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IS BLM LISTENING TO HORSE LOVERS?

IS THE BLM LISTENING TO HORSE LOVERS?

 

BLM IS SEEKING OFF-RANGE WILD-HORSE PASTURE BIDS THROUGH MAY 3, 2019

 

March 13, 2019
Information from “The Horse”

As of March 1, 2018, the wild-horse and burro population on public lands was estimated at 82,000 animals, which is more than triple the number of animals the land can support in conjunction with other legally mandated land uses (which also includes the grazing of privately-owned cattle, sheep and goats). 

According to a March 4, 2019 press release, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), is seeking bids from contractors for off-range pastures to provide a free-roaming environment and quality care for wild horses that have been removed from Western public lands. 

Bids will be accepted through May 3, 2019, from Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas Panhandle (north of Hwy 82 and 84), Utah, Washington and Wyoming. The area west of the Cascade mountain range in Oregon and Washington is excluded.

Applicants who are new to conducting business with the U.S. Government must obtain a Dun and Bradstreet number at dnb.com and register at sam.gov to respond to the solicitation. No fees are involved and the solicitation describes what to submit to the BLM and where to send it.

The BLM will award multiple contracts that can accommodate 200-5,000 head of wild horses, with a four or nine-year renewal option. All contracts require supplemental feed for a minimum of four months to ensure that the animals maintain a quality body condition throughout the dormant months of the year.

To obtain a contract, go fedconnect.net and click on “Search Public Opportunities.” Under the search criteria, select “Reference Number” and enter the solicitor’s reference number: 140L0119R0002. Click “search” and once the solicitation’s information appears, download the information on the right. 

For assistance and general questions, contact Kemi Ismael at 202-912-7098 or e-mail him at kismael@blm.gov. For frequently asked questions go to www.blm.gov/whb.

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One Comment

  1. I’m thinking WHAT IF … Initially, it might be difficult to pull out all of the stallions. Most mares would be in foal. Their colts would need to be pulled out after weaning. But, no stallions for the duration of the lease would temporarily reduce the number of Mustangs produced.

    No, I would never want to see the Mustangs killed off or reduced to extinction. The break in production could strengthen the gene pool by rotating stallions from states or herds other than where the mares were originally collected. It really wouldn’t be selective breeding.

    Bottom line, no horse should end up in a can of dog food or a blue plate special in Europe.

    sent from La Grange TX

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