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NEWS FROM THE PRCA

Posted by on May 7, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

NEWS FROM THE PRCA

 

Press Release from PRCA
May 7, 2019

 

PRCA rookie cowboy Garrett Shadbolt wins in Guymon

GUYMON, Okla. – In the early 1930s Guymon, Okla., was the center of the “Dust Bowl.” The first weekend of May was designated as Pioneer Days – created to cope with and celebrate those hard times – and has been since 1933.

The Henry C. Hitch Arena, site of the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo, is situated in a natural draw, and the arena provides a unique setting for one of Oklahoma’s richest rodeos and the top contestants in ProRodeo.
One of those contestants was bareback rider Garrett Shadbolt, who edged out Bill Tutor, last year’s Pioneer Days champion bareback rider. Shadbolt posted an 87-point ride on Powder River Rodeo’s Joker, clinching the win by one point.

The Merriman, Neb., cowboy was ranked 30th in the PRCA | RAM World Standings before Guymon. Shadbolt’s earnings of $2,414 will not only get him closer to his first Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualification but will also further his lead in the Prairie Circuit Standings and boost his position in the PRCA | Resistol Rookie Standings.

“I’ve seen a video or two of that horse bucking, and he seemed like an average horse,” Shadbolt said. “The stock contractor told me if I have a really strong mark-out, he’ll sometimes stack up in front of the chutes and have a better trip. I just tried to focus on getting him marked out really well, and he stopped right out there and circled around in front of the chutes. It made for a really flashy ride. He was everything I could ask for.”

The rookie cowboy has his sights set high.

“My goal is to hit 100 rodeos this year, win the Resistol Rookie of the year, and I believe that would get me to the Wrangler NFR.” Shadbolt said. “I’m feeling awesome, I’ve never been healthier, stronger than I’m feeling right now.”

As he enjoyed his Sunday drive home to Nebraska in his new cargo van, he looked forward to his wife being able to travel with him and to continue his hot streak.

“I feel like I’ve had some good luck, but I also feel like my riding is improving and I’m getting my foot through the door of Professional Rodeo.”

Other winners at the $233,073 rodeo were all-around cowboy Ryan Jarrett ($4,814 in tie-down roping and team roping); steer wrestler Clayton Hass (13.3 seconds on three head); team ropers Cody McCluskey/Joe Mattern (24.8 seconds on three head); saddle bronc rider Wade Sundell (90 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Big News); tie-down roper John Douch (27.9 seconds on three head); barrel racer Kylie Weast (35.12 seconds on two runs); steer roper Thomas Smith (64.9 seconds on five head); and bull riders Stetson Wright (87 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Black Ice) and Trevor Reiste (87 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Footloose).

PRCA saddle bronc rider Elliott injured in Guymon

GUYMON, Okla. – Saddle bronc rider Clay Elliott, a three-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2016-18) was severely injured during a ride May 3 at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo.

Elliott was bucked off Frontier Rodeo’s Delta Force and that’s when his trouble began. The Nanton, Alberta, cowboy landed on his head and fractured his neck.

Elliott had surgery May 4 at the Swedish Medical Center in Denver said Rick Foster, program director for the Justin Sportsmedicine Team.

“He had a cervical spine fracture that was stabilized with surgery,” Foster said. “The surgery went well, and the prognosis is good for a full recovery. Hopefully, he will be released from the hospital on Tuesday (May 7).”

Elliott will be out of action indefinitely. Elliott placed a career-best 10th in the 2018 PRCA | RAM World Standings with $148,868. He placed in three rounds at the 2018 Wrangler NFR and earned $44,692 in Las Vegas.

PRCA saddle bronc rider Elliott injured in Guymon

GUYMON, Okla. – Saddle bronc rider Clay Elliott, a three-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2016-18) was severely injured during a ride May 3 at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo.

Elliott was bucked off Frontier Rodeo’s Delta Force and that’s when his trouble began. The Nanton, Alberta, cowboy landed on his head and fractured his neck.

Elliott had surgery May 4 at the Swedish Medical Center in Denver said Rick Foster, program director for the Justin Sportsmedicine Team.

“He had a cervical spine fracture that was stabilized with surgery,” Foster said. “The surgery went well, and the prognosis is good for a full recovery. Hopefully, he will be released from the hospital on Tuesday (May 7).”

Elliott will be out of action indefinitely. Elliott placed a career-best 10th in the 2018 PRCA | RAM World Standings with $148,868. He placed in three rounds at the 2018 Wrangler NFR and earned $44,692 in Las Vegas.

 

ProRodeo Hall of Fame commemorates 40th anniversary

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The ProRodeo Hall of Fame is celebrating its 40th anniversary throughout 2019, starting with a new exhibit outlining some of professional rodeo’s historical moments.

“This exhibit gives our guests a taste of the various collections we have here at the Hall all at once,” said ProRodeo Hall of Fame Director Kent Sturman. “Since we are unable to have all of these items out on display year-round, visitors can see a little bit of the amazing history we are preserving here, all leading up to the 40-year celebration we are planning at the end of summer.”

The museum’s ruby anniversary kicked off with an exhibit entitled “ProRodeo Hall of Fame: First 40 Years” in the Hall’s 101 Gallery on May 1. The exhibit will be featured through September.

“The Hall of Fame is unique in that it is the only heritage center in the world dedicated solely to the sport of professional rodeo,” Sturman said. “There is no other museum on earth like it.”

The exhibit showcases a sampling of pieces from many of the permanent collections the Hall has.

Photographs of milestone events in the Hall’s 40 years of history are on display, including:

• Opening Day Celebration Aug. 6, 1979
• “The Champ” statue dedication Aug. 10, 1989
• Opening of the Hall’s expansion Aug. 10, 1996
• The dedication of The World Champions’ Pavilion Aug. 10, 2001

The various collections featured in the display include a wide range of rodeo memorabilia, such as:

• Photos dating back to 1919 from the Panoramic Photo Collection
• Artwork from the Chris LeDoux Collection
• Personal memorabilia from the Casey Tibbs Collection
• Items from the Hafley-Shelton Wild West Show Collection
• The Hesston NFR Buckle Collection
• The Ardourel Bit and Spur Collection
• Rodeo clown statues from the Heap Collection
• Photographs by Ben Allen and Lewis Portnoy from the Rodeo Photograph Collection
• Artwork from the Artist and the Bucking Horse Collection
• Western dinnerware from the Short Collection

Also on display are samples from the Rodeo Program Collection, the Western Clothing Collection, the Winston Pro Tour Collection and the Graham Family Collection, who were 10 siblings that were all trick riders.

“I think any anniversary is worthy of celebrating, but certainly 40 years is a great milestone to commemorate,” Sturman said. “The community of Colorado has been so supportive,” Sturman said.

“The community of Colorado Springs has been so supportive.
The historical exhibit will bring attention to the anniversary throughout the summer and will end with the celebration in August following the ProRodeo Hall of Fame Class of 2019 Inductions.

“It is an honor for me to serve as the director,” Sturman said. “This year will be my seventh, so I feel like I have had a good part in the history of the Hall. I take very seriously the responsibility the Hall has in telling our story, preserving our history and promoting the future of professional rodeo. This celebration is just another chapter in our story.”

What to Watch For
ProRodeoTV.com
Las Vegas Days (Helldorado), May 10-11, 5 p.m. (PT)

ProRodeo Live with Steve Kenyon
Mineral Wells (Texas) PRCA Rodeo, May 9-11, 7:30 p.m. (CT)

News & Notes From The Rodeo Trail

The Reno (Nev.) Rodeo is celebrating its 100th anniversary and the Nevada Historical Society is tipping its cap to the city’s longest running special event with a new exhibit. On May 15, the Historical Society will unveil, “Reno Rodeo: 100 Years of the Wildest Richest Rodeo in the West.” The exhibit includes historic artifacts, artwork and photographs that range from the event’s beginnings in 1919 to present day and focuses on the people who were instrumental in writing the rodeo’s history. The exhibit will also include vignettes of Nevada cowboys and cowgirls who made history as champions at their home-state rodeo, including Joe Marvel, of Battle Mountain, Jade Corkill, of Fallon, Dakota Eldridge, of Elko, and Charley Gardner, of Ruby Valley. Today, the Reno Rodeo is one of the top 10 regular-season rodeos in terms of prize money sanctioned by the PRCA and has an annual economic impact on the region of more than $50 million.
The exhibit, which will be in place through the summer at the Nevada Historical Society, will be in place through the summer, and is curated by Nevada Historical Society staff and Guy Clifton, a former journalist and author of the book, “Reno Rodeo: A History, the First 80 Years.” The exhibit will remain in place through July. The 2019 Reno Rodeo is June 20-29.

2019 PRCA | RAM World Standings Leaders
Unofficial through April 29, 2019

AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas, $83,412
BB: Kaycee Feild, Genola, Utah, $115,965
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena , Mont., $101,162
TR-1: Ty Blasingame, Casper, Wyo., $73,229
TR-2: Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif., 81,645
SB: Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah, $138,110
TD: Michael Otero, Weatherford, Texas, $81,435
SR: Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas, $32,563
BR: Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla., $86,831

Please see prorodeo.com for the latest standings update. All standings are unofficial.

All-Around | Bareback | Steer Wrestling | Team Roping (Headers) | Team Roping (Heelers) | Saddle Bronc Riding | Tie-Down Roping | Steer Roping | Bull Riding

 

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ONE RACE HORSE DIES EACH WEEK AT PENNSYLVANIA RACE TRACKS

Posted by on May 2, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

ONE RACE HORSE DIES EACH WEEK AT PENNSYLVANIA RACE TRACKS

PENNSYLVANIA EQUINE SAFETY RECORD UNDER MICROSCOPE

 

May 2, 2019
Article written from an article in the Paulick Report

According to an article by David Wenner of PennLive posted in the “Paulick Report”, The bad news about Thoroughbred racing in the PennLive racing facility is that a recent report report on racing fatalities showed that roughly one horse dies each week at the Pennsylvania racetracks. However, the good news is that the state’s fatality rate is down from previous years and slightly below the national average.

Pennsylvania made headlines several years ago in connection with an FBI investigation and subsequent race-fixing charges related to illegal medication administration. The state’s racing commission says it has made positive changes, such as making its rulings publicly available and searchable and implementing out-of-competition testing.

However, Dr. Kate Papp, a rescue advocate and veterinarian, said there are still changes to be.made like Pennsylvania condition books still show a problematic unbalance between slots-infused purses and claiming prices. Papp is also convinced trainers and backstretch employees witness cheating but are afraid to testify about it. The remedy may be increased security cameras.

A portion of one response to the article said, “In my view the article brings into focus further evidence that horse racing is truly in trouble. The overwhelming majority of the general public increasingly see it as a drug-laden, cruel undertaking whose day has come and gone. The powers-that-be in the industry would be wise to take to heart the harsh lessons of the greyhound racing industry, which has seen voters in numerous states make greyhound racing illegal over the past couple of decades.”

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SANTA ANITA HORSE DEATHS OVERSHADOW REFORMS ELSEWHERE

Posted by on Apr 30, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ABUSE, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

SANTA ANITA HORSE DEATHS OVERSHADOW REFORMS MADE ELSEWHERE

The following article was posted by
STEPHEN WHYNO AP Sports Writer

April 30, 2019

Linda Gaudet can’t watch the replays.

Even after 47 years in horse racing, she turns away from any video showing one of the 23 fatalities over three months at Santa Anita Park.

“It was just devastating,” Gaudet said. “I still can’t stomach it.”

Neither can many others around horse racing. The alarming rate of horse deaths at Santa Anita plunged the industry into chaos and was a major blow to the sport’s public image going into Triple Crown season.

The tragedy was all too familiar for those who were around for spates of breakdowns years ago in New York, New Jersey and Maryland, and many are still perplexed that officials at the California track didn’t act more quickly on proven reforms that had been previously recommended across the country years ago.

Those East Coast states had investigated, diagnosed and successfully begun to solve similar issues with a series of effective reforms.

“Why they took so long to get on top of it is beyond any of us,” said Alan Foreman, chairman and CEO of the Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association and co-author of the 2012 New York Task Force on Racehorse Health and Safety.

“When you see spates of breakdowns like this, which are very unusual, you know something’s going on and something is impacting it. Certainly here we would’ve thought that based on the work we did in 2011-2012 that they would’ve grabbed on to this thing much sooner than they did, and that’s part of the tragedy here.”

Much like the 21 horse deaths at Aqueduct in New York in 2011-12 that led to the task force, many believe the situation at Santa Anita was something of a perfect storm: a combination of a rainy winter after years of drought that affected the surfaces, pressure from ownership on horsemen to fill fields and possibly problems with medications used on horses. After the fatalities began Dec. 26, Santa Anita closed for almost all of March and has seemed to get the problem under control since reopening , though it already has hurt racing there.

“They’re seeing an exodus of horses, they’re seeing an exodus of horsemen, they’re now being forced to reduce racing days, they’re running short fields and they’re in deep trouble,” Foreman said.

Horse racing officials from the Mid-Atlantic region, which consists of tracks in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and Illinois, feel the findings of the 2012 task force provided a roadmap for Santa Anita. Since the recommendations from that task force were put into place, breakdowns in the Mid-Atlantic region have been reduced by 35 percent.

Foreman said last year the Mid-Atlantic was at the national average of 1.68 fatalities per 1,000 starts, which he called “unacceptable.” He and Gaudet believe the magnitude of the fallout at Santa Anita could have been avoided.

“This thing with Santa Anita, it is chaos because they’ve not done the proper investigation, the protocols,” said Gaudet, who has been with the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association since its inception.

“Most of the things that they want to do in California we’ve already done here. We’ve been doing it. It’s nothing new. It should’ve been done a long time ago.”

In a statement to The Associated Press, the Stronach Group said it, along with industry partners in California, “took the bold and necessary steps to begin to modernize and reform our sport for the betterment of horse and rider welfare. This industry-led initiative, successfully gained approval on groundbreaking Lasix reforms from California’s regulatory body for horse racing, the California Horse Racing Board. While steeped in both history and tradition, the sport needs to be modernized in a way that prioritizes the health and safety of horses and athletes first and foremost.”

The Stronach Group said it is forging ahead with “progressive reforms ranging from medication overhaul to training protocols” and added that horses at Santa Anita and Golden Gate Fields race “under the strongest medication regulations in the United States.”

California Horse Racing Board spokesman Mike Marten outlined that Santa Anita instituted medication limits and provided additional track veterinarians to monitor training hours and the board increased veterinarian, steward and investigator staffing time.

One issue that continues to be debated is the use of Lasix — a diuretic given to horses on race days to prevent pulmonary bleeding. The Triple Crown races are planning to phase out the use of Lasix over the next few years, even though independent regulators have found it is unrelated to horse deaths.

After New York Governor Andrew Cuomo called for an investigation amid the breakdowns at Aqueduct, the task force cited issues other than Lasix as causes for fatalities, including oversight and use of medicine, track safety and purse structure.

East Coast officials have been more focused on other practices by racing offices, owners and trainers, including the use of non-steroidal drugs that help a horse’s joints being administered too close to races. Foreman, Dr. Mary Scollay, New York equine medical director Scott Palmer and former jockey Jerry Bailey discovered horses were being overmedicated during their 75 interviews and months of work on the task force.

Bailey said in an effort to speed a horse’s recovery for the next race, some trainers were medicating horses with anti-inflammatories so often that it masks pain or an injury a horse might be feeling.

“These practices and the medications these trainers were giving them were way too close to race time,” said Bailey, a six-time winner in Triple Crown races who’s now an analyst for NBC Sports.

“Once we made the recommendation along with our competition testing to make sure that these trainers were adhering on medication and more transparency with veterinary records to make sure the vets weren’t doing it on their behalf, then we saw a change.”

Scollay, the equine medical director for the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission and co-author of the 100-page New York task force report, said one lesson to be learned from the situations in New York and California is that cutting down on fatalities is a collaborative effort. She said front-office executives, who portion out the money that can be won in races, must be involved.

When casino revenue started pouring into New York earlier this decade, purses skyrocketed and that had unintended consequences. In claiming races, where any horse can be bought afterward, the incentives were so intoxicating that owners and trainers were willing to risk entering races with inferior or potentially injured horses for a potentially big payday.

“That commoditized the horse and established sort of a day-trading environment where you went all-in for that one big return and it didn’t matter after that because it wasn’t going to be your asset for very long,” Scollay said. “It sets horses up to be at substantially increased risk.”

Sometimes the track itself is a risk, which was believed to be a cause of 19 horse fatalities at Saratoga Race Course in 2017 and played a role at Santa Anita.

In an effort to address the track issue, the National Thoroughbred Racing Association contributed a $100,000 grant for the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory run by Dr. Mick Peterson at the University of Kentucky. The lab is developing technology such as sensors that can read moisture content of a track in real time and attempt to make the surface as consistent as possible.

While the lab testing and other initiatives are in the works, Foreman doesn’t believe the industry is doing a good job of informing the public of what it’s doing to try to prevent deaths. He also is discouraged that various jurisdictions have chosen to adopt different rules to combat the issue.

The proposed solutions in California and even at Churchill Downs, home of the Kentucky Derby, are very different from the policies that have been effective in the mid-Atlantic.

“What’s distressing to me is that here’s an opportunity for some consensus-based best practices and everybody’s going on their own, trying to do better than what the other guy did,” Foreman said. “That helps to create an atmosphere of industry dysfunction.”

___

Follow Stephen Whyno on Twitter at http://twitter.com/SWhyno .

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TODAY’S. NEWS FROM REINING, CUTTING AND. HORSE RACING

Posted by on Apr 23, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, CUTTING NEWS, FROM THE EDITOR, HORSE HEALTH, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, INDUSTRY NEWS, REINING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

TODAY’S NEWS FROM REINING, CUTTING AND HORSE RACING

April 23, 2019

NEWS FROM THE REINING INDUSTRY:

Carol Trimmer, Crescent, Okla., NRHA Hall of Fame Inductee and staff member, passed away on Tuesday, April 16. The dedicated and knowledgeable horse lover worked with horses and horse people over the years, claiming it was “not work” as she loved her job and was passionate about helping promote the industry in whatever capacity she could. 

Before going to work for the NRHA, Trimmer spent 15 years in the press room at the All American Quarter Horse Congress, one of the largest horse shows in the world. At the NRHA she filled many positions, including her appointment in 2003 as the NRHA Senior Director of Publications. She was inducted into the NRHA Hall of Fame in 2013. 

Trimmer’s funeral service will be held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, April 23, at First Baptist Church, 220 South Grand, Crescent, Okla.

NEWS FROM THE CUTTING HORSE INDUSTRY:

Billy Ray Rosewell, an NCHA Hall of Fame Rider and World Champion, passed away on Monday Feb. 18, 2019. 

Rosewell, who was raised near Mt. Pleasant, Texas, began training cutting horses in 1967 and won three Appaloosa World titles before he rode Show Biz Sandy, owned by Starkey Smith, in 1992, when the daughter of Son Of A Doc was 5.

The pair were one of the top three contenders for the 1993 NCHA Open World Champion Show and won the event, earning $42,812. That was the year that Kenny Patterson was Reserve Champion riding Commandicate, earning $42,385 and Kobie Wood rode Red White and Boon, placing third for $42,314. Rosewell had NCHA career earnings of $576,013, primarily showing in weekend competition.

His survivors include three sons: Billy Rosewell, Jr., Cookville, David and Maria Rosewell, Kilgore, Texas and Tommy Joe Rosewell, Mt Pleasant; one daughter-in-law, Tammy and John of Reno, Nevada; one brother and sister-in-law, Jerry and Katy Rosewell of Cookville; one sister Betty Ann Phillips, Mt. Pleasant; nine grandchildren, nine great grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Feb. 22  at the Harrison Funeral Home, Naples, Texas, and  interment was at the Omaha Cemetery in Omaha, Texas. 

 

NEWS FROM THE RACE HORSE INDUSTRY:

With the Kentucky Derby coming up, there’s no slowdown in what owner/trainers are giving their horses to make them run faster and die sooner. According to the Thoroughbred Daily News (TDN), Strychnine, the active agreement in rat poison, has been detected in post-race drug testing of three horses from the same owner/trainer at Phoenix, Arizona’s Turf Paradise, Alex Torres-Casas, who also owned and trained a fourth horse that tested positive for caffeine alone.

Torres-Casas was fined $2,625 and suspended 80 days on Feb. 27 for the offenses according to Arizona Department of Racing (ADR). However, according to the public information officer for the Arizona Department of Gaming, Torres-Casas appealed the ruling the same day it was issued. .

Strychnine is listed as a Class 1 Penalty/Category, a substance on the Association of Racing Commissioners International Uniform Classification of Substances list, which is the most-dangerous level. Caffeine is listed as 2/B. The ARCI’s recommended penalty for 1/A violations is a minimum one-year suspension and a minimum fine of $10,000.

However, this was not the first offense for Torres-Casa as on May 30, 2017, ADR ruled he was also fined $2,650 and suspended 180 days for a cocaine positive in a horse he raced at Turf Paradise in February of that year. The ARCI guidelines for a trainer’s second Lifetime Penalty Category. Although his suspension was not available at press time, an offense in any jurisdiction calls for a minimum three-year suspension and a minimum fine of $25,000. However, according to the article, neither Torres-Casas nor a Turf Paradise employee could not be reached for comment.

According to the TDN article, if the case is overturned in the appeals process, all of the above-mentioned horses will be disqualified from purse money and placed on the steward’s list for 60 days. They then would have to be retested and be proven to be clear from foreign substances prior to being allowed to race.

Although strychnine would seem like an unlikely performance-enhancer given its widespread use as a rodenticide, over a century ago, it was one of the first substances to cause a major sports doping scandal in America

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PRO RODEO HALL OF FAME ANNOUNCES 2019 INDUCTEES

Posted by on Apr 23, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

PRO RODEO HALL OF FAME ANNOUNCES 2019 INDUCTEES

Press Release from PRCA
April 23, 2019
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Commotion, one of the greatest bucking horses of all time, highlights a star-studded, 12-member class that will be enshrined in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Colo., Aug. 3.
           “I think this is great,” said stock contractor Bennie Beutler. “With Commotion, he either bucked them off or they would win first on him. He was one of the horses who liked to buck, and he never had a bad day.”
           The rest of the 2019 ProRodeo Hall of Fame class that was announced Monday consists of stock contractors Elra Beutler and his son, Jiggs; four-time world champion team roping heeler Allen Bach(1979, 1990, 1995, 2006); two-time world champion steer wrestler Dean Gorsuch (2006, 2010); world champion bull rider Doug “Droopy” Brown (1969); world champion bareback rider Larry Peabody (1984); notable Jerome Robinson; the Cody (Wyo.) Stampede Rodeo; contract personnel Tommy Lucia; and three Women’s Professional Rodeo Association inductees – barrel racers Jimmie Munroe and Sammy Thurman Brackenberry and notable Florence Youree.
In addition to the 13 inductees, Guy Elliott, a former arena director for the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo in Denver and the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo and countless others, will receive the Ken Stemler Pioneer Award, which honors individuals in recognition of their groundbreaking, innovative ideas and forward thinking.
 Commotion, a 1,300-pound bay stallion, who stood at 16.1 hands, was voted the top bareback horse at his first Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in 1997. He went on to win the next three Bareback Riding Horse of the Year awards, 1998-2000, when he was part of the Beutler and Gaylord Rodeo Company string. He made 10 consecutive trips (1997-2006) to the Wrangler NFR before retiring in his prime at the 2006 Wrangler NFR at the age of 15. Two rounds were won on him at the Wrangler NFR. Commotion has sired more than 70 horses who have gone on to compete at the Wrangler NFR. His daughter Killer Bee was named the Top Saddle Bronc at the Wrangler NFR in 2013 and 2014 and was runner up for Saddle Bronc of the Year in 2015. Another daughter of his is Wound Up, the 2016 Top Saddle Bronc at the Wrangler NFR and the 2017 Saddle Bronc of the Year.
           “Besides him being such a great bucking horse for us, he was also a breeder, and that doesn’t happen very much,” Beutler said.
In August 2013, artist T.D. Kelsey’s larger-than-life-statue of Commotion was dedicated at the National Route 66 Museum Complex in Elk City, Okla. When Commotion wasn’t at rodeos, he lived at the Beutler’s Ranch in Elk City, and he was buried next to the statue.
“He was an outlaw,” Beutler said about Commotion. “We never did halter break him. He was very independent, and he strutted around like he was king of the road. After he was in bareback riding for seven or eight years, we put him one year in the bronc riding, and he was really good, but then we went back to bareback riding because that’s what he was best at. He just bucked hard every time, and cowboys were only able to ride him about half the time, and when he would buck somebody off, he would prance around the arena. He knew he was special.”
          Commotion passed away Sept. 7, 2016, at the Beutler & Son ranch near Elk City, Okla. He was 25.
Elra Beutler & Jiggs Beutler – Stock Contractor
The Beutler name has been part of professional rodeo for decades, from the onset of Beutler Brothers Rodeo Co. in 1929 to the collaboration of Beutler & Son Rodeo Company.
Elra and his son, Jiggs, were some of the foremost rodeo promoters in the business.
“It doesn’t get any bigger than (Monday) was for us,” Bennie Beutler said. “They (Elra and Jiggs) worked rodeo all their lives and they put me into the (ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2010) and they should have gone in long before I ever did. They did a heck of a lot more than I ever did and had it a lot tougher. The rodeos we still have in this day and age, they are the ones who had them. The rodeo business has been very good to the Beutlers.”
Lynn Beutler, Elra’s brother, was inducted into the inaugural ProRodeo Hall of Fame class in 1979.
In 1954, Elra Beutler sold his interest in the livestock company to his brothers Jake and Lynn. A year later, Elra joined with Buster Morgan to form Beutler and Morgan Rodeo Producers. In 1959, Elra and Jiggs bought out Morgan and formed Beutler & Son Rodeo Co. Fast-forward to the present and Jiggs’ son, Bennie, and grandson, Rhett, operate Beutler & Son Rodeo Co.
Elra passed away in 1987 at the age of 90. Jiggs died in a tractor accident in 1980 at the age of 55.
Elra “Boss Man” Beutler was known to be an avid horseman and stockman. He served as the company’s pick-up man at the age of 65. He was selected to be a pick-up man at the inaugural National Finals Rodeo in 1959 and again in 1960. He was a veteran of World War I and was a catalyst in bringing modern professional rodeo into its maturity.
Jiggs was part of the 82nd Airborne Division during World War II. He also served as a guard for Gen. George Patton and was awarded the Purple Heart. He competed in bareback riding and bull riding until his riding career ended following a severely broken arm.
Elra and Jiggs owned Old Spec, the curiously spotted, cross-bred Brahma bull that in 350 attempts, over a seven-year bucking career, allowed only seven riders to make qualifying rides. Old Spec was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1979. Elra and Jiggs also owned the 1973 Saddle Bronc Horse of the Year, Sam Bass.
Allen Bach – Team roping heeler
Team roping heeler Allen Bach was one of the best in ProRodeo over four decades, highlighted by capturing world championships in 1979, 1990, 1995 and 2006.
Bach holds the PRCA record for most qualifications (including invitations) by a team roper to the National Finals Rodeo with 30 (1978-96, 1998-2008).
“I’m flattered, but does that mean I can’t try to make the NFR one more time?” Bach said Monday.
Bach also won NFR average titles in 1979 and 2006, roping with Jesse James and Chad Masters, respectively. In 1990 and ’95, Bach paired with Doyle Gellerman and Bobby Hurley.
In 2007, Bach became the 11th rodeo competitor to surpass $2 million in career earnings. Bach joined the PRCA in 1978.
Dean Gorsuch – Steer Wrestler
           Dean Gorsuch, a steer wrestler with two world titles, eight qualifications to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, two Tour titles and $1.3 million in career earnings has certainly earned his spot in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.
           “Ever since I was little, I’d always dreamed of rodeoing for a living, making the Finals and being a world champ,” Gorsuch told ProRodeo Sports News in 2007. “My dream has always been to make the Finals, but the best thing was to walk into that building with my little boy and my wife. I’ve always wanted to do that as a family. It was fun to have (Taydon) there and to share it with them. It was pretty cool.”
           The Nebraska cowboy started his PRCA career in 2002 and rapidly rose to ProRodeo stardom as he made his first Wrangler NFR qualification in 2005 and won his first world title in 2006. He went on to qualify again ever year from 2008 through 2013, picking up his second world title in 2010.
           Gorsuch competed at the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo in 2005 and 2010 and was named Tour champion in 2006 and 2008.
           Now, he can add Hall of Famer to the long list of victories he can share with his family.
Doug “Droopy” Brown – Bull Rider
Whether he believes it or not, Brown will soon be surrounded by the legends he’s always admired.
Brown won the 1969 bull riding world championship with $27,610. It was one of 13 total NFR qualifications – five in bull riding and eight in saddle bronc riding (though one year he did not compete due to injury).
All that success landed Brown a Hall of Fame selection.
“I’m having an exceptional day today,” said Brown, 73. “I guess it means that the 20-some years I put in on the road rodeoing did make a difference in other people’s lives and in my life. I’m glad other people noticed.”
Brown pointed out that on the 50th anniversary of his world championship, he’s headed to the Hall.
“It’s been 50 years,” he said. “It’s a huge surprise.”
Brown, of Silverton, Ore., will be inducted among some of his heroes.
“I’m a little overwhelmed because there are legends in there,” Brown said. “I think I was a good cowboy, but I was never a legend, so I’m very pleased.”
Larry Peabody – bareback rider
Peabody, a Montana native, made a steady climb in rodeo to his 1984 world title.
Within three years of becoming a member, Peabody had qualified for his first National Finals Rodeo. He went on to make five total, all consecutive, and crowned it with the 1984 bareback riding championship.
Peabody also won the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association bareback riding title in 1981. He won the Montana Pro Rodeo Circuit bareback riding year-end title four times, the circuit team roping title once and the all-around once.
In 1981, that first NFR trip, he set the NFR record with an 89-point ride on Growney’s Dreamboat Annie. He also split the NFR average in 1983 and finished the season in third place.
He edged fellow Hall of Famer Lewis Field for the 1984 title by $2,000. The race was so close it came down to the final round of the NFR. Even after he’d been declared the champ, it took a while for Peabody to truly believe it.
“I kept thinking they’d re-tally things and call me to say they’d made a mistake,” Peabody told ProRodeo Sports News in May 1985. “It wasn’t until Denver, when I got my (world champion) buckle, that I really believed I’d won.”
Jerome Robinson – Notable
Robinson was a cowboy with many hats – a contestant, contractor, event producer, contract personnel and member of the PRCA Board of Directors. With so many titles on his résumé, Robinson is being inducted to the HOF as a Notable, a word that summarizes his career.
“I was floored, to be truthful,” Robinson said. “It was completely unexpected knowing all the other people who put into this association. I’m completely humbled by it knowing the other people who have done a lot for this outfit.”
Robinson competed with the PRCA for 16 years, starting in 1967, and made 11 trips to the National Finals Rodeo (1970-75, ’77 and ’81). He mentored several PRCA world champion bull riders and many others involved with rodeo production.
Robinson was instrumental in creating PROCOM in 1975, a system still in use today for entering rodeos. This task, along with starting the Winston Tour, are what he considers to be his most difficult achievements.
“If we took notes, it would have crumbled around our ears,” Robinson laughed. “We could have written a book on all of that, but the roof would have caved in on us because there was so much touch and go. We worked unbelievable hours to keep both of those moving.”
He also played a role in bringing rodeo and Western experiences to France, Oman, Italy, Japan, Finland, Venezuela and Costa Rica. Of all his accomplishments, Robinson couldn’t pick a favorite.
“Serving on the board was definitely educational but just being involved in the lifestyle and the day-to-day of all of it,” Robinson said.
Cody Stampede Rodeo – Committee
Cody, Wyo., is often called the “Rodeo Capitol of the World” – and for good reason, as it’s home to the Cody Stampede Rodeo, which has attracted countless tourists to the small town just east of Yellowstone National Park since 1919.
Now in its centennial year, the Cody Stampede is being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.
“It’s amazing and outstanding, and it’s not just this year’s board, it’s 100 years of boards,” said Michael Darby, co-president of the Cody Stampede Board,. “We were hoping it would be this year since this is our centennial. It’d be a good kickoff to our celebration.”
An induction into the HOF should come as no surprise for a town that was started by the American icon William Frederick “Buffalo Bill” Cody. Buffalo Bill began as a rider for the Pony Express and went on to help settle the northwestern Rocky Mountain region and created the world-traveling “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show,” which taught the world about cowboy life during the late 1800s thanks in part to the sharp-shooting skills of Annie Oakley.
The Cody Stampede won the PRCA’s Best Large Outdoor Rodeo of the Year in 1998 and 1999, and its arena was where many legends of ProRodeo got their start, such as 1962 World Champion Bull Rider Freckles Brown, as well as rodeo cowboy and musician Chris LeDoux.
“It’s a great storied history that’s still going to this day,” Darby said.
Today, the Cody Stampede and the corresponding Xtreme Bulls event boast a combined payout in excess of $400,000 with big names in rodeo production, such as local cowboy and nine-time Bullfighter of the Year Dusty Tuckness, as well as four-time Announcer of the Year Boyd Polhamus. The rodeo also features some top-notch stock by working with three-time Stock Contractor of the Year Frontier Rodeo.
“It’s like a dream that’s come true and gives you a deeper appreciation for what’s been going on there the last 100 years,” Darby said. “It’s a great honor to be associated with the great names in rodeo.”
Tommy Lucia – Contract Personnel
Lucia was a three-time Wrangler NFR Specialty Act and three-time PRCA Specialty Act of the Year. For more than 50 years he worked as a barrelman and specialty act, entertaining at rodeos across the U.S. In 2010, he was inducted into the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame, and in 2016, he was inducted into the National Cowboy Rodeo Hall of Fame.
Lucia will be inducted posthumously into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, having passed away June 1, 2016, on his 75th birthday.
His son, Anthony, is a ProRodeo announcer, trick rider and team roper. He said his dad was an amazing entertainer and inspired him to pursue a career in rodeo.
“My dad always said it wasn’t him getting the applause but his animals,” Anthony said.
Tommy Lucia’s popular acts included Glory, his swayback horse, and Whiplash, a monkey in cowboy attire who rode a dog.
“My dad’s goal was to bring out the best in every animal, and he felt like his calling from God was to use his gift of training animals to bring joy to people in the arena,” Anthony said.
Anthony said he became emotional when he found out his dad would join the 2019 class.
“Not only does this mean the world to me but also to my family – that the selection committee wanted to recognize my dad for his contributions,” he said. “My dad dedicated his life to bringing joy in the arena and providing for his family. It’s neat and special that his legacy will be forever enshrined in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame family. My dad would be smiling ear to ear … and I know he is right now.”
Jimmie Gibbs Munroe – Barrel Racer
While Munroe initially made a name for herself in the rodeo arena, winning a world title in 1975, her love and commitment to the association cemented her legacy in the sport.
“This is just great news,” Munroe said. “What an incredible honor this is. I was there two years ago to see the first class of WPRA members inducted and was so excited then.”
Munroe made 11 trips to the National Finals Rodeo on three different horses and was twice an NIRA National Champion Barrel Racer and once an NIRA National Champion All-Around Cowgirl.
Munroe served as president of the WPRA from 1978-1993 and again from 2011-12. During her first time as president she led the association in acquiring equal prize money, obtained national sponsors and advanced the use of electric timers and better arena conditions.
She joins her husband, Dan O. “Bud” Munroe, in the Hall of Fame. Bud Munroe, who was inducted in 2007, was a 12-time National Finals Rodeo qualifier and 1986 saddle bronc riding world champion.
Sammy Thurman Brackenbury – Barrel Racer
Brackenbury was also an all-around talent, even roping and winning money in PRCA rodeos. Brackenbury qualified for the National Finals Rodeo 11 consecutive times, winning the world title in 1965.
           During her career she served as the California Circuit Director, All Events Director, Vice President of the Association and in 1975 served as the President of the Girl’s Rodeo Association.
Florence (Price) Youree – Notable
Youree is the first notable inducted under the WPRA umbrella into the Hall of Fame.
Youree was among the Top 15 six times and won the WPRA all-around title in 1966. But it was her services to the GRA/WPRA in an administrative capacity that landed her induction. Youree served the association as a director, then president from 1960-64 and then secretary-treasurer, where she made the biggest impact. It was during that time that Youree worked to get the barrel racing included at the National Finals Rodeo as it is today.
           “I appreciate this so much,” Youree said. “I have loved and enjoyed everything I have ever done with the WPRA and still do. When I won my award (WPRA NFR Lifetime Achievement Award) in Las Vegas this past December, I thought that was the best thing that could have ever happened and it couldn’t get bigger than that, but I guess I was wrong.”
The WPRA contributed to this report.
About The PRCA
The PRCA, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colo., is recognized as the unsurpassed leader in sanctioning the sport of professional rodeo. The PRCA’s mission is to unify membership in providing an innovative fan experience, to grow the sport of professional rodeo and provide new expanded opportunities for our membership and sponsors. Since 1986, the PRCA has paid out more than $1 billion in prize money to its contestants. The PRCA offers the best cowboys and the best rodeos; delivering the best fan experience while positively impacting our communities and embracing the spirit of the West. A membership-based organization, the PRCA sanctioned 650 rodeos in 2018, and there are more than 40 million rodeo fans in the U.S. The PRCA televises the sport’s premier events, with the world-renowned Wrangler National Finals Rodeo on CBS Sports Net and streaming on ProRodeoTV.com. The PRORODEO® Tour and RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo also air on CBS Sports Net, and ProRodeoTV.com. PRCA-sanctioned rodeos donate more than $40 million to local and national charities every year. For comprehensive coverage of the cowboy sport, read the ProRodeo Sports News, the official publication of the PRCA, and make sure to check out the digital edition of the PSN. The digital PSN and daily updates of news and results can be found on the PRCA’s official website, www.prorodeo.com.
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Rodeo News 4-16-19

Posted by on Apr 16, 2019 in BREAKING NEWS, HORSE ORGANIZATIONS, RODEO & BULLRIDING NEWS, WHO, WHAT & WHERE | 0 comments

RODEO NEWS
From the PRCA
April 16, 2019
TAZ OLSON WINS LOGANDALE
LOGANDALE, Nev. – Steer wrestler Taz Olson knew that the next few weeks were going to present a break in rodeoing for him.
Olson is heading home to Prairie City, S.D., to help his grandfather and father on the family ranch. He can go home with a big smile on his face.
The 26-year-old posted a 4.0-second run in the final round of the Clark County Fair & Rodeo in Logandale, Nev., Sunday night, to clock an average time of 14.5 seconds on three head to win the ProRodeo Tour event.
Olson earned $5,635 after finishing third in the first round, tying for first in the final round and winning the average.
In his fourth trip to Logandale, this was the first time he took home any kind of check, let alone the title and more than $5,500.
“That’s the first time I’ve won money there,” he said. “It’s pretty cool. It was sure a good time. I’ve always enjoyed that rodeo, the fresh steers.”
Olson was 37th in the PRCA | RAM World Standings heading into Logandale with $13,480. The win launched him up to 24th in the world standings. It will also put him right in the mix of the ProRodeo Tour Standings.
Olson was on Tanner Brunner’s horse Bert for the first time, but quickly found he was as good as he looked.
“That was the first time I ever rode him,” Olson said. “I wouldn’t mind (getting on him again). He gave some pretty good goes.”
He’ll head back on the rodeo road for Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo the first weekend of May.
“I’ll be home until Guymon,” he said. “I have to go home for lambing right now.”
Other winners at the $246,318 rodeo were all-around cowboy Stetson Wright ($5,734, saddle bronc riding and bull riding), bareback rider Austin Foss (172 points on two head); team ropers Garrett Rogers/Jake Minor (15.9 seconds on three head); saddle bronc rider Isaac Diaz (174 points on two head); tie-down roper Tuf Cooper (27.6 seconds on three head); barrel racer Leia Pluemer (35.01 seconds on two runs); and bull rider Wright (174 points on two head).
AARON WILLIAMS GETS REDEMPTION AT OAKDALE
OAKDALE, Calif. – In his second year of PRCA competition, bull rider Aaron Williams was out for redemption at the Oakdale (Calif.) Saddle Club Rodeo.
The Pismo Beach, Calif., cowboy took a re-ride during his rookie year in 2018 but didn’t get a qualified ride.
“They got me for a slap right at the whistle (last year), so it was good to go this year and redeem myself,” Williams said.
One year later, Williams cruised into the winner’s circle with an 89-point ride on Big Stone Rodeo Inc.’s War Car.
“I had a good bull, and Oakdale is pretty historic, so I’m excited to add that buckle to my collection and keep it growing right on into Red Bluff (Calif.) this weekend,” Williams said.
Williams had a good idea of what he was in for with War Car after talking to Chance Schott, his friend and fellow bull rider.
“He gave me the rundown and said he’s a good little bull, a little hot-acting at first, but once you get down on him he’s awesome,” Williams said, adding that Schott predicted Williams would score in the high 80s.
Williams’ ride was worth $3,440, which should give him a healthy boost in the 2019 PRCA | RAM World Standings. Before winning Oakdale, the 22-year-old cowboy was ranked 17th in the world standings with $30,541.
“The year is still young, and I’m going to keep rodeoing and riding bulls,” Williams said. “They’ll let me know where I stand at the end of the year. It’s kind of out of my hands as far as where I get placed. I can only do so much, so I keep it simple and have fun riding and let the rest of the chips fall where they may.”
In true California style, Williams has a laid-back and relaxed mindset when it comes to competing.
“I just try to keep it as easy as possible and put the rest out of my mind,” Williams said. “It’s just bull riding – show up and have fun.”
His easygoing attitude has paid off at major rodeos before, as he won the 2018 Ellensburg (Wash.) Rodeo in September. He went on to finish second in the 2018 PRCA | Resistol Rookie Standings for bull riding with $67,066.
Williams took what he learned from his successful rookie year and is applying it to the 2019 season, getting started earlier than before.
“Last year, I didn’t get going until February or March, so it was nice to get those winter rodeos and go to San Antonio and Houston,” Williams said.
Other winners at the $124,875 rodeo were all-around cowboy Doyle Hoskins ($568, tie-down roping and team roping); bareback rider Devan Reilly (85.5 points on Four Star Rodeo’s Black Ice); steer wrestler Hunter Cure (8.4 seconds on two head); team ropers Luke Brown/Jade Corkill (13.5 seconds on two head); saddle bronc rider Jesse Wright (88 points on C5 Rodeo’s Bad Intentions); tie-down roper Westyn Hughes (18.1 seconds on two head) and barrel racer Megan Champion (17.20 seconds).
J.R. VEZAIN MAKING PROGRESS AFTER SEVERE INJURY
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Veteran bareback rider J.R. Vezain continues to make progress after suffering a broken back while competing at the Pasadena (Texas) Livestock Show & Rodeo when he was riding Frontier Rodeo Company’s Brazos Bash, Sept. 22.
The injury required surgery and has left him with mobility issues from the waist down. Vezain addressed his rehab in an interview with ProRodeo Sports News Friday.
“I was rehabbing at Neuroworx in Sandy, Utah, since November,” said Vezain, 27. “They have upgraded me to taking steps with bodyweight support. My wife (Shelby) is getting ready to have a baby boy (the couple’s first child) May 14, so the closer that (date) came the more we were wanting to be at home. I talked to the therapist, and we did some new testing. They set me up with an at-home program to come to do some strength training for the next six to eight weeks until after the baby comes. Then we will touch base and make a new game plan after that. My in-laws turned the garage into a gym, and we have a bunch of equipment set up.”
Vezain, a six-time qualifier for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (2012-14 and 2016-18), returned home to Melstone, Mont., from Sandy, Utah, April 5.
“I have been back rehabbing, and I elicit my own steps,” Vezain said. “My hip flexor is firing, my quads are firing, my glutes are firing, and those muscles are flexing. I can elicit my own steps, but my leg muscles are still so weak that I can’t hold myself up yet without assistance. I’m making progress daily.”
Vezain said his faith and the outpouring of support is helping him deal with his plight.
“Ever since the beginning when this happened, I could have laid in bed and wondered why it happened to me and wonder if I was going to get out of it, or you can get dressed, get out of bed and make the most of it, and that’s what I have been trying to do,” Vezain said. “I’m relying on the support system I have and my faith. I don’t know what the outcome is going to be, but I dang-sure know who holds tomorrow, and I’m going to keep working hard and keep on swinging.”
Vezain got on a horse for the first time since his injury April 6.
“I rode a horse around the place here (in Melstone), and that sure was great,” Vezain said. “I also got a four-wheeler rigged up with a hand-shifter, so I can go tag cows and help out around the ranch.”
Recently, Vezain also started doing leatherwork again.
“I used to do leatherwork growing up,” Vezain said. “I always had aspirations to set up my own saddle shop, and I got married and got busy with life and rodeoing,” Vezain said. “I had not done much leatherwork for three years or so, and then when I went to Utah, Kent Mertin raffled off a leather bag that he made and some spurs. Through small talk, I told him I used to do leatherwork. He told me if I got bored to come over (to West Jordan, Utah), which was 10 minutes away and do some leatherwork. I spent every day there after rehab doing leatherwork. I’ve been making a bunch of Navajo purse bags. Kent told me to show some of my purse bags on the internet, and I’ve been blessed. I got a bunch of orders of purses and some belts.”
WHAT TO WATCH FOR:
Wranglernetwork.com
Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up, April 20, 2:30 p.m. (PT); April 21, 1:30 p.m. (PT)
ProRodeoTV.com
Rodeo Corpus Christi (Texas) ProRodeo Tour Rodeo, April 25-27, 7 p.m. (PT); April 28, 3 p.m., CT.
George Paul Memorial Division 1 Xtreme Bulls, Del Rio, Texas, April 26-27, 8 p.m., CT
ProRodeo Live with Steve Kenyon
Central Ark PRCA Rodeo, El Paso, Ark., April 19-20, 7:30 p.m. (CT)
NEWS & NOTES FROM THE RODEO TRAIL
Bull riding is all Cody Rostockyj has known. However, after a serious injury scare recently, Rostockyj, who qualified for the 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, is retiring from bull riding at the age of 29. “I was riding at the Waxahachie, Texas, rodeo a couple of weeks ago and I got hit in the head with a horn to the face,” said Rostockyj, who started his two-year term as bull riding representative on the PRCA Executive Council, April 1.
“It didn’t look like a bad wreck at all, but it kind of stunned me and paralyzed me for two minutes. I came back to after a couple of minutes and was able to move my body again, but it was tingling from my neck to my toes. The tingling went away except for my arms and my hands. I went to the ER that night and I didn’t have a broken neck or back, but they wanted me to go see a neurologist, so I did. They did an MRI and told me I bruised my spine.
“The way they explained it was that it was kind of like a concussion, once you get one, they can come more frequently and easier. The same thing with my back, that I might get hit again and nothing could happen or it could bruise it easier or I could get paralyzed.” That latter possibility was what led to Rostockyj walking away from the sport. Rostockyj joined the PRCA in October 2009 and earned $363,734. He was 45th in the April 8 PRCA | RAM World Standings with $11,486. Rostockyj will continue to keep close tabs on bull riding after being elected to serve as the bull riding representative on the PRCA Executive Council. “I wanted to do it and I was still going, and it would make it a lot easier,” Rostockyj said. “But now with me being retired, I can pay more attention to things and do an even better job.”
Next Up
April 19          Red Bluff (Calif.) Round-Up begins
April 19          Central Ark PRCA Rodeo, El Paso, Ark., begins
April 19          Jesse Andrus & Mike Hillman Memorial, Roswell, N.M., begins
April 20          Ron Ross Permit Steer Roping, Liberty, Texas, begins
April 20          Ron Ross Steer Roping, Liberty, begins
2019 PRCA | RAM World Standings Leaders
Unofficial through April 15, 2019
AA: Caleb Smidt, Bellville, Texas, $83,412
BB: Kaycee Feild, Genola, Utah, $115,965
SW: Ty Erickson, Helena , Mont., $96,274
TR-1: Ty Blasingame, Casper, Wyo., $71,832
TR-2: Kyle Lockett, Visalia, Calif., 75,435
SB: Ryder Wright, Milford, Utah, $122,272
TD: Michael Otero, Weatherford, Texas, $81,435
SR: Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas, $25,778
BR: Trevor Kastner, Roff, Okla., $84,960
2019 PRCA | RAM World Standings
Please see prorodeo.com for the latest standings update. All standings are unofficial.
2019 PRCA Rodeo Results
About The PRCA
The PRCA, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colo., is recognized as the unsurpassed leader in sanctioning the sport of professional rodeo. The PRCA’s mission is to unify membership in providing an innovative fan experience, to grow the sport of professional rodeo and provide new expanded opportunities for our membership and sponsors. Since 1986, the PRCA has paid out more than $1 billion in prize money to its contestants. The PRCA offers the best cowboys and the best rodeos; delivering the best fan experience while positively impacting our communities and embracing the spirit of the West. A membership-based organization, the PRCA sanctioned 650 rodeos in 2018, and there are more than 40 million rodeo fans in the U.S. The PRCA televises the sport’s premier events, with the world-renowned Wrangler National Finals Rodeo on CBS Sports Net and streaming on ProRodeoTV.com. The PRORODEO® Tour and RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo also air on CBS Sports Net, and ProRodeoTV.com. PRCA-sanctioned rodeos donate more than $40 million to local and national charities every year. For comprehensive coverage of the cowboy sport, read the ProRodeo Sports News, the official publication of the PRCA, and make sure to check out the digital edition of the PSN. The digital PSN and daily updates of news and results can be found on the PRCA’s official website, www.prorodeo.com.
For additional information about this press release, contact:
Tracy Renck
719.528.4758
Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association
101 Pro Rodeo Drive
Colorado Springs, CO 80919 www.prorodeo.com
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