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PRCA ADDS RODEOS TO A LIST OF THOSE THAT COUNT TOWARD WORLD STANDINGS

Posted by on Mar 15, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, MAJOR EVENTS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRCA ADDS RODEOS TO THEIR LIST OF THOSE WITH EARNINGS THAT COUNT TOWARD WORLD STANDINGS

March 15, 2019

Some of the highest-paying PRCA-sanctioned rodeos in the United States are now being counted toward the 2018 World Standings. These rodeos include the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo in Colorado Springs, Colo. and The Houston, Texas, Livestock Show Rodeo that parted ways in 2011, as well as a substantial portion of the $2.35 million purse paid during RFD-TV’s The American he’d at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

According to a column by Brett Hoffman in the Wise County Messenger, PRCA Chief Executive Officer George Taylor said that adding the higher-paying rodeos to the World standings are great for competitors. 

“If you win some of these events, you start winning San Antonio and Houston; they all help you get there so its a huge impact and a big jump in where you are in the standings without a doubt,” said Taylor in an interview at The American. 

“For example, at the American the winner of each standard PRCA event, such as steer wrestling and tie-down roping, earned $100,000. The PRCA allowed each event winner to count half of that – $50,000 of the $100,000 toward the World Standings.

Also, according to the article, “Another positive move under Taylor’s watch is a noticeable amount of shows that are not a full-fledged rodeo counting toward the World standings. Taylor said, “It’s important for us to have full rodeos; it’s the history of the sport and that’s critical. But we want rodeo to grow in whatever format that fans want it to grow as well as having a big roping in the heart of Texas is really a neat option, a neat opportunity for our cowboys to be able to participate in and have it (the money won) count toward (qualification to) the National Finals Rodeo (NFR) as well.”

According to Taylor, the PRCA sanctions 600 rodeos a year. 

“As the world becomes more urban and rural, we’ve got to keep developing that. So we’ve just been working to try to bring the sport together,” said Taylor.

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GOOD VERSUS EVIL; THE HISTORY OF THE HORSE

Posted by on Mar 11, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 13 comments

GOOD VERSUS EVIL

 

THE HISTORY OF THE HORSE

 

March 11, 2019
By Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
For allaboutcutting.com

The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, called an Eohippus, into the large, single-toed animal of today.  Humans began domesticating horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC.  Horses’ anatomy enables them to make use of speed to escape predators and they have a well sense of balance and a strong fight-or-flight response.  Related to this need to flee from predators in the wild is an unusual trait: horses are able to sleep both standing up and lying down with younger horses tending to sleep significantly more than adults.

Most domesticated horses begin training under saddle or in harness between the ages of two and four.  They reach full adult development by age five, and have an average lifespan of between 25 and 30 years.  Horse breeds are loosely divided into three categories based on general temperament: spirited “hot bloods” with speed and endurance; “cold bloods,” such as draft horses and some ponies suitable for slow, heavy work and “warm bloods,” developed from crosses between hot bloods and cold bloods, often focusing on creating breeds for specific riding purposes, particularly in Europe.  Today, there are more than 300 breeds of horse in the world, developed for many different uses.

Horses and humans interact in a wide variety of sport competitions and non-competitive recreational pursuits, as well as in working activities such as police work, the competition show pen, agriculture, entertainment and therapy.  Horses were historically used in warfare, from which a wide variety of riding and driving techniques developed, using many different styles of equipment and methods of control. Humans provide domesticated horses with food, water and shelter, as well as attention from specialists such as veterinarians and farriers. In the United States, the history of the horse is entwined in the founding of our nation and the very existence of our ancestor evolution and survival.

THE MAJESTY OF THE HORSE:

As Winston Churchill once stated, “The outside of a horse, is good for the inside of a man.”  Horses have played a central role in human societies for millennia.  To the horseman, the majestic horse is the epitome of grace and elegance. Simply stated, a horse embodies the soul of both man and woman. Horses possess character, intuition, a soul and emotions.  They anticipate storms and earthquakes. When they’re happy, they drop their heads, flop them high, maybe make a high and full skyward circle with their noses.  Their behavior is eager, interested, alert, playful and responsive.  They will reply to you with raised head, arched neck and their muzzle down. They’ll prick their ears forward and might even take off at a dead run.  When they’re angry, their ears will lie back and their tail swishes as if at a fly. When they’re angrier their hindquarters are tense, their ears flatten against their skull, they swish their tail more vigorously and their rear hoof raises slightly.

They show pride by prancing with their ears straight forward, nostrils flaring, tail up, head pointed downward on an arched neck. They show interest when their nose, eyes and ears, point straight ahead at an object of interest, circling with curiosity. Horses have a natural competitiveness built into their DNA.  They are kind and gentle creatures who have captivated our minds and hearts through time and memorial. Horses illustrate affection by being around and gently nuzzling their human counterparts. A horse develops life-long bonds with other horses as well as humans. After all, they are herd-oriented animals. In my opinion, horses aren’t meant for the kitchen table; however, it’s a fact that many of these majestic creatures are destined for the foreign slaughter plants once man discards them when they are of no further meaningful use to their owners.

OVER POPULATION OF HORSES IN THE U.S.A.:

Today, in the USA, the dilemma facing the horse is unequivocally “overpopulation”.  A myriad of reasons attribute to the overpopulation phenomenon. For example, an excess of wild horses is mainly due to catastrophic and ill-advised herd management plans implemented by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), to control the wild mustang populations on public grazing lands. More specifically, BLM devised a plan to remove predators from our public grasslands to accommodate complaints by domestic cattle and sheep grazers. Therefore, BLM created its own problems with a wild mustang overpopulation by trying to alter nature.  An article depicting the role the BLM is playing in trying to eradicate the wild mustang, via, the horse slaughter pipeline can be viewed by clicking on the following January 15, 2019 AP news link:

Click for article regarding eradicating the wild mustang>> 

Essentially, this ill-advised plan allowed wild horses to populate unrestricted due to a lack of predation which normally controls horse populations through attrition. The irony, in the foregoing Associated Press article illustrates how the Federal Government is using the tax-paid Department of Justice lawyers to fight to kill a protected species under the 1971 Wild Horse and Burros Act.  The other irony is:  President Donald J. Trump authorized this atrocity in his budget but was stopped by Congress.  Other contributing factors affecting over population are: Overbreeding, backyard breeding and  unorthodox breeding methodologies such as: frozen semen, multiple embryo transfer, cooled transported semen, etc. by horse association non-profits. They all contribute to the over population of horses.  Another contributor is non-profit horse associations with high-paying 3-year-old futurities and incentivized early-age horse races. 

COMMON DENOMINATOR:

A common denominator, in the U.S. horse industry, directly tied to horse ownership, is the economy.  In a good economy, investors and horse ownership spirals up and declines in a bad economy. The down-turn wake leaves a glut of horses on the open market with no one to care for them. It’s an inherent component, in the industry. Unfortunately, for the unwanted horse, sale pen locations are exactly where “kill buyers” sit idly by. They are likened to vultures waiting for their next meal, readily buying healthy and robust horses for the foreign slaughter house plants.  The unsavory aspect of “kill buyers” is that although it’s a disgusting profession, it’s not illegal in the USA to transport a trailer load of horses across our borders to slaughter houses in Canada and Mexico. However, there are currently no horse slaughter plants in operation in the USA, due to the fact it is illegal to slaughter horses in the USA “for human consumption”.

KILL BUYER EXTORTION TACTICS:

Extortion is a favorite tactic used, by “kill buyers” to sell horses to enhance their financial status.  More specifically, once bought, the “kill buyer” advertises sale barn-bought horses on their social media page(s), stating they have a number of horses bound for the slaughter plant and it’s going to cost X amount of dollars to bail them out of the kill pen before they are shipped out. To reinforce the direness of the horses position, the “kill buyer” uses psychological reinforcement to attract prospective buyers by appealing to each individual’s sense of charity, decency, pity and willingness to help the horses in distress. For example, the “kill buyer” usually places a time-line on the prospective buyers before the horses ships out to the slaughter horse plant where their killed, dismembered and butchered for human consumption in foreign markets. The psychologically induced time-line, illustrates the horses’ seemingly hopeless situation with an added sense of urgency.

Another favorite tactic used by “kill buyers” is to show a group of mares with foals or weanlings and yearlings, by themselves, to bait the buyer trap.  After all, mares with foals and young horses directly appeal to everyone’s sense of protection, rescue and charity, except the “kill buyers,” who are in the business for the money and nothing more. In my opinion, they could care less about the poor horses who finds themselves in such a deplorable state.  In essence, they laugh all the way to the bank.  One way or another, “kill buyer’s” are going to be paid.  Either at the foreign slaughter horse plant or from the individuals bailing them out of the kill pen.

HORSE RESCUES: ARE THEY ANGELS ON THEIR SHOULDERS OR EVIL IN THEIR MIDST?

The law of physics states, “For every action, there’s an equal and opposite reaction.”  Such is the same with horse-rescue types. Horse Rescues comprise two distinct categories:  Legitimate and Fraudulent.”  

LEGITIMATE HORSE RESCUES:

The legitimate horse rescue is usually comprised of one of two categories: a Federal 501 (C) 3 Non-Profit or a State Non-Profit. The commonality for each is simple: To some degree, both receive a tax-exempt status. However, the public financial reporting and disclosure status is different. More specifically, the Federal 501 (C) 3 is required to report its financial status on the IRS 990 form, in conjunction with their annual filed tax return. A particular 501 (C) 3 Non-profit IRS 990 can readily be viewed on Guidestar.org.

Equally, each state-organized non-profit horse rescue is required to adhere to a particular state’s, public financial reporting and disclosure requirements.  To review a particular state’s non-profit public financial disclosure requirements, simply visit the state’s Secretary of State to ascertain public non-profit financial disclosure adherence laws. Legitimate horse rescues are actually “angels on their shoulders” who endure a lot of pain and suffering while rescuing abused, abandoned, unwanted or unaffordable horses.  

However, their devotion to the horses care and rehabilitation is unwavering.  Horse rescue operators endure long hours, arduous labor and, in some cases, very little, if no, pay for their efforts. Primarily, they do it for the love of the horse and the passion in their heart. In a litany of cases, the horse rescue owner is overwhelmed while dealing with rescued horses who are sick, abused or diseased horses requiring significant financial cash outlays for treatment, rehabilitation and recovery of the horses.  Once a horse is recovered, the owner of the rescue is left with the task of trying to re-home the horse. Statistics indicate that the largest hurdles for a rescued horse to overcome are psychological and physiological trauma caused by the abuse of unconscionable human interaction.

My research indicates that there’s only a few ways the horse rescue is able to sustain itself.  Private donations are: business donations, charging an adoption fee for rehoming a particular horse, charitable raffles, etc.  At the end of the day, if the horse rescue is blessed with a cash surplus the owner is allowed to take a salary for their timeless effort spent in the business but not a non-taxable profit. In order to acquire donations for the horse rescue, they need to advertise on a myriad of social-media platforms as well as other advertising sites. The key to running a legitimate horse rescue is absolute transparency, as required by law, in its business dealings with the general public.  

However, the horse rescue is limited in the types of disclosures they are required, by law, to make. My research indicated that the only types of disclosures a horse rescue are required to make, by law, are financial reportings derived from their annual tax return.  Other disclosures, such as: when a horse arrives, leaves and who adopted it, is not required as is opening up the horse rescue’s accounting books for general inspection. For example, the horse rescue’s financial accounting such as the chart of accounts, ledgers, balance sheets, etc., are closed, except on special occasions such as during an IRS audit, a state audit or an investigation with the issuance of a subpoena.  

The general public is not entitled to a general inspection of a horse rescue’s individual donations.  The exception to the foregoing, is predicated by specific state or federal statue requirement. However, the donor can request to view the horse rescue’s facility to observe how the facility looks and cares for the rescued horses in their care.  Most horse rescues readily accommodate the inquirer. My only personal experience with horse rescues happened during my Risk Analysis of the Rick and Sherri Brunzell “Dual Peppy Saga” in Colorado several years ago.  Two horse rescues that performed miraculously were:  Harmony Equine Center and Blue Rose Ranch.  Without their assistance, it’s very possible, none of the remaining rescued horses would have survived such a grizzly ordeal.

FRAUDULENT HORSE RESCUES:

The fraudulent horse rescue is one that mimics the legitimate horse rescue in every respect, except their motive is entirely different.  Their goal is to acquire a horse by deceptive means for the sole purpose of selling the horse to the horse slaughter plant for a profit, instead of providing care and rehabilitation.  However, once their evil operation is made transparent by discovery, their demise is met with arrest, prosecution, conviction and imprisonment. It’s a high price to pay for earning a few hundred dollars selling a horse to a slaughter house.

A FINAL NOTE:

Unfortunately, in the USA, the slaughtering of horses in foreign slaughter plants will continue until the overpopulation of horses is reduced and brought under control to a manageable level by changing the mindset of the general population.  The USA, unlike Europe, operates on the “Free Enterprise Market.” Therefore, horse breeding is open to anyone, for any reason. In Europe, some countries have breed wardens who control animal populations by limiting the number of authorized breeding animals and produced young, by permit.

Another mindset requiring change to reduce horse populations is the De Facto breeding practices of the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), as well as other horse non-profits offering futurities for 3-year old horses and incentivized “early age” horse races. It’s these early-age events that drive the annual breeding of potential participants.  Unfortunately, until the “almighty dollar” is replaced with compassion, sensitivity and respect, this archaic, “breed-more, kill-more” philosophy will continue and horses are going to continue to be disposable and “throw away items” in our society.

“Until Next Time, Keep Em Between The Bridle!”

Richard E. “Rick” Dennis
WIND RIVER COMPANY LLC
Managing Member
Freelance Writer and Author
Phone: (985) 630-3500
Email:  richardedennis@yahoo.com
Web Site:  http://www.richardedennis.net

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PRO RODEO HALL OF FAMER DEB COPENHAVER PASSES AWAY AT AGE 94

Posted by on Feb 27, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

DEB COPENHAVER PASSES AWAY AT AGE 94

Press release from PRCA
Feb. 27, 2019

ProRodeo Hall of Famer and two-time Saddle Bronc Riding World Champion, Deb Copenhaver passed away late at night after going to sleep Feb. 6 at his home in Cresston, Wash, just a few weeks after his 94th birthday, according to his son Jeff Copenhaver. 

“He went to sleep and woke up in heaven,” said Jeff. “He was reunited with Cheryl, his wife of over 50 years. He was excited about seeing her.”

Copenhaver is considered one of the greatest bronc riders to come from the Pacific Northwest. He was known as a “thinking” rider. He started the style of the “dehorned” saddle, now required in saddle bronc riding competition. He did it partly by accident after a bronc mashed the horn when it ran into the unsaddling chute. Copenhaver shuttled off the rest of the horn and a new style was born.

Rodeo was in the Copenhaver family’s blood as Jeff was the 1975 tie-down roping World Champion and his daughter, Deborah, is a former Miss Rodeo Washington and a respected bronze sculptor.

Deb was born in Wilbur, Wash., on Jan. 21, 1925 and began breaking horses and exercising racehorses as a young boy. He entered his first rodeo at age 15. He enlisted in the Navy Seabees at 17 and spent two years in North Africa during World War II. After the war, Copenhaver worked as a logger in the Northwest for a couple of years before embarking on his rodeo career full time in 1948.

He won saddle bronc riding world championships in 1955 and 1956, was runner-up to Casey Tibbs three times (1951,’53 and ’54) and was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1992.

He was nicknamed “Fireplug” as much for his fiery, competitive nature and his stocky build. The 5-foot-8 Copenhaver won plenty of big rodeos, including Calgary in1953, ’55 and ’58; Madison Square Garden in 1952 and ’55; Pendleton, Oregon in 1954; Salinas, Calif., in 1952; Denver in 1956 and Fort Worth, Texas in 1954.

He went on to serve on the PRCA Board pf Directors from 1986-1989. When he was 88 years old, he built a tiny roadside chapel on his ranch about 50 miles west of Spokane, Wash. He is survived by his children: Jeff, Deborah, Matt, Kelly and Guy, as well as numerous grandchildren.

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News from the PRCA 2/20/19

Posted by on Feb 20, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NEWS FROM THE PRCA

Press Release from PRCA
Feb. 20, 2019

TIE-DOWN ROPER MICHAEL OTERO WINS SAN ANGELO

SAN ANGELO, Texas – Michael Otero’s rodeo goals have changed.
There was a time when qualifying for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo was his main focus.
That’s not the case anymore for the tie-down roper.
Otero, 37, is married to barrel racer Carlee Pierce-Otero and has a new outlook on rodeo.
“It has always been a goal of mine to reach the NFR, but I have had different goals here recently,” said Otero, who finished 19th in the 2015 world standings. “I have goals of doing more things with my family. I’m older and more mature, and roping is just icing on the cake.”
Nonetheless, Otero still loves to compete, as evidenced by his performance at the San Angelo (Texas) Rodeo, a ProRodeo Tour event.
The Weatherford, Texas, cowboy won the average with a rodeo record 23.0-second time on three head. The previous three-head tie-down roping average record at the San Angelo Rodeo was 23.5 seconds, set by Timber Moore in 2014.
“This is the first time I’ve won the rodeo here, and it feels great, especially with the time I had in the average,” Otero said. “This was very exciting. They put on a heck of a rodeo. They made it NFR-like. There was a lot of energy in the building.”
Otero’s most clutch run was his last one, as he won the finals with a 7.8-second run which vaulted him to the win in the average Feb. 15 in the San Angelo Coliseum.
For his effort, Otero earned $13,263 – $7,187 for capturing the average. Otero started on a roll, placing second in the first round after stopping the clock in 7.1 seconds. He followed that with a solid, 8.1-second run, setting the stage for the finals.
“I was just seeing how things played out in front of me,” said Otero, who was the last cowboy out in the finals. “The short round kind of fell apart for everybody else, and I had a really good calf. I just wanted to make sure I didn’t break the barrier and attacked my run. (Going out last) made it easy on me in a way because I knew if I did my job I was going to win the rodeo because I knew I had a really good calf.”
At San Angelo, Otero was riding his horse, D2, a 12-year-old.
“I seasoned him some a little over a year ago, and last year I didn’t rodeo much, I just went to some of the winter rodeos and stayed home,” Otero said. “I was trying to build a business with my wife.”
Otero and his wife moved to Weatherford in July. They have a real estate business together, and he and his wife run an excavation business – Momentum Excavating & Services. Together, they have a 15-month-old son, Hudson, and she has three children, daughters Jacy, 12, and Makala, 19, and son, Kale, 20.
“The plan this year for rodeo is kind of a toss-up,” Otero said. “If things are going good, we will go.”
Other winners at the $451,203 rodeo were all-around cowboy Trevor Brazile ($7,394, tie-down roping and team roping); bareback rider Caleb Bennett (178.5 points on two head); steer wrestler Tucker Allen (12.8 seconds on three head); team ropers Aaron Tsinigine/Kyle Lockett (13.2 seconds on three head); saddle bronc rider Rusty Wright (177 points on two head); barrel racer Jill Tanner (44.36 seconds on three runs) and bull rider Jordan Spears (175 points on two head).

WRANGLER BULL RIDER TIM BINGHAM INJURED

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Bull rider Tim Bingham, a three-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2014, 2016-17), injured his neck following his 84.5-point ride on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Twizzler at La Fiesta de los Vaqueros in Tucson, Ariz., Feb. 17.
“I had neck surgery (at Banner – University Medical Center in Tucson, Feb. 18), and I feel a lot better,” said Bingham, 27. “They fused C4 and C5 vertebrae together because the C4 was displaced. I got bucked off right at eight seconds. I came out the back a little bit and I got flipped upside down. I landed right on my head and my neck kind of folded. I didn’t lose any mobility. I got up and ran to the chutes and jumped up over the top of the chutes and sat down on the back there for a minute, and I knew instantly something was wrong.”
As of the morning of Feb. 19, Bingham was unclear how long he would be sidelined, but he expects to be out about six months. He was riding Twizzler for the first time.
Unfortunately for Bingham, he has experience with neck injuries.
“I was at an amateur rodeo in Island Park, Idaho, when I was 17 and I broke my neck,” he said. “That time, I got thrown up quite a bit higher, and I came down on my head and broke my C6 (vertebrae). The first time I broke my neck I didn’t have surgery and was out six months.”
Bingham spent the offseason recovering from a shattered right collarbone he suffered in September at the Justin Finale in Puyallup, Wash.
“That collarbone injury kept me out until Jan. 23 when I competed at the Division 1 Xtreme Bulls in Fort Worth,” Bingham said. “Now, it is just a matter of getting better, so I can get back out there.”
Bingham finished a career-best seventh in the world standings in 2014.

CLOWN OF YEAR JUSTIN RUMFORD OUT WITH INJURY

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Justin Rumford, the PRCA Clown of the Year every year since 2012, is sidelined after having left knee surgery.
Rumford had the surgery Feb. 7 by Dr. Chris Miller in Wichita, Kan. Rumford is planning to return to the arena for Rodeo Austin (Texas), which begins March 16.
Rumford, who also won the Coors Man in the Can award in 2013, 2015 and 2018, injured the knee Jan. 26 while performing at the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo in Denver. He went on to perform at Rodeo Rapid City, Jan. 25 through Feb. 2.
“I had an MRI, and when I got home from Rapid City (S.D.) my orthopedic surgeon (Miller) looked at the MRI and said we have to fix this right away because if we wait until the fall there will be nothing left to fix,” Rumford said. “I blew my whole left knee out, the ACL, MCL and meniscus. At Denver, I was doing a new clown act with a miniature fighting bull. I jumped him, and I was fighting him, and I was making some rounds. I went to throw a back fake and when I did I stepped in a hole (in the arena dirt at the Denver Coliseum). When I stepped in the hole, I hurt my knee.”
Rumford, 38, said he will walk and talk and do his acts that don’t involve jumping, beginning at Rodeo Austin.
“I just will not be able to work the barrel for a while,” he said. “I still have a lot of acts I can do without having to run. I’m pretty much going to do everything I usually do except work the barrel. I think by mid-April I should be back to my old self. They said the surgery was really good. I have been going to therapy, and I have a great team behind me. My physical therapist is amazed at how strong my legs are and how much stuff I have already been able to do. I plan on clowning for a long time and I’m going to come back stronger than ever.”
Rumford said he blew his right knee out steer wrestling at the Greeley (Colo.) Stampede in 2004.

WHAT TO WATCH FOR:

WranglerNetwork.com
San Antonio (Texas) Stock Show & Rodeo, ProRodeo Tour event semifinals, Feb. 19-21, 7 p.m. (CT); Semifinals, Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m. (CT); Feb. 23, Division 1 Xtreme Bulls, 1 p.m. (CT); Feb. 23, San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo, finals, 7:30 p.m. (CT)
La Fiesta de los Vaqueros, Tucson, Ariz., ProRodeo Tour event, Feb. 23-24, 2 p.m. The finals are Feb. 24.
ProRodeoTV.com
CINCH World’s Toughest Rodeo, Raleigh, N.C., Feb. 23. The livestream begins at 7:30 p.m. (ET).
ProRodeo Live with Steve Kenyon
San Antonio (Texas) Stock Show & Rodeo, ProRodeo Tour event semifinals, Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m. (CT); Feb. 23, Division 1 Xtreme Bulls, 1 p.m. (CT); Feb. 23, San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo, finals, 7:30 p.m. (CT)
CBS Sports Network
San Antonio (Texas) Stock Show & Rodeo, ProRodeo Tour event, Feb. 24, 10 p.m. (ET)

NEWS & NOTES FROM THE RODEO TRAIL:

Cody Nelson Lawrence, a PRCA tie-down roper, passed away on Feb. 15. He was 27. Cody was born April 17, 1991, in San Antonio to his parents Melody (Holland) and Donny Wayne Lawrence. He graduated from Jourdanton (Texas) High School in 2009 and attended Texas A&M Kingsville on a rodeo scholarship. He was employed by his family’s trailer and feed business, Brush Country Supply in Pleasanton, Texas, and he managed the hunting and cattle operations of the family ranch in McMullen County. Lawrence was a man with a deep Christian faith and an endless love for his family and friends. Lawrence was preceded in death by his brother, Ty Murray Lawrence and grandfathers, Robert Ruckman Holland and Donald Edwards Lawrence. Lawrence is survived by his parents, his brothers, Donald (Dee) Wayne Lawrence and Scott Wayne (Amanda) Lawrence; girlfriend, Rozlyn Reeves; grandmothers, Goldie Alston Holland, Barbara Moody Lawrence and Joyce Lawrence; aunts and uncles, Sherry Holland (Michael) Appell, Bill (Lana) Holland, Debbie (Boyd) Grimshaw, Nancy Lawrence (Mark) Kennerly and James (Elizabeth) Lawrence; cousins, Todd (Pam) Dougherty, Scott Dougherty, Cuatro (Anna) Holland, Marlana (Nate) Mauer, Kaitlyn (Josh) Verette, Murray Grimshaw, Christy Hindes (Clint) and Ryan Kennerly; nephew and niece, Tanner and Jane Lawrence. Visitation to celebrate Lawrence’s time on Earth will be conducted at Cowboy Fellowship Church at 561 FM 3350 in Jourdanton, Texas, Feb. 22 from 4 to 8 p.m. (CT). Funeral service will be at Cowboy Fellowship Church, Feb. 23 at 10 a.m., followed by interment at Hilltop Cemetery in Tilden, Texas.
 ____________________
There are two upcoming PRCA Rodeo Days camps in San Antonio and Red Bluff, Calif. The PRCA one-day camps in San Antonio take place March 11-14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (CT). All abilities welcome for ages 8 and up. Registration required at http://prorodeo.com/jrrodeo.
The PRCA Rodeo Camp in Red Bluff is slated for 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (PT) on March 23. All abilities welcome for ages 8 and up. Registration required at http://prorodeo.com/jrrodeo.

NEXT UP:

Feb. 19         San Antonio (Texas) Stock Show & Rodeo continues
Feb. 21         La Fiesta de los Vaqueros, Tucson, Ariz., continues
Feb. 21         Georgia National Rodeo, Perry, Ga., begins
Feb. 22         Paco County Fair Championship Rodeo, Dade City, Fla., begins
Feb. 22         Wide Open Rodeo, Fort Pierce, Fla., begins
Feb. 22         Hooters Fort Myers Pro Rodeo, North Fort Myers, Fla., begins
Feb. 23         Chad Besplug Invitational Division 2 Xtreme Bulls, Claresholm, Alberta
Feb. 23         Salinas Valley Wine Country Rodeo, King City, Calif.
Feb. 23         CINCH World’s Toughest Rodeo, Raleigh, N.C.
Feb. 23         Division 1 Xtreme Bulls, San Antonio (Texas)
Feb. 23        Weekley Brothers Davie (Fla.) Pro Rodeo begins
Feb. 25         RodeoHouston begins

2019 PRCA | RAM WORLD STANDINGS LEADERS:

Unofficial through Feb. 19, 2019
AA: Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas, $26,380
BB: Clayton Biglow, Clements, Calif., $29,425
SW: Josh Clark, Belgrade, Mont., $21,123
TR-1: Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Okla., $30,231
TR-2: Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan., $22,731
SB: Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, Texas, $37,679
TD: Tyson Durfey, Brock, Texas, $39,682
SR: Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas, $20,842
BR: Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont., $39,603

2019 PRCA | RAM WORLD STANDINGS:

Please see prorodeo.com for the latest standings update. All standings are unofficial.
2019 PRCA Rodeo Results
About The PRCA
The PRCA, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colo., is recognized as the unsurpassed leader in sanctioning the sport of professional rodeo. The PRCA’s mission is to unify membership in providing an innovative fan experience, to grow the sport of professional rodeo and provide new expanded opportunities for our membership and sponsors. Since 1986, the PRCA has paid out more than $1 billion in prize money to its contestants. The PRCA offers the best cowboys and the best rodeos; delivering the best fan experience while positively impacting our communities and embracing the spirit of the West. A membership-based organization, the PRCA sanctioned 650 rodeos in 2017, and there are more than 40 million rodeo fans in the U.S. The PRCA televises the sport’s premier events, with the world-renowned Wrangler National Finals Rodeo on CBS Sports Net and streaming on ProRodeoTV.com. The Wrangler Tour, Justin Finale, RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo and All American ProRodeo Finals also air on CBS Sports Net, and ProRodeoTV.com. PRCA-sanctioned rodeos donate more than $40 million to local and national charities every year. For comprehensive coverage of the cowboy sport, read the ProRodeo Sports News, the official publication of the PRCA, and make sure to check out the digital edition of the PSN. The digital PSN and daily updates of news and results can be found on the PRCA’s official website, www.prorodeo.com.
For additional information about this press release, contact:
Tracy Renck
719.528.4758
Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association
101 Pro Rodeo Drive
Colorado Springs, CO 80919 www.prorodeo.com

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PROPOSED LAW WOULD MAKE ANIMAL CRUELTY A FELONY ACROSS THE U.S.

Posted by on Feb 14, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE NEWS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PROPOSED LAW WOULD MAKE ANIMAL CRUELTY A FELONY ACROSS THE UNITED STATES

Reprint from CBS News
Jan. 29, 2019

Two members of the U.S. House of representatives re-introduced a bill last week that would make malicious acts of animal cruelty a felony nationwide. A person convicted of the crime could face a fine or up to seven years in prison, or both.

The bill, known as the Preventing Animal Cruel and Torture (PACT) Act, is co-sponsored by Democrat Ted Deutch and Republican Vern Buchanan. PACT would criminalize “crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating and impaling animals.

Deutch tweeted, We will get this done. It’s bipartisan, common-sense policy that will protect our animals.”

His congressional colleague, Buchanan, also said that protecting animals from cruelty is a “top priority” for him. “The torture of innocent animals is abhorrent and should be punished to the fullest extent of the law,” he tweeted.

The legislation contains exceptions for hunting, veterinary care and actions necessary to protect life or property from a serious threat from an animal,

The Humane Society Legislative Fund supports the measure, noting that while most states consider certain acts of animal cruelty a felony, some penalties are still considered misdemeanors. The bill earned 284 bipartisan co-sponsors and more than 200 law enforcement endorsements in the previous session of Congress, according to the group. However, former Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va) kept it from coming to the door for a vote.

Goodlatte is no longer in Congress and supporters of the measure are more optimistic about its chances of passing this time around,

A previous law to protect animals, the Animal Crush Video Prohibition Act, passed in 2010 and outlaws producing gruesome videos of animal abuse,

First published on January 28, 2019.

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I’M BACK!!!!!

Posted by on Feb 11, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, COW HORSE NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, EQUI-VOICE, FEATURE ARTICLES, FROM THE EDITOR, HEALTH AND WEALTH, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE LAWSUITS, HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, LAWSUITS & INDICTMENTS, MAJOR EVENTS, REINING NEWS, RICK'S CORNER, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, SALES INFORMATION, TO THE EDITOR, Uncategorized, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

I’M BACK!!!!!

Dear Readers,

Following over a month of being offline, www.allaboutcutting.net is back!!!

Following a change by the website creators, a change in Word Press and a visit to the Apple store, today is the first time that I have been able to get into my site within the last two months. I hope you will continue returning to this site for the latest news in the horse industry. I need you to keep sending me your news. My gmail address is glory.kurtz@gmail.com.

Since this is the first time that I have been able to get into my site, my news is a little scarce – but in the coming days, I assure you that will change. The fleecing of innocent people in the cutting horse industry hasn’t gone down just because www.allaboutcutting.net went down.

 

 

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