of the PRCA, and make sure to check out the digital edition of the PSN. The digital PSN and daily updates of news and results can be found on the PRCA’s official website, www.prorodeo.com.
For additional information about this press release, contact:
Tracy Renck
719.528.4758
Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association
101 Pro Rodeo Drive
Colorado Springs, CO 80919 www.prorodeo.com
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IS THERE AN EXTORTION RACKET IN THE HORSE INDUSTRY?

Posted by on Apr 15, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 10 comments

IS THERE AN EXTORTION RACKET OPERATING IN THE HORSE INDUSTRY?

 

THE LATEST GIMMICK INVOLVES THE POOR HORSE, ANIMAL RESCUES, DONORS AND KILL BUYERS

 

 

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
For all about cutting.net

April 14, 2019

EXTORTION BUYING:

It seems, if there’s a new scam that’s been derived, in the horse industry, to separate folks from their hard earned money.  The latest gimmick involves the poor horse, animal rescue operations, donors and “kill buyers.”  The scheme is quite unique in that it fulfills all the requirements of the definition of extortion:  More specifically, Extortion (also called shakedown, outwrestling and exaction) is a criminal offense of obtaining money, property or services from an individual or institution, through coercion.  Coercion is defined as “the practice of persuading someone to do something by using force or threats”.

Another extortion tactic they use is: “The extortionist tells the donor that the horse is already on the truck headed to Mexico, but $200. will turn the truck around.” Still another extortion tactic they use is: “They will tell the potential donor and buyer that the horse has already been separated, sorted and chipped for shipment to the slaughter plant on a certain date.  The seller then jacks the price up on a previous $750. horse, for example, to a new asking price of $1,500 to cover the sorting and the chipping.

“Horse Kill Buyers” have enacted and perfected their presentation of an extortion operation which is offered to the general public in order to double their profits on selling horses, with the aid of phrases such as: “This horse was just rescued from the kill pen and if it doesn’t sell within a specified time frame, it’s going to the slaughter house!”  (Threat). 

Louisiana law enforcement has caught on to this unscrupulous and illegal tactic and is actually doing something about it by investigating “horse kill buyers” where in some cases the offender is actually arrested and prosecuted.  However, this unsavory extortion tactic isn’t unique to just Louisiana.  The same basic principle can be found throughout the United Sates where “horse kill buyers” are located and they use the same extortion tactic to sell excess horses for double profits on the internet or social media sites.

A more aptly applied moniker for what their doing is often referred to as a “shakedown racket”.  Simply stated, its akin to an individual telling a person, “unless you pay me so much protection money, I won’t burn your house down. In the case of the “horse kill buyer” they use a similar tactic by saying, “Unless this horse is sold out of the “kill pen” within a certain time frame, it’s going to the slaughter house!” (Threat). This illegal activity is designed to induce an immediate response from donors and horse rescues alike by invoking an individual’s sense of caring to save the poor horse.  My observed responses depicts a bidding war among rescues and donors alike.  

All-in-all, this bidding interaction can sometimes drive the price of the horse above the initial asking price.  The end result is that donors are eager to save a life and cough up their hard-earned money in the process. This perfectly-devised plan further enriches the seller.  So are horse rescues and money donors actually saving a life or are they enabling the “horse kill buyer” to further his or her extortion operation by using the donor funds to return to the local auction, buy more horses for the extortion operation and start the process all over again?  Unfortunately, the answer is a resounding “yes” and “no”.  Case in point:  Most all “kill pen brokers” already have existing contracts with horse slaughter plants across the international border of the United States.  These contracts usually require a “kill pen buyer” to fulfill a certain number of horses per contract, e.g., 200.  In all probability, the “kill pen buyer” has already fulfilled his obligation to the horse slaughter plant or the horse slaughter plant will find someone else to fill the contract, which leaves the original broker out in the cold, so-to-speak.

In all probability, the horse that’s being marketed as being “in dire straits,” in a “do-or-die situation” really isn’t in dire straits at all, never was intended for the slaughter plant and is being sold off to double his or her profits. Especially when they are usable riding horses.  That’s just a fact.  This illegal tactic is just really a very effective and fraudulent way of selling a horse and enriching ones bank account. One key way to verify this is to be cautious of photographs of horses with saddles on them, ready to ride. Usable horses aren’t the ones that make it to the horse slaughter plant. Unusable, unstable, mean and wild horses are the ones that usually make it to slaughter.

For the record, horses end up in the horse slaughter pipeline for all sorts of reasons, whether its because of economic down-turn, a death in the family, a non-performer in the show pen or on the race track, etc. Furthermore, it’s not against the law to fill a trailer full of horses and export them to a foreign slaughter house.  However, the unlawful tactics that are being employed today to sell horses allegedly, in the “kill pen” by “kill buyers,” is most certainly illegal. It’s just a SCAM program that’s been used effectively for a very long time in the horse industry.

Furthermore, it’s just an effective extortion tactic to double an investment. After all, let’s face it, “kill buyers” have found a very effective niche in the industry to double their profits by selling usable horses in this fashion that they’ve picked up at a bargain price at the sale barn. After all, no one wants to buy an emaciated horse or a horse in poor health and neither does the slaughter plant. This type of horse just isn’t fashionable or sellable. 

HOW PROFITABLE IS THE EXTORTION TACTIC?

Let’s just introduce a hypothetical into the extortion tactic equation and  see how it all shakes out. For example, a “kill buyer” attends a local auction he or she buys horses based on the horse-slaughter plant paying him or her 40 cents per pound per slaughter horse.  Therefore, he has to purchase a horse below this figure in order to sell the same horse to the horse slaughter plant for a profit.  In the meantime, he or she buys some usable riding horses for the same below market price at the same sale.

Bear-in-mind that the “kill buyer” (who is engaged in selling horses using extortion tactics) is buying horses for two purposes: the unusable horses for the slaughter plant to fulfill the contract and the useable riding horses that are sold using the “in-dire straights” moniker. In order to make a substantial profit, the “kill buyer” markets the usable horse to the general public at let’s just say, 80 cents per pound, yielding double profits or even $1.20 a pound or more, which may yield triple profits.  When the horse sells because of the illegal extortion tactics being used, the horse brings a substantial profit to the “kill buyer”, which in turn allows him or her to restock and start the process all over again.  In fact and reality, if the usable horse isn’t sold at one location, the horse is just moved to another selling location to start the bidding war all over again. It’s the sad reality of the situation.

HORSE RESCUES: 

As the old saying goes, “there are horse rescues and then there are horse rescues.” Horse rescues are comprised of two categories: “legal and fraudulent.” Unfortunately, for the novice, it’s hard to distinguish between the two.  As a primer to the novice, rescues usually occupy the category of either being a Non-Profit or a 501 C (3) Non-Profit. The difference between the two are:  The State Non-Profit has to abide by certain disclosure laws of the State of Incorporation as well as Federal Taxing laws.  

The 501 C (3) Non-Profit has to abide not only by the Federal Non-Profit guidelines, but the State of Incorporation tax guidelines, as well.  The State Non-Profit has to afford the general public a financial disclosure.  The Federal 501 C (3) Non-Profit has to afford the general public a financial disclosure in the form of an IRS 990 which is loaded on Guidestar.org.  Donations to the 501 C (3) are tax deductible.  Donations to the Non-Profit aren’t always tax deductible.

Before donating to an individual posing as a horse rescue, it’s always advisable to conduct a cursory background check, including references and a document request, or you could be donating your money and your horse to an individual whose posing as a rescue but in fact and reality is a “kill buyer” and the only loving home your horse will ever see is on someone’s dinner plate in Europe.  Donors beware!  

ANIMAL RIGHTS ACTIVISTS: 

As with horse rescues, the same can be applied to alleged animal-rights activists. The legitimate horse rescues perform wonderful work; however, unfortunately there are individuals on social media who pose as animal-rights activists, but in fact and reality are just “cyber bullies” and extortionists or social-media extremists whose mindsets are border-line terrorists, as I like to refer to them. Their modus operandi (MOS) is to launch an attack on an individual not in their favor and to ruin that individual at all costs while using lies, half truths and distorted facts to accomplish their mission.  

To reinforce their self-worth and legitimacy, they usually post headlines from news articles generated by other news outlets concerning abused horses or other matters of interest but they usually can’t post anything pertaining to anything they actually accomplished on their own to contribute their actually providing their personal accomplishments in making a horse’s life better. Therefore, one should be careful with whom one interacts with on social media and the Internet. As the Trojan adage goes, “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts!”

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!”

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Managing Member
Phone: (985) 630-3500
Email: richardedennis@outlook.com
Web Site: http://www/richardedennis.net

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RECENTLY INTRODUCED ANIMAL ABUSE LEGISLATION

Posted by on Apr 14, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

CALIFORNIA INTRODUCES ANIMAL-ABUSE LEGISLATION

 

THE CORRELATION BETWEEN HUMAN ABUSE AND ANIMAL ABUSE

 

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
For all about cutting.net

April 13, 2019

CALIFORNIA INTRODUCES “THE ANIMAL CRUELTY & VIOLENCE INTERVENTION ACT OF 2019

 

IS ANIMAL CRUELTY A PREDECESSOR TO VIOLENCE AND ABUSE?

Animal abusers are five times more likely to harm humans. Various studies have shown that there is a high correlation between domestic violence and animal abuse, as well as child abuse and animal abuse.  Statistics show that 70 percent of the most violent prisoners in a study of federal prisons had serious animal abuse in their histories.

California Senator Scott Wilk and the Animal Legal Defense Fund are sponsoring the Animal Cruelty and Violence Intervention Act of 2019, Senate Bill (“SB”) 580, to address this link between animal cruelty and violence against humans and to stop the escalation of dangerous behavior among offenders who hurt animals.

The bill requires offenders convicted of serious animal abuse crimes, as well as those convicted of crimes associated with underlying mental health issues such as hoarding, to undergo a mandatory mental health evaluation and possibly ongoing treatment if deemed beneficial by the assessing mental health professional and the court.  Judges are also empowered to order people convicted of less serious crimes to enroll in humane education courses that provide people with the skills they need to interact with animals in a positive way.

The Animal Cruelty and Violence Intervention Act of 2019 gives judges the tools they need to rehabilitate people convicted of animal abuse and prevent the escalation of dangerous behavior, to protect animals – and humans – from future violence.  A good read on the subject of animal abuse is:  Arnold Arluke et. al., The Relationship of Animal Abuse to Violence and Other Forms of Antisocial Behavior, 14 JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, 963 (1999)

 

AN OREGON MAN GETS 60 DAYS IN JAIL FOR SEXUALLY ASSAULTING DOG THAT HAD TO BE EUTHANIZED

By Louis Casiano, Fox News, April 11, 2019
An Oregon man was sentenced Wednesday to 60 days in jail for sexually assaulting a dog who had to be euthanized due to extensive injuries.

Fidel Lopez, 52, was given the maximum penalty allowed for his offense by Multnomah County Judge Angel Lopez who said, “If it could have been more, I would have gladly given you more,” according to KOIN-TV in Portland.

The station reported that Lopez admitted to investigators to sexually assaulting the dog, a Lhaso Apso mix named Estrella. Estrella’s owner took her to a veterinarian in November 2018 after suspecting she had been abused. Lopez knew the owner and admitted to investigators that he abused the dog.

 

THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF THE UNITED STATES (HSUS)

The shocking number of animal cruelty cases reported every day is just the tip of the iceberg, as most cases are never reported. Unlike violent crimes against people, cases of animal abuse are not compiled by state or federal agencies, making it difficult to calculate just how common they are. However, we can use the information that is available to try to understand and prevent cases of abuse.

 

WHO ABUSES ANIMALS?

Cruelty and neglect cross all social and economic boundaries and media reports suggest that animal abuse is common in both rural and urban areas. Intentional cruelty to animals is strongly correlated with other crimes, including violence against people.

Hoarding behavior often victimizes animals. Sufferers of a hoarding disorder may impose severe neglect on animals by housing far more than they are able to adequately take care of. Serious animal neglect (such as hoarding) is often an indicator of people in need of social or mental health services.

Surveys suggest that those who intentionally abuse animals are predominantly men under 30, while those involved in animal hoarding are more likely to be women over 60.

 

MOST COMMON VICTIMS:

The animals whose abuse is most often reported are dogs, cats, horses and livestock. Undercover investigations have revealed that animal abuse abounds in the factory farm industry. But because of the weak protections afforded to livestock under state cruelty laws, only the most shocking cases are reported, and few are ever prosecuted.

 

ORGANIZED CRUELTY:

Dogfighting, cockfighting and other forms of organized animal cruelty go hand in hand with other crimes and continues in many areas of the United States due to public corruption.

The HSUS documented uniformed police officers at a cockfighting pit in Kentucky. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency has prosecuted multiple cases where drug cartels were running narcotics through cockfighting and dogfighting operations, while dozens of homicides have occurred at cockfights and dogfights. In fact, a California man was killed in a disagreement about a $10 cockfight bet.

The HSUS’s investigative team combats complacent public officials and has worked with the FBI on public corruption cases in Tennessee and Virginia. In both instances, law enforcement officers were indicted and convicted.

 

CORRELATION WITH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE:

Data on domestic violence and child abuse cases reveal that a staggering number of animals are targeted by those who abuse their children or spouses. There are approximately 70 million pet dogs and 74.1 million pet cats in the U.S. where 20 men and women are assaulted per minute (an average of around 10 million a year). In one survey, 71 percent of domestic violence victims reported that their abuser also targeted pets.

In one study of families under investigation for suspected child abuse, researchers found that pet abuse had occurred in 88 percent of the families under supervision for physical abuse of their children.

 

STATE LEGISLATIVE TRENDS:

The HSUS has long led the push for stronger animal cruelty laws and provides training for law officials to detect and prosecute these crimes. With South Dakota joining the fight in March of 2014, animal cruelty laws now include felony provisions in all 50 states.

 

FIRST VS. SUBSEQUENT OFFENSE:

Some state laws only allow felony charges if the perpetrator has a previous animal cruelty conviction. Given that only a fraction of animal cruelty acts are ever reported or successfully prosecuted, the HSUS is committed to supporting felony convictions in cases of egregious cruelty regardless of whether the perpetrator has a prior conviction. A total of 46 of 50 states’ felony provisions are first-offense provisions.  Four states (Pennsylvania, Ohio, Iowa and Mississippi) have laws that apply felony charges only to subsequent offenses.  A majority of anti-cruelty laws are limited to cases involving aggravated cruelty, torture or cruelty to companion animals.

 

CHANGES IN FEDERAL TRACKING:

On January 1, 2016, the FBI added Cruelty to Animals as a category in the Uniform Crime Report, a nationwide crime-reporting system commonly used in homicide investigations. While only about a third of U.S. communities currently participate in the system, the data generated will help create a clearer picture of animal abuse and guide strategies for intervention and enforcement. Data collection covers four categories: simple/gross neglect, intentional abuse and torture, organized abuse (such as dogfighting and cockfighting) and animal sexual abuse.

Law Enforcement has long known the direct correlation between animal abuse and violence in society.  As the old adage, “The way a person treats an animal is exactly how their going to treat you.”

Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Managing Member
Phone: (985) 630-3500
Email: richardedennis@outlook.com
Web Site: http://www.richardedennis.net

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ANIMAL ACTIVISTS HAVE A MESSAGE FOR KENTUCKY HORSE RACING!

Posted by on Apr 11, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 1 comment

ANIMAL ACTIVISTS HAVE A MESSAGE FOR KENTUCKY HORSE RACING: THEY ARE WATCHING!

 

April 11, 2019

“PETA is putting Kentucky on notice,” warned a statement from Kathy Guillermo, senior vice president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, which has been protesting at Santa Anita in the wake of 23 horse deaths related to the track.

Now, PETA is turning its attention to the Bluegrass state in the wake of the death of a horse Saturday at Keeneland.

“No horses died during Santa Anita Derby weekend, which seems to show that the track’s new rules — while not as strong as PETA would have liked — are a lifesaving step. Now, all eyes will be on Kentucky, where Churchill Downs — home of the Kentucky Derby — has the second-worst death rate for horses in the country,” Guillermo said in the statement. She said PETA would attend the Churchill Downs Inc. annual shareholders meeting later this month “to question the company’s executives.”

In California, The Stronach Group, which owns Santa Anita as well as Pimlico, where the second jewel of the Triple Crown is run, announced a set of new rules including limiting the use of furosemide (known as Lasix) and the use of whips. Protesters demonstrated outside Santa Anita on Saturday.

“At nearby Keeneland, Thoroughbred Cathedral Reader broke a leg and was euthanized on Saturday, and today, 2-year-old horses will be made to run faster than they ever will for the rest of their lives, risking injury and death to fetch a high price at the Keeneland April Sale,” Guillermo said. “Change is overdue, and for the sake of the horses, it needs to come now.”

The April 2-Year-Olds In Training Sale is taking place this week at Keeneland, which is also the world’s largest Thoroughbred auction house. Horses ran timed sprints Monday and will be offered for sale Tuesday.

Meanwhile, the Association of Racing Commissioners International issued a statement clarifying that horses treated with bisphosphonates, a controversial osteoporosis drug, may be denied entry into races while the organization formulates a policy to recommend to states.

The drugs have come under increased scrutiny by veterinary and racing organizations as deaths mount. Last year, Kentucky saw an unprecendented 80 percent increase in equine fatalities during racing. Bisphosphonates, which are recommended for navicular bone disease in older horses, are suspected of interfering with proper bone formation. Racing and sales officials have called on the industry to stop using them in horses under the age of 4.

Bimeda, the maker of Tildren, one of the medications, said in a statement to the Herald-Leader that they “welcome the recent partial bans proposed by racing organizations in the United States and Canada, regarding bisphosphonate use in young horses, and we are committed to research which will provide a better understanding of these important equine pharmaceuticals.”

Dechra, which makes the other drug, Osphos, pointed to another potential concern in an email: “There are two generations of bisphosphonates, non-nitrogenous (non-nitrogen containing) or nitrogenous (nitrogen-containing). Osphos is a first-generation non-nitrogenous bisphosphonate. This is the least potent class of bisphosphonate.

“There has been evidence of the non-approved and FEI-banned nitrogenous bisphosphonate zoledronate being compounded and used in horses. The nitrogenous bisphosphonates are not approved for use in the horse and work on a more complex pathway with a myriad of side effects as seen and documented in human medicine literature.”

The racing commissioners said that “bisphosphonate use in a racing environment is already prohibited and, if found, the trainer is subject to significant fine and suspension and the horse will be excluded from competition for at least 30 days to one year. The extra label use in any horse younger than 4 years of age of any bisphosphonate is prohibited.”

The racing commissioners, who recommend model rules for states to adopt, is considering a policy that would “disallow any horse from being entered in a race that has been treated with bisphosphonates prior to age 4 or for reasons not specifically cited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as appropriate use. Owners and potential buyers of young horses are advised to insist on complete disclosure of any bisphosphonate treatments administered to horses they are considering for purchase.”

Keeneland, Fasig-Tipton and Ocala Breeders’ Sales last month announced a ban on the use of bisphosphonates in young horses. The sales companies said that buyers will be allowed to request horses be tested and that the sales could be rescinded.

However, it is unclear if current testing would be able to detect the use of the drugs after more than three months

Editor’s Message: Allaboutcutting.net warned about using drugs on race horses previously in the attached article:  The Mechanical Horse,” written by Rick Dennis.

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EIA CASES CONFIRMED IN TEXAS

Posted by on Apr 10, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

EIA CASES CONFIRMED IN TEXAS

April 10, 2019

According to  an article by Erica Larson in The Horse, EIA cases have been confirmed in Smith and Van Zandt counties in Texas.

In each county, a Quarter Horse was tested positive for EIA in March and both affected horses have been euthanized, according to the Equine Disease Communication Center (EDCC).

According to the EDCC, “Each animal’s home premises will remain under quarantine until requirements for release have been met. TAHC staff is working closely with owners and veterinarians to monitor potentially exposed horses and implement biosecurity measures.”

Equine infectious anemia is a viral disease that attacks horses’ immune systems. The virus is transmitted through the exchange of body fluids from an infected to an uninfected animal often by blood-feeding insects such as horseflies.  It can also be transmitted through th use of blood-contaminated instruments or needles. A Coggins tot screens horses’ blood for antibodies that are indicative of the presence of the EIA virus. 

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