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THE ART OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS

Posted by on Apr 27, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FEATURE ARTICLES, HEALTH AND WEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

THE ART OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
For all about cutting.net

 

WHAT IS RISK MANAGEMENT

Risk management is the ongoing analytical review and evaluation, by a Risk Analyst, of client-provided documents, practices or processes to determine a safety and risk factor to same.  It’s also the analytical process of assigning a numerical Risk Factor designation to any perceived or identified Risk or Safety risk or threat occurrences. Equally, it’s also the practice of continually reviewing and changing established, in-place, Risk Management Practices to counter future risks to thwart incidences of occurrence.  

Other examples of an ongoing and continuing Risk Management program include: Onsite facility security and safety surveys which includes a review of: barrier prevention access (i.e.) fencing, door and window locking systems and devices, closed circuit tv cameras and recording devices, computer, financial, IT and banking security as well as lighting, entry and exit points safety and security.  The Risk Analysis also includes a review of safety and security protocols to include employee hiring and termination practices.

During my tenure in the private security sector as a Risk Manager and Analyst, I’ve authored a myriad of Corporate Employee and Contractor Drug and Alcohol Prevention programs for:  Exxon Company USA, Atlantic Richfield, ARCO oil and Gas, KerrMcGee Corporation, as well as companies in the oil and gas exploration, aviation, maritime, construction, mining and construction industries.  These program models are in full compliance with the Federal Workplace Drug and Alcohol testing programs defined by 49, CFR, Part 40. Long ago, it was determined that the on-the-job use of impairment prescription drugs as well as illegal drugs and alcohol use and abuse were detrimental to safety, productivity and welfare of the workforce.

Risk Analysis comes in various forms to meet specific industry requirements: Security, Financial and Banking, etc.  Risks can come from various sources including uncertainty in financial markets, threats from project failures (at any phase in design, development, production, or sustainment life-cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters, deliberate attack from an adversary or events of uncertain or unpredictable root-cause.

There are two types of events i.e. negative events can be classified as risks while positive events are classified as opportunities. Several risk management standards have been developed including the Project Management Institute, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, actuarial societies and ISO standards. Methods, definitions and goals vary widely according to whether the risk management method is in the context of project management, security, engineering, industrial processes, financial portfolios, actuarial assessments or public health and safety.

Strategies to manage threats (uncertainties with negative consequences) typically include avoiding the threat, reducing the negative effect or probability of the threat, transferring all or part of the threat to another party and even retaining some or all of the potential or actual consequences of a particular threat as well as the opposites for opportunities (uncertain future states with benefits).

In ideal risk management, a prioritization process is followed whereby the risks with the greatest loss (or impact) and the greatest probability of occurring are handled first and risks with lower probability of occurrence and lower loss are handled in descending order. In practice, the process of assessing overall risks can be difficult and balancing resources used to mitigate between risks with a high probability of occurrence but lower loss versus a risk with high loss but lower probability of occurrence can often be mishandled. 

Risk Management also includes the use of mathematical algorithms whereby a set of standards of incident occurrence are included in the algorithm to project a certain number of probabilities of occurrence or happening within a certain time frame.

Intangible risk management identifies a new type of a risk that has a 100 percent  probability of occurring but is ignored by the organization due to a lack of identification ability. For example, when deficient knowledge is applied to a situation, a knowledge risk materializes. Relationship risk appears when ineffective collaboration occurs. Process-engagement risk may be an issue when ineffective operational procedures are applied. These risks directly reduce the productivity of knowledgable workers, decrease cost-effectiveness, profitability, service, quality, reputation, brand value, and earnings quality. Intangible risk management allows risk management to create immediate value from the identification and reduction of risks that reduce productivity.

Risk management also faces difficulties in allocating resources. This is the idea of opportunity cost. Resources spent on risk management could have been spent on more profitable activities. Again, ideal risk management minimizes spending (or manpower or other resources) and also minimizes the negative effects of risks.

RISK ASSESSMENT

Broadly speaking, a risk assessment is the combined effort of 1. identifying and analyzing potential (future) events that may negatively impact individuals, assets, and/or the environment (i.e., risk analysis); and 2. making judgments “on the tolerability of the risk on the basis of a risk analysis” while considering influencing factors (i.e., risk evaluation). Put in simpler terms, a risk assessment analyzes what can go wrong, how likely it is to happen, what the potential consequences are and how tolerable the identified risk is. As part of this process, the resulting determination of risk may be expressed in a quantitative or qualitative fashion. The risk assessment is an inherent part of an overall risk management strategy, which attempts to, after a risk assessment, “introduce control measures to eliminate or reduce” any potential risk-related consequences.

METHODS

For the most part, these methods consist of the following elements, performed, more or less in the following order:

Identify the threats, characterize the threat or risk, assess the vulnerability of critical assets to specific threats, determine the risk (i.e, the expected likelihood and consequences the risk or threat poses to the project or object of the Risk Analysis as well as specific assets), identify ways to reduce the threat or Risk and develop and prioritize counter measures to the identified or perceived Risk or Threat.

MONITORING

After the identified Risk or Threat has been eliminated, the Risk Manager and Analyst develop a system whereby the in-place Risk Vulnerability Threat Assessment System is constantly monitoring the system to prevent future occurrences.

WHAT IS RISK ANALYSIS?

Risk analysis is the process of identifying and analyzing information to determine potential issues that could negatively impact an individual, key business initiatives or critical projects in order to help organizations avoid or mitigate those risks.

Performing a risk analysis includes considering the probability of adverse events caused by either natural processes, like severe storms, earthquakes or floods or adverse events caused by malicious or inadvertent human activities. An important part of risk analysis is identifying the potential for harm from these events, as well as the likelihood that they will occur.  An analytical Risk Analysis will also identify any current risks to the client.

WHO USES RISK MANAGEMENT & RISK ANALYSIS

Individuals, business enterprises and other organizations use risk analysis to:

Anticipate and reduce the effect of harmful results from adverse events;

Evaluate whether the potential risks of a project are balanced by its benefits to aid in the decision process when evaluating whether to move forward with the project,

Plan responses for technology or equipment failure or loss from adverse events, both natural and human-caused, and identify the impact of and prepare for changes in the enterprise environment, including the likelihood of new competitors entering the market or changes to government regulatory policy.

Essentially, Risk Management and Risk Analysis are used daily to prevent economic or other losses in a particular business or personal environment.  Furthermore, Risk Management and Risk Analysis are used effectively by the oil & gas, maritime, aviation, manufacturing, insurance, telecommunications, and trucking industries, to name a few, as well as the United States Government and the US Department of Defense.  Private individuals utilize the services of a Risk Analyst to produce a Risk Analysis Report pertaining to individual safety as well as threats to their safety and as a protection of assets.

WHO IS A RISK ANALYST?

A Risk Analyst is an individual who uses his or her analytical skills to evaluate client-provided documents such as banking or other documents, or processes included in an onsite Security Survey such as. banking practices, use of computer devices, safety practices, etc., to determine a Risk Category, usually on a scale of 1 through 5, to determine a specific threat or risk to the client.  The analyst also devises a plan for implementation of a Risk Management Program, to counter any identified or perceived threats in order to protect client assets.  For the record, a Risk Analysis isn’t an investigation of any type and the Risk Analyst isn’t a private investigator but simply an analytical review artist who is well versed in law, finances, security and safety processes including an analysis of client-provided documents to determine a specific risk to the client and counter same by applying the appropriate counter measures.

Furthermore, a Risk Analyst is usually an individual with an intricate and extensive background in law enforcement, counter intelligence, security, finances, or generally required business safety requirements and practices. But he or she is also well versed in the rule of law. If the Risk Analyst requires the need of a private investigator, he or she hires an outside licensed individual to conduct any investigations.  The same is applied for forensic audits.  If during a Risk Analysis, the Risk Analyst requires the need of a forensic audit of accounting records, the Risk Analyst outsources this requirement to a duly licensed Forensic Accountant to complete the audit and turn his or her findings over to the Risk Analyst for transmittal to the client. However, if a Risk Analyst determines that a violation of the law has occurred, he or she is compelled, by law, to inform the client of the occurrence in order for the client to adhere to the Misprision of A Felony law.  

THE VALUE OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM & A RISK ANALYST

Overtime, the savings to a business or individual is realized when the money saved far outweigh the investment.  For example, some of the Risk Analysis cases I’ve conducted have realized a savings for my clients due to the recovery of assets totaling millions of dollars and in some instances have dramatically changed the way a company conducts business.

EVERYDAY EXAMPLES OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

Normally, individuals don’t realize he or she is executing a Risk Management program in their daily lives. More specifically, if you have your vehicle on a regular maintenance program to change the oil, or if you have an in-place practice of securing your passwords for on-line internet activities, or if you own a livestock ranch and you check the fencing daily to ensure the escape of your livestock is minimized, you are conducting an in-house Risk Management Program.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!”

Copyright 2019, All Rights Reserved

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
Managing Member
Freelance Writer and Author
Phone: (985) 630-3500
Email: richardedennis@outlook.com

Web Site: http://www.richardedennis.net

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TODAY’S. NEWS FROM REINING, CUTTING AND. HORSE RACING

Posted by on Apr 23, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TODAY’S NEWS FROM REINING, CUTTING AND HORSE RACING

April 23, 2019

NEWS FROM THE REINING INDUSTRY:

Carol Trimmer, Crescent, Okla., NRHA Hall of Fame Inductee and staff member, passed away on Tuesday, April 16. The dedicated and knowledgeable horse lover worked with horses and horse people over the years, claiming it was “not work” as she loved her job and was passionate about helping promote the industry in whatever capacity she could. 

Before going to work for the NRHA, Trimmer spent 15 years in the press room at the All American Quarter Horse Congress, one of the largest horse shows in the world. At the NRHA she filled many positions, including her appointment in 2003 as the NRHA Senior Director of Publications. She was inducted into the NRHA Hall of Fame in 2013. 

Trimmer’s funeral service will be held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, April 23, at First Baptist Church, 220 South Grand, Crescent, Okla.

NEWS FROM THE CUTTING HORSE INDUSTRY:

Billy Ray Rosewell, an NCHA Hall of Fame Rider and World Champion, passed away on Monday Feb. 18, 2019. 

Rosewell, who was raised near Mt. Pleasant, Texas, began training cutting horses in 1967 and won three Appaloosa World titles before he rode Show Biz Sandy, owned by Starkey Smith, in 1992, when the daughter of Son Of A Doc was 5.

The pair were one of the top three contenders for the 1993 NCHA Open World Champion Show and won the event, earning $42,812. That was the year that Kenny Patterson was Reserve Champion riding Commandicate, earning $42,385 and Kobie Wood rode Red White and Boon, placing third for $42,314. Rosewell had NCHA career earnings of $576,013, primarily showing in weekend competition.

His survivors include three sons: Billy Rosewell, Jr., Cookville, David and Maria Rosewell, Kilgore, Texas and Tommy Joe Rosewell, Mt Pleasant; one daughter-in-law, Tammy and John of Reno, Nevada; one brother and sister-in-law, Jerry and Katy Rosewell of Cookville; one sister Betty Ann Phillips, Mt. Pleasant; nine grandchildren, nine great grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Feb. 22  at the Harrison Funeral Home, Naples, Texas, and  interment was at the Omaha Cemetery in Omaha, Texas. 

 

NEWS FROM THE RACE HORSE INDUSTRY:

With the Kentucky Derby coming up, there’s no slowdown in what owner/trainers are giving their horses to make them run faster and die sooner. According to the Thoroughbred Daily News (TDN), Strychnine, the active agreement in rat poison, has been detected in post-race drug testing of three horses from the same owner/trainer at Phoenix, Arizona’s Turf Paradise, Alex Torres-Casas, who also owned and trained a fourth horse that tested positive for caffeine alone.

Torres-Casas was fined $2,625 and suspended 80 days on Feb. 27 for the offenses according to Arizona Department of Racing (ADR). However, according to the public information officer for the Arizona Department of Gaming, Torres-Casas appealed the ruling the same day it was issued. .

Strychnine is listed as a Class 1 Penalty/Category, a substance on the Association of Racing Commissioners International Uniform Classification of Substances list, which is the most-dangerous level. Caffeine is listed as 2/B. The ARCI’s recommended penalty for 1/A violations is a minimum one-year suspension and a minimum fine of $10,000.

However, this was not the first offense for Torres-Casa as on May 30, 2017, ADR ruled he was also fined $2,650 and suspended 180 days for a cocaine positive in a horse he raced at Turf Paradise in February of that year. The ARCI guidelines for a trainer’s second Lifetime Penalty Category. Although his suspension was not available at press time, an offense in any jurisdiction calls for a minimum three-year suspension and a minimum fine of $25,000. However, according to the article, neither Torres-Casas nor a Turf Paradise employee could not be reached for comment.

According to the TDN article, if the case is overturned in the appeals process, all of the above-mentioned horses will be disqualified from purse money and placed on the steward’s list for 60 days. They then would have to be retested and be proven to be clear from foreign substances prior to being allowed to race.

Although strychnine would seem like an unlikely performance-enhancer given its widespread use as a rodenticide, over a century ago, it was one of the first substances to cause a major sports doping scandal in America

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IS THERE AN EXTORTION RACKET IN THE HORSE INDUSTRY?

Posted by on Apr 15, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 10 comments

IS THERE AN EXTORTION RACKET OPERATING IN THE HORSE INDUSTRY?

 

THE LATEST GIMMICK INVOLVES THE POOR HORSE, ANIMAL RESCUES, DONORS AND KILL BUYERS

 

 

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
For all about cutting.net

April 14, 2019

EXTORTION BUYING:

It seems, if there’s a new scam that’s been derived, in the horse industry, to separate folks from their hard earned money.  The latest gimmick involves the poor horse, animal rescue operations, donors and “kill buyers.”  The scheme is quite unique in that it fulfills all the requirements of the definition of extortion:  More specifically, Extortion (also called shakedown, outwrestling and exaction) is a criminal offense of obtaining money, property or services from an individual or institution, through coercion.  Coercion is defined as “the practice of persuading someone to do something by using force or threats”.

Another extortion tactic they use is: “The extortionist tells the donor that the horse is already on the truck headed to Mexico, but $200. will turn the truck around.” Still another extortion tactic they use is: “They will tell the potential donor and buyer that the horse has already been separated, sorted and chipped for shipment to the slaughter plant on a certain date.  The seller then jacks the price up on a previous $750. horse, for example, to a new asking price of $1,500 to cover the sorting and the chipping.

“Horse Kill Buyers” have enacted and perfected their presentation of an extortion operation which is offered to the general public in order to double their profits on selling horses, with the aid of phrases such as: “This horse was just rescued from the kill pen and if it doesn’t sell within a specified time frame, it’s going to the slaughter house!”  (Threat). 

Louisiana law enforcement has caught on to this unscrupulous and illegal tactic and is actually doing something about it by investigating “horse kill buyers” where in some cases the offender is actually arrested and prosecuted.  However, this unsavory extortion tactic isn’t unique to just Louisiana.  The same basic principle can be found throughout the United Sates where “horse kill buyers” are located and they use the same extortion tactic to sell excess horses for double profits on the internet or social media sites.

A more aptly applied moniker for what their doing is often referred to as a “shakedown racket”.  Simply stated, its akin to an individual telling a person, “unless you pay me so much protection money, I won’t burn your house down. In the case of the “horse kill buyer” they use a similar tactic by saying, “Unless this horse is sold out of the “kill pen” within a certain time frame, it’s going to the slaughter house!” (Threat). This illegal activity is designed to induce an immediate response from donors and horse rescues alike by invoking an individual’s sense of caring to save the poor horse.  My observed responses depicts a bidding war among rescues and donors alike.  

All-in-all, this bidding interaction can sometimes drive the price of the horse above the initial asking price.  The end result is that donors are eager to save a life and cough up their hard-earned money in the process. This perfectly-devised plan further enriches the seller.  So are horse rescues and money donors actually saving a life or are they enabling the “horse kill buyer” to further his or her extortion operation by using the donor funds to return to the local auction, buy more horses for the extortion operation and start the process all over again?  Unfortunately, the answer is a resounding “yes” and “no”.  Case in point:  Most all “kill pen brokers” already have existing contracts with horse slaughter plants across the international border of the United States.  These contracts usually require a “kill pen buyer” to fulfill a certain number of horses per contract, e.g., 200.  In all probability, the “kill pen buyer” has already fulfilled his obligation to the horse slaughter plant or the horse slaughter plant will find someone else to fill the contract, which leaves the original broker out in the cold, so-to-speak.

In all probability, the horse that’s being marketed as being “in dire straits,” in a “do-or-die situation” really isn’t in dire straits at all, never was intended for the slaughter plant and is being sold off to double his or her profits. Especially when they are usable riding horses.  That’s just a fact.  This illegal tactic is just really a very effective and fraudulent way of selling a horse and enriching ones bank account. One key way to verify this is to be cautious of photographs of horses with saddles on them, ready to ride. Usable horses aren’t the ones that make it to the horse slaughter plant. Unusable, unstable, mean and wild horses are the ones that usually make it to slaughter.

For the record, horses end up in the horse slaughter pipeline for all sorts of reasons, whether its because of economic down-turn, a death in the family, a non-performer in the show pen or on the race track, etc. Furthermore, it’s not against the law to fill a trailer full of horses and export them to a foreign slaughter house.  However, the unlawful tactics that are being employed today to sell horses allegedly, in the “kill pen” by “kill buyers,” is most certainly illegal. It’s just a SCAM program that’s been used effectively for a very long time in the horse industry.

Furthermore, it’s just an effective extortion tactic to double an investment. After all, let’s face it, “kill buyers” have found a very effective niche in the industry to double their profits by selling usable horses in this fashion that they’ve picked up at a bargain price at the sale barn. After all, no one wants to buy an emaciated horse or a horse in poor health and neither does the slaughter plant. This type of horse just isn’t fashionable or sellable. 

HOW PROFITABLE IS THE EXTORTION TACTIC?

Let’s just introduce a hypothetical into the extortion tactic equation and  see how it all shakes out. For example, a “kill buyer” attends a local auction he or she buys horses based on the horse-slaughter plant paying him or her 40 cents per pound per slaughter horse.  Therefore, he has to purchase a horse below this figure in order to sell the same horse to the horse slaughter plant for a profit.  In the meantime, he or she buys some usable riding horses for the same below market price at the same sale.

Bear-in-mind that the “kill buyer” (who is engaged in selling horses using extortion tactics) is buying horses for two purposes: the unusable horses for the slaughter plant to fulfill the contract and the useable riding horses that are sold using the “in-dire straights” moniker. In order to make a substantial profit, the “kill buyer” markets the usable horse to the general public at let’s just say, 80 cents per pound, yielding double profits or even $1.20 a pound or more, which may yield triple profits.  When the horse sells because of the illegal extortion tactics being used, the horse brings a substantial profit to the “kill buyer”, which in turn allows him or her to restock and start the process all over again.  In fact and reality, if the usable horse isn’t sold at one location, the horse is just moved to another selling location to start the bidding war all over again. It’s the sad reality of the situation.

HORSE RESCUES: 

As the old saying goes, “there are horse rescues and then there are horse rescues.” Horse rescues are comprised of two categories: “legal and fraudulent.” Unfortunately, for the novice, it’s hard to distinguish between the two.  As a primer to the novice, rescues usually occupy the category of either being a Non-Profit or a 501 C (3) Non-Profit. The difference between the two are:  The State Non-Profit has to abide by certain disclosure laws of the State of Incorporation as well as Federal Taxing laws.  

The 501 C (3) Non-Profit has to abide not only by the Federal Non-Profit guidelines, but the State of Incorporation tax guidelines, as well.  The State Non-Profit has to afford the general public a financial disclosure.  The Federal 501 C (3) Non-Profit has to afford the general public a financial disclosure in the form of an IRS 990 which is loaded on Guidestar.org.  Donations to the 501 C (3) are tax deductible.  Donations to the Non-Profit aren’t always tax deductible.

Before donating to an individual posing as a horse rescue, it’s always advisable to conduct a cursory background check, including references and a document request, or you could be donating your money and your horse to an individual whose posing as a rescue but in fact and reality is a “kill buyer” and the only loving home your horse will ever see is on someone’s dinner plate in Europe.  Donors beware!  

ANIMAL RIGHTS ACTIVISTS: 

As with horse rescues, the same can be applied to alleged animal-rights activists. The legitimate horse rescues perform wonderful work; however, unfortunately there are individuals on social media who pose as animal-rights activists, but in fact and reality are just “cyber bullies” and extortionists or social-media extremists whose mindsets are border-line terrorists, as I like to refer to them. Their modus operandi (MOS) is to launch an attack on an individual not in their favor and to ruin that individual at all costs while using lies, half truths and distorted facts to accomplish their mission.  

To reinforce their self-worth and legitimacy, they usually post headlines from news articles generated by other news outlets concerning abused horses or other matters of interest but they usually can’t post anything pertaining to anything they actually accomplished on their own to contribute their actually providing their personal accomplishments in making a horse’s life better. Therefore, one should be careful with whom one interacts with on social media and the Internet. As the Trojan adage goes, “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts!”

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!”

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis

WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Managing Member
Phone: (985) 630-3500
Email: richardedennis@outlook.com
Web Site: http://www/richardedennis.net

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RECENTLY INTRODUCED ANIMAL ABUSE LEGISLATION

Posted by on Apr 14, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

CALIFORNIA INTRODUCES ANIMAL-ABUSE LEGISLATION

 

THE CORRELATION BETWEEN HUMAN ABUSE AND ANIMAL ABUSE

 

By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
For all about cutting.net

April 13, 2019

CALIFORNIA INTRODUCES “THE ANIMAL CRUELTY & VIOLENCE INTERVENTION ACT OF 2019

 

IS ANIMAL CRUELTY A PREDECESSOR TO VIOLENCE AND ABUSE?

Animal abusers are five times more likely to harm humans. Various studies have shown that there is a high correlation between domestic violence and animal abuse, as well as child abuse and animal abuse.  Statistics show that 70 percent of the most violent prisoners in a study of federal prisons had serious animal abuse in their histories.

California Senator Scott Wilk and the Animal Legal Defense Fund are sponsoring the Animal Cruelty and Violence Intervention Act of 2019, Senate Bill (“SB”) 580, to address this link between animal cruelty and violence against humans and to stop the escalation of dangerous behavior among offenders who hurt animals.

The bill requires offenders convicted of serious animal abuse crimes, as well as those convicted of crimes associated with underlying mental health issues such as hoarding, to undergo a mandatory mental health evaluation and possibly ongoing treatment if deemed beneficial by the assessing mental health professional and the court.  Judges are also empowered to order people convicted of less serious crimes to enroll in humane education courses that provide people with the skills they need to interact with animals in a positive way.

The Animal Cruelty and Violence Intervention Act of 2019 gives judges the tools they need to rehabilitate people convicted of animal abuse and prevent the escalation of dangerous behavior, to protect animals – and humans – from future violence.  A good read on the subject of animal abuse is:  Arnold Arluke et. al., The Relationship of Animal Abuse to Violence and Other Forms of Antisocial Behavior, 14 JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, 963 (1999)

 

AN OREGON MAN GETS 60 DAYS IN JAIL FOR SEXUALLY ASSAULTING DOG THAT HAD TO BE EUTHANIZED

By Louis Casiano, Fox News, April 11, 2019
An Oregon man was sentenced Wednesday to 60 days in jail for sexually assaulting a dog who had to be euthanized due to extensive injuries.

Fidel Lopez, 52, was given the maximum penalty allowed for his offense by Multnomah County Judge Angel Lopez who said, “If it could have been more, I would have gladly given you more,” according to KOIN-TV in Portland.

The station reported that Lopez admitted to investigators to sexually assaulting the dog, a Lhaso Apso mix named Estrella. Estrella’s owner took her to a veterinarian in November 2018 after suspecting she had been abused. Lopez knew the owner and admitted to investigators that he abused the dog.

 

THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF THE UNITED STATES (HSUS)

The shocking number of animal cruelty cases reported every day is just the tip of the iceberg, as most cases are never reported. Unlike violent crimes against people, cases of animal abuse are not compiled by state or federal agencies, making it difficult to calculate just how common they are. However, we can use the information that is available to try to understand and prevent cases of abuse.

 

WHO ABUSES ANIMALS?

Cruelty and neglect cross all social and economic boundaries and media reports suggest that animal abuse is common in both rural and urban areas. Intentional cruelty to animals is strongly correlated with other crimes, including violence against people.

Hoarding behavior often victimizes animals. Sufferers of a hoarding disorder may impose severe neglect on animals by housing far more than they are able to adequately take care of. Serious animal neglect (such as hoarding) is often an indicator of people in need of social or mental health services.

Surveys suggest that those who intentionally abuse animals are predominantly men under 30, while those involved in animal hoarding are more likely to be women over 60.

 

MOST COMMON VICTIMS:

The animals whose abuse is most often reported are dogs, cats, horses and livestock. Undercover investigations have revealed that animal abuse abounds in the factory farm industry. But because of the weak protections afforded to livestock under state cruelty laws, only the most shocking cases are reported, and few are ever prosecuted.

 

ORGANIZED CRUELTY:

Dogfighting, cockfighting and other forms of organized animal cruelty go hand in hand with other crimes and continues in many areas of the United States due to public corruption.

The HSUS documented uniformed police officers at a cockfighting pit in Kentucky. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency has prosecuted multiple cases where drug cartels were running narcotics through cockfighting and dogfighting operations, while dozens of homicides have occurred at cockfights and dogfights. In fact, a California man was killed in a disagreement about a $10 cockfight bet.

The HSUS’s investigative team combats complacent public officials and has worked with the FBI on public corruption cases in Tennessee and Virginia. In both instances, law enforcement officers were indicted and convicted.

 

CORRELATION WITH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE:

Data on domestic violence and child abuse cases reveal that a staggering number of animals are targeted by those who abuse their children or spouses. There are approximately 70 million pet dogs and 74.1 million pet cats in the U.S. where 20 men and women are assaulted per minute (an average of around 10 million a year). In one survey, 71 percent of domestic violence victims reported that their abuser also targeted pets.

In one study of families under investigation for suspected child abuse, researchers found that pet abuse had occurred in 88 percent of the families under supervision for physical abuse of their children.

 

STATE LEGISLATIVE TRENDS:

The HSUS has long led the push for stronger animal cruelty laws and provides training for law officials to detect and prosecute these crimes. With South Dakota joining the fight in March of 2014, animal cruelty laws now include felony provisions in all 50 states.

 

FIRST VS. SUBSEQUENT OFFENSE:

Some state laws only allow felony charges if the perpetrator has a previous animal cruelty conviction. Given that only a fraction of animal cruelty acts are ever reported or successfully prosecuted, the HSUS is committed to supporting felony convictions in cases of egregious cruelty regardless of whether the perpetrator has a prior conviction. A total of 46 of 50 states’ felony provisions are first-offense provisions.  Four states (Pennsylvania, Ohio, Iowa and Mississippi) have laws that apply felony charges only to subsequent offenses.  A majority of anti-cruelty laws are limited to cases involving aggravated cruelty, torture or cruelty to companion animals.

 

CHANGES IN FEDERAL TRACKING:

On January 1, 2016, the FBI added Cruelty to Animals as a category in the Uniform Crime Report, a nationwide crime-reporting system commonly used in homicide investigations. While only about a third of U.S. communities currently participate in the system, the data generated will help create a clearer picture of animal abuse and guide strategies for intervention and enforcement. Data collection covers four categories: simple/gross neglect, intentional abuse and torture, organized abuse (such as dogfighting and cockfighting) and animal sexual abuse.

Law Enforcement has long known the direct correlation between animal abuse and violence in society.  As the old adage, “The way a person treats an animal is exactly how their going to treat you.”

Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Managing Member
Phone: (985) 630-3500
Email: richardedennis@outlook.com
Web Site: http://www.richardedennis.net

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EIA CASES CONFIRMED IN TEXAS

Posted by on Apr 10, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE HEALTH, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

EIA CASES CONFIRMED IN TEXAS

April 10, 2019

According to  an article by Erica Larson in The Horse, EIA cases have been confirmed in Smith and Van Zandt counties in Texas.

In each county, a Quarter Horse was tested positive for EIA in March and both affected horses have been euthanized, according to the Equine Disease Communication Center (EDCC).

According to the EDCC, “Each animal’s home premises will remain under quarantine until requirements for release have been met. TAHC staff is working closely with owners and veterinarians to monitor potentially exposed horses and implement biosecurity measures.”

Equine infectious anemia is a viral disease that attacks horses’ immune systems. The virus is transmitted through the exchange of body fluids from an infected to an uninfected animal often by blood-feeding insects such as horseflies.  It can also be transmitted through th use of blood-contaminated instruments or needles. A Coggins tot screens horses’ blood for antibodies that are indicative of the presence of the EIA virus. 

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LAWMAKERS INTRODUCE BILL TO MAKE ANIMAL CRUELTY A NATIONWIDE FELONY

Posted by on Apr 1, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

LAWMAKERS INTRODUCE BILL TO MAKE ANIMAL CRUELTY A NATIONWIDE FELONY

 

ABUSERS COULD GET SEVEN YEARS IN PRISON IF FOUND GUILTY

 

By Carly Sitzer
Orlando Sentinel

Lawmakers out of Florida are introducing a new bill that will make animal cruelty a felony nationwide. Reps. Ted Deutch and Vern Buchanan — a democrat and a republican, respectively — are behind the Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture (PACT) Act, which targets “crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating, and impaling animals.”

If the law passes, those found guilty of such acts of violence against animals could face up to seven years in prison, should they be found guilty.

“The torture of innocent animals is abhorrent and should be punished to the fullest extent of the law,” Rep. Buchanan said to the Orlando Sentinel of the bill. His partner said the effort is “commonsense, bipartisan legislation to bring some compassion to our animal laws.”

The congressmen have noted that there have been other bills in the past that address the abuse against animals on both the state and federal levels — most notably, a 2010 law aimed at stopping punishing those who create videos that show animals being subjected to torture — but the lawmakers behind the PACT Act believe that those laws aren’t comprehensive enough.

Rep. Deutch added, “We’ve acted in the past to stop the horrific trend of animal abuse videos. Now it’s time to make the underlying acts of cruelty a crime as well.”

This isn’t the first time the PACT Act has been introduced to lawmakers; it was previously passed by the U.S. Senate, unanimously, on two separate occasions and earned more than 200 law enforcement endorsements in the previous session of Congress. However, in the House, it was blocked from coming to the floor by former Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte, who is no longer serving in Congress.

The Humane Society applauded the new introduction, and hoped it would eliminate the loophole caused by former legislation that made it only illegal when video was being recorded. Despite the failure of the PACT Act to become a reality in the past, Sara Amundson, President of the Humane Society Legislative Fund, told the Sentinel that she’s optimistic the bill will pass this time — and is likely to reduce other types of crime.

“Decades ago, the Federal Bureau of Investigation recognized the seriousness of animal cruelty and its link to escalating violence toward humans,” she explained.

The bill will include some exceptions for normal veterinary care, hunting and conduct necessary to protect life or property from a serious threat caused by an animal.

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