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TODAY’S. NEWS FROM REINING, CUTTING AND. HORSE RACING

TODAY’S NEWS FROM REINING, CUTTING AND HORSE RACING

April 23, 2019

NEWS FROM THE REINING INDUSTRY:

Carol Trimmer, Crescent, Okla., NRHA Hall of Fame Inductee and staff member, passed away on Tuesday, April 16. The dedicated and knowledgeable horse lover worked with horses and horse people over the years, claiming it was “not work” as she loved her job and was passionate about helping promote the industry in whatever capacity she could. 

Before going to work for the NRHA, Trimmer spent 15 years in the press room at the All American Quarter Horse Congress, one of the largest horse shows in the world. At the NRHA she filled many positions, including her appointment in 2003 as the NRHA Senior Director of Publications. She was inducted into the NRHA Hall of Fame in 2013. 

Trimmer’s funeral service will be held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, April 23, at First Baptist Church, 220 South Grand, Crescent, Okla.

NEWS FROM THE CUTTING HORSE INDUSTRY:

Billy Ray Rosewell, an NCHA Hall of Fame Rider and World Champion, passed away on Monday Feb. 18, 2019. 

Rosewell, who was raised near Mt. Pleasant, Texas, began training cutting horses in 1967 and won three Appaloosa World titles before he rode Show Biz Sandy, owned by Starkey Smith, in 1992, when the daughter of Son Of A Doc was 5.

The pair were one of the top three contenders for the 1993 NCHA Open World Champion Show and won the event, earning $42,812. That was the year that Kenny Patterson was Reserve Champion riding Commandicate, earning $42,385 and Kobie Wood rode Red White and Boon, placing third for $42,314. Rosewell had NCHA career earnings of $576,013, primarily showing in weekend competition.

His survivors include three sons: Billy Rosewell, Jr., Cookville, David and Maria Rosewell, Kilgore, Texas and Tommy Joe Rosewell, Mt Pleasant; one daughter-in-law, Tammy and John of Reno, Nevada; one brother and sister-in-law, Jerry and Katy Rosewell of Cookville; one sister Betty Ann Phillips, Mt. Pleasant; nine grandchildren, nine great grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Feb. 22  at the Harrison Funeral Home, Naples, Texas, and  interment was at the Omaha Cemetery in Omaha, Texas. 

 

NEWS FROM THE RACE HORSE INDUSTRY:

With the Kentucky Derby coming up, there’s no slowdown in what owner/trainers are giving their horses to make them run faster and die sooner. According to the Thoroughbred Daily News (TDN), Strychnine, the active agreement in rat poison, has been detected in post-race drug testing of three horses from the same owner/trainer at Phoenix, Arizona’s Turf Paradise, Alex Torres-Casas, who also owned and trained a fourth horse that tested positive for caffeine alone.

Torres-Casas was fined $2,625 and suspended 80 days on Feb. 27 for the offenses according to Arizona Department of Racing (ADR). However, according to the public information officer for the Arizona Department of Gaming, Torres-Casas appealed the ruling the same day it was issued. .

Strychnine is listed as a Class 1 Penalty/Category, a substance on the Association of Racing Commissioners International Uniform Classification of Substances list, which is the most-dangerous level. Caffeine is listed as 2/B. The ARCI’s recommended penalty for 1/A violations is a minimum one-year suspension and a minimum fine of $10,000.

However, this was not the first offense for Torres-Casa as on May 30, 2017, ADR ruled he was also fined $2,650 and suspended 180 days for a cocaine positive in a horse he raced at Turf Paradise in February of that year. The ARCI guidelines for a trainer’s second Lifetime Penalty Category. Although his suspension was not available at press time, an offense in any jurisdiction calls for a minimum three-year suspension and a minimum fine of $25,000. However, according to the article, neither Torres-Casas nor a Turf Paradise employee could not be reached for comment.

According to the TDN article, if the case is overturned in the appeals process, all of the above-mentioned horses will be disqualified from purse money and placed on the steward’s list for 60 days. They then would have to be retested and be proven to be clear from foreign substances prior to being allowed to race.

Although strychnine would seem like an unlikely performance-enhancer given its widespread use as a rodenticide, over a century ago, it was one of the first substances to cause a major sports doping scandal in America

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